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1

Pressure-transient test design in tight gas formations  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines a procedure for pre- and postfracture pressure-transient test design in low-permeability (tight) gas formations. The procedures proposed are based on many years' experience in evaluating low-permeability formations, and particularly on recent experience with Gas Research Inst. (GRI) programs in eastern Devonian gas shales and in western tight-gas formations.

Lee, W.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

3

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL BOGATCHEV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tight gas sands study breaks down drilling and completion costs  

SciTech Connect

Given the high cost to drill and complete tight gas sand wells, advances in drilling and completion technology that result in even modest cost savings to the producer have the potential to generate tremendous savings for the natural gas industry. The Gas Research Institute sponsored a study to evaluate drilling and completion costs in selected tight gas sands. The objective of the study was to identify major expenditures associated with tight gas sand development and determine their relative significance. A substantial sample of well cost data was collected for the study. Individual well cost data were collected from nearly 300 wells in three major tight gas sand formations: the Cotton Valley sand in East Texas, the Frontier sand in Wyoming, and the Wilcox sand in South Texas. The data were collected and organized by cost category for each formation. After the information was input into a data base, a simple statistical analysis was performed. The statistical analysis identified data discrepancies that were then resolved, and it helped allow conclusions to be drawn regarding drilling and completion costs in these tight sand formations. Results are presented.

Brunsman, B. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)); Saunders, B. (S.A. Holditch Associates Inc., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2006 7, 2006 DOE Selects Projects Targeting America's "Tight" Gas Resources Research to Help Unlock Nation's Largest Growing Source of Natural Gas WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy today announced the selection of two cost-shared research and development projects targeting America's major source of natural gas: low-permeability or "tight" gas formations. Tight gas is the largest of three so-called unconventional gas resources?the other two being coalbed methane (natural gas) and gas shales. Production of unconventional gas in the United States represents about 40 percent of the Nation's total gas output in 2004, but could grow to 50 percent by 2030 if advanced technologies are developed and implemented. The constraints on producing tight gas are due to the impermeable nature of the reservoir rocks, small reservoir compartments, abnormal (high or low) pressures, difficulty in predicting natural fractures that aid gas flow rates, and need to predict and avoid reservoirs that produce large volumes of water.

10

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Typical Tight Gas Sand Log Interval (Cotton Valley Formation)........................... 3 2.1 Type of Decline Curves by Arps........................................................................... 11 2.2 Fetkovich Type Curves... ......................................................................................... 14 2.3 Fetkovich Type Curves for Gas Wells .................................................................. 15 3.1 Plan View of Hydraulic Fracture and Grid System...............................................30 3.2 History Match...

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Tight sands gain as U.S. gas source  

SciTech Connect

This report, the last of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the tight gas sands industry following the 1992 expiration of the qualification period for the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. Because tight gas sands were the most mature of the unconventional gas sources and received only a modest tax credit, one would not expect much change when the tax credit qualification period ended, and post-1992 drilling and production data confirm this. What the overall statistics do not show, and thus the main substance of this article, is how rediscovered tight gas plays and the evolution in tight gas exploration and extraction technology have shifted the outlook for tight gas drilling and its economics from a low productivity, marginally economic resource to a low cost source of gas supply.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hoak, T.E.; Kuuskraa, J.A. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Hansen, J. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

File:EIA-tight-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

tight-gas.pdf tight-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.04 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States Sources U.S. Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-06-06 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:44, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:44, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (2.04 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload You cannot overwrite this file.

17

The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?, including tight gas, gas/oil shale, oil sands, and coal-bed methane. North America has a substantial growth in its unconventional oil and gas market over the last two decades. The primary reason for that growth is because North America, being a mature...

Lin, Jiajing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tight Oklahoma gas sands remain an attractive play  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee tight gas sands of Oklahoma remain an attractive play because of improvements in drilling and completion practices and actions by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) that allow separate allowables for new wells. The expired federal tax credits for tight gas wells have not been the only reason for increased activity. Since decontrol of most regulated gas pricing and since 1986, the number of wells drilled and gas production per well have been increasing in the cherokee area while overall drilling in Oklahoma has decreased. These conclusions are based on wells as categorized by permit date and not by the spud, completion, or first production date. A few wells outside but adjacent to the Cherokee area may have been included, although, their impact on the conclusions is considered nominal. The paper discusses the tight gas credit, proration units, the concept of separate allowables, costs, completion efficiency, and the economic outlook for this area.

Cartwright, G.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................76 4.2.3 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1976 .........................................................78 4.2.4 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1977 .........................................................81 4.2.5 Water-Gas Ratio Trend 1978 ? 2004... .........................................................76 4.2.3 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1976 .........................................................78 4.2.4 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1977 .........................................................81 4.2.5 Water-Gas Ratio Trend 1978 ? 2004...

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands have been proposed in the petroleum literature. Kuuskraa, V.A. and Haas, M.R. proposed that tight gas is merely an arbitrary delineation of a natural geologic continuity in the permeability of a reservoir rock. The dominant characteristic...-situ permeability as low as 0.001 mD6. 10 Misra, R. proposed that tight gas sands are reservoirs that have low permeability (< 0.1 mD) and which cannot be produced at economic flow rates or do not produce economic volumes without the assistance from...

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sands have been proposed in the petroleum literature. Kuuskraa, V.A. and Haas, M.R. proposed that ?tight gas is merely an arbitrary delineation of a natural geologic continuity in the permeability of a reservoir rock. The dominant characteristic...-situ permeability as low as 0.001 mD?6. 10 Misra, R. proposed that ?tight gas sands are reservoirs that have low permeability (< 0.1 mD) and which cannot be produced at economic flow rates or do not produce economic volumes without the assistance from...

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include tight gas sands, gas shales, and coal-bed methane.Figure 3. Although the gas-shale production grows at a

Silin, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Stress-dependent permeability on tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Diffusivity Equation, Liquid Case?????????????.?. 8 2.3 Diffusivity Equation, Gas Case??????????????.?. 9 2.4 Stress-Dependent Formations????????????????. 11 2.5 Linear Flow???????????????????????. 14 2.6 Radial Flow???????????????????????. 14 2... laboratory data is not available. 1.3 Methodology The methodology consists of using both analytical and numerical models of a stress- sensitive formation saturated with irreducible water saturation and gas. The model considers analytical...

Rodriguez, Cesar Alexander

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Research continued in the detection of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Tasks include modeling, data analysis, geologic assessment of the Piceance Basin, and remote sensing.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The Formation of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs) via Aerodynamic Drift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NASA Kepler mission has revealed an abundant class of Systems with Tightly-packed Inner Planets (STIPs). The current paradigm for planet formation suggests that small planetesimals will quickly spiral into the host star due to aerodynamic drag, preventing rocky planet formation. In contrast, we find that aerodynamic drift, when acting on an ensemble of solids, can concentrate mass at short orbital periods in gaseous disks. Sublimation fronts may further aid this process. Kepler data suggest that the innermost known planets are found near the silicate sublimation zone. STIP planets should have a wide range of volatile fractions due to aerodynamic drift and H2 dissociation-driven gas accretion. We further propose that the low mass of Mars is evidence that the Solar System was once a proto-STIP.

Boley, Aaron C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

Maria Cecilia Bravo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Application of Artificial Neural Network for Estimating Tight Gas Sand Intrinsic Permeability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Artificial Neural Network for Estimating Tight Gas Sand Intrinsic Permeability ... This jth neuron occupies a general position in the network since it accepts inputs from nodes in the input layer and sends its output to neurons to the second hidden layer. ... (15)?Veelenturf, L. P. J. Analysis and Applications of Artificial Neural Networks; Prentice Hall:? London, 1995. ...

Ali A. Garrouch; Nejib Smaoui

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

32

Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying possible relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. Based on a critical review of the available literature, a better understanding of the main weaknesses of the current state of the art of modeling and simulation for tight sand reservoirs has been reached. Progress has been made in the development and implementation of a simple reservoir simulator that is still able to overcome some of the deficiencies detected. The simulator will be used to quantify the impact of microscopic phenomena in the macroscopic behavior of tight sand gas reservoirs. Phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization are being considered as part of this study. To date, the adequate modeling of gas slippage in porous media has been determined to be of great relevance in order to explain unexpected fluid flow behavior in tight sand reservoirs.

Maria Cecilia Bravo; Mariano Gurfinkel

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Tight gas sands are unconventional hydrocarbon energy resource storing large volume of natural gas. Microscopy and 3D imaging of reservoir samples at different scales and resolutions provide insights into the coaredo not significantly smaller in size than conventional sandstones, the extremely dense grain packing makes the pore space tortuous, and the porosity is small. In some cases the inter-granular void space is presented by micron-scale slits, whose geometry requires imaging at submicron resolutions. Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations simulate different scenarios of capillary-equilibrium two-phase fluid displacement. For tight sands, the simulations predict an unusually low wetting fluid saturation threshold, at which the non-wetting phase becomes disconnected. Flow simulations in combination with Maximal Inscribed Spheres computations evaluate relative permeability curves. The computations show that at the threshold saturation, when the nonwetting fluid becomes disconnected, the flow of both fluids is practically blocked. The nonwetting phase is immobile due to the disconnectedness, while the permeability to the wetting phase remains essentially equal to zero due to the pore space geometry. This observation explains the Permeability Jail, which was defined earlier by others. The gas is trapped by capillarity, and the brine is immobile due to the dynamic effects. At the same time, in drainage, simulations predict that the mobility of at least one of the fluids is greater than zero at all saturations. A pore-scale model of gas condensate dropout predicts the rate to be proportional to the scalar product of the fluid velocity and pressure gradient. The narrowest constriction in the flow path is subject to the highest rate of condensation. The pore-scale model naturally upscales to the Panfilov's Darcy-scale model, which implies that the condensate dropout rate is proportional to the pressure gradient squared. Pressure gradient is the greatest near the matrix-fracture interface. The distinctive two-phase flow properties of tight sand imply that a small amount of gas condensate can seriously affect the recovery rate by blocking gas flow. Dry gas injection, pressure maintenance, or heating can help to preserve the mobility of gas phase. A small amount of water can increase the mobility of gas condensate.

Silin, D.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Nico, P.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara, a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock; and the Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. This was the tenth quarter of the contract. During this quarter the investigators (1) continued processing the seismic data, and (2) continued modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data.

Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

36

Study of Multi-scale Transport Phenomena in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These challenges have impeded efficient economic development of shale resources. New fundamental insights and tools are needed to improve the state of shale gas development. Few attempts have been made to model the compositional behavior of fluids in shale gas...

Freeman, Craig Matthew

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimation of original gas in place from short-term shut-in pressure data for commingled tight gas reservoirs with no crossflow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas production (GP) under these circumstances. This research studies different empirical methods to estimate the original gas in place (OGIP) for one-layer or commingled two-layer tight gas reservoirs without crossflow, from short-term (72-hour) shut...

Khuong, Chan Hung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Factors that affect fracture fluid clean-up and pressure buildup test results in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACTORS THAT AFFECT FRACTURE FLUID CLEAN-UP AND PRESSURE BUILDUP TEST RESULTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis KEVIN TODD MONTGOMERY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering FACTORS THAT AFFECT FRACTURE FLUID CLEAN-UP AND PRESSURE BUILDUP TEST RESULTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis KEVIN TODD MONTGOMERY Approved as to style and content by: S...

Montgomery, Kevin Todd

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gas hydrate formation in fine sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation from two types of dissolved gas (methane and mixed gas) was studied under varying thermodynamic conditions in ... Sea. The testing media consisted of silica sand particles with diameters of ...

XiaoYa Zang; DeQing Liang; NengYou Wu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Simulation of fracture fluid cleanup and its effect on long-term recovery in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies, such as large volume fracture treatments, are required before a reasonable profit can be made. Hydraulic fracturing is one of the best methods to stimulate a tight gas well. Most fracture treatments result in 3-6 fold increases in the productivity...

Wang, Yilin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This was the seventh quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued the large task of processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional geological information to aid in the interpretation, (3) tied the well log data to the seismic via generation of synthetic seismograms, (4) began integrating regional structural information and fracture trends with our observations of structure in the study area, (5) began constructing a velocity model for time-to-depth conversion and subsequent AVO and raytrace modeling experiments, and (6) completed formulation of some theoretical tools for relating fracture density to observed elastic anisotropy. The study area is located at the southern end of the Powder River Basin in Converse County in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due to the low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. A basemap is presented with the seismic lines being analyzed for this project plus locations of 13 wells that we are using to supplement the analysis. The arrows point to two wells for which we have constructed synthetic seismograms.

Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

1993-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter we (1) received the last of the field tapes and survey information for the seismic field data acquisition which was finished at the very end of the previous quarter, (2) began the large task of processing the seismic data, (3) collected well logs and other informination to aid in the interpretation, and (4) initiated some seismic modeling studies. As already reported, the field data acquisition was at Amoco`s Powder River Basin site in southeast Wyoming. This is a low permeability fractured site, with both gas and oil present. The reservoir is highly compartmentalized, due to the low permeability, with the fractures providing the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara: a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier: a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contact with it by an unconformity. The fractures are thought to lie in a roughly northwest-southeast trend, along the strike of a flexure, which forms one of the boundaries of the basin.

Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

1993-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

The RealGas and RealGasH2O options of the TOUGH+ code for the simulation of coupled fluid and heat flow in tight/shale gas systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed two new EOS additions to the TOUGH+ family of codes, the RealGasH2O and RealGas. The RealGasH2O EOS option describes the non-isothermal two-phase flow of water and a real gas mixture in gas reservoirs, with a particular focus in ultra-tight ... Keywords: Coupled flow and heat flow, Fractured media, Multicomponent flow, Numerical simulation, Real gas mixture, Shale gas

George J. Moridis, Craig M. Freeman

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Use of high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells to measure electronic transport and thermodynamics in metal oxides  

SciTech Connect

By using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors can perform high-temperature coulometric titration and measure electronic transport properties to determine the electronic defect structure of metal oxides. This technique reduces the time and expense required for conventional thermogravimetric measurements. The components of the gas-tight coulometric titration cell are an oxygen sensor, Pt/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Pt, and an encapsulated metal oxide sample. Based on cell design, both transport and thermodynamic measurements can be performed over a wide range of oxygen partial pressures (pO{sub 2} = 10{sup {minus}35} to 1 atm). This paper describes the high-temperature gas-tight electrochemical cells used to determine electronic defect structures and transport properties for pure and doped-oxide systems, such as YSZ, doped and pure ceria (Ca-CeO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2}), copper oxides, and copper-oxide-based ceramic superconductors, transition metal oxides, SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x}, and BaTiO{sub 3}.

Park, J.H.; Ma, B.; Park, E.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

46

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

48

An evaluation of acid frac/matrix stimulation of a tight limestone formation in exploratory wells in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect

With the advent of Kuwait's intensive exploratory activities to locate and test deeper geologic structures, tighter and very low porosity limestone formations were progressively encountered. Most of these hydrocarbon bearing formations initially appeared to be very stubborn and hardly indicated any fluid influx into the well-bore. In certain cases the hydrostatic head was nearly completely removed by unloading the well practically down to perforations, thereby creating optimum draw-down but it either resulted in poor inflow or none at all. In the absence of currently available chemicals, equipment, job design engineering and better understanding of tight carbonate formations and their responses to various acid formulations, some of these could have slipped into unattractive categories. With the implementation of specially designed matrix and acid-frac treatments, these formation have, however, been unmasked and turned out to be highly potential finds now. This paper basically outlines the salient features of theoretical and operational aspects of stimulating and testing some of the very low porosity hard limestone formations in Kuwait recently.

Singh, J.R.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Deloitte Energy Conference Deloitte Energy Conference May 21, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , Deloitte, May 21, 2013 3 shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to reach half of U.S. output 4 U.S. dry natural gas production trillion cubic feet Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013

50

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference FLAME Natural Gas & LNG Conference March 13, 2013 | Amsterdam, Netherlands by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , FLAME March 13, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

51

Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This was the ninth quarter of the contract. During this quarter we (1) continued processing the seismic data, (2) collected additional logs to aid in the interpretation, and (3)began modeling some of the P-wave amplitude anomalies that we see in the data. The study area is located at the southern end of the powder river Basin in Converse county in east-central Wyoming. It is a low permeability fractured site, with both has and oil present. Reservoirs are highly compartmentalized due tot he low permeabilities, and fractures provide the only practical drainage paths for production. The two formations of interest are: The Niobrara; a fractured shale and limey shale to chalk, which is a reservoir rock, but also its own source rock. The Frontier, a tight sandstone lying directly below the Niobrara, brought into contract with it by an unconformity.

Mavko, G.; Nur, A.

1994-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

53

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

54

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

55

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

56

Oklahoma Cherokee formation study shows benefits of gas tax credits  

SciTech Connect

To no one's surprise, the administration's recently released energy initiative package does not advocate the use of tax incentives such as the Internal Revenue Code Sec. 29 (tight sand gas) credit that expired Dec. 31, 1992. This is unfortunate since tax credits do stimulate drilling, as the authors' recent study of Oklahoma's Pennsylvanian age Cherokee formation demonstrates. Within this 783,000 acre study area, more than 130 additional wells were drilled between 1991--92 because of tax credit incentives. And such tax credits also increase total federal tax revenues by causing wells to be drilled that would not have been drilled or accelerating the drilling of wells, thereby increasing taxable revenue. In short, tax credits create a win-win situation: they stimulate commerce, increase tax revenues, reduce the outflow of capital to foreign petroleum projects, and add to the nation's natural gas reserve, which is beneficial for national security, balance of payments, the environment, and gas market development. The paper discusses the study assumptions, study results, and the tax credit policy.

Stanley, B.J.; Cline, S.B. (Hefner Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

57

Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Voids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the detection of molecular gas using CO(1-0) line emission and follow up Halpha imaging observations of galaxies located in nearby voids. The CO(1-0) observations were done using the 45m telescope of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory (NRO) and the optical observations were done using the Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT). Although void galaxies lie in the most under dense parts of our universe, a significant fraction of them are gas rich, spiral galaxies that show signatures of ongoing star formation. Not much is known about their cold gas content or star formation properties. In this study we searched for molecular gas in five void galaxies using the NRO. The galaxies were selected based on their relatively higher IRAS fluxes or Halpha line luminosities. CO(1--0) emission was detected in four galaxies and the derived molecular gas masses lie between (1 - 8)E+9 Msun. The H$\\alpha$ imaging observations of three galaxies detected in CO emission indicates ongoing star formation and the derived star forma...

Das, M; Iono, D; Honey, M; Ramya, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Seismic inversion and attributes analysis for porosity evaluation of the tight gas sandstones of the Whicher Range field in the Perth Basin, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A comprehensive understanding of porosity variations in tight gas sandstones plays an important role in reservoir management and provision of plans for developing of the field. This is especially important when we encounter with some degree of complexity in reservoir characteristics of these sandstones. Reservoir properties of tight gas sandstones of the Whicher Range field, the target reservoir of this study, were affected by internal reservoir heterogeneity mostly related to depositional and diagenetic features of the reservoir sandstones. In this study, 2D seismic data in combination with well log data were used for prediction of porosity based on seismic inversion technique and multi-attribute regression analysis. The results show that acoustic impedance from model based inversion is the main seismic attribute in reservoir characterization of tight sandstones of the field. Wide variations in this parameter can be effectively used to differentiate the reservoir sandstones based on their tightness degree. Investigation of porosity by this method resulted in 2D-view of porosity variations in sandstone reservoir which is in accordance with variations in geological characteristics of tight gas sandstones in the field. This view can be extended to a 3D-view in the framework of reservoir model to follow the variations throughout the field.

Rahim Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi; Reza Moussavi-Harami; Reza Rezaee; Majid Nabi-Bidhendi; Ali Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Desorption parameters for the Billi coalbed methane reservoir correspond to within an acceptable range with those of the Barnett shale. For the initial reservoir pressure used in this study these values correspond to an initial methane storage of 344 scf... media has been studied extensively in coalbed methane reservoirs , where adsorption can be the primary mode of gas storage. Many analytic and semi-analytic models have been developed from the study of gas desorption from coalbed methane reservoirs...

Freeman, Craig M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for for IEA Bilateral Meetings March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, IEA Bilateral Meetings, March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analytical questions for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For Consumer Energy Alliance February 21, 2013 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski February 21, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

62

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IFRI IFRI March 14, 2013 | Paris, France by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu Adam Sieminski , IFRI March 14, 2013 History Projections 2011 36% 20%

63

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society Baltimore Chartered Financial Analyst Society April 08, 2013 | Baltimore, MD By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 Adam Sieminski, Baltimore CFA Society April 08, 2013 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040

64

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference Platts - North American Crude Marketing Conference March 01, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Adam Sieminski , Platts, March 01, 2013 2 * Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth * Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade * Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards * The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s * U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040 U.S. energy use grows slowly over the projection reflecting improving energy efficiency and slow, extended economic recovery 3 U.S. primary energy consumption quadrillion Btu

65

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Annual report, September 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is an annual summarization of an ongoing research in the field of modeling and detecting naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The current research is in the Piceance basin of Western Colorado. The aim is to use existing information to determine the most optimal zone or area of fracturing using a unique reaction-transport-mechanical (RTM) numerical basin model. The RTM model will then subsequently help map subsurface lateral and vertical fracture geometries. The base collection techniques include in-situ fracture data, remote sensing, aeromagnetics, 2-D seismic, and regional geologic interpretations. Once identified, high resolution airborne and spaceborne imagery will be used to verify the RTM model by comparing surficial fractures. If this imagery agrees with the model data, then a further investigation using a three-dimensional seismic survey component will be added. This report presents an overview of the Piceance Creek basin and then reviews work in the Parachute and Rulison fields and the results of the RTM models in these fields.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

Methane and the greenhouse-gas footprint of natural gas from shale formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We evaluate the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas obtained by high-volume hydraulic fracturing from shale formations, focusing on methane emissions. Natural gas is composed largely of methane, and 3 ... to ...

Robert W. Howarth; Renee Santoro; Anthony Ingraffea

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geochemical characteristics and formation process of natural gas in Kela 2 gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of a large amount of natural gas components and the carbon isotope as well ... as some other analysis data in Kela 2 gas field, the geochemical characteristics, source, origin, and formation process ...

Mengjun Zhao; Shuangfang Lu; Tingdong Wang; Jian Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Integrated Multi-Well Reservoir and Decision Model to Determine Optimal Well Spacing in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on unconventional gas has increased with tight gas sands, gas shales and coalbed methane being the primary contributors. Elsewhere, the potential of unconventional gas formations is just beginning to be explored, with assessments under way in Europe, South...

Ortiz Prada, Rubiel Paul

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

71

Conceptual study of thermal stimulation in shale gas formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Shale gas formations have become a major source of energy in recent years. Developments in hydraulic fracturing technology have made these reservoirs more accessible and productive. Apart from other dissimilarities from conventional gas reservoirs, one major difference is that a considerable amount of gas produced from these shale gas formations comes from desorption. Up to 85% of the total gas within shale can be found as an adsorbed phase on clay and kerogen, so how much adsorbed gas can be produced will have significant impact on ultimate gas recovery. The Langmuir isotherm has been widely used in industry to describe the pressure dependence of adsorbed gas. However, temperature dependent adsorption behavior and its major implications for evaluating thermal stimulation as a recovery method for shale reservoirs have not been thoroughly explored. Therefore, in order to design and analyze the thermal treatment of shale gas formations successfully, it is crucial to understand the effects of fracture heating on the shale gas adsorption and desorption phenomenon, and how can we exploit such effects to enhance shale gas recovery from hydraulically fractured reservoirs. Even though numerous research efforts have been focused on thermal recovery of shale oil, its possible application to shale gas has not been investigated. In this research, we propose a method to evaluate desorbed gas as a function of pressure and temperature in shale formations, by regression of a Bi-Langmuir model on Langmuir isotherm data. We have developed a fully coupled unconventional reservoir simulator, which is capable of capturing real gas flow in the shale matrix and in the hydraulic fracture by accounting for the effects of gas desorption and diffusion, as well as the temperature diffusion process within the matrix. This simulator enables us to investigate the effects of fracture heating on the shale gas desorption phenomenon on the global well performance and recovery. The results of this study show, for the first time in a rigorous way, that by increasing the temperature within the fracture, shale gas recovery can be improved. We have rationalized and quantified relations between the adsorption/desorption fundamental phenomena and stimulation temperature, fracture spacing, reservoir permeability and bottom hole pressure. The thermal properties of shale formations only have limited impacts on long term production. The results of this study can provide a guidance to develop a strategy to design thermal treatment in hydraulically fractured shale formations and propose the degree of thermal stimulation temperature required in a fracture to promote an economically viable return on production.

HanYi Wang; Omobola Ajao; Michael J. Economides

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

New look for gas in Forbes formation, Sacramento Valley, California  

SciTech Connect

The Forbes formation of upper Cretaceous age consists of marine shale, siltstone, and interbedded sandstone, and lies stratigraphically between the younger Kione Deltaic sandstone facies and the older Dobbins shale. On the west side of the Sacramento Valley, the Kione formation is truncated and the Forbes formation is overlain by the Capay (Eocene) and/or Tehama (post-Eocene) formations. In the Sacramento to Red Bluff area, the Forbes formation attains a thickness of up to 5000 ft (1524 m). The importance of the Forbes formation as a source of gas production in the Sacramento Valley is well established. Gas was first produced from the Forbes formation near the south edge of the Marysville Buttes in 1953. The formation is now productive in over 20 fields in the Sacramento Valley with cumulative production to January 1, 1980, of 1.23 billion MCF of gas. As a result of new CDP seismic reflection profiling, drilling for gas from the Forbes formation has increased dramatically since 1978.

Lindblom, R.G.; Mosier, W.C.; Jacobson, J.B.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of fracture treatment type on the recovery of gas from the cotton valley formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Every tight gas well needs to be stimulated with a hydraulic fracture treatment to produce natural gas at economic flow rates and recover a volume of gas that provides an acceptable return on investment. Over the past few decades, many different...

Yalavarthi, Ramakrishna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nonassociated gas resources in low-permeability sandstone reservoirs, lower tertiary Wasatch Formation, and upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey recognizes six major plays for nonassociated gas in Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous low-permeability strata of the Uinta Basin, Utah. For purposes of this study, plays without gas/water contacts are separated from those with such contacts. Continuous-saturation accumulations are essentially single fields, so large in areal extent and so heterogeneous that their development cannot be properly modeled as field growth. Fields developed in gas-saturated plays are not restricted to structural or stratigraphic traps and they are developed in any structural position where permeability conduits occur such as that provided by natural open fractures. Other fields in the basin have gas/water contacts and the rocks are water-bearing away from structural culmination`s. The plays can be assigned to two groups. Group 1 plays are those in which gas/water contacts are rare to absent and the strata are gas saturated. Group 2 plays contain reservoirs in which both gas-saturated strata and rocks with gas/water contacts seem to coexist. Most units in the basin that have received a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) designation as tight are in the main producing areas and are within Group 1 plays. Some rocks in Group 2 plays may not meet FERC requirements as tight reservoirs. However, we suggest that in the Uinta Basin that the extent of low-permeability rocks, and therefore resources, extends well beyond the limits of current FERC designated boundaries for tight reservoirs. Potential additions to gas reserves from gas-saturated tight reservoirs in the Tertiary Wasatch Formation and Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Uinta Basin, Utah is 10 TCF. If the potential additions to reserves in strata in which both gas-saturated and free water-bearing rocks exist are added to those of Group 1 plays, the volume is 13 TCF.

Fouch, T.D.; Schmoker, J.W.; Boone, L.E.; Wandrey, C.J.; Crovelli, R.A.; Butler, W.C.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

Hendricks, C.D.

1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density {Sigma} of {Sigma}{sub c} {approx} 120 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (A{sub K} {approx} 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area {Sigma}{sub SFR} with increasing {Sigma}, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of {Sigma}{sub SFR}, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of {Sigma}{sub SFR} versus {Sigma} in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -3} for low-mass regions and A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -1} for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse.

Burkert, Andreas [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Hartmann, Lee, E-mail: burkert@usm.lmu.de, E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Chitosan as green kinetic inhibitors for gas hydrate formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetic inhibiting effect of a number of chitosans on hydrate formation was investigated using methane and methane/ethane gas mixtures. The results indicated that chitosan was a good kinetic inhibitor. The induction time of gas hydrate formation evidently increased with the degree of deacetylation (DD), however, when DD was higher than 80%, the effect of DD on the induction time was negligible. Moreover, it was found that the molecular weight (MW) of chitosan and the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO) had little effect on the induction time. The optimal concentration of chitosan was found to be 0.6 wt%. Finally, the mechanisms of the kinetic inhibitor on the hydrate formation were discussed.

Yongjun Xu; Minlin Yang; Xiaoxi Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient...

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING): MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW IN NGC 4254  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the effects of different assumptions and systematics on the determination of the local, spatially resolved star formation law. Using four star formation rate (SFR) tracers (H{alpha} with azimuthally averaged extinction correction, mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, combined H{alpha} and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m, and combined far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared 24 {mu}m), several fitting procedures, and different sampling strategies, we probe the relation between SFR and molecular gas at various spatial resolutions (500 pc and larger) and surface densities ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}})approx. 10-245 M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}) within the central {approx}6.5 kpc in the disk of NGC 4254. We explore the effect of diffuse emission using an unsharp masking technique with varying kernel size. The fraction of diffuse emission, f{sub DE}, thus determined is a strong inverse function of the size of the filtering kernel. We find that in the high surface brightness regions of NGC 4254 the form of the molecular gas star formation law is robustly determined and approximately linear ({approx}0.8-1.1) and independent of the assumed fraction of diffuse emission and the SFR tracer employed. When the low surface brightness regions are included, the slope of the star formation law depends primarily on the assumed fraction of diffuse emission. In such a case, results range from linear when the fraction of diffuse emission in the SFR tracer is f{sub DE} {approx}< 30% (or when diffuse emission is removed in both the star formation and the molecular gas tracer) to super-linear ({approx}1.4) when f{sub DE} {approx}> 50%. We find that the tightness of the correlation between gas and star formation varies with the choice of star formation tracer. The 24 {mu}m SFR tracer by itself shows the tightest correlation with the molecular gas surface density, whereas the H{alpha} corrected for extinction using an azimuthally averaged correction shows the highest dispersion. We find that for R < 0.5R{sub 25} the local star formation efficiency is constant and similar to that observed in other large spirals, with a molecular gas depletion time {tau}{sub dep} {approx} 2 Gyr.

Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Jameson, Katherine; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wong, Tony; Xue Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, Erik [I. K. Barber School of the Arts and Science, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V1V7 (Canada); West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Bigiel, Frank; Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ott, Juergen, E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D is to determine how (major and minor) mergers, gas, star formation and feedback affect the transformation

Bureau, Martin

83

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Diagenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates Formation and Silica Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Acoustic and Thermal Characterization of Oil Migration, Gas Hydrates-A to Opal-CT, the formation of gas hydrates, fluid substitution in hydrocarbon reservoirs, and fluid

Guerin, Gilles

84

MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and local conditions persist. In particular, we observe lower {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and enhanced CO excitation associated with nuclear gas concentrations in a subset of our targets. These appear to reflect real enhancements in the rate of star formation per unit gas, and although the distribution of {tau}{sub dep} does not appear bimodal in galaxy centers, {tau}{sub dep} does appear multivalued at fixed {Sigma}{sub H2}, supporting the idea of ''disk'' and ''starburst'' modes driven by other environmental parameters.

Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Schuster, Karl-Friedrich [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/ Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - abscess gas formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if there is evidence of intestinal obstruction, abscess formation, perforation, fis... -old white woman with a history of gas- trointestinal problems presented with ab-...

87

Investigation of the Effect of Non-Darcy Flow and Multi-Phase Flow on the Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has recently been the completion of choice for most tight gas bearing formations. It has proven successful to produce these formations in a commercial manner. However, some considerations have to be taken into account to design...

Alarbi, Nasraldin Abdulslam A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

NETL: News Release - New Projects to Help Operators See Oil, Gas Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Help Operators "See" Oil, Gas Formations More Clearly Six Research Teams to Develop Advanced Diagnostics And Imaging Technologies for Oil, Gas Fields TULSA, OK - If oil and gas producers could "see" hydrocarbon-bearing formations more accurately from the surface or from nearby wellbores, they can position new wells more precisely to produce more oil or gas with less risk and ultimately, at lower costs. For many producers in the United States, especially smaller producers operating on razor-thin margins, advanced diagnostics and imaging systems can help them in business. By visualizing the barriers and pathways for the flow of oil and gas through underground rock formations, producers can avoid dry holes and increase ultimate recovery.

89

Gas Retention and Accumulation in Stellar Clusters and Galaxies: Implications for Star Formation and Black Hole Accretion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Star formation cannot proceed without the existence of an extensive gas reservoir. In particular, the supply of gas to form stars in dwarf galaxies and (more)

Naiman, Jill Palmer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

High Hopes, Tight Quarters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hopes, Hopes, Tight Quarters Unique Recycler, world's largest array of permanent magnets, taking shape in crowded Main Injector tunnel. by Mike Perricone, Office of Public Affairs The magnets are numbered in the hundreds; their weight is measured in tons. The available space in the tunnel is usually about four and a half feet, but it can be as little as two or three inches, and the forklifts doing the moving have been custom- designed for these tight quarters. The obstacles include water systems, cable trays, workers performing other installations, and the precisely aligned components of the signature Main Injector accelerator. The consequences of a possible slip-up: Don't even ask. Installation crews can put eight to 10 magnets in place in a day, if the magnets are located close together. Installing a magnet

91

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Phase distribution and intrapore salt exchange during drilling mud invasion of an oil- and gas-bearing formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a result of drilling mud filtrate invasion of a formation saturated with oil, gas and natural water, the distribution...

N. K. Korsakova; V. I. Penkovskii

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Drilling through gas hydrates formations: possible problems and suggested solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate research in the last two decades has taken various directions ranging from ways to understand the safe and economical production of this enormous resource to drilling problems. as more rigs and production platforms move into deeper...

Amodu, Afolabi Ayoola

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Landfill Gas Formation, Recovery and Emission in The Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfills are one of the main sources of methane in The Netherlands. Methane emissions from landfills are estimated to be about 180580 ... at a total of 7601730 ktonnes. Landfill gas recovery and utilization is...

Hans Oonk

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The formation of gas bubbles at submerged orifices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For values of Nc greater than 0.85, the formation and release of the bubbles appeared to occur almost simul? taneously. For the formation of bubbles at zero chamber volume and at low flow rates, the following equation was developed. (2) Ve * equilibrium... experimentally. The d determined for water (benzene (

Hayes, William Bell

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydraulic fracturing in tight, fissured media  

SciTech Connect

Large volumes of natural gas are found in tight, fissured reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing can enhance recovery, but many complications, such as pressure-sensitive or accelerated leakoff, damage, and complex fracturing, arise during treatment of such reservoirs. This paper reports that special procedures generally should be considered during breakdown and fracturing of these reservoirs. In addition, the use of alternative stimulation strategies may be beneficial.

Warpinski, N.R. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Trenton Llimestone Formation of New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Authority completed a study of the natural gas-bearing potential of New York State's Trenton Limestone Formation. The report includes an analysis of existing gas-well information and geological maps covering 33 counties in western and central New York State. The Trenton Limestone Formation is a limestone sequence with zones of shale interbeds that, when jointed and fractured, form reservoirs for natural gas. These reservoirs appear to be large and capable of sustained production, providing the production rates are carefully monitored to maintain reservoir pressure. Test wells have shown evidence of natural gas in all areas where the formation is present. The areas with the greatest reservoir potential trend from northeast to southwest beginning near the Adirondack foothills in Oneida County. When reservoir volumes are matched with a high success rate of discovery and minimum drilling costs, the northeastern part of central New York State appears to be the most likely region for both local use and commercial exploration. The Trenton formation in this area of the State generally contains gas at above-normal hydrostatic pressure. This indicates that the gas reservoirs are extensive and reach considerable depths. Due to the geophysical conditions of the reservoirs, however, it is important to carefully manage production and maintain pre-production pressure for optimum gas recovery.

Robinson, J.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Natural gas from shale formation The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extraction of natural gas from shale rock in the United States (US) is one of the landmark events in the 21st century. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing can extract huge quantities of natural gas from impermeable shale formations, which were previously thought to be either impossible or uneconomic to produce. This review offers a comprehensive insight into US shale gas opportunities, appraising the evolution, evidence and the challenges of shale gas production in the US. The history of US shale gas in this article is divided into three periods and based on the change of oil price (i.e., the period before the 1970s oil crisis, the period from 1970s to 2000, and the period since 2000), the US has moved from being one of the world's biggest importers of gas to being self-sufficient in less than a decade, with the shale gas production increasing 12-fold (from 2000 to 2010). The US domestic natural gas price hit a 10-year low in 2012. The US domestic natural gas price in the first half of 2012 was about $2 per million British Thermal Unit (BTU), compared with Brent crude, the world benchmark price for oil, now about $ 80100/barrel, or $1417 per million BTU. Partly due to an increase in gas-fired power generation in response to low gas prices, US carbon emissions from fossil-fuel combustion fell by 430millionton CO2 more than any other country between 2006 and 2011. Shale gas also stimulated economic growth, creating 600,000 new jobs in the US by 2010. However, the US shale gas revolution would be curbed, if the environmental risks posed by hydraulic fracturing are not managed effectively. The hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, and can cause pollution in the marine environment, with implications for long-term environmental sustainability in several ways. Also, large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be emitted during the shale gas exploration and production. Hydraulic fracturing also may induce earthquakes. These environmental risks need to be managed by good practices which is not being applied by all the producers in all the locations. Enforcing stronger regulations are necessary to minimize risk to the environment and on human health. Robust regulatory oversight can however increase the cost of extraction, but stringent regulations can foster an historic opportunity to provide cheaper and cleaner gas to meet the consumer demand, as well as to usher in the future growth of the industry.

Qiang Wang; Xi Chen; Awadhesh N. Jha; Howard Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Simulation of production and injection performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a simple yet comprehensive mathematical model for simulation of injection and production performance of gas storage caverns in salt formations. The model predicts the pressure and temperature of the gas in the cavern and at the wellhead for an arbitrary sequence of production and injection cycles. The model incorporates nonideal gas properties, thermodynamic heat effects associated with gas expansion and compression in the cavern and tubing, heat exchange with the surrounding salt formation, and non-uniform initial temperatures but does not include rock-mechanical effects. The model is based on a mass and energy balance for the gas-filled cavern and on the Bernoulli equation and energy balance for flow in the wellbore. Cavern equations are solved iteratively at successive timesteps, and wellbore equations are solved within an iteration cycle of the cavern equations. Gas properties are calculated internally with generally accepted correlations and basic thermodynamic relations. Example calculations show that the initial temperature distribution has a strong effect on production performance of a typical gas storage cavern. The primary application of the model is in the design, planning, and operation of gas storage projects.

Hagoort, J. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Test plan: Gas-threshold-pressure testing of the Salado Formation in the WIPP underground facility  

SciTech Connect

Performance assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste from the United States defense program in the WIPP underground facility must assess the role of post-closure was generation by waste degradation and the subsequent pressurization of the facility. be assimilated by the host formation will Whether or not the generated gas can be assimilated by the host formation will determine the ability of the gas to reach or exceed lithostatic pressure within the repository. The purpose of this test plan is (1) to present a test design to obtain realistic estimates of gas-threshold pressure for the Salado Formation WIPP underground facility including parts of the formation disturbed by the underground of the Salado, and (2) to provide a excavations and in the far-field or undisturbed part framework for changes and amendments to test objectives, practices, and procedures. Because in situ determinations of gas-threshold pressure in low-permeability media are not standard practice, the methods recommended in this testplan are adapted from permeability-testing and hydrofracture procedures. Therefore, as the gas-threshold-pressure testing program progresses, personnel assigned to the program and outside observers and reviewers will be asked for comments regarding the testing procedures. New and/or improved test procedures will be documented as amendments to this test plan, and subject to similar review procedures.

Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations  

SciTech Connect

This project investigates the feasibility of geologic sequestration of CO2 in depleted shale gas reservoirs from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. It is anticipated that over the next two decades, tens of thousands of wells will be drilled in the 23 states in which organic-rich shale gas deposits are found. This research investigates the feasibility of using these formations for sequestration. If feasible, the number of sites where CO2 can be sequestered increases dramatically. The research embraces a broad array of length scales ranging from the ~10 nanometer scale of the pores in the shale formations to reservoir scale through a series of integrated laboratory and theoretical studies.

Zoback, Mark; Kovscek, Anthony; Wilcox, Jennifer

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for the quarter of October 1, 1997--December 31, 1997 consisted of two tasks: (1) Present results of Rulison field test at various conferences, seminars, and to Barrett Resources and Snyder Oil Co. and (2) Continue work into developing a predictive quantitative method for locating fault-related natural fractures. The first task was completed during this reporting period. The second task continues the beginning of quantitative fracture mechanics analysis of the geologic processes that are involved for the development of fault-related natural fractures. The goal of this work is to develop a predictive capability of locating natural fractures prior to drilling.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Water-alternating-gas flooding of a hydrocarbon-bearing formation  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an oil recovery process for recovering a low viscosity crude oil from an oil-bearing zone of a subterranean formation. The process consists of: (a) injecting a gas into the oil-bearing zone of the subterranean formation via an injection well in fluid communication with the oilbearing zone, the gas injected at an injection pressure substantially below the minimum miscibility pressure of the gas in the low-viscosity crude oil; (b) displacing the low-viscosity crude oil away from the injection well toward an oil production well in fluid communication with the oil-bearing formation; (c) continuously recovering the low-viscosity crude oil from the oil production well; (d) thereafter terminating the injection of the gas upon substantial diminution of the continuous crude oil recovery from the production well; (e) injecting water into the oil-bearing zone of the formation via the injection well; (f) displacing the low-viscosity crude oil away from the injection well toward the oil production well; (g) recovering the low-viscosity oil form the oil production well; and (h) terminating the water injection.

Haines, H.K.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Anaerobic and Aerobic Hydrogen Gas Formation by the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena cylindrica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as high in heterocyst cells (2.3 units/mg of protein) as in vegetative cells (1.1 units/mg of...isolating heterocyst cells is described. Biological hydrogen gas formation is under...potential source of fuel, and hence there is...

Arlene Daday; Rosalea A. Platz; Geoffrey D. Smith

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Final Technical Report on: Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation, Gulf of Mexico: In Situ Field Study with Laboratory Characterizations of Exposed and Buried Gas Hydrates DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-02NT41328 Dates: 3/4/02 - 3/3/06 Prepared by: Miriam Kastner, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California 92093 Ian MacDonald, Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 Prepared for US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory June 2006 2 Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

109

New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle, May 2008.

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fiber Optic Sensing Technology for Detecting Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition  

SciTech Connect

A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 L) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time resolved, 3-D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data is visualized as a 'movie' of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Processing Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory show clear indications of hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected P-T conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Leeman, John R [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Ulrich, Shannon M [ORNL; Alford, Jonathan E [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Madden, Megan Elwood [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Wax formation assessment of condensate in South Pars gas processing plant sea pipeline (a case study)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wax deposition from the gas condensate in South Pars gas processing plant causes a number of severe problems. These problems include: (1) deposits form on the reboiler tubes of stabilizer column and tend to reduce its duty (2) forcing periodic shut-down and removal of deposits (3) interrupting normal processing operations. An understanding of deposition, nature and propensity is necessary to mitigate the mentioned problems. In this work, the multi solid phase model is used to predict the wax precipitation from gas condensate fluid. For five different reservoir fluids, several methods were investigated to split the heavy hydrocarbon fraction into pseudo fractions. The results show that the Al-Meshari method is the most accurate one. Also, a set of consistent correlations were used to calculate the critical points, fusion properties and the acentric factor of the single carbon number groups in the extended composition. Finally the best methods for predicting the wax formation are selected and used to predict the wax formation in the sea line of South Pars gas processing plant. The modeling shows that wax precipitation starts at 293K and 86bar. At this pressure and temperature the pipeline is 94km away from the wellhead.

M.R. Rahimpour; M. Davoudi; S.M. Jokar; I. Khoramdel; A. Shariati; M.R. Dehnavi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gasliquid flow stability and bubble formation in non-Newtonian fluids in microfluidic flow-focusing devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication describes the gasliquid two-phase flow patterns and the formation of bubbles in non-Newtonian fluids in microfluidic flow-focusing devices. Experiments were conducted in two different polym...

Taotao Fu; Youguang Ma; Denis Funfschilling; Huai Z. Li

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Determination of formation permeability using back-pressure test data from hydraulically-fractured, low-permeability gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACX-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AsJ4 University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1984 Major subject: petroleum Engineering DETERMINATION OF FORMATION PERMEABILITY USING BACK-PRESSURE TEST DATA FROM HYDRAULICALLY-FRACTURED, LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS WELLS A Thesis JOHN PAUL KRAWTZ...

Krawtz, John Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Enhanced rate of gas hydrate formation in a fixed bed column filled with sand compared to a stirred vessel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of two gas/liquid contact modes was evaluated in relation to the rate of gas hydrate formation. Hydrate formation experiments were conducted for several gas mixtures relevant to natural gas hydrate formation in the earth (CH4, CH4/C3H8, CH4/C2H6 and CH4/C2H6/C3H8) and two CO2 capture and storage (CO2, CO2/H2/C3H8). One set of experiments was conducted in a bed of silica sand, saturated with water (fixed fed column) while the other experiment was conducted in a stirred vessel for each gas/gas mixture. Both sets of experiments were conducted at a constant temperature. The rate of hydrate formation is customarily correlated with the rate of gas consumption. The results show that the rate of hydrate formation in the fixed bed column is significantly greater and thereby resulted in a higher percent of water conversion to hydrate in lesser reaction time for all the systems studied.

Praveen Linga; Nagu Daraboina; John A. Ripmeester; Peter Englezos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plasma expansion into a background gas at atmospheric pressure is cru- cial for many engineeringDynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures Alexander Miloshevsky, Sivanandan S. Harilal, Gennady Miloshevsky

Harilal, S. S.

118

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 14mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

TURBULENT MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THE SHOCKED INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM OF STEPHAN'S QUINTET  

SciTech Connect

The Stephan's Quintet (hereafter SQ) is a template source to study the impact of galaxies interaction on the physical state and energetics of their gas. We report on IRAM single-dish CO observations of the SQ compact group of galaxies. These observations follow up the Spitzer discovery of bright mid-IR H{sub 2} rotational line emission (L(H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 35} W) from warm (10{sup 2-3} K) molecular gas, associated with a 30 kpc long shock between a galaxy, NGC 7318b, and NGC 7319's tidal arm. We detect CO(1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) line emission in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) with complex profiles, spanning a velocity range of Almost-Equal-To 1000 km s{sup -1}. The spectra exhibit the pre-shock recession velocities of the two colliding gas systems (5700 and 6700 km s{sup -1}), but also intermediate velocities. This shows that much of the molecular gas has formed out of diffuse gas accelerated by the galaxy-tidal arm collision. CO emission is also detected in a bridge feature that connects the shock to the Seyfert member of the group, NGC 7319, and in the northern star forming region, SQ-A, where a new velocity component is identified at 6900 km s{sup -1}, in addition to the two velocity components already known. Assuming a Galactic CO(1-0) emission to H{sub 2} mass conversion factor, a total H{sub 2} mass of Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} is detected in the shock. The ratio between the warm H{sub 2} mass derived from Spitzer spectroscopy, and the H{sub 2} mass derived from CO fluxes is Almost-Equal-To 0.3 in the IGM of SQ, which is 10--100 times higher than in star-forming galaxies. The molecular gas carries a large fraction of the gas kinetic energy involved in the collision, meaning that this energy has not been thermalized yet. The kinetic energy of the H{sub 2} gas derived from CO observations is comparable to that of the warm H{sub 2} gas from Spitzer spectroscopy, and a factor Almost-Equal-To 5 greater than the thermal energy of the hot plasma heated by the collision. In the shock and bridge regions, the ratio of the PAH-to-CO surface luminosities, commonly used to measure the star formation efficiency of the H{sub 2} gas, is lower (up to a factor 75) than the observed values in star-forming galaxies. We suggest that turbulence fed by the galaxy-tidal arm collision maintains a high heating rate within the H{sub 2} gas. This interpretation implies that the velocity dispersion on the scale of giant molecular clouds in SQ is one order of magnitude larger than the Galactic value. The high amplitude of turbulence may explain why this gas is not forming stars efficiently.

Guillard, P.; Cluver, M. E.; Lisenfeld, U.; Ogle, P. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forets, G. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS), UMR 8617, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Falgarone, E.; Gusdorf, A. [ENS, LERMA, UMR 8112, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond 75005 Paris (France); Appleton, P. N. [NASAHerschel Science Center (NHSC), California Institute of Technology, Mail code 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Duc, P.-A. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA-CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR 7158 (France); Xu, C. K. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

Krason, J.; Finley, P.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Adding Environmental Gas Physics to the Semi-Analytic Method for Galaxy Formation: Gravitational Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of an attempt to include more detailed gas physics motivated from hydrodynamical simulations within semi-analytic models (SAM) of galaxy formation, focusing on the role that environmental effects play. The main difference to previous SAMs is that we include 'gravitational' heating of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) by the net surplus of gravitational potential energy released from gas that has been stripped from infalling satellites. Gravitational heating appears to be an efficient heating source able to prevent cooling in environments corresponding to dark matter halos more massive than $\\sim 10^{13} $M$_{\\odot}$. The energy release by gravitational heating can match that by AGN-feedback in massive galaxies and can exceed it in the most massive ones. However, there is a fundamental difference in the way the two processes operate. Gravitational heating becomes important at late times, when the peak activity of AGNs is already over, and it is very mass dependent. This mass dependency and time behaviour gives the right trend to recover down-sizing in the star-formation rate of massive galaxies. Abridged...

S. Khochfar; J. P. Ostriker

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas such as tight gas, shale gas, or coal bed methane gas tolocation. Development of shale oil and gas, tar sands, coalGas hydrates will undoubtedly also be present in shales,

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

125

Comparisons of pore size distribution: A case from the Western Australian gas shale formations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pore structure of shale samples from Triassic Kockatea and Permian Carynginia formations in the Northern Perth Basin, Western Australia is characterized. Transport properties of a porous media are regulated by the topology and geometry of inter-connected pore spaces. Comparisons of three laboratory experiments are conducted on the same source of samples to assess such micro-, meso- and macro-porosity: Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure (MICP), low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and nitrogen adsorption (N2). High resolution FIB/SEM image analysis is used to further support the experimental pore structure interpretations at sub-micron scale. A dominating pore throat radius is found to be around 6 nm within a mesopore range based on MICP, with a common porosity around 3%. This relatively fast experiment offers the advantage to be reliable on well chips or cuttings up the pore throat sizes >2nm. However, nitrogen adsorption method is capable to record pore sizes below 2nm through the determination of the total pore volume from the quantity of vapour adsorbed at relative pressure. But the macro-porosity and part of the meso-porosity is damaged or even destroyed during the sample preparation. BET specific surface area results usually show a narrow range of values from 5 to 10m2/g. Inconsistency was found in the pore size classification between MICP and N2 measurements mostly due to their individual lower- and upper-end pore size resolution limits. The water filled pores disclosed from NMR T2 relaxation time were on average 30% larger than MICP tests. Evidence of artificial cracks generated from the water interactions with clays after re-saturation experiments could explain such porosity over-estimation. The computed pore body to pore throat ratio extracted from the TimurCoates NMR model, calibrated against gas permeability experiments, revealed that such pore geometry directly control the permeability while the porosity and pore size distribution remain similar between different shale gas formations and/or within the same formation. The combination of pore size distribution obtained from MICP, N2 and NMR seems appropriate to fully cover the range of pore size from shale gas and overcome the individual method limits.

Adnan Al Hinai; Reza Rezaee; Lionel Esteban; Mehdi Labani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The measurement of gas relative permeability for low permeability cores using a pressure transient method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of oil and gas from a. typical reservoir. However, determining relative permeability ac- curately, especially for tight formations, has been a, challenging problem to petroleum engineers for many years. Commonly used laboratory methods of measuring.... Generally, there exist three kinds of fluids in petroleum reservoirs, oil, gas and water. In petroleum engineering, relative permeability of formation is one of the most important parameters one must use to estimate the fluid flow rates and recoveries...

Ning, Xiuxu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Calculated and measured gas formation in beryllium samples irradiated in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium samples have been irradiated in BR2, the materials testing reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN at Mol, Belgium, up to fission fluence values of 5.2 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} at low temperature. The gas formation (helium, tritium), as measured by SCK/CEN, as well as the induced swelling of the beryllium samples and the enhancement of the swelling due to annealing have been presented at the 17th SOFT Conference (Rome, 14--18 Sept., 1992). Since this conference, helium measurements on the same samples have been carried out at RI and calculations of the gas production have been performed, taking into account the various formation schemes. The experimental results from SCK/CEN and from RI are compared with the calculated gas formations.

De Raedt, C.M.; Sannen, L.F.; Vanmechelen, P.J. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Importance of Low Permeability Natural Gas Reservoirs (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40% of natural gas production and about 35% of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in darcies.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The drop in the cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused by a change in the mode of gas accretion and by active galactic nucleus feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cosmic star formation rate below redshift 2 is caused...Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrabetae...cosmic star formation rate is observed to drop sharply...of the gas that did not pass through a virial shock...simulations to show that the rate at which the gas accretes......

Freeke van de Voort; Joop Schaye; C. M. Booth; Claudio Dalla Vecchia

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Phase equilibrium conditions for simulated landfill gas hydrate formation in aqueous solutions of tetrabutylammonium nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for the simulated landfill gas (LFG) of methane and carbon dioxide (50mol% methane, 50mol% carbon dioxide) were investigated with the pressure range of (1.90 to 13.83)MPa and temperature range of (280.0 to 288.3)K at (0.050, 0.170, 0.340, and 0.394) mass fraction (w) of tetrabutylammonium nitrate (TBANO3). The phase boundary between liquidvaporhydrate (LVH) phases and liquidvapor (LV) phases was determined by employing an isochoric pressure-search method. The phase equilibrium data measured showed that TBANO3 appeared a remarkable promotion effect at w TBANO 3 =0.394, corresponding to TBANO326H2O, but inhibition effect at w TBANO 3 =(0.050, or 0.170) on the semiclathrate hydrate formation. In addition, the application of TBANO3 at 0.340 mass fraction, corresponding to TBANO332H2O, displayed promotion effect at lower pressures (below 6.38MPa) and inhibition effect at higher pressures (above 6.38MPa).

Ling-Li Shi; De-Qing Liang; Dong-Liang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Natural gas consumption and economic growth: The role of foreign direct investment, capital formation and trade openness in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper is to reinvestigate the relationship between natural gas consumption and economic growth by including foreign direct investment, capital and trade openness in Malaysia for the period of 19712012. The structural break unit root test is employed to investigate the stationary properties of the series. We have applied combined cointegration test to examine the relationship between the variables in the long run. For robustness sake, the ARDL bounds testing method is also employed to test for a possible long run relationship in the presence of structural breaks. We note the validity of cointegration between the variables. Natural gas consumption, foreign direct investment, capital formation and trade openness have positive influence on economic growth in Malaysia. The results support the presence of feedback hypothesis between natural gas consumption and economic growth, foreign direct investment and economic growth, and natural gas consumption and foreign direct investment. The policy implications of these results are provided.

Sakiru Adebola Solarin; Muhammad Shahbaz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Formation mechanism and geochemical characteristics of shallow natural gas in heavy oil province, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shallow gas reservoirs are distributed widely in Chinese heavy oil-bearing basins. At present, shallow gas resources have opened up giant potentials. The previous researches indicate the intimate genetic relat...

GuangYou Zhu; ShuiChang Zhang; WenZhi Zhao

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Shale Gas Formations and Their Potential for Carbon Storage: Opportunities and Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale gas resources are proving to be globally abundant...2...(carbon dioxide) to mitigate the climate impacts of global carbon emissions from power and industrial sectors. This paper reviews global shale gas res...

Roozbeh Khosrokhavar; Steve Griffiths; Karl-Heinz Wolf

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Star formation, metallicity gradient and ionized gas: clues to the formation of the elliptical galaxies NGC6868 and NGC5903  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stellar population, metallicity distribution and ionized gas in the elliptical galaxies NGC 6868 and NGC 5903 are investigated in this paper by means of long-slit spectroscopy and stellar population synthesis. Lick indices in both galaxies present a negative gradient indicating an overabundance of Fe, Mg, Na and TiO in the central parts with respect to the external regions. Concerning the emitting gas conspicuously detected in NGC 6868, we test three hypotheses as ionizing source: an H II region, post-AGB stars and an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). Diagnostic diagrams involving the ratios $[NII]_{\\lambda6584}/H\\alpha$, $[OI]_{\\lambda6300}/H\\alpha$ and $[SII]_{\\lambda6717,31}/H\\alpha$, indicate that values measured in the central region of NGC 6868 are typical of LINERs. Together with the stellar population synthesis, this result suggests that the main source of gas ionization in NGC 6868 is non-thermal, produced by a low-luminosity AGN, probably with some contribution of shocks to explain ionization at distances of $\\sim3.5$ kpc from the nucleus.

Mauro G. Rickes; Miriani G. Pastoriza; Charles Bonatto

2007-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

136

REDUCING RISK IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS FORMATIONS: UNDERSTANDING THE ROCK/FLUID CHARACTERISTICS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN LARAMIDE BASINS  

SciTech Connect

An anomalous velocity model was constructed for the Wind River Basin (WRB) based on {approx}2000 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. Ten cross sections were constructed through the model coincident with known gas fields. In each cross section, an intense, anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas-productive rock/fluid interval. The anomalous velocity model: (1) Easily isolates gas-charged rock/fluid systems characterized by anomalously slow velocities and water-rich rock/fluid systems characterized by normal velocities; and (2) Delineates the regional velocity inversion surface, which is characterized by steepening of the Ro/depth gradient, a significant increase in capillary displacement pressure, a significant change in formation water composition, and acceleration of the reaction rate of smectite-to-illite diagenesis in mixed-layer clays. Gas chimneys are observed as topographic highs on the regional velocity inversion surface. Beneath the surface are significant fluid-flow compartments, which have a gas-charge in the fluid phase and are isolated from meteoric water recharge. Water-rich domains may occur within regional gas-charged compartments, but are not being recharged from the meteoric water system (i.e., trapped water). The WRB is divided into at least two regionally prominent fluid-flow compartments separated by the velocity inversion surface: a water-dominated upper compartment likely under strong meteoric water drive and a gas-charged, anomalously pressured lower compartment. Judging from cross sections, numerous gas-charged subcompartments occur within the regional compartment. Their geometries and boundaries are controlled by faults and low-permeability rocks. Commercial gas production results when a reservoir interval characterized by enhanced porosity/permeability intersects one of these gas-charged subcompartments. The rock/fluid characteristics of the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) described in this work determine the potential for significant, relatively unconventional, so-called ''basin-center'' hydrocarbon accumulations. If such accumulations occur, they will be characterized by the following critical attributes: (1) Location beneath a regional velocity inversion surface that typically is associated with low-permeability lithologies; (2) Anomalous pressure, both over- and underpressure, and when, less commonly, they appear to be normally pressured, they are not in contact with the meteoric water system; (3) A significant gas component in the regional multiphase fluid-flow system (water-gas-oil) that occurs beneath the regional velocity inversion surface; (4) Domains of intense gas charge (i.e., high gas saturation) within the regional multiphase fluid-flow system; (5) Compartmentalization of the rock/fluid system to a far greater extent beneath the regional velocity inversion surface than above it (i.e., convection of fluids across the regional velocity inversion surface is reduced or eliminated depending on the nature of the capillary properties of the low-permeability rocks associated with the inversion surface); (6) Commercial gas accumulations occurring at the intersection of reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability and gas-charged domains; (7) Productive intersections of reservoir intervals and gas-charged domains, which are controlled by the structural, stratigraphic, and diagenetic elements affecting the rock/fluid system; and (8) No apparent meteoric water connection with the gas accumulations and gas columns up to several thousand feet in height. Because some of these critical attributes are not associated with conventional hydrocarbon accumulations, a new set of diagnostic tools are required in order to explore for and exploit these types of gas prospects efficiently and effectively. Some of these new diagnostic tools have been discussed in this report; other have been described elsewhere. In order to maximize risk reduction, it is recommended when exploring for these types of gas accu

Ronald C. Surdam

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

NETL: News Release - DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 15, 2001 August 15, 2001 DOE Selects 2 Projects to Help Boost Gas Flow from Low-Permeability Formations New Technologies Targeted at Future Gas Production From "Tight" Formations in Western U.S. MORGANTOWN, WV - America has vast resources of natural gas, but President Bush's National Energy Policy cautions that domestic production of the easier "conventional" gas could peak as early as 2015. To help prepare for the day when the Nation's increasing demand for clean-burning natural gas will have to be met by gas trapped in denser, more difficult-to-produce "unconventional" formations, the U.S. Department of Energy has selected two firms to develop advanced methods for locating and producing these low permeability gas reservoirs.

138

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 6, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates in the Panama Basin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a geological description of the Panama Basin, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, distribution of hydrates within the sediments, and the relation of hydrate distribution to other features such as salt diapirism are also included. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 63 refs., 38 figs., 7 tabs.

Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 9, Formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Middle America Trench  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a geological description of the Pacific margin of Mexico and Central America, including regional and local structural settings, geomorphology, geological history, stratigraphy, and physical properties. It provides the necessary regional and geological background for more in-depth research of the area. Detailed discussion of bottom simulating acoustic reflectors, sediment acoustic properties, and distribution of hydrates within the sediments are also included in this report. The formation and stabilization of gas hydrates in sediments are considered in terms of phase relations, nucleation, and crystallization constraints, gas solubility, pore fluid chemistry, inorganic diagenesis, and sediment organic content. Together with a depositional analysis of the area, this report is a better understanding of the thermal evolution of the locality. It should lead to an assessment of the potential for both biogenic and thermogenic hydrocarbon generation. 150 refs., 84 figs., 17 tabs.

Finley, P.; Krason, J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Formation of ordered gas-solid structures via solidification in metal-hydrogen systems  

SciTech Connect

This work contains theoretical discussions concerning the large amount of previously published experimental data related to gas eutectic transformations in metal-hydrogen systems. Theories of pore nucleation and growth in these gas-solid materials will be presented and related to observed morphologies and structures. This work is intended to be helpful to theorists that work with metal-hydrogen systems, and experimentalists engaged in manufacturing technology development of these ordered gas-solid structures.

Shapovalov, V.I. [State Metallurgical Academy of Ukraine (Ukraine); [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reservoir evaluation of the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation shale gas in the southern Sichuan Basin of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation (the Palaeozoic) is organic-rich (black) shale in the southern Sichuan Basin (the Yangtze Plate) of China. This study analyses the lateral extent and thickness, burial depth, total organic carbon content and thermal maturity of the Longmaxi Formation black shale as the key features of the shale gas reservoir. The thickness of the black shale ranges from 10 to 170m. The thickest reservoir is located in Changning-Naxi-Yongchuan region. The TOC of the shale at the bottom of the formation (50-m thickness) is above 2.0%. The lateral distribution of TOC varies with the lateral distribution of thickness, with the maximum TOC in the Gongxian-Luzhou-Yongchuan region. The burial depth ranges from 2000 to 4500m. The shale is thermally over mature. The evaluation of reservoir characteristics indicates that the Longmaxi Formation has conditions appropriate for shale gas accumulation and thus resource potential in the southern Sichuan Basin of China. The objective of this preliminary evaluation of the reservoir characteristics is to locate potential areas favourable for exploration. The most favourable areas are defined here as those where the thickness of black shale is more than 100m and the burial depth is less than 3000m; these cover approximately 12,600km2. The most favourable areas, which cover an area of approximately 5100km2, are located in the northeast Luzhou region.

Shangbin Chen; Yanming Zhu; Yong Qin; Hongyan Wang; Honglin Liu; Junhua Fang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Digital Rock Studies of Tight Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Carl Sondergeld, Shale-gas permeability and diffusivitypermeability of gas flow in mudrocks (shales and silt-researcher conclude that gas flow in shales can be affected

Silin, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM  

SciTech Connect

Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

Freeland, E. [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wilcots, E., E-mail: freeland@physics.tamu.edu, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

tight_nuts_thehub closed_boot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tight_nuts_the­hub closed_boot in_jack_boot in_pump_boot in_wheel1_boot in_wrench_boot inflated_nuts_the­hub closed_boot in_jack_boot in_pump_boot in_wheel1_boot in_wrench_boot inflated_wheel2 on_wheel2_the­hub tight_nuts_the­hub closed_boot in_jack_boot in_pump_boot in_wheel1_boot in_wrench_boot inflated_wheel2

Murphy, Robert F.

146

Prediction of gas-hydrate formation conditions in production and surface facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as methane, ethane, propane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to binary, ternary, and natural gas mixtures. I used the Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) to find the best correlations among variables such as specific gravity and pseudoreduced pressure...

Ameripour, Sharareh

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is shale gas? is shale gas? Basically, it is natural gas - primarily methane - found in shale formations, some of which were formed 300-million-to-400-million years ago during the Devonian period of Earth's history. The shales were deposited as fine silt and clay particles at the bottom of relatively enclosed bodies of water. At roughly the same time, primitive plants were forming forests on land and the first amphibians were making an appearance. Some of the methane that formed from the organic matter buried with the sediments escaped into sandy rock layers adjacent to the shales, forming conventional accumulations of natural gas which are relatively easy to extract. But some of it remained locked in the tight, low permeability shale layers, becoming shale gas.

148

Escape, Accretion or Star Formation? The Competing Depleters of Gas in Markarian 231  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on high resolution CO(1-0), CS(2-1) and 3mm continuum Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) observations of the molecular outflow host and nearest quasar Markarian 231. We use the CS(2-1) measurements to derive a dense gas mass within Mrk 231 of $1.8\\pm0.3\\times10^{10}$ $M_\\odot$, quite consistent with previous measurements. The CS(2-1) data also seem to indicate that the molecular disk of Mrk 231 is forming stars at normal efficiency. The high resolution CARMA observations were able to resolve the CO(1-0) outflow into two distinct lobes, allowing for a size estimate to be made and further constraining the molecular outflow dynamical time, further constraining the molecular gas escape rate. We find that 15% of the molecular gas within the Mrk 231 outflow actually exceeds the escape velocity in the central kiloparsec. Assuming that molecular gas is not constantly being accelerated, we find the depletion timescale of molecular gas in Mrk 231 to be 49 Myr, rather than 32 Myr, more...

Alatalo, Katherine

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Physical mechanisms of self-organization and formation of current patterns in gas discharges of the Townsend and glow types  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses current filamentation and formation of current structures (in particular, hexagonal current patterns) in discharges of the Townsend and glow types. The aim of the paper, which is in part a review, is to reveal basic reasons for formation of current patterns in different cases, namely, in dielectric barrier discharge, discharge with semiconductor cathode, and micro-discharge between metallic electrodes. Pursuing this goal, we give a very brief review of observations and discuss only those theoretical, computational, and experimental papers that shed light on the physical mechanisms involved. The mechanisms are under weak currentsthe thermal expansion of the gas as a result of Joule heating; under enhanced currentsthe electric field and ionization rate redistribution induced by space charge. Both mechanisms lead to instability of the homogeneous discharges. In addition, we present new results of numerical simulations of observed short-living current filaments which are chaotic in space and time.

Raizer, Yu. P.; Mokrov, M. S. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119526 (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

THE GAS/DUST RATIO OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: TESTING MODELS OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution, near-infrared NIRSPEC observations of CO absorption toward six class II T Tauri stars: AA Tau, DG Tau, IQ Tau, RY Tau, CW Tau, and Haro 6-5b. {sup 12}CO overtone absorption lines originating from the circumstellar disk of each object were used to calculate line-of-sight gas column densities toward each source. We measured the gas/dust ratio as a function of disk inclination, utilizing measured visual extinctions and inclinations for each star. The majority of our sources show further evidence for a correlation between the gas/dust column density ratio and disk inclination similar to that found by Rettig et al.

Horne, David [New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590 (United States); Gibb, Erika [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-St. Louis, 8001 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63121 (United States); Rettig, Terrence W.; Tilley, David; Balsara, Dinshaw [Center for Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Brittain, Sean [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mechanism of formation of the oil and gas basins of the Persian Gulf  

SciTech Connect

Earlier investigations have shown that most sedimentary basins on continental crust were formed without significant extension. These basins are of two main types. Cratonic sedimentary basins, 3 to 15 km deep, form as a result of slow compensated subsidence at a rate of 10 to 100 m/m.y. over a long period of time (300-1000 m.y.). Miogeosynclines usually form by rapid uncompensated subsidence at a rate of 0.2-1 km/m.y., in a short period of time (1-10 m.y.). In this paper, the authors examine the evolution and distribution of hydrocarbon deposits in the oil and gas basins of the Persian Gulf, which contain more than 60% of the oil and 40% of the gas reserves of non-Soviet countries. They conclude that the oil and gas basins of the Persian Gulf were formed by repeated rapid subsidence without crustal extension. The rapidity of the subsidence was responsible for high heat flow, intensive local tectonics, and the deposition of suitable source beds, reservoir rocks and caprocks, factors that are responsible for the immense oil and gas resources. 44 references, 2 figures.

Artyushkov, E.V.; Beer, M.A.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a function of time and proximity of the bubble boundary to the well. For all simulations reported here, with a formation radius above 50 m the maximum methane composition in the produced gas phase was less than 0.5%. This report provides an initial investigation of CAES in a depleted natural gas reservoir, and the results will provide useful guidance in CAES system investigation and design in the future.

Gardner, William Payton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of flow paths on tight gas well performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the production rate for constant pwf case. Equal emphasis is placed on short-term production (hours to a few days) as well as long-term production (1 to 15 years). A wide range of complex flow regime is investigated. A major section of this study deals...

Ganpule, Sameer Vasant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessment of API Thread Connections Under Tight Gas Well Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enginering in the form of hydraulic fracturing, efective wel-spacing and optimum wel placement for economic development. Wolhart et al (200) discused how Pemex Exploration and Production (PEMEX) utilized the services of Pinacle Technologies (tiltmeter...

Bourne, Dwayne

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

EIA - AEO2010 -Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Importance of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs Introduction Production from low-permeability reservoirs, including shale gas and tight gas, has become a major source of domestic natural gas supply. In 2008, low-permeability reservoirs accounted for about 40 percent of natural gas production and about 35 percent of natural gas consumption in the United States. Permeability is a measure of the rate at which liquids and gases can move through rock. Low-permeability natural gas reservoirs encompass the shale, sandstone, and carbonate formations whose natural permeability is roughly 0.1 millidarcies or below. (Permeability is measured in “darcies.”)

157

Direct formation of supermassive black holes in metal-enriched gas at the heart of high-redshift galaxy mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present novel 3D multi-scale SPH simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers between the most massive galaxies at $z \\sim 8 - 10$, designed to scrutinize the direct collapse formation scenario for massive black hole seeds proposed in \\citet{mayer+10}. The simulations achieve a resolution of 0.1 pc, and include both metallicity-dependent optically-thin cooling and a model for thermal balance at high optical depth. We consider different formulations of the SPH hydrodynamical equations, including thermal and metal diffusion. When the two merging galaxy cores collide, gas infall produces a compact, optically thick nuclear disk with densities exceeding $10^{-10}$ g cm$^3$. The disk rapidly accretes higher angular momentum gas from its surroundings reaching $\\sim 5$ pc and a mass of $\\gtrsim 10^9$ $M_{\\odot}$ in only a few $10^4$ yr. Outside $\\gtrsim 2$ pc it fragments into massive clumps. Instead, supersonic turbulence prevents fragmentation in the inner parsec region, which remains warm ($\\sim 3000-6000$ K) and dev...

Mayer, Lucio; Bonoli, Silvia; Quinn, Thomas; Roskar, Rok; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Restructuring of hex-Pt(100) under CO gas environments: formation of 2-D nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect

The atomic-scale restructuring of hex-Pt(100) induced by carbon monoxide with a wide pressure range was studied with a newly designed chamber-in-chamber high-pressure STM and theoretical calculations. Both experimental and DFT calculation results show that CO molecules are bound to Pt nanoclusters through a tilted on-top configuration with a separation of {approx}3.7-4.1 {angstrom}. The phenomenon of restructuring of metal catalyst surfaces induced by adsorption, and in particular the formation of small metallic clusters suggests the importance of studying structures of catalyst surfaces under high pressure conditions for understanding catalytic mechanisms.

Tao, Feng; Dag, Sefa; Wang, Lin-Wang; Liu, Zhi; Butcher, Derek; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A.

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

160

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze Michael Krivelevich Po-Shen Loh Abstract Let H be a 3-uniform hypergraph with n vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C H of H can be covered by edge-disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for n divisible by 4. Consequently, we

Frieze, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs Alan Frieze Carnegie Mellon University alan ploh@cmu.edu Abstract Consider a 3-uniform hypergraph H with n vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C H by edge- disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for n divisible by 4. Consequently, random 3-uniform hypergraphs

Krivelevich, Michael

162

2-D numerical simulation of digital rock experiments with lattice gas automation for electrical properties of reservoir formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......41074103 from National Natural Science Foundation...law from lattice-gas hydrodynamics, Phys...equation using a lattice gas Boltzmann method...1991b. Lattice gas automata for flow...Logging Analysist, Corpus Christi, TX, 1982 July......

Wenzheng Yue; Guo Tao; Shangxu Wang; Bin Tian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microsoft Word - RUL_1Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31 March 2011 31 March 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom-hole locations (BHLs) of the seven gas wells sampled are between 0.75 and 0.90 mile from the Project Rulison detonation point. All wells sampled are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations. On 10 September 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected: * 7 gas samples from 7 wells * 7 produced water samples from 6 wells and 1 drip tank; one well was dry Findings:

166

Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity. [Jurassic Smackover Formation  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains maps, well logging correlated to porosity and permeability, structural cross section, graph of production history, porosity vs. natural log permeability plot, detailed core log, paragenetic sequence and reservoir characterization sheet of the following fields in southwest Alabama: Appleton oil field; Barnett oil field; Barrytown oil field; Big Escambia Creek gas and condensate field; Blacksher oil field; Broken Leg Creed oil field; Bucatunna Creed oil field; Chappell Hill oil field; Chatom gas and condensate field; Choctaw Ridge oil field; Chunchula gas and condensate field; Cold Creek oil field; Copeland gas and condensate field; Crosbys Creed gas and condensate field; and East Barnett oil field. (AT)

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Moore, H.E. Jr.; Mann, S.D.; Hall, D.R.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Numerical Modeling of Hydrate Formation in Sand Sediment Simulating Sub-Seabed CO2 Storage in the form of Gas Hydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Among several methods for CO2 capture and storage, we focus on CO2 sequestration in the form of gas hydrate under the seafloor, mainly for many sequestration sites offshore Japan and for little risk of CO2 leakage from the sediment. However, it is difficult to evaluate the precise storage potential and cost of this method due to the lack of the relevant information. Here, in order to do feasibility studies of this technique so as to make an effective storage method, we made a 3-dimentional gas water flow simulator with kinetic hydrate formation. The new design of CO2 hydrate formation in porous media under two-phase flow condition was implemented in this simulator, and unknown parameters in necessary mathematical models for gas-water flow in sand sediments were verified from the comparison between the results of the numerical simulations and the experimental measurements from the previous study.

Takuya Nakashima; Toru Sato; Masayuki Inui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Formation of ultracold molecules (T?200 ?K) via photoassociation in a gas of laser-cooled atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the formation of ultracold moleculesthat is, at temperatures well below 1 mK, the photoassociation scheme in a sample of laser-cooled ultracold atoms is currently the best route, yielding a few millions of molecules at a translational temperature in the microkelvin range, which were successfully trapped. In photoassociation experiments, a pair of ultracold ground-state atoms absorbs a photon slightly (? a fraction of cm-1 to 1000 cm-1) red-detuned relative to the resonance line. Because of the ultracold conditions, the width of the statistical distribution of the kinetic energy Ec is markedly reduced. For a gas of atoms at thermal equilibrium with a temperature T, this width is of the order of kBT. It corresponds to ?200 cm-1 at room temperature (300 K), yielding the well-known appearance of diffuse spectra, but only to ? 2 \\{MHz\\} or 7 105 cm-1, at 100 ?K yielding well-resolved spectral lines, similar to boundbound transitions. Besides, only a few partial waves have to be considered in the description of the initial continuum state, so the rotational structure is most often limited to J < 710, in contrast with conventional molecular spectra where a much larger number of rotational levels are usually observed.

Franoise Masnou-Seeuws; Pierre Pillet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614 --- Breaking of Star Formation Law in the Central kpc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \\Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \\Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation fro...

Xu, C K; Lu, N; Gao, Y; Diaz-Santos, T; Herrero-Illana, R; Meijerink, R; Privon, G; Zhao, Y -H; Evans, A S; Knig, S; Mazzarella, J M; Aalto, S; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Chu, J; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; van der Werf, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation in Matrix-Assisted Laser Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 3 907 http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.3.907  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation in Matrix-Assisted Laser Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2013, Vol. 34, No. 3 907 http://dx.doi.org/10.5012/bkcs.2013.34.3.907 Efficiency of Gas-Phase Ion Formation-1 for peptides and 10-5 -10-3 for matrices speculated by Hillenkamp and Karas. Number of gas-phase ions generated

Kim, Myung Soo

171

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Permeability Gas Low Permeability Gas Design and Implementation of Energized Fracture Treatment in Tight Gas Sands DE-FC26-06NT42955 Goal The goal of this project is to develop methods and tools that can enable operators to design, optimize, and implement energized fracture treatments in a systematic way. The simulator that will result from this work would significantly expand the use and cost-effectiveness of energized fracs and improve their design and implementation in tight gas sands. Performer University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands account for 58 percent of the total proved natural gas reserves in the United States. As many of these tight gas sand basins mature, an increasing number of wells are being drilled or completed into nearly depleted reservoirs. This includes infill wells, recompletions, and field-extension wells. When these activities are carried out, the reservoir pressures encountered are not as high as the initial reservoir pressures. In these situations, where pressure drawdowns can be less than 2,000 psi, significant reductions in well productivity are observed, often due to water blocking and insufficient clean-up of fracture-fluid residues. In addition, many tight gas sand reservoirs display water sensitivity—owing to high clay content—and readily imbibe water due both to very high capillary pressures and low initial water saturations.

172

Log-derived evaluation of gas-bearing Cherokee, Red Fork, and Morrow formations, Custer County, OK  

SciTech Connect

Medium to low porosity and rather tight Cherokee, Red Fork and Morrow sands, located in Oklahoma, contain significant hydrocarbon resources. To evaluate the commercial importance of wells drilled in Custer County, Oklahoma, an innovative digital shaly sand analysis approach (CLASS - Epilog) has been applied, which provides information on total and effective reservoir porosity, total and effective fluid distribution based on the Waxman-Smits equation, shaliness, clay typing, and reservoir productivity. Several field case examples are presented and discussed based on (1) open hole logging suite, consisting of induction, compensated density/neutron and Spectralog, (2) CLASS analysis, (3) well completion and stimulation data, and (4) the resulting production test results.

Busch, E.A.; Fertl, W.H.; Neill, B.E.; Sinha, A.K.; Sobkowich, K.N.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tight Hamilton Cycles in Random Uniform Hypergraphs Andrzej Dudek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight Hamilton Cycles in Random Uniform Hypergraphs Andrzej Dudek Alan Frieze June 28, 2011 Abstract In this paper we show that e/n is the sharp threshold for the existence of tight Hamilton cycles also determine thresholds for the existence of other types of Hamilton cycles. 1 Introduction

Frieze, Alan

174

Microsoft Word - RUL_4Q2010_Rpt_Gas_Samp_Results_8Wells  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the Project Rulison Horizon the Project Rulison Horizon U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: 21 October 2010 Purpose: The purpose of this sample collection is to monitor for radionuclides from Project Rulison. The bottom hole locations (BHLs) of the 8 gas wells sampled are within 0.75 and 1.0 mile of the Project Rulison detonation horizon. All wells sampled have produced or are producing gas from the Williams Fork Formation. Background: Project Rulison was the second Plowshare Program to try stimulation natural gas in tight sandstone formations using a nuclear device. On 10 September 1969, a 40- nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (about 1.6 miles) below ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation. Samples Collected:

175

Organic geochemistry of Mississippian shales (Bowland Shale Formation) in central Britain: Implications for depositional environment, source rock and gas shale potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Marine Carboniferous shales are proven hydrocarbon source rocks in central Britain. In this contribution the depositional environment and shale gas/liquid potential of the lower Namurian part of the Bowland Shale Formation is studied using 77 thermally immature samples from the Duffield borehole. The Bowland Shale Formation comprises mudstone and turibidite lithofacies reflecting a pronounced sea level controlled cyclicity. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the mudstones lithofacies (including marine bands) and of fine-grained rocks within the turibidite lithofacies varies between 1.3 and 9.1%. Hydrogen index (HI) values imply the presence of kerogen type III-II. According to biomarker ratios and bulk geochemical parameters, marine bands (maximum flooding surfaces, mfs) were deposited in deep water with slightly enhanced, normal, or slightly reduced salinity. Mudstones of the highstand systems tract (HST) were deposited in environments with normal to reduced salinity, whereas photic zone anoxia favoured the preservation of marine organic matter during deposition of the mfs and the HST. The supply of landplant debris increased during the HST. Turbidites and their non-calcareous mudstone equivalents represent lowstand systems tracts deposited in low salinity environments. Terrestrial organic matter dominates in turbiditic sediments, marine organisms prevail in time-equivalent mudstones. Mudstone beneath marine bands represents transgressive systems tracts when normal marine conditions and photic zone anoxia were re-established. The mudstone lithofacies exhibits a very good to excellent potential to generate conventional mixed oil and gas. TOC content of fine-grained rocks in the turbidite lithofacies depends on the amount of detrital minerals supplied from the south. Moreover, their organic matter is gas-prone. High TOC contents and large thicknesses of the mudstone lithofacies show that the Bowland Shale Formation holds a significant shale gas/liquid potential in areas with appropriate maturity. A relatively low average HI and high clay contents may have negative effects on the shale gas potential.

D. Gross; R.F. Sachsenhofer; A. Bechtel; L. Pytlak; B. Rupprecht; E. Wegerer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

177

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil.gif (4836 bytes) oil.gif (4836 bytes) The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply. A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(99), (Washington, DC, January 1999). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural gas from domestic fields throughout the United States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery and unconventional gas recovery from tight gas formations, gas shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG).

178

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

TIGHT CLOSURE IN GRADED RINGS Karen E. Smith \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIGHT CLOSURE IN GRADED RINGS Karen E. Smith \\Lambda Abstract. This paper facilitates is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation. Typeset by A M S­T E X 1 #12; 2 KAREN E. SMITH \\Lambda

Smith, Karen E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Occurrence of Multiple Fluid Phases Across a Basin, in the Same Shale Gas Formation Eagle Ford Shale Example  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas and oil are playing a significant role in US energy independence by reversing declining production trends. Successful exploration and development of the Eagle Ford Shale Play requires reservoir characterization, recognition of fluid...

Tian, Yao

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Generation of a beam of fast electrons by tightly focusing a radially polarized ultrashort laser pulse  

SciTech Connect

The generation of an electron beam through longitudinal field acceleration from a tightly focused radially polarized (TM{sub 01}) laser mode is reported. The longitudinal field is generated by focusing a TM{sub 01} few-cycle laser pulse (1.8 {mu}m, 550 {mu}J, 15 fs) with a high numerical aperture parabola. The created longitudinal field in the focal region is intense enough to ionize atoms and accelerate electrons to 23 keV of energy from a low density oxygen gas. The characteristics of the electron beam are presented.

Payeur, S.; Fourmaux, S.; Schmidt, B. E.; MacLean, J. P.; Tchervenkov, C.; Legare, F.; Kieffer, J. C. [ALLS Facility, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications (INRS-EMT), 1650, boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Piche, M. [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser (COPL), 2375 rue de la Terrasse, Universite Laval, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

183

30 kV coaxial vacuum-tight feedthrough for operation at cryogenic temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the technology of building a vacuum-tight high voltage feedthrough which is able to operate at voltages up to 30 kV. The feedthrough has a coaxial structure with a grounded sheath which makes it capable to lead high voltage potentials into cryogenic liquids, without risk of surface discharges in the gas phase above the liquid level. The feedthrough is designed to be used in ionization detectors, based on liquefied noble gases, such as Argon or Xenon.

I. Kreslo; I. Badhrees; S. Delaquis; A. Ereditato; S. Janos; M. Messina; U. Moser; B. Rossi; M. Zeller

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of target reservoirs for horizontal drilling: Lower Glen Rose Formation, South Texas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to test the hypothesis that a horizontally drilled borehole can increase gas production sufficiently from the Lower Glen Rose Formation to provide an economic advantage over conventional vertical drilling. Additional objectives are to conduct detailed investigations of reservoir properties and completion methods. This paper presents preliminary results of a project, co-funded by PrimeEnergy and the United States Department of Energy (DOE), to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing DOE investigation of directional drilling in the development of tight gas resources within the United States. This paper builds on data presented in Muncey (1992) with data from two vertical tests of the Lower Glen Rose Formation, both drilled in 1993, and the analysis of approximately 20 line-miles of high-resolution seismic data recorded in 1992 and 1993.

Muncey, G.; Drimal, C.E. Jr.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Numerical Modeling of Fractured Shale-Gas and Tight-Gas Reservoirs Using Unstructured Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, which provides the flexibility required to accurately represent complex geologic domains and fractures in three dimensions. Using these Voronoi grids, the interaction between propped hydraulic fractures and secondary "stress-release" fractures were...

Olorode, Olufemi Morounfopefoluwa

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil production from tight reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicate that low-permeability tight oil reservoirs arepermeability cores Effect of Stress Sensitivity on Oil Production During oil production from tight

Lei, Qun; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Cui; Wu, Yu-Shu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

gas7: A gene expressed preferentially in growth-arrested fibroblasts and terminally differentiated Purkinje neurons affects neurite formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...other mouse/hamster hybrids or the parental Chinese hamster cell line (data not shown). A reported human DNA fragment (SHGC-1222) having 85% sequence identity with gas7 maps to the short arm of chromosome 17, which is largely syngeneic with mouse...

Yu-Ten Ju; Annie C. Y. Chang; Bin-Ru She; Meei-Ling Tsaur; Hwa-Min Hwang; Chuck C.-K. Chao; Stanley N. Cohen; Sue Lin-Chao

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

190

Spatially resolved physical conditions of molecular gas and potential star formation tracers in M83, revealed by the Herschel SPIRE FTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the launch of the Herschel Space Observatory, our understanding about the photo-dissociation regions (PDR) has taken a step forward. In the bandwidth of the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board Herschel, ten CO rotational transitions, including J=4-3 to J=13-12, and three fine structure lines, including [CI] 609, [CI] 370, and [NII] 250 micron, are covered. In this paper, I present our findings from the FTS observations at the nuclear region of M83, based on the spatially resolved physical parameters derived from the CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) map and the comparisons with the dust properties and star-formation tracers. I will discuss (1) the potential of using [NII] 250 and [CI] 370 micron as star-formation tracers; (2) the reliability of tracing molecular gas with CO; (3) the excitation mechanisms of warm CO; (4) the possibility of studying stellar feedback by tracing the thermal pressure of molecular gas in the nuclear ...

Wu, Ronin; Galliano, Frdric; Wilson, Christine D; Kamenetzky, Julia; Lee, Min-Young; Schirm, Maximilien; Hony, Sacha; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Spinoglio, Luigi; Cormier, Diane; Glenn, Jason; Maloney, Philip R; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rmy-Ruyer, Aurlie; Baes, Martin; Boselli, Alexandro; Bournaud, Frdric; De Looze, Ilse; Hughes, Thomas M; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Rangwala, Naseem

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

192

Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities June 11, 2010 - 4:33pm Addthis Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Weatherization auditors and crews assist in making a Vermont home more energy-efficient in New England winters. | Photo Courtesy of Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) Agency | Joshua DeLung "I think everyone has their heart in it. I think we see weatherization as a really worthy process." Morgan McKane, weatherization auditor at SEVCA Morgan McKane spent most of his career in southeast Vermont working in the

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-cooled gas turbine Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State University Collection: Engineering 27 Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using Summary:...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - application systems gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute of Technology Collection: Engineering 39 Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using Summary:...

195

Potential for Natural Gas Storage in Deep Basalt Formations at Canoe Ridge, Washington State: A Hydrogeologic Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Between 1999 and 2002, Pacific Gas Transmission Company (PGT) (now TransCanada Pipeline Company) and AVISTA Corporation, together with technical support provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) examined the feasibility of developing a subsurface, natural gas-storage facility in deep, underlying Columbia River basalt in south-central Washington state. As part of this project, the 100 Circles #1 well was drilled and characterized in addition to surface studies. This report provides data and interpretations of the geology and hydrology collected specific to the Canoe Ridge site as part of the U.S. DOE funding to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of this project.

Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Invisibility in non-Hermitian tight-binding lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reflectionless defects in Hermitian tight-binding lattices, synthesized by the intertwining operator technique of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, are generally not invisible and time-of-flight measurements could reveal the existence of the defects. Here it is shown that, in a certain class of non-Hermitian tight-binding lattices with complex hopping amplitudes, defects in the lattice can appear fully invisible to an outside observer. The synthesized non-Hermitian lattices with invisible defects possess a real-valued energy spectrum, however they lack of parity-time (PT) symmetry, which does not play any role in the present work.

Stefano Longhi

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Qubits from tight knots and bent nano-bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel mechanism for creating a qubit based on a tight knot, that is a nano-quantum wire system so small and so cold as to be quantum coherent with respect to curvature-induced effects. To establish tight knots as legitimate candidates for qubits, we propose an effective curvature-induced potential that produces the two-level system and identify the tunnel coupling between the two local states. We propose also a different design of nano-mechanical qubit based on twisted nano-rods. We describe how both devices can be manipulated. Also we outline possible decoherence channels, detection schemes and experimental setups.

Victor Atanasov; Rossen Dandoloff

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

198

Interaction of Fracture Fluid With Formation Rock and Proppant on Fracture Fluid Clean-up and Long-term Gas Recovery in Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The exploitation of unconventional gas reservoirs has become an integral part of the North American gas supply. The economic viability of many unconventional gas developments (more)

Yue, Wenting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microsoft Word - RUL_2Q2011_Gas_Samp_Results_7Wells_23June2011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

23 June 2011 23 June 2011 Purpose: The purpose of this environmental sample collection is to monitor natural gas and production water from natural gas wells drilled near the Project Rulison test site. As part of the DOE's directive to protect human health and the environment, sample are collected and analyzed from producing gas wells to ensure no Rulison related radionuclides have migrated outside the DOE institution control boundary. Using the DOE Rulison Monitoring Plan as guidance, samples are collected on a frequency based on their respective distance from the site. The monitoring plan also specifies the type of analysis and the reporting thresholds. Background: Project Rulison was the second test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from tight sandstone formations.

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - artery-related hemoperitoneum formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PATHOLOGY AND LABORATORY Summary: was ordered. Results: At autopsy, hemoperitoneum with 3000 ml of blood and clot was evident. The splenic... of tight microfollicle formation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

LARGE-SCALE SHOCK-IONIZED AND PHOTOIONIZED GAS IN M83: THE IMPACT OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the ionization structure of the nebular gas in M83 using the line diagnostic diagram, [O III](5007 A)/H{beta} versus [S II](6716 A+6731 A)/H{alpha}, with the newly available narrowband images from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We produce the diagnostic diagram on a pixel-by-pixel (0.''2 x 0.''2) basis and compare it with several photo- and shock-ionization models. We select four regions from the center to the outer spiral arm and compare them in the diagnostic diagram. For the photoionized gas, we observe a gradual increase of the log ([O III]/H{beta}) ratios from the center to the spiral arm, consistent with the metallicity gradient, as the H II regions go from super-solar abundance to roughly solar abundance from the center out. Using the diagnostic diagram, we separate the photoionized from the shock-ionized component of the gas. We find that the shock-ionized H{alpha} emission ranges from {approx}2% to about 15%-33% of the total, depending on the separation criteria used. An interesting feature in the diagnostic diagram is a horizontal distribution around log ([O III]/H{beta}) {approx} 0. This feature is well fit by a shock-ionization model with 2.0 Z{sub sun} metallicity and shock velocities in the range of 250-350 km s{sup -1}. A low-velocity shock component, <200 km s{sup -1}, is also detected and is spatially located at the boundary between the outer ring and the spiral arm. The low-velocity shock component can be due to (1) supernova remnants located nearby, (2) dynamical interaction between the outer ring and the spiral arm, and (3) abnormal line ratios from extreme local dust extinction. The current data do not enable us to distinguish among those three possible interpretations. Our main conclusion is that, even at the HST resolution, the shocked gas represents a small fraction of the total ionized gas emission at less than 33% of the total. However, it accounts for virtually all of the mechanical energy produced by the central starburst in M83.

Hong, Sungryong; Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dopita, Michael A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia); Blair, William P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Balick, Bruce [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Carollo, Marcella [Department of Physics, ETH-Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Disney, Michael J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Frogel, Jay A. [Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Washington, DC 20005 (United States); Hall, Donald [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, Jon A. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Kimble, Randy A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McCarthy, Patrick J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101-1292 (United States); O'Connell, Robert W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Paresce, Francesco [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Saha, Abhijit [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Silk, Joseph I. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Trauger, John T. [NASA-Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Walker, Alistair R., E-mail: wpb@pha.jhu.edu [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: Shale Gas and Other Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas | Environmental | Other Natural Gas Related Resources | Completed NG Projects Project Number Project Name Primary Performer 10122-47 Predicting higher-than-average permeability zones in tight-gas sands, Piceance basin: An integrated structural and stratigraphic analysis Colorado School of Mines 10122-43 Diagnosis of Multi-Stage Fracturing in Horizontal Well by Downhole Temperature Measurement for Unconventional Oil and Gas Wells Texas A&M University 10122-42 A Geomechanical Analysis of Gas Shale Fracturing and Its Containment Texas A&M University 09122-02 Characterizing Stimulation Domains, for Improved Well Completions in Gas Shales Higgs-Palmer Technologies 09122-04 Marcellus Gas Shale Project Gas Technology Institute (GTI)

203

November 10, 2004 Robust Automatic Parallel Parking in Tight Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

park AGVs in tight spaces under both vehicle localization errors and parking space detection errors the kinematic model of a skid steering autonomous ground vehicle (AGV). They are then demonstrated exper. This paper also presents a genetic fuzzy system which uses a genetic algorithm's learning ability

Collins, Emmanuel

204

A CO survey in planet-forming disks: characterizing the gas content in the epoch of planet formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We carried out a 12CO(3-2) survey of 52 southern stars with a wide range of IR excesses (LIR/L*) using the single dish telescopes APEX and ASTE. The main aims were (1) to characterize the evolution of molecular gas in circumstellar disks using LIR/L* values as a proxy of disk dust evolution, and (2) to identify new gas-rich disk systems suitable for detailed study with ALMA. About 60% of the sample (31 systems) have LIR/L* > 0.01 typical of T-Tauri or Herbig AeBe stars, and the rest (21 systems) have LIR/L* 0.01. However, the spectra of only four of the newly detected systems appear free of contamination from background or foreground emission from molecular clouds. These include the early-type stars HD 104237 (A4/5V, 116 pc) and HD 98922 (A2 III, 507 pc, as determined in this work), where our observations reveal the presence of CO-rich circumstellar disks for the first time. Of the other detected sources, many could harbor gaseous circumstellar disks, but our data are inconclusive. For these two newly discov...

Hales, A S; Montesinos, B; Casassus, S; Dent, W F R; Dougados, C; Eiroa, C; Hughes, A M; Garay, G; Mardones, D; Mnard, F; Palau, Aina; Prez, S; Phillips, N; Torrelles, J M; Wilner, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...distribution of gas hydrate (Fig. 4). According...sediment) of methane hydrate is 10-fold greater...unconventional sources of gas, such as coal beds, tight sands, black shales...conventional natural gas. Given these attractive...that natural gas hydrate could serve as...

Keith A. Kvenvolden

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Prediction of formation of gas-phase bubbles correlated by vortices in the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) as a potential CO2 capture technology has been considered as a promising and likely alternative to traditional combustion technology to mitigate the CO2 emission due to its prosecution of CO2 sequestration at a low cost. Although a number of studies on the hydrodynamic behaviours of the CLC process in fuel reactor have been documented in the open literature, there have been rare studies on the correlation between the bubble formation and the local particulate volume fraction. This paper aims to investigate the CLC process in a fuel reactor using the CFD modelling, coupled with the heterogeneous reactions, the hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics occurring in the fuel reactor. A parameter correlating the occurrence of bubble and dynamic properties is proposed. The parameter may be acted as an indicator of time-dependent bubble evolution with a potential to be adopted in the CLC for controlling the bubbling phenomena since the occurrence of the bubbles at specific positions is highly correlated with the local large eddies embedded in the flow. The results obtained clearly indicate that the CFD model developed in the current study reasonably forecasts the hydrodynamic behaviours and important phenomena observed in the fuel reactor.

Luming Chen; Xiaogang Yang; Xia Li; Guang Li; Colin Snape

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Three-dimensional pore networks and transport properties of a shale gas formation determined from focused ion beam serial imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional pore network reconstructions of mudstone properties are made using dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). Samples of Jurassic Haynesville Formation mudstone are examined with FIB-SEM and image analysis to determine pore properties, topology, and tortuosity. Resolvable pore morphologies (>~10 nm) include large slit-like pores between clay aggregates and smaller pores in strain shadows surrounding larger clastic grains. Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) data suggest a dominant 1-10 nm or less size of pores barely resolvable by FIB-SEM imaging. Computational fluid dynamics modelling is used to calculate single phase permeability of the larger pore networks on the order of a few nanodarcys (which compare favourably with core-scale permeability tests). This suggests a pore hierarchy wherein permeability may be limited by connected networks of inter-aggregate pores larger than about 20 nm, while MICP results reflect smaller connected networks of pores residing in the clay matrix. [Received: May 12, 2011; Accepted: September 14, 2011

Thomas A. Dewers; Jason Heath; Russ Ewy; Luca Duranti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil productionfrom tight reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a study of the relationship betweenpermeability and effective stress in tight petroleum reservoirformations. Specifically, a quantitative method is developed to describethe correlation between permeability and effective stress, a method basedon the original in situ reservoir effective stress rather than ondecreased effective stress during development. The experimental resultsshow that the relationship between intrinsic permeability and effectivestress in reservoirs in general follows a quadratic polynomial functionalform, found to best capture how effective stress influences formationpermeability. In addition, this experimental study reveals that changesin formation permeability, caused by both elastic and plasticdeformation, are permanent and irreversible. Related pore-deformationtests using electronic microscope scanning and constant-rate mercuryinjection techniques show that while stress variation generally has smallimpact onrock porosity, the size and shape of pore throats have asignificant impact on permeability-stress sensitivity. Based on the testresults and theoretical analyses, we believe that there exists a cone ofpressure depression in the area near production within suchstress-sensitive tight reservoirs, leading to a low-permeability zone,and that well production will decrease under the influence of stresssensitivity.

Lei, Qun; Xiong, Wei; Yuan, Cui; Wu, Yu-Shu

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. It is prepared in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, Section 57(b)(2)). Projected production estimates of U.S. crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects U.S. domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted drilling expenditures and average drilling costs to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

NONE

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hierarchical galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as the cooling of gas in haloes, the formation...effects on interstellar gas of energy released by young stars, the production of heavy elements, the...dynamics of the cooling gas are calculated in full...relatively small computational cost. The major disadvantage......

Shaun Cole; Cedric G. Lacey; Carlton M. Baugh; Carlos S. Frenk

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tight-binding model for hydrogen-silicon interactions  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an empirical tight-binding model for use in molecular-dynamics simulations to study hydrogen-silicon systems. The hydrogen-silicon interaction is constructed to reproduce the electronic energy levels and vibration frequencies of silane (SiH{sub 4}). Further use of the model in the studies of disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}) and of hydrogen on the Si(111) surface also yields results in good agreement with first-principles calculations and experiments.

Min, B.J.; Lee, Y.H.; Wang, C.Z.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M. (Microelectronics Research Center, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States) Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States))

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

A study of the pore-blocking ability and formation damage characteristics of oil-based colloidal gas aphron drilling fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The colloidal gas aphron (CGA) based drilling fluids are designed to minimize filtration loss by blocking the pores of the rock with microbubbles. Aphrons behave like a flexible bridging material and form an internal seal in a pore-structure, which can later be removed easily when the well is open for production. A non-aqueous CGA fluid was formulated by mixing 0.4% W/W oil soluble surfactant (sorbitan fatty acid ester ) and a 1.5% W/W linear polymer (styreneethylenepropylene) with mineral oil at a very high shear rate. The CGA fluid was used in a series of core flooding experiments to see the effects of the fluid injection rate, the type of saturating fluid, and wettability of the porous media on the pressure drop across the porous media and return permeability. Effective pore blocking ability of CGA fluid was confirmed by ever increasing resistance to the injection of CGA fluid through the porous media (i.e., continuous increase of pressure drop across the porous media). Results confirmed that microbubble buildup has occurred in the porous media, which limits the fluid invasion. The permeability alteration, measured as an indication of the formation damage due to CGA fluid flow, was found to be variable.

Shishir Shivhare; Ergun Kuru

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effect of Magnesite as Bed Material in a 100 kWth Steam?Oxygen Blown Circulating Fluidized-Bed Biomass Gasifier on Gas Composition and Tar Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Those issues, depending upon the type of the gasifier, are related to (1) scale of operation and availability of biomass, (2) size distribution of raw biomass, (3) operability of the gasifier with fuels containing large amounts of ash, especially if the fraction of alkali, chlorine, and sulfur is high,(2) (4) the formation of condensable higher hydrocarbons (tar), and (5) cleaning and upgrading of the gas for dedicated downstream application. ... The main characteristics of the rig are (i) reactor height, 5.5 m; (ii) riser inner diameter, 83 mm; downcomer inner diameter, 54 mm; material, stainless-steel AISI310, DIN 1.4845; (iii) fluidization medium electrical preheater (6 kW; Tmax = 400 C; Tnom = 360 C; Watlow, St. Louis, MO); (iv) electrical heating of the whole rig (22 kW; Tmax = 1200 C; Tnom = 850 C) using modular ceramic fiber heaters (ZMC Zamac, Poland); (v) high-temperature ceramic tissue candle filter unit (BWF, Germany) operating at 450 C and a high-temperature Si?SiC ceramic candle filter (Pall-Schumacher, Germany) operating at 800 C; (vi) feeding system with a maximum feed rate of ca. ... 200 and 470 ?m, while magnesite particle sizes are spread throughout the analysis domain; the fraction of fines in magnesite is significantly larger than in sand. ...

M. Siedlecki; R. Nieuwstraten; E. Simeone; W. de Jong; A. H. M. Verkooijen

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

215

Impact of Tight Energy Markets on Industrial Energy Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fired electric power generation, fueled in part by the low cost of gas for much of the 1990s, the low cost to build new natural gas fuel generation, the relative cleanliness of natural gas generation, and the prospects for continued plentiful supplies of low...-cost gas projected for the future. This resulted in the construction of over 250,000 megawatts of new natural gas fired generation in the 2000-2005 period an unprecedented addition of new generation to the power base (EIA 2006). While some...

Elliott, R. N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

X-RAY SCALING RELATION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES: DARK MATTER AS A PRIMARY FACTOR IN RETAINING HOT GAS  

SciTech Connect

We have revisited the X-ray scaling relations of early-type galaxies (ETG) by investigating, for the first time, the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} relation in a sample of 14 ETGs. In contrast to the large scatter (a factor of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) in the L{sub X,Total}-L{sub B} relation, we found a tight correlation between these physically motivated quantities with an rms deviation of a factor of three in L{sub X,Gas} = 10{sup 38}-10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1} or M{sub Total} = a few 10{sup 10} to a few 10{sup 12} M{sub ?}. More striking, this relation becomes even tighter with an rms deviation of a factor of 1.3 among the gas-rich galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} > 10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}). In a simple power-law form, the new relation is (L{sub X,Gas}/10{sup 40} erg s{sup 1}) = (M{sub Total}/3.2 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}){sup 3}. This relation is also consistent with the steep relation between the gas luminosity and temperature, L{sub X,Gas} ? T{sub Gas} {sup 4.5}, identified by Boroson et al., if the gas is virialized. Our results indicate that the total mass of an ETG is the primary factor in regulating the amount of hot gas. Among the gas-poor galaxies (with L{sub X,Gas} < a few 10{sup 39} erg s{sup 1}), the scatter in the L{sub X,Gas}-M{sub Total} (and L{sub X,Gas}-T{sub Gas}) relation increases, suggesting that secondary factors (e.g., rotation, flattening, star formation history, cold gas, environment, etc.) may become important.

Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed, physics-based hydrologic models require spatially explicit specification of parameters related to climate, geology, land-cover, soil, and topography. Extracting these parameters from national geodatabases requires intensive data processing. Furthermore, mapping these parameters to model mesh elements necessitates development of data access tools that can handle both spatial and temporal datasets. This paper presents an open-source, platform independent, tightly coupled GIS and distributed hydrologic modeling framework, \\{PIHMgis\\} (www.pihm.psu.edu), to improve model-data integration. Tight coupling is achieved through the development of an integrated user interface with an underlying shared geodata model, which improves data flow between the \\{PIHMgis\\} data processing components. The capability and effectiveness of the \\{PIHMgis\\} framework in providing functionalities for watershed delineation, domain decomposition, parameter assignment, simulation, visualization and analyses, is demonstrated through prototyping of a model simulation. The framework and the approach are applicable for watersheds of varied sizes, and offer a template for future GIS-Model integration efforts.

Gopal Bhatt; Mukesh Kumar; Christopher J. Duffy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Optimization Online - Tight and Compact MIP Formulation of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2014 ... ... requirements from deregulated markets have led the existence and building of an important number of combined-cycle gas turbines (CCGTs)...

German Morales-Espaa

2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Optimization Online - Tight and Compact MIP Formulation of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2014 ... ... and building of an important number of combined-cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) in many power systems. These plants represent a complicated...

German Morales-Espaa

2014-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC enhanced the translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. In conclusion, TJs occur in normal mouse heart. IPC preserves the integrity of TJ structure and function that are vulnerable to IR injury.

Li, Zhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Jin, Zhu-Qiu, E-mail: zhu-qiu.jin@sdstate.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)] [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Crude oil prices: Are our oil markets too tight?  

SciTech Connect

The answer to the question posed in the title is that tightness in the market will surely prevail through 1997. And as discussed herein, with worldwide demand expected to continue to grow, there will be a strong call on extra oil supply. Meeting those demands, however, will not be straightforward--as many observers wrongly believe--considering the industry`s practice of maintaining crude stocks at ``Just in time`` inventory levels. Further, impact will be felt from the growing rig shortage, particularly for deepwater units, and down-stream capacity limits. While these factors indicate 1997 should be another good year for the service industry, it is difficult to get any kind of consensus view from the oil price market. With most observers` information dominated by the rarely optimistic futures price of crude, as reflected by the NYMEX, the important fact is that oil prices have remained stable for three years and increased steadily through 1996.

Simmons, M.R. [Simmons and Co. International, Houston, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tight-Binding Models of Amorphous Systems: Liquid Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A tight-binding approach to the electronic structure of disordered systems is developed for a simple one-orbital model of a liquid metal. An equation is derived for a one-electron continuum Green's function from which the electronic density of states can be obtained. Utilizing an analogy between this Green's function and the T matrix of multiple-scattering theory, results are obtained corresponding to the quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of Lax and the self-consistent approximation (SCA) of Schwartz and Ehrenreich. Moments of the spectral function are also analyzed. Calculations were made using random and hard-sphere pair distribution functions. The QCA in this model is quite inadequate, and the SCA, while a considerable improvement, proves to involve a questionable approximation to the three-body distribution function.

Laura M. Roth

1973-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methods and apparatus for measuring the tightness of enclosures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for measuring tightness of an enclosure such as a building by utilizing alternating pressurization techniques. One method comprises providing apparatus capable of causing an internal volume change for the enclosure, the apparatus including a means for determining the instantaneous volume change, and a means for determining the instantaneous pressure within the enclosure. The apparatus is operated within the enclosure to change the volume thereof, and at least one of the frequency and the displacement is adjusted to achieve a root mean square pressure in the enclosure approximately equal to a reference pressure. At that pressure, the leakage of the enclosure is determined from the instantaneous displacement and instantaneous pressure values.

Modera, Mark P. (3815 Brighton Ave., Oakland, CA 94602); Sherman, Max H. (461 Hudson St., Oakland, CA 94618)

1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute Energy Symposium, University of Oklahoma, Price College Energy Institute March 05, 2013 | Norman, OK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski , Energy Symposium, March 05, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the

231

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Energy Council The Energy Council March 09, 2013 | Washington, DC by Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA's mission and main functions Adam Sieminski, Energy Council March 09, 2013 2 Independent Statistical and Analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy - EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. - By law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government [EIA] ...is the gold standard for energy data around the world, and the accessibility of it is so much greater than other places - Dan Yergin,

232

Improved Upscaling & Well Placement Strategies for Tight Gas Reservoir Simulation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 22 2.5 1x1xN Adaptive Upgridding & Upscaling............................................................. 26 2.5.1 1x1xN Upgridding & Upscaling Approaches ................................................. 26 2.5.2 1x1xN Upgridding & Upscaling... Results ......................................................... 28 2.5.3 Full Field Application ..................................................................................... 36 2.6 2x2xN Adaptive Upgridding & Upscaling...

Zhou, Yijie

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

233

Permeability Estimation from Fracture Calibration Test Analysis in Shale and Tight Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

closure can be used to estimate the reservoir permeability. However, for very low permeability, the time to reach radial flow can exceed any practical duration. This study shows how to use the reservoir pressure to estimate the maximum reservoir...

Xue, Han 1988-

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

234

Natural fracture characterization in tight gas sandstones: Integrating mechanics and diagenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2009, this issue; Smart et al., 2009...that is useful for estimating the order of magnitude...4 (Table 4). A benefit of the mechanics-based...a 120 by 120 base grid with grid-block...p.-563-575. Smart, K.-J., D...

Jon E. Olson; Stephen E. Laubach; Robert H. Lander

235

Layered Pseudo-Steady-State Models for tight commingled gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fig. 5 - Typical Production Rate Performance for a Two-Layer Commingled Reservoir with constant p?& 18 Fig. 6 - Typical Average Reservoir Pressure Performance for Two-Layer Commingled Reservoirs 19 Fig. 7 - Fetkovich Decline Curves 21 Fig. 8... ? Matching Single-Layer Rate Decline With Fetkovich Curves 23 Fig. 9 - Matching a Two-Layer Commingled Reservoir With Fetkovich Curves 24 Fig. 10 - Schematic Flow Chart of the Layered PSS Program 29 Fig. 11 - Matching the Rate for Case b (Optimization...

El-Banbi, Ahmed

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Advisory System For Selecting Drilling Technologies and Methods in Tight Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). 13 Fig. 6? Rotary drilling process (Bourgoyne et al. 1986). Two main systems are currently used to rotate the drill bit. As of 2007, for onshore drilling, 55% of the drilling rigs are equipped with a rotary table and Kelly- bushing while 45... ................................................................................................ 11 2.2.2. Discussion .................................................................................................. 12 2.3 Fit For Purpose Land Rig ................................................................................. 16 2.4 Slim...

Pilisi, Nicolas

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future of Geothermal Energy. Massachusetts Institute ofthe exploitation of geothermal energy from such rocks. Wemethod to extract geothermal energy from tight sedimentary

Wessling, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Impacts of Increased Natural Gas Acquisition, Processing, and Use: A Critical Review to rapid and intensive development of many unconventional natural gas plays (e.g., shale gas, tight sand understanding of local and regional air quality impacts of natural gas extraction, production, and use. Air

Jackson, Robert B.

239

Identification and evaluation of bypassed and incompletely drained gas reservoirs in the wave-dominated deltaic system of the Frio Formation (Oligocene), North McFaddin field, Victoria County, South Texas  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geologic, engineering, and petrophysical evaluation of North McFaddin field, undertaken in cooperation with the current operator. Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., targeted actual and potential secondary natural gas resources within thin reservoirs (typically 5-15 ft thick). Funded by the Gas Research Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the State of Texas, this research forms part of the Secondary Gas Recovery project of the Bureau of Economic Geology. Improved vertical resolution of recently developed wireline tools and advances in well-log analytical techniques have been fundamental in identifying these resources. Reservoirs are vertically compartmentalized by nonreservoir facies of subequal thicknesses and collectively are grouped into sequences 75-100 ft thick. Individual reservoirs typically form laterally discontinuous lobes (5000-6000 ft wide) of variable elongation and orientation with respect to inferred depositional dip. Reservoir facies are interpreted to be of distal shoreface origin. Contour maps of net sandstone thickness, relative spontaneous potential deflection, and resistivity were superposed for each reservoir unit. These data were integrated with structure maps and well-test production, wireline-formation test, and sidewall-core data, allowing the potentially productive limits of each reservoir unit to be delineated. By comparing subsequently determined volumes of original gas in place with historical production data, potentially recoverable reserves were estimated to be as much as 1000 mmcf for individual reservoirs. These procedures enabled not only the recommendation of recompletion targets, but also suggested a strategic location for a potential development well.

Burn, M.J.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Vidal, J. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services Technology, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Knowles, P. (Anaqua Oil and Gas, Inc., Corpus Christi, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Invisible surface defects in a tight-binding lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface Tamm states arise in one-dimensional lattices from some defects at the lattice edge and their energy generally falls in a gap of the crystal. The defects at the surface change rather generally the phase of propagative Bloch waves scattered off at the lattice edge, so that an observer, far from the surface, can detect the existence of edge defects from e.g. time-of-flight measurements as a delay or an advancement of a Bloch wave packet. Here we show that a special class of defects can sustain surface Tamm states which are invisible, in a sense that reflected waves acquire the same phase as in a fully homogeneous lattice with no surface state. Surface states have an energy embedded into the tight-binding lattice band and show a lower than exponential (algebraic) localization. Like most of bound states in the continuum of von Neumann - Wigner type, such states are fragile and decay into resonance surface states in presence of perturbations or lattice disorder. The impact of structural lattice imperfections and disorder on the invisibility of the defects is investigated by numerical simulations.

Stefano Longhi

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a Partially Saturated Core-Scale Sand Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as wellproperties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation,saturated sand/water/gas (s/w/g) system, hydrate formation,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as wellproperties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation,saturated sand/water/gas (s/w/g) system, hydrate formation,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Formation and fragmentation of gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of transition-metal ions with organic molecules containing two functional groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer fast atom bombardment source has been used to synthesize, in the gas phase, the ion-molecule complexes of transition-metal ions (Ni+, CO+, Fe+, and Mn+) with ?- or ?-unsaturated alkenenitriles...

Lin-Zhi Chen; Jack M. Miller

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Influence of reservoir heterogeneity on gas resource potential for geologically based infill drilling, Brooks and I-92 reservoirs, Frio Formation, south Texas  

SciTech Connect

Gas resource potential for strategic infill drilling or recompletion in a reservoir can be calculated by subtracting gas volumes derived using the material balance (pressure decline) method from volumes derived using a volumetric method. This resource potential represents remaining gas that is not in communication with existing wells. Frio reservoirs in mature, nonassociated gas plays located downdip from the Vicksburg fault zone are characterized by multiple, vertically stacked sandstones. The Brooks reservoir, in La Gloria field, lies in a fluvial-dominated system that contains dip-elongate channel sandstone belts 1-2 mi wide. Within these belts are six or more vertically stacked channel-fill, point-bar and splay deposits. Depositional environments were interpreted from SP logs. Individual sandstones are separated vertically by thin mudstone layers and pinch out laterally into flood-plain deposits.

Jackson, M.L.W.; Ambrose, W.A. (Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Numerical Modeling of CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations - Recent Results and Open Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed for oil and gas reservoirs, and for vadose zoneor depleting oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams,formations. While oil and gas reservoirs may provide some

Pruess, Karsten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture treatments. This study evaluates fracture stimulation technology in tight gas sands by using case histories found in the petroleum engineering literature and by using a comparison of the performance of wells stimulated with different treatment...

Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

Ma, Xiaodan

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

249

Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

251

Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nanobubbles [3,4,11,14]. 2. A decrease in surface tension from 72 to 68 dyn/cm [11]. 3. Increase nanobubble network is the out come of a self organization process due to the collective effect of bubble-bubble term stability of water structure is resulted from the formation of dense array of stable gas

Jacob, Eshel Ben

252

ORTHONORMAL DILATIONS OF NON-TIGHT FRAMES MARCIN BOWNIK, JOHN JASPER, AND DARRIN SPEEGLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORTHONORMAL DILATIONS OF NON-TIGHT FRAMES MARCIN BOWNIK, JOHN JASPER, AND DARRIN SPEEGLE Abstract and Riesz bounds are the same. Recently, Bownik and Jasper [3, Proposition 2.3] proved a dilation result

Scannell, Kevin Patrick

253

OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }) in the interstellar medium compared to CO ({approx}0.4 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas, and found that only a non-ionizing source can heat this gas; the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds is able to satisfy the large energy budget of {approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }. Analysis of the very high-J lines of HCN strongly indicates that they are solely populated by infrared pumping of photons at 14 {mu}m. This mechanism requires an intense radiation field with T > 350 K. We detect a massive molecular outflow in Arp 220 from the analysis of strong P Cygni line profiles observed in OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 2}O. The outflow has a mass {approx}> 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and is bound to the nuclei with velocity {approx}< 250 km s{sup -1}. The large column densities observed for these molecular ions strongly favor the existence of an X-ray luminous AGN (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in Arp 220.

Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 1255 38th street, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Rykala, Adam [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Isaak, Kate [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bradford, Charles M. [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter [Blue Sky Spectroscopy Inc, Suite 9-740 4th Avenue South, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0N9 (Canada); Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Nicola [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

255

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

257

A cost-effective backward Lagrangian method for simulation of pollutant formation in gas turbine combustors by post-processing of complex 3D calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A backward Lagrangian Monte Carlo modelling is proposed to calculate by post-processing the PDF of the thermo-chemical parameters of complex turbulent reactive flows simulated with a simple turbulent combustion model. PDF's of minor species such as pollutant species (NOx, soot, unburnt hydrocarbons...) can be easily obtained as long as these species have no significant influence on the main features of the flow. A numerical validation and an example of application of the method to a real burner are presented. If the number of points where information is sought is limited the cost of the method in terms of CPU time is very low and the statistical error can be perfectly controlled. With a first application to a semi-technical scale combustor producing soot the method has been proved very promising for the prediction of pollutant in complex turbulent reactive flows of gas turbine combustors.

Francis Dupoirieux; Nicolas Bertier; Aymeric Boucher; Pascale Gilbank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations, including oil and gas reservoirs and deep salineGCS consist mainly of oil and gas reservoirs and deep salinebelow the caprock in oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide- Polyethylenimine- Dextran Sulfate Polymer Gel System as a Water Shut-Off Agent in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies such as horizontal wells and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have made ultra-low permeability shale and tight gas reservoirs productive but the industry is still on the learning curve when it comes to addressing various production...

Jayakumar, Swathika 1986-

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effect of shear rate on the activity of enzymes used in hydraulic fracture cleanup of tight unconventional reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Injection of polymeric solutions in order to propagate a fracture and carry proppants to keep the fracture open is a common practice in hydraulic fracturing of ultra-tight formations. Polymeric fluids open and extend the already existing network of fractures. Considering the low permeability of the formation, small width of the micro-fractures, and the importance of fracture cleanup during the production phase, using breakers is recommended to degrade the more concentrated polymeric fluid and increase the conductivity of the fractures. Enzymes are typically used successfully as breakers for fracturing fluids. In this study, the effect of high shear rates on the activity of enzymes was studied. Enzyme activity decreased at increasing shear rates. However, this activity reduction is reversible. This proves insignificant damage to the enzyme structure due to shear effects. This will assure the activity of the enzymes after reaching the fracture and the more efficient cleanup of the fracture(s). [Received: 31 July 2013; Accepted: 26 January 2014].

Chris Ouyang; Reza Barati

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FE Oil and Natural Gas News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 DOE Leads National Research Program in Gas Hydrates The U.S. Department of Energy today told Congress the agency is leading a nationwide program in search of naturally occurring natural gas hydrates - a potentially significant storehouse of methane--with far reaching implications for the environment and the nation's future energy supplies. July 30, 2009 DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. May 18, 2009 DOE-Supported Publication Boosts Search for Oil, Natural Gas by Petroleum Operators A comprehensive publication detailing the oil-rich fields of Utah and

262

Outlook for U.S. shale oil and gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

shale oil and gas shale oil and gas IAEE/AEA Meeting January 4, 2014 | Philadelphia, PA By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator Key insights on drilling productivity and production trends Adam Sieminski, IAEE/AEA January 4, 2014 2 * The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources * Six tight oil and shale gas plays taken together account for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth over the last 2 years * Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity, rather than an increase in the rig count, have been the main drivers of recent production growth * Steep legacy production decline rates are being offset by growing

263

Destruction of attractive bosonic cloud due to high spatial coherence in tight trap  

SciTech Connect

We study coherence of a trapped bosonic cloud with attractive finite-range interaction in a tight harmonic trap. One-body density and pair-distribution function in the ground state for different trap sizes are calculated. We also calculate healing length and the correlation length which signify the presence of high spatial coherence in a very tight trap leading to the destruction of the condensate for a fixed particle number. This is in marked variance with the usual collapse of the attractive metastable condensate when N>N{sub cr}. Thus we investigate the critical frequency and critical size of the trap for the existence of attractive Bose-Einstein condensation. The finite-range interaction gives a nonlocal effect in the effective many-body potential, and we observe a high-density stable branch besides the known metastable branch. Moreover, the new branch shows universal behavior even in the very tight trap.

Biswas, Anindya; Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Chakrabarti, Barnali [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Department of Physics, Lady Brabourne College, P1/2 Surawardi Avenue, Kolkata 700017 (India); Salasnich, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica ''Galileo Galilei'' and CNISM, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35122 Padova (Italy)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

William L. Ellsworth January 25, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the process to stimulate the production of natural gas and oil from tight shale formations, or by disposal

Heaton, Thomas H.

265

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

266

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

267

The Effects of Tight Budgetary Control on Employee Behavior in the Public Sector of Jordan, Pakistan and Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis aims to explore the effects of tight budgetary control on employee behavior focusing on employee loyalty, employee satisfaction, job related tension and (more)

Al-Shaibie, Mahmoud

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Expansion of the NRL Tight-Binding Method to Include f-orbitals and Application in Thorium and Actinium .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current NRL Tight-Binding suite of programs was designed to only include s, p, and d orbitals in the basis. Because of this limitation, materials (more)

Durgavich, Joel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Shale Gas and Hydrofracturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in horizontal drilling technology and hydrofracturing allow natural gas to escape from shale formations following high pressure treatment, i.e. fracking with sand, water and chemicals. ... With fracking, natural gas prices have remained low at less than $2.50 per million BTU. ... Fracking chemicals, petrochemicals, and metals and radionuclides from source rock cause major environmental burdens if not properly treated or deep-injected. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disordered graphene and boron nitride in a microwave tight-binding analogue S. Barkhofen,1 M Sophia-Antipolis, 06108 Nice, France (Dated: December 20, 2012) Experiments on hexagonal graphene of the high flexibility of the discs positions, consequences of the disorder introduced in the graphene

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

271

Tightly-Coupled Navigation Assistance in Heterogeneous Multi-Robot Teams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tightly-Coupled Navigation Assistance in Heterogeneous Multi-Robot Teams Lynne E. Parker, Balajee International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS), Sendai, Japan, 2004. Abstract-- This paper robot teams, specifically for the task of navigation assistance. These cooperative behaviors enable

Parker, Lynne E.

272

Results from Tight and Loose Coupled Multiphysics in Nuclear Fuels Performance Simulations using BISON  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled wont converge and vice versa.

S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. Andrs; R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tight Lower Bounds for st-Connectivity on the NNJAG Model (jeff@cs.yorku.ca)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4=3) on the NNJAG model by Edmonds Edm93a]. Our lower bound is tight for S 2 O(n1 ), for any > 0 to the size of the internal mem- ory of a machine. In these applications algorithms that run in small space

Edmonds, Jeff

274

Experiments with an Ecological Interface for Monitoring Tightly-Coordinated Robot Teams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments with an Ecological Interface for Monitoring Tightly-Coordinated Robot Teams Gal A, with an ecological socially-attentive display that makes the state of coordination explicit. The results show such monitoring include search and rescue operations [4], multi-rover planetary exploration, and multi-vehicle

Kaminka, Gal A.

275

Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study  

SciTech Connect

The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

Ramrez-Morales, A.; Martnez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodrguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Acadmica de Fsica, Universidad Autnoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Tight Approximation for an EOQ Model with Supply Disruptions Lawrence V. Snyder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, supply disruptions, EOQ, approximations, power-of-two policies 1 Introduction Despite the carefulA Tight Approximation for an EOQ Model with Supply Disruptions Lawrence V. Snyder Dept. of Industrial and Systems Engineering Lehigh University 200 West Packer Ave., Mohler Lab Bethlehem, PA, 18015

Snyder, Larry

277

What is shale gas and why is it important?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Shale gas refers to natural gas that is trapped within shale formations. Shales are fine-grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Over the past decade, the combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has allowed access to large volumes of shale gas that were previously uneconomical to produce. The production of natural gas from shale formations has rejuvenated the natural gas industry in the United States.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

279

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

280

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

voxel contained sand, gas, hydrate (under proper conditions)of Gas Hydrate Formation in a Bed of Silica Sand Particles.Gas Hydrate Formation in a Variable Volume Bed of Silica Sand

Rees, E.V.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Oil and Gas Supply Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale States, acquire natural gas from foreign producers for resale in the United States, or sell U.S. gas to foreign consumers. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes unconventional gas recovery from low permeability formations of sandstone and shale, and coalbeds. Foreign gas transactions may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico) or transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). Energy Information Administration/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 89 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Report #:DOE/EIA-0554(2006) Release date: March 2006

284

Data Formats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter provides a taxonomy of existing data formats for power power system analysis. These include most commonly used formats of free and proprietary software packages as well as the IEC common informati...

Federico Milano

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Glossary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Glossary Glossary Acquifer - A single underground geological formation, or group of formations, containing water. Antrim Shale - A shale deposit located in the northern Michigan basin that is a Devonian age rock formation lying at a relatively shallow depth of 1,000 feet. Gas has been produced from this formation for several decades primarily via vertical, rather than horizontal, wells. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates the technically recoverable Antrim shale resource at 20 trillion cubic feet (tcf). Appalachian Basin - The geological formations that roughly follow the Appalachian Mountain range and contain

287

Creating Ground State Molecules with Optical Feshbach Resonances in Tight Traps  

SciTech Connect

We propose to create ultracold ground state molecules in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate by adiabatic crossing of an optical Feshbach resonance. We envision a scheme where the laser intensity and possibly also frequency are linearly ramped over the resonance. Our calculations for {sup 87}Rb show that for sufficiently tight traps it is possible to avoid spontaneous emission while retaining adiabaticity, and conversion efficiencies of up to 50% can be expected.

Koch, Christiane P. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Ba circumflex t. 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Department of Physical Chemistry and Fritz Haber Research Center, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Kosloff, Ronnie [Department of Physical Chemistry and Fritz Haber Research Center, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

(Nearly-)Tight Bounds on the Linearity and Contiguity of Christophe Crespelle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop France (2012)" #12;Lemma 1 For a rooted complete binary tree T, rank(T) = ph(T) = h(T). Theorem 2 For any rooted tree T, we have rank(T) = ph(T). Upper bounds for contiguity and linearity of cographs. We by their cotree, a rooted tree with two kinds of nodes labeled by P and S, giving a tight upper bound

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

289

The Importance of Geochemical Parameters and Shale Composition on Rock Mechanical Properties of Gas Shale Reservoirs: a Case Study From the Kockatea Shale and Carynginia Formation From the Perth Basin, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of the gas shale mechanical properties is very important screening criteria ... for hydraulic fracturing and as a result in gas shale sweet spot mapping. Youngs modulus and ... mechanical properties t...

Mohammad Mahdi Labani; Reza Rezaee

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

porous media does not exist. Once the fundamentals of iceFundamental Issues in Subzero PEMFC Startup and Operation. UTC Fuel Cells, DOE

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cold Gas Traps for Ice Particle Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany. Water, with the characteristic angular structure...GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Max-Planck-Strabetae 1, D-21502 Geesthacht, Germany. *To whom correspondence should be addressed...

S. Bauerecker; B. Neidhart

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

293

An approach for assessing engineering risk from shale gas wells in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In response to a series of energy crises in the 1970s, the United States government began investigating the potential of unconventional, domestic sources of energy to offset imported oil. Hydraulic fracturing applied to vertical tight sand and coal bed methane wells achieved some degree of success during a period of high energy prices in the early 1980s, but shale gas remained largely untapped until the late 1990s with the application of directional drilling, a mature technology adapted from deepwater offshore platforms that allowed horizontal wells to penetrate kilometers of organic-rich shale, and staged hydraulic fracturing, which created high permeability flowpaths from the horizontal wells into a much greater volume of the target formations than previous completion methods. These new engineering techniques opened up vast unconventional natural gas and oil reserves, but also raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. These include short-term and long-term impacts to air and water quality from rig operations, potential migration of gas, fluids and chemicals through the ground, and effects on small watersheds and landscapes from roads, pads and other surface structures. Engineering risk assessment commonly uses integrated assessment models (IAMs), which define sources of risk from features, events and processes. The risk from each system element is assessed using high-fidelity models. Output from these is simplified into reduced-order models, so that a large, integrated site performance assessment can be run using the IAM. The technique has been applied to engineered systems in geologic settings for sequestering carbon dioxide, and it is also applicable to shale gas, albeit with some modifications of the various system elements. Preliminary findings indicate that shale gas well drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques are generally safe when properly applied. Incident reports recorded by state environmental agencies suggest that human error resulting from the disregard of prescribed practices is the greatest cause of environmental incidents. This can only be addressed through education, regulations and enforcement.

Daniel J. Soeder; Shikha Sharma; Natalie Pekney; Leslie Hopkinson; Robert Dilmore; Barbara Kutchko; Brian Stewart; Kimberly Carter; Alexandra Hakala; Rosemary Capo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11, 2002 11, 2002 On Friday, spot gas traded at the Henry Hub for $2.20 per MMBtu, marking no change from the price on the previous Friday. Last week spot prices at the Henry Hub traded within a tight range of $2.14-$2.20 per MMBtu. Temperatures in much of the country returned to above normal in the second half of the week and the National Weather Service's (NWS) latest 6-to 10-day forecast called for this pattern to continue through the weekend and all of this week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) This dominant pattern of above normal temperatures has resulted in heating degree days thus far this winter that are 16 percent lower than normal. At the NYMEX, the settlement price for the March contract ended the week up almost 5 cents at $2.191 per MMBtu. Natural gas stocks remained well above last year's level as estimated net withdrawals were 82 Bcf during the last week of January. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 15 cents last week and ended Friday trading at $20.25 per barrel or $3.49 per MMBtu.

295

Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources  

SciTech Connect

A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

Gogolak, C.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

297

Application of the Continuous EUR Method to Estimate Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoirs 19. Cheng et al. (2007) Decline Curve Analysis for Multilayered Tight Gas Reservoirs 20. Blasingame and Rushing Method for Gas-in-Place and Reserves Estimation (2005) 21. Clarkson et al. (2007) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane... Wells 22. Clarkson et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 23. Rushing et al. (2008) Production Data Analysis for Coalbed-Methane Wells 24. Lewis and Hughes (2008) Production Data Analysis for Shale Gas Wells 25. Mattar et al...

Currie, Stephanie M.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

299

Utility Formation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amounts See detailed discussion of these standards. For more information regarding tribal utility formation, contact the Power Service Line Account Executives: Eastern Power...

300

Acta Technica 56 (2011), T113T122 c 2011 Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v.v.i. Features of plasma focus formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plasma focus formation in different operation modes of gas-discharge magnetoplasma compressor Anna

Harilal, S. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Dangling Bond Defects in a-Si,Ge Alloys: A Theoretical Study Using the Tight-Binding Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical study of Si and Ge atom dangling bond defects in a-Si,Ge alloys. We use a tight-binding Hamiltonian, and a structural model based on a cluster Bethe Lattice. The central clust...

S. Y. Lin; G. Lucovsky

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced hot gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation, high temperature gas flow... to describe the observed effects of particle size and porosity. Of central importance is the formation of hot... spots and the chemical...

303

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation in a variable volume bed of silica sandamount of sand, gas, and water. Although methane hydrate has

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tight bound on coherent-state-based entanglement generation over lossy channels  

SciTech Connect

The first stage of the hybrid quantum repeaters is entanglement generation based on transmission of pulses in coherent states over a lossy channel. Protocols to make entanglement with only one type of error are favorable for rendering subsequent entanglement distillation efficient. Here we provide the tight upper bound on performances of these protocols that is determined only by the channel loss. In addition, we show that this bound is achievable by utilizing a proposed protocol [K. Azuma, N. Sota, R. Namiki, S. K. Oezdemir, T. Yamamoto, M. Koashi, and N. Imoto, Phys. Rev. A 80, 060303(R) (2009)] composed of a simple combination of linear optical elements and photon-number-resolving detectors.

Azuma, Koji; Sota, Naoya; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Materials Physics, Department of Materials Engineering Science, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tight bounds on the size of neural networks for classification problems  

SciTech Connect

This paper relies on the entropy of a data-set (i.e., number-of-bits) to prove tight bounds on the size of neural networks solving a classification problem. First, based on a sequence of geometrical steps, the authors constructively compute an upper bound of O(mn) on the number-of-bits for a given data-set - here m is the number of examples and n is the number of dimensions (i.e., R{sup n}). This result is used further in a nonconstructive way to bound the size of neural networks which correctly classify that data-set.

Beiu, V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pauw, T. de [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Dept. de Mathematique

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

308

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices Prices 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

309

Experimental investigation of geomechanical aspects of hydraulic fracturing unconventional formations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Understanding the mechanisms that govern hydraulic fracturing applications in unconventional formations, such as gas-bearing shales, is of increasing interest to the petroleum upstream industry. Among (more)

Alabbad, Emad Abbad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tight-binding study of the electronic structure of amorphous silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have performed tight-binding calculations on a model of an amorphous silicon sample generated previously by a molecular-dynamics simulation employing the Stillinger-Weber potential. The sample consists of 588 atoms and contains a high density of floating-bond defects. Two tight-binding calculations are presented, one using the widely accepted Chadi parameters, which include only nearest-neighbor interactions, and the other using the parameters recently proposed by Allen, Broughton, and McMahan (ABM) [Phys. Rev. B 34, 859 (1986)] for a nonorthogonal basis set. Comparison of the densities of states shows similar behavior in the valence band, but the electron density near a defect is less localized with the ABM parameters. It is also found that the projected density of states on the fivefold-coordinated atoms is very close to that on the fourfold-coordinated atoms, while the projected density of states on the threefold-coordinated atoms is distinctly different and has more states in the gap.

James L. Mercer; Jr. and M. Y. Chou

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Critical Power Correlation for Axially Uniformly Heated Tight-Lattice Bundles  

SciTech Connect

Critical power experiments were carried out, and the critical power correlation for axially uniformly heated tight bundles has been derived based on the present experimental data and data sets measured by the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. The shape of the test section simulates the fuel assembly of the reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR), which is a water-cooled breeder reactor with a core of the tight triangular fuel rod arrangement. The obtained correlation covers the following conditions: channel geometry (triangular arrangement bundle of 7 to 20 rods, 6.6 to 12.3 mm in rod diameter, 1.0- to 2.3-mm gap between rods, 1.37 to 1.8 m in heated length), mass velocity of 100 to 2500 kg/(m{sup 2}s), inlet quality of -0.2 to 0, pressure of 2 to 8.5 MPa, and radial peaking factor of 0.98 to 1.5, which include uniform, center-peak, and liner transverse heat flux distribution data. An excellent agreement was obtained between the developed correlation and data (371 points) within an error of {+-}4.6%.

Kureta, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Hajime [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

313

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

314

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

315

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

316

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

317

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

318

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

319

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

320

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

322

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

323

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

324

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

325

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

326

Treatment of gas from an in situ conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing methane is described. The method includes providing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ conversion process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. At least the olefins in the first gas stream are contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more catalysts and steam to produce a second gas stream. The second gas stream is contacted with a hydrogen source in the presence of one or more additional catalysts to produce a third gas stream. The third gas stream includes methane.

Diaz, Zaida (Katy, TX); Del Paggio, Alan Anthony (Spring, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Pipeline gas pressure reduction with refrigeration generation  

SciTech Connect

The high pressure of pipeline gas is reduced to the low pressure of a distribution system with simultaneous generation of refrigeration by passing the gas through two successive centrifugal compressors driven by two turbo-expanders in which the compressed gas is expanded to successively lower pressures. Refrigeration is recovered from the gas as it leaves each turbo-expander. Methanol is injected into the pipeline gas before it is expanded to prevent ice formation. Aqueous methanol condensate separated from the expanded gas is distilled for the recovery and reuse of methanol.

Markbreiter, S. J.; Schorr, H. P.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

329

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

330

DOE Gas Hydrate R&D: Shale Gas Dj Vu?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

More than 30 years ago, DOE looked into the future and saw the potentially large benefit of developing promising but difficult-to-extract unconventional natural gas resources, particularly those from shale formations. As a result, it began sponsoring research and development (R&D), partnering with industry and academia, and, among other things, invested about $137 million in the Eastern Gas Shale Program between 1978 and 1992.

331

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Exploration & Reserves  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exploration & Reserves Exploration & Reserves 2009 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2008 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 10/29/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2007 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Released, 2/10/2009, PDF, XLS, and HTML formats) 2007 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2006 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2007, PDF and HTML formats) 2006 U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves 2005 Annual Report Categories: Resources & Reserves (Publication, Dec. 2006, PDF and HTML formats) Overview of the Federal Offshore Royalty Relief Program

332

Experiments on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates in Unconsolidated Sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out to observe the formation and decomposition of hydrocarbon gas hydrates in an unconsolidated sand pack 4.4 cm in diameter and ... 43 bars and 5 to 10C; gas used was 90% methane and 10...

P. E. Baker

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Economic analysis of shale gas wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas produced from shale formations has increased dramatically in the past decade and has altered the oil and gas industry greatly. The use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has enabled the production ...

Hammond, Christopher D. (Christopher Daniel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Documented Example of Gas Hydrate Saturated Sand in the Gulfthat observed for gas hydrate-bearing sand sediments in thethan those for the gas hydrate-bearing sand formations in

Boswell, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Shale-Gas Permeability and Diffusivity Inferred by Improved Formulation of Relevant Retention and Transport Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretically improved model incorporating the relevant mechanisms of gas retention and transport in gas-bearing shale formations is presented for determination of intrinsic gas permeability and diffusivity. Th...

Faruk Civan; Chandra S. Rai; Carl H. Sondergeld

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sour gas injection for use with in situ heat treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for providing acidic gas to a subsurface formation is described herein. The method may include providing heat from one or more heaters to a portion of a subsurface formation; producing fluids that include one or more acidic gases from the formation using a heat treatment process. At least a portion of one of the acidic gases may be introduced into the formation, or into another formation, through one or more wellbores at a pressure below a lithostatic pressure of the formation in which the acidic gas is introduced.

Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX)

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

Historical Natural Gas Annual - 1930 Through 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historical Natural Gas Annual Historical Natural Gas Annual 1930 Through 2000 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Historical Natural Gas Annual The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-2000 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-2000. To read reports in PDF format download a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

338

Analytical tools for investigating strong-field QED processes in tightly focused laser fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper is the natural continuation of the letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{113}, 040402 (2014)], where the electron wave functions in the presence of a background electromagnetic field of general space-time structure have been constructed analytically, assuming that the initial energy of the electron is the largest dynamical energy scale in the problem and having in mind the case of a background tightly focused laser beam. Here, we determine the scalar and the spinor propagators under the same approximations, which are useful tools for calculating, e.g., total probabilities of processes occurring in such complex electromagnetic fields. In addition, we also present a simpler and more general expression of the electron wave functions found in [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{113}, 040402 (2014)] and we indicate a substitution rule to obtain them starting from the well-known Volkov wave functions in a plane-wave field.

Di Piazza, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Tight-Binding Modeling and Low-Energy Behavior of the Semi-Dirac Point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a tight-binding model description of semi-Dirac electronic spectra, with highly anisotropic dispersion around point Fermi surfaces, recently discovered in electronic structure calculations of VO2-TiO2 nanoheterostructures. We contrast their spectral properties with the well-known Dirac points on the honeycomb lattice relevant to graphene layers and the spectra of bands touching each other in zero-gap semiconductors. We also consider the lowest order dispersion around one of the semi-Dirac points and calculate the resulting electronic energy levels in an external magnetic field. In spite of apparently similar electronic structures, Dirac and semi-Dirac systems support diverse low-energy physics.

S. Banerjee; R. R. P. Singh; V. Pardo; W. E. Pickett

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Demonstration of a memory for tightly guided light in an optical nanofiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the experimental observation of slow-light and coherent storage in a setting where light is tightly confined in the transverse directions. By interfacing a tapered optical nanofiber with a cold atomic ensemble, electromagnetically induced transparency is observed and light pulses at the single-photon level are stored in and retrieved from the atomic medium with an overall efficiency of (10 +/- 0.5) %. Collapses and revivals can be additionally controlled by an applied magnetic field. Our results based on subdiffraction-limited optical mode interacting with atoms via the strong evanescent field demonstrate an alternative to free-space focusing and a novel capability for information storage in an all-fibered quantum network.

Gouraud, B; Nicolas, A; Morin, O; Laurat, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Tight-binding theory of spin-orbit coupling in graphynes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings (SOC) in graphynes. First, we develop a general method to address spin-orbit couplings within the tight-binding theory. Then, we apply this method to ?-, ?-, and ?-graphyne, and determine the SOC parameters in terms of the microscopic hopping and onsite energies. We find that for ?-graphyne, as in graphene, the intrinsic SOC opens a nontrivial gap, whereas the Rashba SOC splits each Dirac cone into four. In ?- and ?-graphyne, the Rashba SOC can lead to a Lifshitz phase transition, thus transforming the zero-gap semiconductor into a gapped system or vice versa, when pairs of Dirac cones annihilate or emerge. The existence of internal (within the benzene ring) and external SOC in these compounds allows us to explore a myriad of phases not available in graphene.

Guido van Miert; Vladimir Juri?i?; Cristiane Morais Smith

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

345

Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fifteen research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously reducing environmental footprints and risks, have been selected to receive a total of $28 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy.

346

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1999 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1999. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1999. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1999. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

347

Oil and Gas Drilling Bit Tribology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A drilling bit is used in petroleum exploration to drill a wellbore through various layers of rock formations to access oil or natural gas resources. It is engineered...1). A roller cone drill bit is categorized ...

Dr. Chih Lin Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Structure and function of gas vacuoles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...overlying gas phase to atmospheric pressure. Volume...film of surrounding water. From the results...to force liquid water in- side the structure...would also prevent water from accumulating inside by condensation (105). FORMATION...

A E Walsby

1972-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Regularities of the influence of the aerodynamic coupling of blades on the formation of the spectrum of natural vibrations of the rims of turbine wheels of gas-turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of analytic and numerical investigations aimed at the evaluation of the influence of the aerodynamic coupling of blades on the formation of the spectrum of natural vibrations of the rims...

A. P. Zinkovskii; A. V. Poberezhnikov; V. A. Tsimbalyuk

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A new technique to analyze simultaneous sandface flow rate and pressure measurements of gas wells with turbulence and damage  

SciTech Connect

Most of the problems associated with conventional gas well test are related to the nonlinearity of the equations describing real gas flow, the presence of the rate dependent (non-Darcy) skin, and the long shut-in time periods required to collect the data for the analysis in tight reservoirs in which the wellbore storage period can be excessively long. This paper presents a new pressure buildup technique that reduces the wellbore storage effects, eliminates the long shut-in periods experienced with conventional tests by using afterflow rate and pressure data, and most importantly provides a direct method to estimate non-Darcy skin. The proposed technique uses normalized pseudofunctions to avoid the nonlinearities of the governing equations and involves using two different plots. The formation permeability is obtained from the slope of the first plot. The mechanical and non-Darcy skin factors are obtained respectively from the slope and intercept of the second plot. A field example and two simulated cases are presented to illustrate the application of the new technique.

Nashawi, I.S. [Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait); Al-Mehaideb, R.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Oil and Gas Gateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil and Gas Gateway Oil and Gas Gateway Jump to: navigation, search Oil and Gas Companies The oil and gas industry is the largest energy industry in the world, with companies spanning the globe. The map below depicts the top oil companies. Anyone can add another company to this list. Add a new Oil and Gas Company Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

352

Natural and Induced Fracture Diagnostics from 4-D VSP in low Permeability Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Tight gas sand reservoirs generally contain thick gas-charged intervals that often have low porosity and very low permeability. Natural and induced fractures provide the only means of production. The objective of this work is to locate and characterize natural and induced fractures from analysis of scattered waves recorded on 4-D (time lapse) VSP data in order to optimize well placement and well spacing in these gas reservoirs. Using model data simulating the scattering of seismic energy from hydraulic fractures, we first show that it is possible to characterize the quality of fracturing based upon the amount of scattering. In addition, the picked arrival times of recorded microseismic events provide the velocity moveout for isolating the scattered energy on the 4-D VSP data. This concept is applied to a field dataset from the Jonah Field in Wyoming to characterize the quality of the induced hydraulic fractures. The time lapse (4D) VSP data from this field are imaged using a migration algorithm that utilizes shot travel time tables derived from the first breaks of the 3D VSPs and receiver travel time tables based on the microseismic arrival times and a regional velocity model. Four azimuthally varying shot tables are derived from picks of the first breaks of over 200 VSP records. We create images of the fracture planes through two of the hydraulically fractured wells in the field. The scattered energy shows correlation with the locations of the microseismic events. In addition, the azimuthal scattering is different from the azimuthal reflectivity of the reservoir, giving us more confidence that we have separated the scattered signal from simple formation reflectivity. Variation of the scattered energy along the image planes suggests variability in the quality of the fractures in three distinct zones.

Mark Willis; Daniel Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

354

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

355

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

356

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

357

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

358

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

359

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

360

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

362

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

363

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

364

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

365

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

366

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

367

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

369

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

371

Dirac Point and Edge States in a Microwave Realization of Tight-Binding Graphene-like Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dirac Point and Edge States in a Microwave Realization of Tight-Binding Graphene-like Structures U-binding graphene-like structures. The structures are realized using disks with a high index of refraction properties, mechan- ically as electronically. Another realization is graphene, a one-atom-thick allotrope

Boyer, Edmond

372

Abstract--Market and system operations are tightly coupled in the restructured environment. Such coupling requires a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Abstract--Market and system operations are tightly coupled in the restructured environment and the way the power systems are operated. There is a particular need to go beyond the qualitative of electricity markets need not decrease when the system is operated under a stricter criterion. Index Terms

Gross, George

373

Effects of a Supermassive Black Hole Binary on a Nuclear Gas Disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study influence of a galactic central supermassive black hole (SMBH) binary on gas dynamics and star formation activity in a nuclear gas disk by making three-dimensional Tree+SPH simulations. Due to orbital motions of SMBHs, there are various resonances between gas motion and the SMBH binary motion. We have shown that these resonances create some characteristic structures of gas in the nuclear gas disk, for examples, gas elongated or filament structures, formation of gaseous spiral arms, and small gas disks around SMBHs. In these gaseous dense regions, active star formations are induced. As the result, many star burst regions are formed in the nuclear region.

Hidenori Matsui; Asao Habe; Takayuki R. Saitoh

2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

374

Natural Gas Applications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications What's New Publications Applications Survey Forms Sign Up for Email Updates Contact Experts Applications EIA-176 Query System The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer.

375

In situ bioremediation of petroleum in tight soils using hydraulic fracturing  

SciTech Connect

This case study evaluated the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in tight soils. The study area was contaminated with cutting oil from historic releases from underground piping, probably dating back to the 1940`s. Previous site assessment work indicated that the only chemicals of concern were total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Two fracture sets (stacks) were installed at different locations to evaluate this in situ bioremediation technique under passive and active conditions. Several injection wells were drilled at both locations to provide entry for hydraulic fracturing equipment. A series of circular, horizontal fractures 40 to 50 feet in diameter were created at different depths, based on the vertical extent of contamination at the site. The injection wells were screened across the contaminated interval which effectively created underground bioreactors. Soils were sampled and analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbons on five separate occasions over the nine-month study. Initial average soil concentrations of total petroleum hydrocarbons of 5,700 mg/kg were reduced to 475 mg/kg within nine months of hydraulic fracturing. The analytical results indicate an average reduction in TPH at the sample locations of 92 percent over the nine-month study period. This project demonstrates that in situ bioremediation using hydraulic fracturing has significant potential as a treatment technology for petroleum contaminated soils.

Stavnes, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, CO (United States); Yorke, C.A. [Foremost Solutions, Inc., Golden, CO (United States); Thompson, L. [Pintail Systems, Inc., Aurora, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

because of the external radiation exposure but also because of the radon gas emissions, both of which are due to the radioactive minerals contained in the scale. It was believed that the structure of the scale is formed tightly enough to prevent much...

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Natural gas dehydration by desiccant materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water vapor in a natural gas stream can result in line plugging due to hydrate formation, reduction of line capacity due to collection of free water in the line, and increased risk of damage to the pipeline due to the corrosive effects of water. Therefore, water vapor must be removed from natural gas to prevent hydrate formation and corrosion from condensed water. Gas dehydration is the process of removing water vapor from a gas stream to lower the temperature at which water will condense from the stream; this temperature is called the dew point of the gas. Molecular sieves are considered as one of the most important materials that are used as desiccant materials in industrial natural gas dehydration. This work shows a study of natural gas dehydration using 3A molecular sieve as a type of solid desiccant materials, the scope of this work was to build up a pilot scale unit for a natural gas dehydration as simulation of actual existing plant for Egyptian Western Desert Gas Company (WDGC). The effect of different operating conditions (water vapor concentration and gas flow rate) on dehydration of natural gas was studied. The experimental setup consists of cylinder filled with 3A molecular sieve to form a fixed bed, then pass through this bed natural gas with different water vapor concentration, The experimental setup is fitted with facilities to control bed pressure, flow rate, measure water vapor concentration and bed temperature, a gas heater was used to activate molecular sieve bed. Increasing water vapor concentration in inlet feed gas leads to a marked decrease in dehydration efficiency. As expected, a higher inlet flow rate of natural gas decrease dehydration efficiency. Increasing feed pressure leads to higher dehydration efficiency.

Hassan A.A. Farag; Mustafa Mohamed Ezzat; Hoda Amer; Adel William Nashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A tight-binding potential for atomistic simulations of carbon interacting with transition metals: Application to the Ni-C system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for transition metals, carbon, and transition metal carbides, which has been optimized through a systematicA tight-binding potential for atomistic simulations of carbon interacting with transition metals of the transition metal, is used to obtain a transferable tight-binding model of the carbon-carbon, metal-metal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

380

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Lithium bromide chiller technology in gas processing  

SciTech Connect

Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption Chillers have been in use for more than half a century, mainly in the commercial air conditioning industry. The Gas Research Institute and EnMark Natural Gas Company co-funded a field test to determine the viability of this commercial air conditioning technology in the gas industry. In 1991, a 10 MMCFC natural gas conditioning plant was constructed in Sherman, Texas. The plant was designed to use a standard, off-the-shelf chiller from Trane with a modified control scheme to maintain tight operating temperature parameters. The main objective was to obtain a 40 F dewpoint natural gas stream to meet pipeline sales specifications. Various testing performed over the past three years has proven that the chiller can be operated economically and on a continuous basis in an oilfield environment with minimal operation and maintenance costs. This paper will discuss how a LiBr absorption chiller operates, how the conditioning plant performed during testing, and what potential applications are available for LiBr chiller technology.

Huey, M.A.; Leppin, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

384

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Mars, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The fundamental limit on the rate of quantum dynamics: the unified bound is tight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of how fast a quantum state can evolve has attracted a considerable attention in connection with quantum measurement, metrology, and information processing. Since only orthogonal states can be unambiguously distinguished, a transition from a state to an orthogonal one can be taken as the elementary step of a computational process. Therefore, such a transition can be interpreted as the operation of "flipping a qubit", and the number of orthogonal states visited by the system per unit time can be viewed as the maximum rate of operation. A lower bound on the orthogonalization time, based on the energy spread DeltaE, was found by Mandelstam and Tamm. Another bound, based on the average energy E, was established by Margolus and Levitin. The bounds coincide, and can be exactly attained by certain initial states if DeltaE=E; however, the problem remained open of what the situation is otherwise. Here we consider the unified bound that takes into account both DeltaE and E. We prove that there exist no initial states that saturate the bound if DeltaE is not equal to E. However, the bound remains tight: for any given values of DeltaE and E, there exists a one-parameter family of initial states that can approach the bound arbitrarily close when the parameter approaches its limit value. The relation between the largest energy level, the average energy, and the orthogonalization time is also discussed. These results establish the fundamental quantum limit on the rate of operation of any information-processing system.

Lev B. Levitin; Tommaso Toffoli

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Data Collection and Estimation This presentation to the Oklahoma Independent Petroleum Association gives an overview of the EIA natural gas data collection system, Oklahoma natural gas statistics, recent changes in monthly natural gas production statistics, and the May 2010 short-term natural gas forecast. The presentation focuses on the EIA-914, the "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report," and recent changes to this survey's estimation methodology. Categories: Production (Released, 6/9/2010, ppt format)

388

Chapter six - Dehydration of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter describes the dehydration process of natural gas. Dehydration is the process by which water is removed from natural gas. This is a common method used for preventing hydrate formation. If there is no water present, it is impossible for a hydrate to form. If there is only a small amount of water present, the formation of hydrate is less likely. There are other reasons for dehydrating natural gas. The removal of water vapor reduces the risk of corrosion in transmission lines. Furthermore, dehydration improves the efficiency of pipelines by reducing the amount of liquid accumulating in the linesor even eliminates it completely. There are several methods of dehydrating natural gas. The most common are: glycol dehydration (liquid desiccant), molecular sieves (solid adsorbent), and refrigeration. In glycol dehydration process, the wet gas is contacted with a lean solvent (containing only a small amount of water). The water in the gas is absorbed by the lean solvent, producing a rich solvent stream (one containing more water) and a dry gas. In mole sieves, water in the gas adheres to the solid phase, the solid being the mole sieve, and thus is removed from the natural gas. The usual purpose of a refrigeration plant is to remove heavy hydrocarbons from a natural gas streamto make hydrocarbon dew point specification. However, this process also removes water.

John J. Carroll

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

390

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

391

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

392

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

393

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

394

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

395

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

396

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

397

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

398

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

399

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

400

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

402

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

403

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

404

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

405

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target  

SciTech Connect

Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Niello, J. O. Fernandez [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, C1033AAJ Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad de San Martin, B1650BWA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, B1650KNA San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Gragoata, Niteroi, R. J., 24210-340 (Brazil)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chapter 6 - Dehydration of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter reviews several methods used for dehydrating natural gas. Dehydration is the process by which water is removed from natural gas. This is a common method used for preventing hydrate formation. There are other reasons for dehydrating natural gas. Removing water vapor reduces the risk of corrosion in transmission lines. Furthermore, dehydration improves the efficiency of pipelines by reducing the amount of liquid accumulating in the linesor even eliminates it completely. There are several methods of dehydrating natural gas. The most common of these are: glycol dehydration (liquid desiccant), molecular sieves (solid adsorbent), and refrigeration. The most common method for dehydration in the natural gas industry is the use of a liquid desiccant contactor-regeneration process. In this process, the wet gas is contacted with a lean solvent. The lean solvent, producing a rich solvent stream and a dry gas, absorbs the water in the gas. Unlike glycol dehydration, which is an absorption process, dehydration with molecular sieves is an adsorption process. Water in the gas adheres to the solid phase (the solid being the mole sieve), and thus is removed from the natural gas. Molecular sieves are usually used when very dry gas is required. The usual purpose of a refrigeration plant is to remove heavy hydrocarbons from a natural gas streamto make hydrocarbon dewpoint specificationbut this process also removes water.

John J. Carroll

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Isotope Evidence for Ozone Formation on Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remarkably, the gas-phase recombination or association reaction of ozone has an unusually large (?10%) isotope effect and shows almost equal enrichments of the ozone molecules containing two different oxygen isotopes. ... For a better understanding of the pressure and temperature dependence of ozone isotopic composition in oxygen discharges, we developed a relatively simple isotope kinetic model that accounts for the processes of (i) heterogeneous ozone formation at the reactor walls, (ii) isotope exchange of oxygen atoms with O2 molecules, and (iii) ozone formation in the gas phase. ...

Christof Janssen; Bla Tuzson

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

A generalized lattice Boltzmann model for flow through tight porous media with Klinkenberg's effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas slippage occurs when the mean free path of the gas molecules is in the order of the characteristic pore size of a porous medium. This phenomenon leads to the Klinkenberg's effect where the measured permeability of a gas (apparent permeability) is higher than that of the liquid (intrinsic permeability). A generalized lattice Boltzmann model is proposed for flow through porous media that includes Klinkenberg's effect, which is based on the model of Guo et al. (Z.L. Guo et al., Phys.Rev.E 65, 046308 (2002)). The second-order Beskok and Karniadakis-Civan's correlation (A. Beskok and G. Karniadakis, Microscale Thermophysical Engineering 3, 43-47 (1999), F. Civan, Transp Porous Med 82, 375-384 (2010)) is adopted to calculate the apparent permeability based on intrinsic permeability and Knudsen number. Fluid flow between two parallel plates filled with porous media is simulated to validate model. Simulations performed in a heterogeneous porous medium with components of different porosity and permeability indicat...

Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Viswanathan, Hari S; Tao, Wen-Quan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile liquid hydrocarbon characterization of underwater hydrocarbon vents and formation waters from offshore production operations ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ... The environmental implications of offshore oil and gas activities ...

Theodor C. Sauer

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

415

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

417

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Imports/Exports & Pipelines  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports/Exports & Pipelines Imports/Exports & Pipelines 2010 U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format) Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format)

418

Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Galaxy Ecosystems: gas contents, inflows and outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a set of observational data for galaxy cold gas mass fraction and gas phase metallicity to constrain the content, inflow and outflow of gas in central galaxies hosted by halos with masses between $10^{11} M_{\\odot}$ to $10^{12} M_{\\odot}$. The gas contents in high redshift galaxies are obtained by combining the empirical star formation histories of Lu et al. (2014) and star formation models that relate star formation rate with the cold gas mass in galaxies. We find that the total baryon mass in low-mass galaxies is always much less than the universal baryon mass fraction since $z = 2$, regardless of star formation model adopted. The data for the evolution of the gas phase metallicity require net metal outflow at $z\\lesssim 2$, and the metal loading factor is constrained to be about $0.01$, or about $60\\%$ of the metal yield. Based on the assumption that galactic outflow is more enriched in metal than both the interstellar medium and the material ejected at earlier epochs, we are able to put stringent c...

Lu, Zhankui; Lu, Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Determination of tetrahydrothiophene formation as a probe of in vitro busulfan metabolism by human glutathione S-transferase A1-1: use of a highly sensitive gas chromatographicmass spectrometric method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for the sensitive determination of tetrahydrothiophene (THT) in cytosolic incubation mixtures was developed. Busulfan conjugation with glutathione was predominantly catalysed by glutathione S-transferase A1-1 (GST A1-1) and THT was released from the primary metabolite by alkalization. After liquidliquid extraction using n-pentane separation and quantification of the product was performed by gas chromatography with a mass-selective detector. The method showed good sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility with a detection limit of 2 ngml?1 and a limit of quantification of 5 ngml?1. The suitability of the method is shown for enzyme kinetic studies in human liver cytosol as well as for determination of GST A1-1 activity.

Christoph A. Ritter; Frank Bohnenstengel; Ute Hofmann; Heyo K. Kroemer; Bernhard Sperker

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide in tight formations. Benefits Production of natural gas from hydraulically-fractured shales surrounding horizontal wells is a relatively recent and...

423

Sensitivity of seismic reflections to variations in anisotropy in the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Upper DevonianLower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is estimated to have significant amount of technically recoverable oil and gas. The objective of (more)

Ye, Fang, geophysicist.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. Representation of common equipment at a natural gas hydraulic fracturing drill pad. How is Shale Gas Produced? Shale gas formations are "unconventional" reservoirs - i.e., reservoirs of low "permeability." Permeability refers to the capacity of a porous, sediment, soil - or rock in this case - to transmit a fluid. This contrasts with a "conventional" gas reservoir produced from sands and carbonates (such as limestone). The bottom line is that in a conventional reservoir, the gas is in interconnected pore spaces, much like a kitchen sponge, that allow easier flow to a well; but in an unconventional reservoir, like shale, the reservoir must be mechanically "stimulated" to

425

STEO September 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

natural gas production at record high, inventories most natural gas production at record high, inventories most ever at start of heating season on Nov. 1 U.S. marketed natural gas production is expected to rise by 2.6 billion cubic feet per day this year to a record 68.9 billion cubic feet per day, said the U.S. Energy Information Administration in its new monthly short-term energy outlook for September. EIA analyst Katherine Teller explains: "This strong growth in production was driven in large part by production in Pennsylvania's Marcellus shale formation where drilling companies are using hydraulic fracturing to free the trapped gas." The increase in production, along with the large natural gas inventories left over from last winter because of warmer temperatures, will push U.S. gas inventories to a record high of nearly

426

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

428

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce...

Mohamed, Ibrahim Mohamed 1984-

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important method used to enhance the recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs, especially for low permeability formations. The distribution of pressure in fractures and fracture geometry are needed to design conventional...

Xiang, Jing

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Natural Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

432

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

433

A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI  

SciTech Connect

(OAK/B204) A proliferation resistant hexagonal tight lattice BWR fueled core for increased burnup and reduced fuel storage requirements. Annual progress report: August, 1999 to July, 2000 [DOE NERI

Hiroshi Takahashi; Upendra Rohatgi; T.J. Downar

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

Barnett Shale Municipal Oil and Gas Ordinance Dynamics: A Spatial Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the recent optimization of horizontal drilling, has substantially increased United States oil and gas production. Hydrocarbon firms perfected and use hydraulic fracturing on the Barnett Shale in North Texas; due to the nature of the formation, gas companies...

Murphy, Trey Daniel-Aaron

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

435

The damped natural oscillations of a gas flowing past a cascade of flat plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We solve the problem of the natural oscillations of a gas flowing past a cascade of flat plates under the Joukowsky-Chaplygin ... case part of the energy of the oscillating gas is consumed in the formation of a ....

V. B. Kurzin

436

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

437

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. The efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 10^5 m(H2)/cc. Star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium.

Bruce G. Elmegreen

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

438

Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

Mahajan, Devinder (Selden, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Galaxy Formation, Bars and QSOs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model that accounts for the brief flaring of QSOs in the early stages of galaxy formation is proposed. I argue that a bar must develop early in the life of nearly every galaxy and that gas to create and fuel the QSO is driven into the center of the galaxy by the bar. The QSO lifetime, and the mass of its central engine, are also controlled by large-scale dynamics, since the fuel supply is shut off after a short period by the development of an inner Lindblad resonance. This resonance causes the gas inflow along the bar to stall at a distance of a few hundred parsecs from the center. The ILR develops as a result of previous inflow, making quasar activity self-limiting. The bars are weakened and can be destroyed by the central mass concentration formed in this way.

J. A. Sellwood

1999-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tight gas formations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

442

The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation  

SciTech Connect

The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

ZACH, J.J.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Multi-Phase Galaxy Formation and Quasar Absorption Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central problem of galaxy formation is understanding the cooling and condensation of gas in dark matter halos. It is now clear that to match observations this requires further physics than the simple assumptions of single phase gas cooling. A model of multi-phase cooling (Maller & Bullock 2004) can successfully account for the upper cutoff in the masses of galaxies and provides a natural explanation of many types of absorption systems (Mo & Miralda-Escude 1996). Absorption systems are our best probes of the gaseous content of galaxy halos and therefore provide important constraints on models for gas cooling into galaxies. All physical processes that effect gas cooling redistribute gas and therefore are detectable in absorption systems. Detailed studies of the nature of gas in galaxy halos using absorption systems are crucial for building a correct theory of galaxy formation.

Ariyeh H. Maller

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

444

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma DE-FC26-00NT15125 Project Goal The Hunton formation in Oklahoma has some unique production characteristics, including large water production, initially decreasing gas-oil ratios, and excellent dynamic continuity—but poor geological continuity. The overall goal of the project is to understand the mechanism of gas and oil production from the Hunton Formation in Oklahoma so that similar reservoirs in other areas can be efficiently exploited. An additional goal is to develop methodologies to improve oil recovery using secondary recovery techniques. Performers University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK Marjo Operating Company, Tulsa, OK University of Houston, Houston, TX Orca Exploration, Tulsa, OK

445

ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions  

SciTech Connect

Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

ARPA-E: Creating Practical, Affordable Natural Gas Storage Solutions  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Allowing people to refuel natural gas vehicles at home could revolutionize the way we power our cars and trucks. Currently, our nation faces two challenges in enabling natural gas for transportation. The first is improving the way gas tanks are built for natural gas vehicles; they need to be conformable, allowing them to fit tightly into the vehicle. The second challenge is improving the way those tanks are refueled while maintaining cost-effectiveness, safety, and reliability. This video highlights two ARPA-E project teams with innovative solutions to these challenges. REL is addressing the first challenge by developing a low-cost, conformable natural gas tank with an interconnected core structure. Oregon State University and OnBoard Dynamics are addressing the second challenge by developing a self-refueling natural gas vehicle that integrates a compressor into its engine-using one of the engine's cylinders to compress gas eliminates the need for an expensive at-home refueling system. These two distinct technologies from ARPA-E's MOVE program illustrate how the Agency takes a multi-pronged approach to problem solving and innovation.

Boysen, Dane; Loukus, Josh; Hansen, Rita

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

447

INTERPRETATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING PRESSURE IN LOW-PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic fracturing has been used in most oil and gas wells to increase production by creating fractures that extend from the wellbore into the formation. (more)

Kim, Gun Ho

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010....

449

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Natural Gas Annual, 1999 (HISTORICAL)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 The Natural Gas Annual, 1999 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1999. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1995 to 1999. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1999 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1999, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1995-1999 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

451

Secondary recovery from a stromatoporoid buildup: Devonian Duperow Formation, Ridgelawn field, Montana  

SciTech Connect

Ridgelawn field is located in Richland County, Montana, in the western part of the Williston basin. It is a multiple-pay field, with production from ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian carbonates. Discovered in 1980, the field was recently unitized in the Devonian Duperow Formation for purposes of secondary recovery by waterflood. In this part of the Williston, the Duperow consists of a repetitive succession of shoaling-upward carbonate cycles, each deposited under increasingly restricted conditions on a shallow marine shelf. Production at Ridgelaw occurs from dolomites within one of these cycles, cycle IIIa. Three separate, laterally continuous porosity zones (here termed a, b, and c, from lowest to highest) are recognized and mapped individually in the field. The reservoir has a lensoidal geometry; porous dolomite thins and grades laterally into tight carbonate. The Duperow pool at Ridgelawn is a solution gas drive reservoir. Computer log analysis of the Duperow pay interval indicates an average true porosity of 11.8% and an average initial water saturation of 17.7%. Net pay, defined as greater than 5% crossplot porosity, averages 16.6 ft across the field. Petrographic analysis and log calibration suggests that different facies in each of the three porosity zones were preferentially dolomitized to create reservoir-quality rock; each is now a sucrosic dolomite with intercrystalline porosity. Porosity can be occluded (most often in the upper two zones b and c) by both calcite and anhydrite cements. The lowermost zone, a, is related to a stromatoporoid/coralline bank, and has excellent but highly variable porosity and permeability. The two upper zones, b and c, are more finely crystalline dolomite and represent shallower water depositional facies. Maps for each zone, including porosity, porosity-feet, net pay, and water saturation were constructed and used for equity determination in the unit.

Little, L.D. (Conoco Inc., Casper, WY (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Process Design and Integration of Shale Gas to Methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent breakthroughs in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technology have made huge reservoirs of previously untapped shale gas and shale oil formations available for use. These new resources have already made a significant impact...

Ehlinger, Victoria M.

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

From haloes to Galaxies I. The dynamics of the gas regulator model and the implied cosmic sSFR history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......formation and metal production. The formation of...regulated by the mass of gas reservoir through...the change of the gas mass of the galaxy...by 2.1.5 Metal production There are two sources...mathematically, but at the cost of unrealistically...mass-loading factor or high gas fraction (100-per-cent......

Ying-jie Peng; Roberto Maiolino

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Beyond the Gas Phase: Towards Modeling Bulk Ionic Liquids with a Comparison of Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB) to Density Functional Theory (DFT).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal-fired power plants are a leading contributor to the increase in CO2 released into the atmosphere. Alkanolamines are considered a potential solvent to capture this (more)

Danser, Mandelle Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The density profiles of hot galactic halo gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended gas haloes around galaxies are a ubiquitous prediction of galaxy formation scenarios. However, the density profiles of this hot halo gas is virtually unknown, although various profiles have been suggested on theoretical grounds. In order to quantitatively address the gas profile, we compare galaxies from direct cosmological simulations with analytical solutions of the underlying gas equations. We find remarkable agreement between simulations and theoretical predictions. We present an expression for this gas profile with a non-trivial dependence on the total mass profile. This expression is useful when setting up equilibrium galaxy models for numerical experiments.

Steen H. Hansen; Jesper Sommer-Larsen

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

457

Translating Lessons Learned From Unconventional Natural Gas R&D To  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The gloomy, almost crisis-like outlook for the future of domestic natural gas in the late 1970s set in motion a set of national-level energy initiatives for adding new gas supplies. Two of the most valuable of these were: (1) the joint government/industry R&D programs in tight gas, gas shales and coalbed methane by the Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) that established the essential exploration and production technology for these resources; and, (2) the unconventional gas economic incentives (Section 29 tax credits) that buffered the economic risks faced by the early set of unconventional gas developers and helped attract scarce investment capital to this emerging resource. Now, twenty years later, unconventional gas offers one of the impressive technology success stories. A poorly understood, high cost energy resource is now providing major volumes of annual gas supplies and helping meet the growing domestic demand for natural gas. Unconventional natural gas provided 4,500 Bcf of supply in 1999, up threefold from about 1,600 Bcf twenty years ago. Proved reserves of unconventional gas are 53 Tcf, up from less than 20 Tcf when the R&D and incentive programs started.

Geologic Sequestration Technology; Vello A. Kuuskraa; Hugh D. Guthrie

458

The impact of diffusion type on multiscale discrete fracture model numerical simulation for shale gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of unconventional gas reservoirs represents totally distinctive characteristics as compared with the conventional reservoirs. The complex pore structure in shale reservoir determines its special flow mechanism, which can be divided into several categories according to the size and type of pores- non Darcy flow, gas slippage, adsorption-desorption and gas diffusion effect. Based on the gas molecules diffusion form in porous media and combining with the multi-scale distribution structural characteristics of shale gas reservoirs, the shale gas diffusion mechanisms in the shale reservoir space including the diffusion of dissolved gases in the organic kerogen and the diffusion of free gas in the nanopores are analyzed in this paper. Meanwhile, the diffusion in the nanopores consists of Knudsen diffusion (KN?10), Fick diffusion (KN?0.1) and transition diffusion (0.1shale gas flow in matrix and fracture networks, and also for their mass transfer in between without neglecting its varying-scale nature following the concept of discrete fracture network (DFN). In addition, we also investigate the different diffusion mechanisms' influences on the production and pressure in the tight shale gas reservoir. Ultimately, concluding that the gas diffusion mechanisms in micro-and nano-scale matrix block have a greater impact on the distribution of shale gas production (especially the production at early time) and reservoir pressure.

Lidong Mi; Hanqiao Jiang; Junjian Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Star Formation History of NGC 6822  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Images of five fields in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822 obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} in the F555W and F814W filters are presented. Photometry for the stars in these images was extracted using the Point-Spread-Function fitting program HSTPHOT/MULTIPHOT. The resulting color-magnitude diagrams reach down to $V\\approx26$, a level well below the red clump, and were used to solve quantitatively for the star formation history of NGC 6822. Assuming that stars began forming in this galaxy from low-metallicity gas and that there is little variation in the metallicity at each age, the distribution of stars along the red giant branch is best fit with star formation beginning in NGC 6822 12-15 Gyr ago. The best-fitting star formation histories for the old and intermediate age stars are similar among the five fields and show a constant or somewhat increasing star formation rate from 15 Gyr ago to the present except for a possible dip in the star formation rate from 3 to 5 Gyr ago. The main differences among the five fields are in the higher overall star formation rate per area in the bar fields as well as in the ratio of the recent star formation rate to the average past rate. These variations in the recent star formation rate imply that stars formed within the past 0.6 Gyr are not spatially very well mixed throughout the galaxy.

Ted K. Wyder

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Identification of the Sequence of Steps Intrinsic to Spheromak Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A planar coaxial electrostatic helicity source is used for studying the relaxation process intrinsic to spheromak formation Experimental observations reveal that spheromak formation involves: (1) breakdown and creation of a number of distinct arched filamentary plasma?filled flux loops that span from cathode to anode gas nozzles (2) merging of these loops to form a central column (3) jet?like expansion of the central column (4) kink instability of the central column (5) conversion of toroidal flux to poloidal flux by the kink instability. Steps 1 and 3 indicate that spheromak formation involves an MHD pumping of plasma from the gas nozzles into the magnetic flux tube linking the nozzles. In order to measure this pumping the gas puffing system has been modified to permit simultaneous injection of different gas species into the two ends of the flux tube linking the wall. Gated CCD cameras with narrow?band optical filters are used to track the pumped flows.

P. M. Bellan; S. You; G. S. Yun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Analysis of Seven NEPTUN-III (Tight-Lattice) Bottom-Flooding Experiments with RELAP5/MOD3.3/BETA  

SciTech Connect

Seven tight-lattice NEPTUN-III bottom-flooding experiments are analyzed by using the frozen version of RELAP5, RELAP5/MOD3.3/BETA. This work is part of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) contribution to the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) European Union project and aims at assessing the capabilities of the code to model the reflooding phenomena in a tight hexagonal lattice (which was one of the core geometries considered at the time for an HPLWR) following a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident scenario. Even though the latest version of the code has as a default the new PSI reflood model developed by the author, which was tested and assessed against reflooding data obtained at standard light water reactor lattices, this work shows that for tight lattices, the code underpredicts the peak clad temperatures measured during a series of reflooding experiments performed at the NEPTUN-III tight-lattice heater rod bundle facility. The reasons for these differences are discussed, and the (possible) changes needed in the framework of RELAP5/MOD3.3 for improving the modeling of reflooding in tight lattices are investigated.

Analytis, G.Th. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

463

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

464

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

465

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

466

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

467

THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the