National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tiger salamander ambystoma

  1. Effects of copper exposure on hatching success and early larval survival in marbled salamanders, Ambystoma opacum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COPPER EXPOSURE ON HATCHING SUCCESS AND EARLY LARVAL SURVIVAL IN MARBLED SALAMANDERS, AMBYSTOMA OPACUM DIANA L. SOTEROPOULOS, STACEY L. LANCE, R. WESLEY FLYNN, and DAVID E. SCOTT* Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, South Carolina, USA (Submitted 4 October 2013; Returned for Revision 24 November 2013; Accepted 27 March 2014) Abstract: The creation of wetlands, such as urban and industrial ponds, has increased in recent decades, and these wetlands often become

  2. Conservation assessment for the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander in northern California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinikour, W. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Adduci, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-10-20

    The purpose of this conservation assessment is to summarize existing knowledge regarding the biology and ecology of the Siskiyou Mountains salamander and Scott Bar salamander, identify threats to the two species, and identify conservation considerations to aid federal management for persistence of the species. The conservation assessment will serve as the basis for a conservation strategy for the species.

  3. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  4. BioTiger - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search BioTiger (Biological Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Extraction) Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology BioTiger<sup>TM </sup>Microbes BioTigerTM Microbes <p>Tar Sands</p> Tar Sands Technology Marketing SummaryScientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have discovered a new environmental biocatalyst for

  5. Tiger Energy Services Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tiger Energy Services Inc. Place: Signal Hill, California Zip: 90755 Sector: Geothermal energy, Services Product: US-based...

  6. Tiger Team assessment of the Pinellas Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This Document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Pinellas Plant, Pinellas County, Florida. The assessment wa directed by the Department's Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) from January 15 to February 2, 1990. The Pinellas Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environment Safety and Health, and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable Federal (including DOE), State, and local regulations and requirements.

  7. Tiger Teams Provide Coalitions Technical and Market Assistance. Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Information Series, Tiger Teams Technical Assistance Fact Sheet.

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Clean Cities Technical Assistance Teams (Tiger Teams) were formed in 2001 to work directly with Clean Cities coordinators, stakeholders, and partners to tackle difficult technical and market challenges that might otherwise stall alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) implementation projects. The Tiger Team project, managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide technical expertise to the 80 Clean Cities coalitions operating

  8. Tiger Team Assessment of the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report documents the Tiger Assessment of the Ames Laboratory (Ames), located in Ames, Iowa. Ames is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Iowa State University. The assessment was conducted from February 10 to March 5, 1992, under the auspices of the Office of Special Projects, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Environment, Safety and Health, Headquarters, DOE. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) disciplines; management practices; and contractor and DOE self-assessments. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of Iowa, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal requirements at Ames Laboratory were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and the site contractor's management of ES H/quality assurance program was conducted.

  9. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  10. Plethodontid salamander mitochondrial genomics: A parsimonyevaluation of character conflict and implications for historicalbiogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert

    2005-01-19

    A new parsimony analysis of 27 complete mitochondrial genomic sequences is conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of plethodontid salamanders. This analysis focuses on the amount of character conflict between phylogenetic trees recovered from newly conducted parsimony searches and the Bayesian and maximum likelihood topology reported by Mueller et al. (2004, PNAS, 101, 13820-13825). Strong support for Hemidactylium as the sister taxon to all other plethodontids is recovered from parsimony analyses. Plotting area relationships on the most parsimonious phylogenetic tree suggests that eastern North America is the origin of the family Plethodontidae supporting the ''Out of Appalachia'' hypothesis. A new taxonomy that recognizes clades recovered from phylogenetic analyses is proposed.

  11. Tiger Teams Assist Coalitions with AFV Challenges: Clean Cities Technical Assistance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    Fact sheet describes alternative fuel technical activities performed by Clean Cities Technical Assistance Teams (Tiger Teams), to be distributed at the 2004 Clean Cities Conference.

  12. Action plan for the Tiger Team assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-30

    This document contains responses and planned actions that address the findings of the Tiger Team Assessment of Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1990. In addition, the document contains descriptions of the management and organizational structure to be used in conducting planned actions, root causes for the problems identified in the findings, responses, planned actions, schedules and milestones for completing planned actions, and, where known, costs associated with planned actions.

  13. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Tiger Team Assessment of the Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This document contains the findings and associated root causes identified during the Tiger Team Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. This assessment was conducted by the Department's Office of Environment, Safety and Health between October 2 and 31, 1989. The scope of the assessment of the Pantex Plant covered all areas of environment, safety and health (ES H) activities, including compliance with federal, state, and local regulations, requirements, permits, agreements, orders and consent decrees, and DOE ES H Orders. The assessment also included an evaluation of the adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs. The draft findings were submitted to the Office of Defense Programs, the Albuquerque Operations Office, the Amarillo Area Office, and regulatory agencies at the conclusion of the on-site assessment activities for review and comment on technical accuracy. Final modifications and any other appropriate changes have been incorporated in the final report. The Tiger Team Assessment of the Pantex Plant is part of the larger Tiger Team Assessment program which will encompass over 100 DOE operating facilities. The assessment program is part of a 10-point initiative announced by Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins on June 27, 1989, to strengthen environmental protection and waste management activities in the Department. The results of the program will provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends.

  15. Morphological homoplasy, life history evolution, and historical biogeography of plethodontid salamanders inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Macey, J. Robert; Jaekel, Martin; Wake, David B.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-08-01

    The evolutionary history of the largest salamander family (Plethodontidae) is characterized by extreme morphological homoplasy. Analysis of the mechanisms generating such homoplasy requires an independent, molecular phylogeny. To this end, we sequenced 24 complete mitochondrial genomes (22 plethodontids and two outgroup taxa), added data for three species from GenBank, and performed partitioned and unpartitioned Bayesian, ML, and MP phylogenetic analyses. We explored four dataset partitioning strategies to account for evolutionary process heterogeneity among genes and codon positions, all of which yielded increased model likelihoods and decreased numbers of supported nodes in the topologies (PP > 0.95) relative to the unpartitioned analysis. Our phylogenetic analyses yielded congruent trees that contrast with the traditional morphology-based taxonomy; the monophyly of three out of four major groups is rejected. Reanalysis of current hypotheses in light of these new evolutionary relationships suggests that (1) a larval life history stage re-evolved from a direct-developing ancestor multiple times, (2) there is no phylogenetic support for the ''Out of Appalachia'' hypothesis of plethodontid origins, and (3) novel scenarios must be reconstructed for the convergent evolution of projectile tongues, reduction in toe number, and specialization for defensive tail loss. Some of these novel scenarios imply morphological transformation series that proceed in the opposite direction than was previously thought. In addition, they suggest surprising evolutionary lability in traits previously interpreted to be conservative.

  16. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-19

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective.

  17. SREL Reprint #3187

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Twelve novel microsatellite markers for the marbled salamander, Ambystoma opacum Schyler O. Nunziata1,2, David E. Scott1, Kenneth L. Jones3, Cris Hagen1, and Stacey L. Lance1...

  18. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  19. Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment Report contains an introduction that describes the three sites in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Kauai, Hawaii, and Tonopah, Nevada, and the activities associated therewith. The self-assessment was performed October 1990 through December 1990. The paper discusses key findings and root causes associated with problem areas; environmental protection assessment with respect to the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the Superfund amendments, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; and other regulatory documents; safety and health assessment with respect to organization administration, quality assurance, maintenance, training, emergency preparedness, nuclear criticality safety, security/safety interface, transportation, radiation protection, occupational safety, and associated regulations; and management practices assessment. 5 figs. (MHB)

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  1. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  2. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  3. Tiger Team Assessment of the Navel Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW). NPOSR-CUW consists of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 located near Casper, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number I and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 3 located near Rifle, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 2 located near Vernal, Utah, which was not examined as part of this assessment. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environment, safety, and health (ES H) and quality assurance (QA) disciplines; site remediation; facilities management; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal NPOSR-CUW requirements was assessed. The NPOSR-CUW Tiger Team Assessment is part of a larger, comprehensive DOE Tiger Team Independent Assessment Program planned for DOE facilities. The objective of the initiative is to provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and contractor ES H management programs, response actions to address the identified problem areas, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends and root causes.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  6. Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Tiger Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf; Bailey, David H.; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Chris; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul D.; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Catherine; Roth, Philip C.; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spear, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeff; Worley, Pat; Wright, Nicholas

    2009-06-26

    The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfill our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

  7. TIGER -- A technology to improve the delivery capability of nuclear bombs and the survivability of the delivery aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-31

    The TIGER (Terminal guided and Extended-Range) Program was initiated in 1972 to study improved delivery capabilities for stockpiled tactical nuclear bombs. The Southeast Asia conflict fostered the development of air-delivered standoff conventional weapons utilizing terminal guidance systems. SNL initiated the TIGER program to determine if current nuclear bombs could be provided with a similarly accurate standoff capabilities. These conventional weapon delivery techniques, while allowing highly accurate attack, generally require entering the target area at high altitude to establish line of sight to the target. In parallel with the TIGER program, system studies analyzed this concept and showed marked improvement in aircraft and weapon survivability with moderate standoff (10--20 km) if low level deliveries (60 m) could be accomplished. As a result of this work, the TIGER program was redirected in early 1974 to demonstrate a standoff bomb with good accuracy (90 m CEP) when delivered from low flying aircraft. This program redirection resulted in the selection of an inertial guidance system to replace the earlier terminal guidance systems. This program was called the Extended-Range Bomb (ERB). In May 1974, a joint Air Force/DOE study identified the desirability of having a single tactical weapon which could be employed against either fixed, preselected targets, or mobile battlefield targets. Studies conducted on the ERB system showed that the inertially guided weapon could fly not only the standoff mission but also a return-to-target mission against the mobile battlefield targets whose locations are not known accurately enough to use a standoff delivery. The ERB program evolved from these initial investigations into an exploratory program to develop the hardware and demonstrate the technology required to fly standoff and return-to-target trajectories. The application of this technology in the form of field retrofit kits to the B61 bomb is called TIGER II.

  8. Clean Cities Technical Assistance Project (Tiger Teams) (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Technical Assistance Project (Tiger Teams) Fleets across the nation have made great progress implementing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and fuel-saving measures into their operations. These efforts have saved billions of gallons of petroleum, and earned fleets recognition as sustainability leaders in the process. Yet as the alternative fuels and advanced vehicles landscape evolves, some fleets may encounter issues along the way. To address these challenges, the U.S. Depart- ment of

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  10. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation Measure 17 iii). The dry sampling (included as an Appendix D) followed the wet season surveys in the summer of 2010.

  11. The Integrated TIGER Series Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-15

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with anmore » input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and intemal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2) multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes, (4) a general purpose geometry engine for linking with CAD or other geometry formats, and (5) the Cholla facet geometry library. Moreover, the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.« less

  12. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  13. Quality assurance in China: a sleeping tiger awakens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baehr, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The People`s Republic of China has undergone major economic reform in the past decade producing a new free-market system that is distinctly Chinese. The Chinese realize that to be successful in world trade, quality management and export trading must be given the highest priority in China`s strategic economic plans. Many manufacturing companies are now implementing Total Quality Management (TQM) and the ISO 9000 i quality management standards. A first hand survey of the quality movement in China today is the objective of this paper.

  14. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  15. MHK Projects/Tiger Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    e":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":"ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN","geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":""...

  16. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  17. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management and organization assessment of environment, safety, and health (ES H) activities performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and onsite contractor personnel. The objectives of the assessment were to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and practices in terms of ensuring environmental compliance and the safety and health of workers and the general public, (2) identify key findings, and (3) identify root causes for all ES H findings and concerns. The scope of the assessment included examinations of the following from an ES H perspective: (1) strategic and program planning; (2) organizational structure and management configuration; (3) human resource management, including training and staffing; (4) management systems, including performance monitoring and assessment; (5) conduct of operations; (6) public and institutional interactions; and (7) corporate'' parent support.

  18. SREL Reprint #3183

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    size, and intra-oral transport time), digestive metabolism (specific dynamic action, SDA), and postprandial locomotor performance of snakes fed Ambystoma and Lepomis. Cost of...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Clean Cities "Tiger Team" Technical and Problem Solving Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Clean...

  20. SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 (SEPTEMBER 2001).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORTORY; PROJECT MANAGER BARBARA COX

    2001-09-27

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) strives for excellence in both its science research and its facility operations. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues through its internationally recognized Environmental Management System (EMS) and award-winning community relations program. The Site Environmental Report 2000 (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the Laboratory site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of BNL's mission. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Earth's Mysteries... Protecting its Future,'' describes how the Laboratory approaches its work, with balance between science and the environment. One of the newest initiatives at the Laboratory, the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve, will permanently preserve 530 acres (212 hectares) of the Long Island Central Pine Barrens, a unique ecosystem of forests and wetlands. The Reserve sets aside 10% of BNL property for conservation and ecological research through a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Reserve provides habitat for approximately 27 endangered, threatened, or species of special concern, including the state-endangered eastern tiger salamander, state-threatened banded sunfish, and swamp darter, along with a number of other species found onsite, such as the wild turkey and red-tailed hawk.

  1. 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

  2. Thunder_IPMI Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-28

    Thunder_Ipmi is a library that gathers sensor information on Intel Tiger2 and Tiger4 motherboards. It gathers sensor information through calls to the libfreeipmi library.

  3. Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of Individual Notch Receptors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The cover, by Gregire Vion of Salamander Design Studios (www.grgwr.com), depicts communication between a ligand-expressing cell (right) stimulating Notch signalling in an...

  4. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  5. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  6. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    including salamanders otters muskrats minks rabbits beavers frogs lizards snakes fish and birds The combination of macro and micro vertebrates invertebrates terrestrial and...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  8. SREL Reprint #3030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salamanders Desmognathus fuscus) by measuring the length of time required until induction, initial recovery, complete recovery, and the entire anesthesia process. SREL...

  9. SREL Reprint #3060

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Habitat selection by southern toads did not vary according to body size, sex, or the environmental cues we measured. However, marbled salamanders were more likely to enter ...

  10. SREL Reprint #3343

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trap characteristics and species morphology explain size-biased sampling of two salamander species Thomas M. Luhring1,2, Grant M. Connette3, Christopher M. Schalk1,4 1Savannah ...

  11. SREL Reprint #3249

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Influence of drought on salamander occupancy of isolated wetlands on the Southeastern Coastal Plain of the United States Susan C. Walls1, William J. Barichivich1, Mary E. Brown2,...

  12. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioTiger TM : Biological Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Extraction Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have discovered a new environmental biocatalyst for improving the recovery of hydrocarbons entrained in sediments utilizing a patent pending consortium of microbes known as BioTiger TM . The action of the BioTiger TM organisms on the oily portions of the sand increases the amount of recoverable bitumen. Tests have shown the microbial activity increases extraction efficiency

  13. Solar Swap Energizes Milwaukee Students | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The DOE's technical assistance Tiger Team supplies Patrick - and his counterpart at BVHS - ... the most out of learning about photovoltaic installation and solar hot water systems. ...

  14. Rabun County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Rabun County, Georgia Clayton, Georgia Dillard, Georgia Mountain City, Georgia Sky Valley, Georgia Tallulah Falls, Georgia Tiger, Georgia Retrieved from "http:...

  15. Breakthrough Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    clean technology innovation to make clean energy cheap and create a new clean energy economy. Recent Reports "Rising Tigers" "Jumpstarting Clean Energy" "Fast, Clean,...

  16. BPA-2011-00384-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damaged due to gunfire, on or around January 2010, in the Tiger Mountain Summit area of King County Washington. Response: BPA has provided a responsive document with the...

  17. BPA-2011-00384-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damaged due to gunfire, on or around January 2010, in the Tiger Mountain Summit area of King County Washington. Response: BPA has provided a responsive document with the...

  18. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated Tiger Series ...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Support The knowledgeable staff brings a broad spectrum of experience in the ... specialized radiation transport and electromagnetic computer codes (Integrated Tiger ...

  20. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  1. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tiger Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Patrick ; Prinja, Anil K. Publication Date: 2013-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1110389 Report Number(s): SAND2013-7609C 473868

  2. Evaluation of Monte Carlo Electron-Transport Algorithms in the Integrated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tiger Series Codes for Stochastic-Media Simulations. (Conference) | SciTech Connect P. ; Prinja, Anil K. Publication Date: 2013-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1114635 Report Number(s): SAND2013-8831C 477016

  3. A I K E N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BioTiger(tm) has been licensed by Opportunities Group, LLC, an Aiken, South Carolina, startup company. Titanium-Based Materials as Bactericides, an SRNL patent that shows promise ...

  4. Environmental Innovation Center Solar Site Evaluation: San José...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This report describes the findings of a solar photovoltaic (PV) site evaluation conducted ... The DOE Tiger Team, including staff from CH2M Hill, Sandia National Labs, and New Mexico ...

  5. Dr.James J.Spivey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Post Doctoral Researcher Dr. Nitin Kumar E-mail: nkumar2@tigers.lsu.edu Ph.D, 2011, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge Current Graduate Students Khietlethanh Mai E-mail:...

  6. BPA-2011-00384-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the tower equipment damaged due to gunfire in the Tiger Mountain Summit area of King County Washington. BPA has claimed a loss of 48017.18 due to damage of this particular...

  7. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Biocatalyst - BioTiger(tm) A novel, surfactant-producing microbial consortia that remediates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals has been isolated from a century-old oil refinery in Poland. The BioTiger(tm) consortium is highly resilient and effective having been isolated from a location with over a century of exposure to extreme environmental conditions, petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and associated solvents. This environmental biocatalyst has

  8. Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of Individual Notch Receptors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of Individual Notch Receptors Print Notch receptors are widely expressed transmembrane proteins through which mammalian cells communicate to regulate cell fate and growth, and defects in Notch signalling are linked to many cancers. Using phage display technology, a multi-department team at Genentech has produced synthetic antibodies that act as potent and specific antagonists of Notch1 and Notch2. The cover, by Gregóire Vion of Salamander Design Studios

  9. Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of Individual Notch Receptors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of Individual Notch Receptors Print Notch receptors are widely expressed transmembrane proteins through which mammalian cells communicate to regulate cell fate and growth, and defects in Notch signalling are linked to many cancers. Using phage display technology, a multi-department team at Genentech has produced synthetic antibodies that act as potent and specific antagonists of Notch1 and Notch2. The cover, by Gregóire Vion of Salamander Design Studios

  10. SREL Reprint #3004

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Three decades of urbanization: Estimating the impact of land-cover change on stream salamander populations Steven J. Price1, Michael E. Dorcas1, Alisa L. Gallant2, Robert W. Klaver2, John D. Willson3 1Department of Biology, Davidson College, Davidson, NC 28035-7118, USA 2USGS Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science, Sioux Falls, SD 57198, USA 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA Abstract: Urbanization has become the dominant form of landscape

  11. SREL Reprint #3127

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Development and characterization of twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci in the threatened Red Hills salamander, Phaeognathus hubrichti Stacey L. Lance1,2, Cris Hagen2, Travis C. Glenn1, Joseph J. Apodaca3, and Leslie J. Rissler3 1Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 3Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA

  12. Guidelines for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-22

    The Guidelines for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs establish objectives and criteria for evaluating nuclear facility training programs. The guidance in this standard provides a framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs at nuclear facilities and is based, in part, on established criteria for Technical Safety Appraisals, Tiger Team Assessments, commercial nuclear industry evaluations, and the DOE Training Accreditation Program.

  13. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Takes 2015 Virginia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab Takes 2015 Virginia Science Bowl Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology Takes 2015 Virginia Science Bowl 2014 Virginia High School Science Bowl The team from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, swept through the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl undefeated on Feb. 7. The team of (back row, left to right) Matthew Barbano, Tiger Zhang and Janice Ong, and (front, l. to r.) Franklyn Wang and Ross Dempsey

  14. DOE-STD-1070-94 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 22, 2014 Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs Reaffirmation July 2014 The Criteria for Evaluation of Nuclear Facility Training Programs establishes objectives and criteria for evaluating nuclear facility training programs. The methodology in this standard provides a framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs at nuclear facilities and is based, in part, on established criteria for Technical Safety Appraisals, Tiger Team Assessments, commercial

  15. Clean Cities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Assistance Project (Tiger Teams) Fleets across the nation have made great progress implementing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and fuel-saving measures into their operations. These efforts have saved billions of gallons of petroleum, and earned fleets recognition as sustainability leaders in the process. Yet as the alternative fuels and advanced vehicles landscape evolves, some fleets may encounter issues along the way. To address these challenges, the U.S. Depart- ment of

  16. Field Test and Evaluation Report Five Photovoltaic Power Systems for the City of Tucson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Members of the DOE solar energy Tiger Team tested five municipally owned, grid connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems for the City of Tucson on March 26 and 27, 2008. The five PV systems tested were Southeast Service Center, Clements Fitness Center, and Thonydale water treatment plant systems 1, 2, and 3. During all tests, skies were virtually cloudless with only occasional, high cirrus present, and none during array testing.

  17. Alternative Fuels Lessons Learned Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Lessons Learned Workshop Alternative Fuels Lessons Learned Workshop Presentation by NREL's Margo Melendez at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon melendez_alt_fuels_lessons.pdf More Documents & Publications Geographically Based Hydrogen Demand and Infrastructure Analysis SANBAG Natural Gas Truck Project Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Clean Cities "Tiger

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual/quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-16

    During 1992 the Department continued planning activities for the expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to one billion barrels. A draft Environmental Impact Statement for the five candidate sites was completed in October 1992, and a series of public hearings was held during December 1992. Conceptual design engineering activities, life cycle cost estimates and geotechnical studies to support the technical requirements for an Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan Amendment were essentially completed in December 1992. At the end of 1992, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oil inventory was 574.7 million barrels and an additional 1.7 million barrels was in transit to the Reserve. During 1992 approximately 6.2 million barrels of crude oil were acquired for the Reserve. A Department of Energy Tiger Team Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Assessment was conducted at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve from March 9 through April 10, 1992. In general, the Tiger Team found that Strategic Petroleum Reserve activities do not pose undue environmental, safety or health risks. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve`s Final Corrective Action Plan, prepared in response to the Tiger Team assessment, was submitted for Department approval in December 1992. On November 18, 1992, the Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy selected DynMcDennott Petroleum Operations Company to provide management and operating services for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve for a period of 5 years commencing April 1, 1993. DynMcDermott will succeed Boeing Petroleum Services, Inc.

  19. ES H action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains planned actions to correct the deficiencies identified in the Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA), January 1991, of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL -- Albuquerque, New Mexico; Tonopah, Nevada; and Kauai, Hawaii). The Self-Assessment was conducted by a Self-Assessment Working Group consisting of 19 department managers, with support from Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) professionals, from October through December 1990. Findings from other past audits, dating back to 1985, were reviewed and compared with the PTTSA findings to determine if additional findings, key findings, or root causes were warranted. The resulting ES H Action Plan and individual planned actions were prepared by the ES H Action Plan Project Group with assistance from the Program owners/authors during February and March 1991. The plan was reviewed by SNL Management in April 1991. This document serves as a planning instrument for the Laboratories to aid in the scoping and sizing of activities related to ES H compliance for the coming five years. It will be modified as required to ensure a workload/funding balance and to address the findings resulting from the Tiger Team assessment at SNL, Albuquerque. The process of producing this document has served well to prepare SNL, Albuquerque, for the coming task of producing the required post-Tiger Team action plan document. 8 tabs.

  20. Fossil vertebrate footprints in the Coconino Sandstone (Permian) of northern Arizona: Evidence for underwater origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.R.; Thu Tang (Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Numerous fossil vertebrate trackways in the Coconino Sandstone of northern Arizona exhibit several features that imply that these trackways were not made in subaerial conditions. Some trackways begin or end abruptly on undisturbed bedding planes, and in other trackways the individual prints are oriented in a different direction from that of the trackway. These features indicate buoyancy of the animals in water. The animals were swimming in the water part of the time and at other times walking on the substrate, and they were sometimes orienting upslope on the surface of the underwater dunes, while being drifted sideways by lateral currents. Observations on salamander locomotion in a sedimentation tank with flowing water support this model.

  1. Showcasing Solar Technologies from San José Companies at the Tech Museum of Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2007, the City of San José won a Solar America Showcase award from the US Department of Energy. This award offers technical assistance to help the City realize its ambitious solar technology deployment goals on large buildings and complexes mainly in the revitalized downtown area. In July 2007, a DOE Tiger Team — led by Cécile Warner of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) — met with numerous city officials to discuss the City’s solar plans in detail and visit the various sites under consideration for solar technology adoption.

  2. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San José Convention Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of San José is considering the installation of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the roof of the San José Convention Center. The installation would be on a lower section of the roof covering approximately 21,000 ft2. To assist city staff in making a decision on the PV installation, the Department of Energy Tiger Team has investigated potential indirect benefits of installing a solar PV system on the Convention Center roof. The indirect benefits include potential increase in roof life, as well as potential reduced heating and cooling load in the building due to roof shading from the PV system.

  3. Impact of Sulfur Dioxide on Lean NOx Trap Catalysts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy In 2008, CH2M HILL performed a solar site analysis of the HP Pavilion facility for the City of San José under the Department of Energy's Solar America Showcase program. Based on weight loading requirements of the facility's roof, CH2M HILL recommended a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) product that consists of thin-film, flexible photovoltaic modules that can be thermally welded to rolls of roofing membrane. The City of San José has requested information from the Tiger Team

  4. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.; Torres, H.M.

    1996-04-01

    In 1991, a DOE ``Tiger Team`` audited the SNL/California Explosives Program and cited Sandia for not being in compliance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual requirements for having an explosives storage review program. At that time, SNL/California did not have a site-wide inventory record of explosives, and no storage review as in place. Sandia corporately owns approximately 1,800,000 lb energetic material, which is located at various sites throughout the country. In 1992, in response to the Tiger Team findings, Sandia formed the Propellants, Explosives, and Pyrotechnics Evaluation and Reapplication Task Force (PEPER) to develop the tools to implement life-cycle management of energetic materials at Sandia. PEPER met the following objectives: (1) create an accurate inventory of all energetic materials owned by Sandia; (2) evaluate the stability of the inventory, and thereby identify and destroy all imminent hazards; (3) draw down the inventory to be consistent with post-Cold War business needs; (4) create a cradle-to-grave ownership process. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment was conducted to document the activities at SNL/California that have involved propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics; and to outline options for minimizing energetic materials and waste at SNL/California.

  5. Modeling the Office of Science Ten Year Facilities Plan: The PERI Architecture Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Supinski, Bronis R.; Alam, Sadaf R; Bailey, David; Carrington, Laura; Daley, Christopher; Dubey, Anshu; Gamblin, Todd; Gunter, Dan; Hovland, Paul; Jagode, Heike; Karavanic, Karen; Marin, Gabriel; Mellor-Crummey, John; Moore, Shirley; Norris, Boyana; Oliker, Leonid; Olschanowsky, Cathy; Roth, Philip C; Schulz, Martin; Shende, Sameer; Snavely, Allan; Spea, Wyatt; Tikir, Mustafa; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Worley, Patrick H; Wright, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Performance Engineering Institute (PERI) originally proposed a tiger team activity as a mechanism to target significant effort optimizing key Office of Science applications, a model that was successfully realized with the assistance of two JOULE metric teams. However, the Office of Science requested a new focus beginning in 2008: assistance in forming its ten year facilities plan. To meet this request, PERI formed the Architecture Tiger Team, which is modeling the performance of key science applications on future architectures, with S3D, FLASH and GTC chosen as the first application targets. In this activity, we have measured the performance of these applications on current systems in order to understand their baseline performance and to ensure that our modeling activity focuses on the right versions and inputs of the applications. We have applied a variety of modeling techniques to anticipate the performance of these applications on a range of anticipated systems. While our initial findings predict that Office of Science applications will continue to perform well on future machines from major hardware vendors, we have also encountered several areas in which we must extend our modeling techniques in order to fulfilll our mission accurately and completely. In addition, we anticipate that models of a wider range of applications will reveal critical differences between expected future systems, thus providing guidance for future Office of Science procurement decisions, and will enable DOE applications to exploit machines in future facilities fully.

  6. Thermochemical plots using JCZS2i piece-wise curve fits.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David L.; Schoof, Justin C.; Hobbs, Michael L.

    2013-10-01

    This report presents plots of specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy for 1439 species in the JCZS2i database. Included in this set of species are 496 condensed-phase species and 943 gas-phase species. The gas phase species contain 80 anions and 112 cations for a total of 192 ions. The JCZS2i database is used in conjunction with the TIGER thermochemical code to predict thermodynamic states from ambient conditions to high temperatures and pressures. Predictions from the TIGER code using the JCZS2i database can be used in shock physics codes where temperatures may be as high as 20,000 K and ions may be present. Such high temperatures were not considered in the original JCZS database, and extrapolations made for these temperatures were unrealistic. For example, specific heat would sometimes go negative at high temperatures which fails the definition of specific heat. The JCZS2i database is a new version of the JCZS database that is being created to address these inaccuracies. The purpose of the current report is to visualize the high temperature extrapolations to insure that the specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy predictions are reasonable up to 20,000 K.

  7. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 64 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the oceanatmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 20102011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  8. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  9. Environment, safety and health compliance assessment, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy established independent Tiger Teams to conduct environment, safety, and health (ES H) compliance assessments at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. This report presents the assessment of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the assessment at FMPC is to provide the Secretary with information regarding current ES H compliance status, specific ES H noncompliance items, evaluation of the adequacy of the ES H organizations and resources (DOE and contractor), and root causes for noncompliance items. Areas reviewed included performance under Federal, state, and local agreements and permits; compliance with Federal, state and DOE orders and requirements; adequacy of operations and other site activities, such as training, procedures, document control, quality assurance, and emergency preparedness; and management and staff, including resources, planning, and interactions with outside agencies.

  10. Resolving the tips of the tree of life: How much mitochondrialdata doe we need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonett, Ronald M.; Macey, J. Robert; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Chippindale, Paul T.

    2005-04-29

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences are used extensively to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among recently diverged animals,and have constituted the most widely used markers for species- and generic-level relationships for the last decade or more. However, most studies to date have employed relatively small portions of the mt-genome. In contrast, complete mt-genomes primarily have been used to investigate deep divergences, including several studies of the amount of mt sequence necessary to recover ancient relationships. We sequenced and analyzed 24 complete mt-genomes from a group of salamander species exhibiting divergences typical of those in many species-level studies. We present the first comprehensive investigation of the amount of mt sequence data necessary to consistently recover the mt-genome tree at this level, using parsimony and Bayesian methods. Both methods of phylogenetic analysis revealed extremely similar results. A surprising number of well supported, yet conflicting, relationships were found in trees based on fragments less than {approx}2000 nucleotides (nt), typical of the vast majority of the thousands of mt-based studies published to date. Large amounts of data (11,500+ nt) were necessary to consistently recover the whole mt-genome tree. Some relationships consistently were recovered with fragments of all sizes, but many nodes required the majority of the mt-genome to stabilize, particularly those associated with short internal branches. Although moderate amounts of data (2000-3000 nt) were adequate to recover mt-based relationships for which most nodes were congruent with the whole mt-genome tree, many thousands of nucleotides were necessary to resolve rapid bursts of evolution. Recent advances in genomics are making collection of large amounts of sequence data highly feasible, and our results provide the basis for comparative studies of other closely related groups to optimize mt sequence sampling and phylogenetic resolution at the ''tips'' of the Tree of Life.

  11. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

  12. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS), near Chicago, Illinois, conducted from October 25 through November 9, 1993. During the Progress Assessment, activities included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the DOE Office of Energy Research (ER); CH, which includes the Argonne Area Office; the University of Chicago; and the contractor`s organization responsible for operation of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of DOE`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the AIS ES&H Progress Assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy, senior DOE managers, and contractor management with concise independent information on the following: change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from the previous Tiger Team Assessment; adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment process of the DOE line organizations, the site management, and the operating contractor; and effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems and new ES&H initiatives.

  13. Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, A.B.

    1996-02-01

    Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

  14. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westover, B.; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 ; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (?150?J, 0.7ps, 2נ10{sup 20}Wcm{sup ?2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2?MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5?MeV and 4?MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  15. Cookoff Modeling of a WIPP waste drum (68660)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2014-11-24

    A waste drum located 2150 feet underground may have been the root cause of a radiation leak on February 14, 2014. Information provided to the WIPP Technical Assessment Team (TAT) was used to describe the approximate content of the drum, which included an organic cat litter (Swheat Scoop®, or Swheat) composed of 100% wheat products. The drum also contained various nitrate salts, oxalic acid, and a nitric acid solution that was neutralized with triethanolamine (TEA). CTH-TIGER was used with the approximate drum contents to specify the products for an exothermic reaction for the drum. If an inorganic adsorbent such as zeolite had been used in lieu of the kitty litter, the overall reaction would have been endothermic. Dilution with a zeolite adsorbent might be a useful method to remediate drums containing organic kitty litter. SIERRA THERMAL was used to calculate the pressurization and ignition of the drum. A baseline simulation of drum 68660 was performed by assuming a background heat source of 0.5-10 W of unknown origin. The 0.5 W source could be representative of heat generated by radioactive decay. The drum ignited after about 70 days. Gas generation at ignition was predicted to be 300-500 psig with a sealed drum (no vent). At ignition, the wall temperature increases modestly by about 1°C, demonstrating that heating would not be apparent prior to ignition. The ignition location was predicted to be about 0.43 meters above the bottom center portion of the drum. At ignition only 3-5 kg (out of 71.6 kg total) has been converted into gas, indicating that most of the material remained available for post-ignition reaction.

  16. Temperature effect on gastric emptying time of hybrid grouper (Epinephelus spp.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, Moumita; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.; Das, Simon K.

    2014-09-03

    Knowledge of fish gastric emptying time is a necessary component for understanding the fish feeding rates, energy budgets and commercial production of fishes in aquaculture. The hybrid grouper Epinephelus spp. is getting popular as a culture species in Malaysia for their faster growth rate compared to commonly cultured grouper species (giant grouper Epinephelus lanceolatus and tiger grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus). There are data suggests that elevated sea water temperature affects gastric emptying time (GET) of fishes. Hence, this study aims to study the GET of hybrid grouper at different temperature (22, 26, 30, 34°C) in laboratory condition with commercial diet pellet. The gastric emptying times (GETs) at different temperatures were determined X-radiographically, using barium sulfate (BaSO{sub 4}) as a contrast medium food marker. The food marker and X-radiography showed that initial voidance of fecal matter began 4-6 h after feeding at all temperature. The fastest GET (13 h) was obsereved in the 30°C group, whereas the longest (17 h) GET was seen in 22°C group fed with artificial diet pellet. Not much differences in GET were recorded between the 26 and 34°C groups as 34°C groups fed lesser amount compared to 26°C groups. Nevertheless a substantial delay in GET was observed in the 22°C group. The findings of this study suggest to culture hybrid grouper between 26 to 30°C with commercial diet pellet as this temperature ranges proliferate the faster digestion process which may contribute faster growth rate of this commerical important fish species. Overall, these findings may have important consequences for optimization of commercial production of hybrid grouper.

  17. Binary electrokinetic separation of target DNA from background DNA primers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Conrad D.; Derzon, Mark Steven

    2005-10-01

    This report contains the summary of LDRD project 91312, titled ''Binary Electrokinetic Separation of Target DNA from Background DNA Primers''. This work is the first product of a collaboration with Columbia University and the Northeast BioDefense Center of Excellence. In conjunction with Ian Lipkin's lab, we are developing a technique to reduce false positive events, due to the detection of unhybridized reporter molecules, in a sensitive and multiplexed detection scheme for nucleic acids developed by the Lipkin lab. This is the most significant problem in the operation of their capability. As they are developing the tools for rapidly detecting the entire panel of hemorrhagic fevers this technology will immediately serve an important national need. The goal of this work was to attempt to separate nucleic acid from a preprocessed sample. We demonstrated the preconcentration of kilobase-pair length double-stranded DNA targets, and observed little preconcentration of 60 base-pair length single-stranded DNA probes. These objectives were accomplished in microdevice formats that are compatible with larger detection systems for sample pre-processing. Combined with Columbia's expertise, this technology would enable a unique, fast, and potentially compact method for detecting/identifying genetically-modified organisms and multiplexed rapid nucleic acid identification. Another competing approach is the DARPA funded IRIS Pharmaceutical TIGER platform which requires many hours for operation, and an 800k$ piece of equipment that fills a room. The Columbia/SNL system could provide a result in 30 minutes, at the cost of a few thousand dollars for the platform, and would be the size of a shoebox or smaller.

  18. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-31

    The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.