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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

2

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2010 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

3

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2007 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

4

CASTANEA 55(1): 56.64. MARCH 1990 New County Records Collected in Tidal Wetlands of Four Coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

salinity gradient exists in the James River. Salinity aver- ages 22 ppt (parts per thousand) at the mouth that horizontal salinity gradients also exist in tidal tributaries of the James River. The distance salt water 1982). The distribution of tidal wetland vegetation appears to be determined by horizontal salinity

Newman, Michael C.

5

Restoration of Tidal Flow to Degraded Tidal Wetlands in Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Connecticut’s tidal wetlands, ranging from salt marsh ... the state’s rivers (e.g., Connecticut, Quinnipiac, and Housatonic). Today, approximately 5900 hectares of tidal wetland occur in Connecticut, two thirds o...

Ron Rozsa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

7

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory Group Director and those hosted by VIMS. Integrated Coastal & Shoreline Management Guidance Integrated coastal zone Virginia Institute of Marine Science #12;If you attended the VIMS Tidal Wetlands Workshop in June 2005

8

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

9

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 28, Issue Wetlands Report/CCRM P.O. Box 1346 Gloucester Pt., VA 23062 (804) 684-7380 dawnf@vims.edu CCRM Director: Dr subagencies or DEQ. Printed on recycled paper Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Discovery Workshops. Sponsored

10

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims. Volume 27, Issue 2 at the VIMS Center for Coastal Resources Management (CCRM) spent the last three summers conducting Tidal Marsh of Marine Science (VIMS) is obligated to continuously maintain and update an inventory of vegetated tidal

11

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue at VIMS Also Living Shoreline Summit Proceedings Now Available Tidal Wetlands News & Events · · Putting Nature to Work: Marine contractors and permitting agents are targeted with new online course and VIMS

12

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 24, Issue Shifting Sands: Beaches and Dunes in Virginia Thursday, February 12, 2009 at VIMS See inside for information & registration! Also Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Advisory Support: Updates for 2009

13

Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and...

14

Wetlands Status and Trends for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Status and Trends ­ for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser Background Coastal wetlands as wetlands that occur within 2 km of the 1:100 year floodline of the Great Lake/channel shoreline, and include all four wetland types identified in the Ontario Wetland Evaluation System. An estimate of current

McMaster University

15

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES By KRISTINA KOSTUK, B OF SCIENCE (2006) McMaster University (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario TITLE: Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands coastal wetlands. The first chapter examines the influence of gear type and sampling protocol on fish

McMaster University

16

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands 40 wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes to develop the Wetland Fish Index (WFI), a tool that can of water quality degradation and wetlands condition, as indicated by an independent index of wetland

McMaster University

17

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project Implementation-TERM ANALYSIS SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands COASTAL WETLANDS PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands (BBCW

US Army Corps of Engineers

18

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

19

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

20

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands (EPA of wetland resources across the Mid-Atlantic physiographic region, efforts are currently underway in a number of states, most notably Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, to develop and implement wetland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

22

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

Wang, Yang

24

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY #12;FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY By MAJA CVETKOVIC, B and fish distribution in coastal wetlands of Georgian Bay AUTHOR: Maja Cvetkovic, B.Sc. (Mc

McMaster University

25

Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

26

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Dynamics in a San Francisco Estuary Tidal Wetland: Assessing Dynamics Using In Situ the tidally driven exchange of mercury (Hg) between the waters of the San Francisco estuary and Browns Island, respectively--together predicted 94 % of the observed variability in measured total mercury concentra- tion

Boss, Emmanuel S.

27

Energy potential of a tidal fence deployed near a coastal headland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...192 Theme Issue New research in tidal current energy compiled and edited by AbuBakr Bahaj Energy potential of a tidal fence deployed near a...a Theme Issue New research in tidal current energy . Enhanced tidal streams close to coastal headlands...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been lost since 1950, due primarily to coastal development and declines in water quality. Restoration of wetlands is essential to reestablish lost functions, but there is no standard method to assess the ecological health of restored salt marshes...

Staszak, Lindsey Ann

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Analysis of landscape patterns in coastal wetlands of Galveston Bay, Texas (USA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High productivity and accessibility have made coastal wetlands attractive sites for human settlements. This study analyzed the patterns of wetland landscapes in Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The first objective of t...

Amy J. Liu; Guy N. Cameron

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 25, Issue: WORKSHOPANNOUNCEMENT Coastal Management Decision Tools Thursday, April 22, 2010 at VIMS See inside for information

31

Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appeared to be structured by the responses of individual species to the estuarine salinity gradient shown that nekton abundance can be affected by salinity gradients in estuaries (Baltz et al. 1993, 1998Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

32

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue, rather than having our usual spring workshop at VIMS, the Center for Coastal Resources Management for upcoming announcements of a staff workshop near you! The VIMS wetlands workshop will return to the VIMS

33

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration In this project, I assembled a seamless binational GIS database that contains all available shapefiles of coastal (Wetland Inventory for Research and Education) website (http://www.wirenet.info). GIS was used to quantify

McMaster University

34

FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DISTURBANCES IN THE GREAT4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i 1 2 FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTALMaster University23 (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario24 TITLE: Forecasting the response of coastal wetlands to declining plants in Lake Ontario coastal36 wetlands while taking into account other factors such as urbanization

McMaster University

35

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

Burns, K.A.; Codi, S. [Australian Inst. of Marine Sciences, Townsville (Australia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Nutrient Transformation and Retention by Coastal Prairie Wetlands, Upper Gulf Coast, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coastal prairie wetlands (CPWs) are small, rain-fed depressions and flats that, together with their catchments, occupy approximately 40 % of the landscape around Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. Many CPWs are unregulat...

Margaret G. Forbes; Jeffrey Back; Robert D. Doyle

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 26, Issue things, requires VIMS to provide Comprehensive Coastal Resource Management Plans (CCRMP) for each these requests to dawnf@ vims.edu. Looking forward to hearing from you. Thanks. #12;2 BMPs for Erosion Control

39

A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

Wang, Yang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 27, Issue: WORKSHOPANNOUNCEMENT Planning for the Future Thursday, May 24, 2012 at VIMS See inside for information & registration 76, require VIMS to conduct a study of strategies to address recurrent flooding. The study area

42

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 29, Issue-Atlantic Living Shorelines Summit In This Issue WORKSHOP ANNOUNCEMENT Thursday, May 22, 2014 at VIMS See inside amazed at how many new programs have sprung up since the last conference...". VIMS scientists are now

43

Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Testing a passive revegetation approach for restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract Restoration of coastal plain depressions, a biologically significant and threatened wetland type of the southeastern United States, has received little systematic research. Within the context of an experimental project designed to evaluate several restoration approaches, we tested whether successful revegetation can be achieved by passive methods (recruitment from seed banks or seed dispersal) that allow for wetland ‘‘self-design’’ in response to hydrologic recovery. For 16 forested depressions that historically had been drained and altered, drainage ditches were plugged to reestablish natural ponding regimes, and the successional forest was harvested to open the sites and promote establishment of emergent wetland vegetation. We sampled seed bank and vegetation composition 1 year before restoration and monitored vegetation response for 3 years after. Following forest removal and ditch plugging, the restored wetlands quickly developed a dense cover of herbaceous plant species, of which roughly half were wetland species. Seed banks were a major source of wetland species for early revegetation. However, hydrologic recovery was slowed by a prolonged drought, which allowed nonwetland plant species to establish from seed banks and dispersal or to regrow after site harvest. Some nonwetland species were later suppressed by ponded conditions in the third year, but resprouting woody plants persisted and could alter the future trajectory of revegetation. Some characteristic wetland species were largely absent in the restored sites, indicating that passive methods may not fully replicate the composition of reference systems. Passive revegetation was partially successful, but regional droughts present inherent challenges to restoring depressional wetlands whose hydrologic regimes are strongly controlled by rainfall variability.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Singer, Julian H.; Barton, Christopher D.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Tidal Wetland Vegetation in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants along the salinity gradient of the San Franciscotidal wetlands along a salinity gradient that ranged fromimportance value, salinity gradient, conservation strategies

Vasey, Michael C.; Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Herbert, Ellen R.; Schile, Lisa M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Rapid Assessment Method Examining the Ecological Health of Tidal Marine Wetlands in Galveston Bay, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wetlands are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world, housing diverse biota and serving important functions as nursery habitat and feeding grounds. However,… (more)

Staszak, Lindsey Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

FISH-BASED INDICATORS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF FISH-BASED INDICATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISH-BASED INDICATORS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS #12;DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF FISH OF PHILOSOPHY (2006) MCMASTER UNIVERSITY (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario TITLE: Development and use of fish on the water quality, fish habitat, and fish community of a Lake Ontario marsh, Frenchman's Bay. Seilheimer, T

McMaster University

48

Modeling soil salinity distribution along topographic gradients in tidal salt marshes in Atlantic and Gulf coastal regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil salinity plays a very important role in determining the distribution of vegetation, plant productivity, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marsh ecosystems. Salinity gradients and salinity–vegetation associations in salt marshes have often been observed but rarely explained. A quantitative and systematic study on the soil salinity distribution in salt marshes is not only important to the understanding of coastal marsh ecosystems but also to the development of a potentially useful ecological and environmental indicator. In this research, we developed a salt marsh soil salinity model based on an existing salt and water balance model with modifications to several key features to examine the impacts of tidal forcing, climate, soil, vegetation, and topography on soil salinity distributions of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal marshes. This model was calibrated and validated using field observations from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) of northwestern Florida, USA. The results showed that the model had good agreement (r2 = 0.84, n = 15, P salinity maximum in a coastal salt marsh. Simulations indicate that tidal irregularity primarily controls the width of the salinity maximum band. Evapotranspiration, temperature, hydraulic conductivity, and incoming tidal salinity significantly affect the salinity maximum band, which may lead to the formation of salt barrens/flats when reaching a threshold level.

Hongqing Wang; Y. Ping Hsieh; Mark A. Harwell; Wenrui Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2005 Vol. 20, No. 1 Annual Summary of Permitted Tidal Wetland Impacts - 2004 By Karen Duhring The Wetlands Program has main impact areas based on a site visit and information provided in the permit documents. The Wetlands Program

50

Wetlands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wetlands Wetlands Nature Bulletin No. 670 March 10, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WETLANDS This bulletin is addressed to the young people who will determine and must share the future of our country. As citizens you will have responsibilities. Among them will be the conservation of its natural resources. You have learned a lot about why and how we are endeavoring to conserve and use wisely the forests, soils, waters, minerals and wildlife. You may not know much about still another resource, nor that it is being destroyed -- largely by drainage for agricultural purposes but also by flood control projects, industrial and residential developments, dumps and pollution. That resource is what remains of our precious natural WETLANDS.

51

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2001 Vol. 16, No. 1 The VIMS Teaching Marsh: A Tidal Wetland Restoration and Education Project Karen Duhring Purpose wetlands education opportunities, including field lessons. Due to the vari- ety and geographic distribution

52

Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed: 3 July 2012 # Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2012 Abstract Nonnative Phragmites is among the most in- vasive plants in the U.S. Atlantic coast tidal wetlands, whereas the native Phragmites has

53

Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs used to determine sediment accretion rates at selected northern European coastal wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment cores were collected form five coastal wetlands along the North Sea (England and Netherlands) and Baltic Sea (Poland). {sup 137}Cs dating was used to assess sediment accretion rates, including rates based on the {sup 137}Cs peak from the 1986 accident at Chernobyl. Peaks form the Chernobyl fallout were found in cores from the Oder and Vistula Rivers in Poland, from the Eastern Scheldt in the Netherlands, and in one of the two cores from Stiffkey Marsh, UK. No evidence of Chernobyl fallout was found in cores from Dengie Marsh, UK. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak serves as an excellent marker for short-term accretion rates because of its high activity. Vertical accretion rates (cm yr{sup {minus}1}) based on 1963 and 1986 peaks were similar at most sites; differences may be due to large inputs of sediment from storms or recent accumulation of organic matter. Large differences in sediment characteristics and accretion rates were found between samples from Poland and western Europe. Vertical accretion rates over the period 1963-1986 ranged from 0.26 to 0.85 cm{sup {minus}1} and from 0.30 to 1.90 cm yr{sup {minus}1} over the 1986-1991 period. Vertical accretion rates for the period these sites are in imminent danger of excessive flooding. The Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs peak will be especially useful for studies of short-term (i.e. very recent) sedimentation in the near future and for comparisons of sediment processes over different time scales. 33 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Callaway, J.C.; DeLaune, R.D.; Patrick, W.H. Jr. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Appraising the extractable tidal energy resource of the UK's western coastal waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...streams has also been explored. renewable energy|tidal energy|barrages or...paramount that all viable sources of renewable energy are fully exploited. Towards...target for the UK of 15 per cent renewable energies (heating/cooling, transport...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Role of Tidal Marsh Restoration in Fish Management in the San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unpublished data). Seasonal floods bring riverine materialsoccasional large-scale flood events. Tidal wetland channels

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wetland Hydrology! 1. Water sources!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Flooding). #12;2. Where do wetlands occur?! Poorly drained sites! Groundwater sites: ! receive! Dominated by herbaceous vegetation.! Tidal (above, with egrets)! Non-tidal (Colorado)! #12;Riparian;Wetland Hydrology and Flood Control?! Do wetlands offer flood control benefits?! Yes, in the sense

Gray, Matthew

57

Energy potential of a tidal fence deployed near a coastal headland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...towards the end of the turbine fence, consistent...close to Portland Bill. The substantial...such as Portland Bill. In addition to...currents surrounding the turbine fence. This is in...mixing of suspended material at a coastal headland...Figure 1. The turbine fence in depth-averaged...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Integrating multi-temporal spectral and structural information to map wetland vegetation in a lower Connecticut River tidal marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Connecticut River tidal marsh Martha S. Gilmore a, , Emily H. Wilson b , Nels Barrett c , Daniel L. Civco d of Connecticut, 1066 Saybrook Road, PO Box 70, Haddam CT 06438, United States c U.S. Department of Agriculture, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, Box U-4087, Room 308, 1376 Storrs

Royer, Dana

59

Wetlands Ecology and ISSN 0923-4861  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Wetlands Ecology and Management ISSN 0923-4861 Volume 19 Number 3 Wetlands Ecol Manage (2011 / Published online: 5 March 2011 Ã? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Coastal wetlands sensing imagery to map wetland habitat. In this study, we use IKONOS satellite imagery to classify coastal

McMaster University

60

Use of remote sensing to link watershed land use change and wetland vegetation response in a California coastal watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

place. In August, the salinity gradient along the sedimentmuch more driven by a salinity gradient, with pickleweed andsalinity decreased greatly along the wetland-upland gradient.

Kelly, N. Maggi; Byrd, Kristin B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tidal Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Photo of the ocean rising along the beach. Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. All coastal areas experience two high tides and two low tides over a period of slightly more than 24 hours. For those tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude. Currently, there are no tidal power plants in the United States, but conditions are good for tidal power generation in the Pacific Northwest and the Atlantic Northeast regions. Tidal Energy Technologies Tidal energy technologies include barrages or dams, tidal fences, and tidal

62

Hydrologic and Vegetative Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii Surrogate Microspheres in Coastal Wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in higher-density aquatic solutions. In addition...However, different aquatic plants may vary in their...commonly used for landscape restoration. The presence of bulrush...vegetation within wetland restoration projects will not only promote healthier ecosystems but also enhance parasite...

Jennifer N. Hogan; Miles E. Daniels; Fred G. Watson; Stori C. Oates; Melissa A. Miller; Patricia A. Conrad; Karen Shapiro; Dane Hardin; Clare Dominik; Ann Melli; David A. Jessup; Woutrina A. Miller

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Institute (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ERDC/ELTR-10-20 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Region (Version 2.0) Environmental to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Region (Version 2.0) U to the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Region, which consists of all or portions of the District of Columbia

US Army Corps of Engineers

66

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with Shoreline Protection Publication Focused on Virginia Wetland Issues and Training Fall 2007 Erosion happens and the sea level of the property owner with the public interest in the Bay and its living resources. The Tidal Wetlands Act (1972

67

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=palustrine forested wetlands PEM=palustrine emergent wetlands PUB=palustrine unconsolidated wetlands #12;The Virginia

68

A numerical study of the barotropic tides and tidal energy distribution in the Indonesian seas with the assimilated finite volume coastal ocean model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tides and tidal energetics in the Indonesian seas ... faithfully reproduced the general features of the barotropic tides in the Indonesian Seas. The mean root...2, S2, K1, and O1..., respectively. Analysis of...

Yang Ding; Xianwen Bao; Huaming Yu; Liang Kuang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Overland Tidal Power Generation Using Modular Tidal Prism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Naturally occurring sites with sufficient kinetic energy suitable for tidal power generation with sustained currents > 1 to 2 m/s are relatively rare. Yet sites with greater than 3 to 4 m of tidal range are relatively common around the U.S. coastline. Tidal potential does exist along the shoreline but is mostly distributed, and requires an approach which allows trapping and collection to also be conducted in a distributed manner. In this paper we examine the feasibility of generating sustainable tidal power using multiple nearshore tidal energy collection units and present the Modular Tidal Prism (MTP) basin concept. The proposed approach utilizes available tidal potential by conversion into tidal kinetic energy through cyclic expansion and drainage from shallow modular manufactured overland tidal prisms. A preliminary design and configuration of the modular tidal prism basin including inlet channel configuration and basin dimensions was developed. The unique design was shown to sustain momentum in the penstocks during flooding as well as ebbing tidal cycles. The unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to subject the proposed design to a number of sensitivity tests and to optimize the size, shape and configuration of MTP basin for peak power generation capacity. The results show that an artificial modular basin with a reasonable footprint (? 300 acres) has the potential to generate 10 to 20 kw average energy through the operation of a small turbine located near the basin outlet. The potential of generating a total of 500 kw to 1 MW of power through a 20 to 40 MTP basin tidal power farms distributed along the coastline of Puget Sound, Washington, is explored.

Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montalto. 2003. Phragmites australis invasion and expansion1999. Expansion of Phragmites australis into tidal wetlandsand the spread of Phragmites australis in a coastal marsh.

Whitcraft, Christine René

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Ainslie September 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

72

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1 , Duncan M. FitzGeralda , Zoe J States Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Wetlands Environmental of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher

Kulp, Mark

73

Tidal Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tidal energy, as interpreted in this essay, is considered to be the artificial extraction of energy from: either the rise or fall of the sea surface under the influence of tides or the extraction of energy from t...

Ian G. Bryden

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tidal Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tidal energy, as interpreted in this essay, is considered to be the artificial extraction of energy from: either the rise or fall of the sea surface under the influence of tides or the extraction of energy from t...

Ian G. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory MARCH 1984 Wetlands of the United States: Current Status and Recent, Childers, Tiner, USFWS #12;WETLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES : CURRENT STATUS AND RECENT TRENDS by Ralph W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What Is A Wetland

77

Community-dependent Positive Interactions in Southern California Coastal Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Across Landscape-Scale Salinity Gradients. Ecology 89:2889-tidal marsh along a salinity gradient. Wetlands 24:879-890.characterized by soil salinity gradients (Zedler 1982, Vince

Bryson, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Community-dependent Positive Interactions in Southern California Coastal Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tidal marsh along a salinity gradient. Wetlands 24:879-890.Across Landscape-Scale Salinity Gradients. Ecology 89:2889-characterized by soil salinity gradients (Zedler 1982, Vince

Bryson, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,, Mary A. Cialone a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,Ã?, Mary A. Cialone a , Jane M to be the potential contribution of wetlands to the lowering of surges as they propagate inland from the coast. Consequently, an accurate method to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels is required

US Army Corps of Engineers

80

Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions such as water purification, coastal stabilization,stabilization, and water purification function of wetlandsPrimary Productivity Water purification nests “Surface”

Moseman, Serena M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

functions such as water purification, coastal stabilization,stabilization, and water purification function of wetlandsPrimary Productivity Water purification nests “Surface”

Moseman, Serena Maria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

2009-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent coastal waters Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wetland Forests Summary: of coastal Louisiana is presently experiencing an apparent water level rise of about 3.3 feet per century... infrastructure that have also altered and...

84

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2000 Vol. 15, No. 1 Virginia Debates Nontidal Wetlands Regulation Carl Hershner Wetland regulation is once again- trolling impacts on existing wetlands, as well as creating new wetlands. There is general agreement

85

Chlorinated hydrocarbons in early life stages of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina) from a coastal wetland on Lake Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assess intra-clutch variation in contaminant concentrations in eggs, and to investigate the dynamics of chlorinated hydrocarbon accumulation in embryos of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), concentrations of p,p{prime}-DDE, hexachlorobenzene, trans-nonachlor, cis-chlordane, and six PCB congeners were measured in eggs, embryos, and hatchlings. Samples were collected from Cootes Paradise, a wetland at the western end of Lake Ontario, Ontario, Canada. The intra-clutch variation in chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations within four snapping turtle clutches was determined by analyzing the first, last, and middle five eggs oviposited in the nest. The first five eggs had the highest mean concentrations of all chlorinated hydrocarbons, wet weight, and egg diameter. On a lipid weight basis, the first five eggs contained the highest concentration of all compounds except total PCBs and cis-chlordane. The concentration of cis-chlordane was the only parameter measured that was significantly different among the three sets of eggs. At hatching, snapping turtles without yolk sacs contained from 55.2 to 90.5% of the absolute amount of organochlorine compounds measured in the egg at oviposition. Eighteen days after hatching, the body burden of PCBs and pesticides decreased to 45.3 to 62.2% of that in the fresh egg. The accumulation of organochlorine chemicals in embryonic turtles peaked at or just before hatching and then declined thereafter, which is consistent with trends reported in developing sea turtles, fish, and birds.

Bishop, C.A.; Lean, D.R.S.; Carey, J.H. [Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario (Canada); Brooks, R.J. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Ng, P. [York Univ., North York, Ontario (Canada)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1997 Vol. 12, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Wetlands mitigation banking is a relatively new tool for wetlands managers. It is finding increasing application in the struggle to achieve a "no net loss" goal for our remaining wetland resources. The concept of creating

87

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2005 Vol. 20, No. 2 VMRC Adopts Wetland Mitigation/ Compensation Policy Changes By Tom Barnard When the Virginia Wetlands Act went into effect on July 1, thirty- three years ago, no one had ever heard of compensatory mitigation, wetland

88

Official Scholarly Journal of the Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, at three tidal marshes spanning a salinity gradient in the San Francisco Bay Estuary, California, USA 31 Number 6 Wetlands (2011) 31:1165-1174 DOI 10.1007/s13157-011-0227-y Salinity and Inundation available until 12 months after publication. #12;ARTICLE Salinity and Inundation Influence Productivity

Parker, V. Thomas

89

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2000 Vol. 15, No. 2 Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Implementing Nontidal Wetlands Protection Mandate Ellen Gilinsky wetland resources, but which occur outside of federal regulation. The General Assembly was motivated

90

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 1997 Vol. 12, No. 3The Virginia Wetlands Report Almost everyone their actions. It is this com- mon sense notion which is motivating a new Wetlands Initiative under the auspices of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetlands Workgroup. State and federal wet- lands program man- agers are working

91

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2001 Vol. 16, No. 3 A GIS Approach for Targeting Potential Wetlands Mitigation or Restoration Sites By Marcia Berman and Tamia vegeta- tion, islands, and wetlands. Most activi- ties enhance habitat for living resources, but also

92

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2002 Vol. 17, No. 1 Update On Virginia's New and Improved Nontidal Wetlands Program By Ellen Gilinsky, Ph.D. PWS Virginia wetlands program. Key changes included the provi- sion of additional jurisdic- tion over: excavation in all

93

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Continued on page 2 Spring 1996 Vol. 11, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Completely Updated The Wetlands Program of the Vir- ginia Institute of Marine Science has completed its update of the Vir- ginia Wetlands Management Hand- book, and with the aid of the Marine

94

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1999 Vol. 14, No. 2 Historic Wetland Loss in the Elizabeth River Walter I. Priest, III Introduction Since earliest colonial consumed many of the natural resources of the river basin, including its wetlands, forests, water quality

95

Patterns of litter production across a salinity gradient in a Pterocarpus officinalis tropical wetland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historically, Pterocarpus officinalisJacq. (Leguminoseae) dominated freshwater wetlands in the coastal plains of Puerto Rico, but deforestation has reduced its distribution to small patches adjacent to mangrove f...

Ana Maria Eusse; T. Mitchell Aide

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of flood defences and sea-level rise on the European Shelf tidal regime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The tidal response of the European Shelf to moderate ( < 1 m ) levels of sea level rise is investigated using a high resolution, well established tidal model. The model is validated for present day conditions and the tidal response to sea level rise by comparing the modelled response to long term tide gauge data. The effects of coastal defence schemes are tested, with three levels of present day coastal defences simulated. Full walls are added at the present day coastline, no coast defence schemes are used and a set of present day coastal defence schemes is simulated. The simulations show that there is a significant tidal response to moderate levels of SLR and that the response is strongly dependant on level of coastal defence simulated. The simulation using coastal defence data resulted in the strongest response as the tide was able to build up behind the coastal defence walls and create a patchwork of sea and land at the coastline. This had a strong impact on the spatial tidal energy dissipation field and in turn this has large effects on the tidal regime throughout the domain.

Holly E. Pelling; J.A. Mattias Green

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3 Are Wetlands Important? 4 Wetlands and their Surroundings 5 Wetlands in the U.S. Caribbean Region 6 Distribution 6 Common Wetland Types 7 Saltwater wetlands 7 Freshwater wetlands 7 Wetland Loss and Consequences 9 Fish Need Wetlands 10 Wetlands as Habitat 10

98

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Wetlands FactSheet 09.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wetlands Terrestrial 1 November 2009 Wetlands Terrestrial 1 November 2009 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42589 DOE/NETL Project Manager: Traci Rodosta, Traci.Rodosta@NETL.DOE.GOV Submitted by Battelle November 2009 Terrestrial Field Test: Wetlands-Blackwater Refuge Principal Investigator Brian Needelman University of Maryland bneed@umd.edu Field Test Name Wetlands: Carbon sequestration in restored tidal marshes at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Test Location Cambridge, MD Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons: N/A Source: Atmospheric Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Maryland Department of Natural Resources Power Plant Research Program

99

Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropica...

100

Studies in Tidal Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... at Aber-vrach near Brest. The proposed barrage will be 150 metres long and the turbines will have a maximum output of about 1200 h.p. The tidal station is ... 1200 h.p. The tidal station is to be worked in conjunction with a second hydroelectric station utilising the waters of the river Diouris, which discharges into the estuary of ...

1924-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Add description List of Tidal Energy Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTidalEnergy&oldid267201" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

102

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

103

Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1 · Botrychium................6 · What cognitiorem tradit. -- Linnaeus January 5, 2004Number 29 VASCULAR PLANTS OF SOME SANTA ROSA WETLANDS, EAST wetland habitat in New Mexico is less well known. Relatively large expanses of municipal and private

Johnson, Eric E.

104

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in wetland soils under different land uses in a coastal estuary: Toxic levels, sources and relationships with soil organic matter and water-stable aggregates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in the soils from industrial, wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites to characterize their distributions, toxic levels and possible sources in the Pearl River Estuary and identify their relationships with soil organic matter (SOM) and water-stable aggregates (WSAs). Our results indicate that the average concentration of total \\{PAHs\\} in this region reached a moderate pollution level, which was higher than that in other larger estuaries in Asia. The average level of total \\{PAHs\\} in industrial soils was 1.2, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.3 times higher than those in soils from wharf, cropland, milldam and natural wetland sites, respectively. Greater accumulation of \\{PAHs\\} occurred in the middle and/or bottom soil layers where 3-ring \\{PAHs\\} were dominant. Industrial soils also exhibited the highest toxic levels with the highest toxic equivalent concentrations of PAHs, followed by wharf and milldam soils, and the cropland and wetland soils had the lowest toxicity. The diagnostic ratios suggested that \\{PAHs\\} primarily originated from biomass and coal combustion at industrial and milldam sites, and petroleum combustion was determined to be the primary source of \\{PAHs\\} at the wharf, cropland and wetland sites. Both 3-ring and 4-ring \\{PAHs\\} in the milldam and wharf soils were significantly positively correlated with the SOM, whereas the 4,5,6-ring \\{PAHs\\} and total \\{PAHs\\} in industrial soils and the 2-ring \\{PAHs\\} in cropland soils were significantly negatively correlated with the SOM. In addition, large \\{WSAs\\} also exhibited a significant positive correlation with PAHs.

Rong Xiao; Junhong Bai; Junjing Wang; Qiongqiong Lu; Qingqing Zhao; Baoshan Cui; Xinhui Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Chaos and Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the tidal capture mechanism for binary formation, an important process in globular cluster cores and perhaps open cluster cores. Tidal capture binaries may be the precursors for some of the low-mass X-ray binaries observed in abundance in globular clusters. They may also play an important role in globular cluster dynamics. We summarize the chaos model for tidal interaction (Mardling 1995, ApJ, 450, 722, 732), and discuss how this affects our understanding of the circularization process which follows capture.

Rosemary A. Mardling

1995-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Maine Coastal Current: Spring Climatological Circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Coastal Current. The nested calculations also expose finer structure due to river sources, heat flux, river discharges) and remote (Gulf­scale) forcing are examined. Tidal rectification in the Eastern Gulf; otherwise unreal­ istic exchanges with the Gulf occur. An approximate division of local and remote dynamical

108

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet What is a Wetland? The US Army Corps of Engineers(Corps) and the US Environmental Protection Agency define wetlands as follows: Those areas that are inundated conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas. Wetlands are areas

US Army Corps of Engineers

109

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

110

Safeguarding wetland on Laboratory property  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wetland on Laboratory property Protecting our environment August 1, 2013 The wetlands in Sandia Canyon on Lab property provide a home to a large amount of wildlife. Work...

111

Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

112

Chapter 16 Wetlands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the cities of Longview, Vancouver, and Camas in Washington, and Portland and Troutdale in Oregon. For the purposes of this analysis, wetlands were mapped within a study...

113

Evaluating Tidal Marsh Sustainability in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: A Hybrid Modeling Approach Applied to San Francisco Bay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland losses due to sea-level rise: regional and global2009) The impact of sea level rise on developing countries:Coastal impacts due to sea-level rise. Annu Rev Earth Pl Sc

Kelly, Maggi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Subsidence Reversal in a Re-established Wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

San Joaquin Delta, California, USA Robin L. Miller, U.S.estuary, California, USA. Journal of Coastal Research 20:accretion in a Mid-Atlantic (USA) tidal freshwater marsh.

Miller, Robin L.; Fram, Miranda; Fujii, Roger; Wheeler, Gail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Institute for Climate Change Research, Coastalcontext of predicted climate change. Madroño 54(3):234–248.MD. 2005. From climate-change spaghetti to climate-change

Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Climate Change and San Francisco Bay-Delta Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the other end of the salinity gradient, salt marshes containVEGETATION The salinity gradient formed by the mixing ofof inundation along a salinity gradient (Schile and others

Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Schile, Lisa M.; Vasey, Michael C.; Herbert, Ellen R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) Coastal Area Management Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management This program regulates coastal activities, permits required, discharges to coastal waters and siting, construction and operation of energy facilities. ADEM's Coastal Program rules include the review and permitting for the following types of activities when they are to occur within the Coastal Area: beach and dune construction projects, developments and subdivision of properties greater than five (5) acres in size, dredging and filling of state water bottoms and wetlands, the drilling and operation of groundwater

118

International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD June 3-8, 2012 Orlando .................................................................................... 27 Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Section-Organized Symposia and Section-Sponsored Sessions.................................................................................................................. 222 #12;9 th INTECOL: International Wetlands Conference 2 WELCOME TO THE JOINT CONFERENCE OF: 9TH

Slatton, Clint

119

NAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay and Tolay Creek Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of estuarine habitat comprised of deep and shallow water habitat, mudflats, salt marsh, and wetlandNAME: Sears Point Tidal Restoration Project LOCATION: Near Petaluma, CA, in the San Pablo Bay PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Sears Point, the proposed project site, consists of approximately 960 acres of diked

US Army Corps of Engineers

120

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wetland (peat) Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wetland (peat) Carbon Cycle Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, twenty times more potent than CO2, but atmospheric concentrations of CH4 under future climate change are...

122

Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetland easement (2000 acres) 3.7 miles 1.4 miles Direction of flow NORTH FM 3039 US 175 Five Major Components ? Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure ? Constructed Wetland ? Conveyance Pump Station ? Electrical Substation... ? Vertical Turbine Pumps 3 ? 3000 Hp 2 ? future 6000 Hp ? Equipped with SCADA system Electrical Substation Electrical Substation ? Provides power to the Conveyance Pump Station ? Power is approximately 60% of annual operating budget ? Power...

Hickey, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Asymmetry of Tidal Plume Fronts in an Eastern Boundary Current Regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water mass. This vorticity controls the transition of the tidal plume 2 #12;front to a subcritical state bulge, which in turn is embedded in far-field plume and coastal waters. Because of the mixing caused on its upwind or northern side) and marks a transition from supercritical to subcritical flow for 6

Jay, David

124

Tidal Energy Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

Stelzenmuller, Nickolas [Univ of Washington; Aliseda, Alberto [Univ of Washington; Palodichuk, Michael [Univ of Washington; Polagye, Brian [Univ of Washington; Thomson, James [Univ of Washington; Chime, Arshiya [Univ of Washington; Malte, Philip [Univ of washington

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey and Permanent Vegetation Monitoring Plots Prepared for: U Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 March 1998 #12;WHITE RANCH WETLANDS assessment of the White Ranch wetlands. In addition we set up permanent plots along transects to collect

126

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative DE-EE0003636 TIDAL...

127

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97­106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists SPATIAL

Manley, Steven L.

128

Iron and Arsenic Cycling in Intertidal Surface Sediments during Wetland Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we examined the behavior of Fe and As during aeration of natural groundwater from the intertidal fringe of a wetland being remediated by tidal inundation. ... This project was funded by the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (6-6-01-06/07 ‘A National Demonstration Site for Innovative Acid Sulfate Soil Management’) and the Queensland Department of Environment and Resource Management. ... Details are presented of scientific investigations, and a lime-assisted tidal exchange strategy that are being undertaken to remediate a serious ASS problem. ...

Scott G. Johnston; Annabelle F. Keene; Edward D. Burton; Richard T. Bush; Leigh A. Sullivan

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Board is Excellent Learning Tool for Virginia Beach Students by Karla L. Schillinger The apple-headed gavel struck the desk top precisely at 10:00 a.m. with a bang. The Waterton Wetlands Board public "help the environment and the economy of Waterton," Dozer was proposing to subdivide the 55 acre farm

130

Tidal-powered water sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tidal-powered compositing water sampler has been designed to operate over a wide range of tides. It can sample water over long periods without attention and can be made from inexpensive hardware components and two check valves. The working principle of the sampler is to use the reduction of pressure by the falling tide and the stored pressure from the previous high tide to pump water into a collection bottle. The sampler can produce a constant volume of water per tidal cycle over a tidal range of 2 to 4 m.

Hayes, D.W.; Harris, S.D.; Stoughton, R.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coastal engineering, history of  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turner I.L., Leatherman S.P., 1997. Beach dewatering as a’ soft' engineering solution to coastal erosion – A history and critical review. J Coastal Res 13...

Per Bruun

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DIVISION S-10-WETLAND SOILS Wetland Soils --Opportunities and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Sciences entitled "Restoration of aquatic ecosystems: Science, technol- ogy and public policy" failed of Interior, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Soil Conservation Service. Wetlands are complex ecosystems that are poorly understood relative to terrestrial and aquatic systems. Difficulties in characterizing wetlands

Florida, University of

134

Fourier and autocorrelation analysis of estuarine tidal rhythmites, lower Breathitt Formation (Pennsylvania), eastern Kentucky, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation in eastern Kentucky reveal a rhythmic pattern of siliciclastic sedimentation in a marginal marine coastal setting. A 15-23 m thick stratigraphic interval of thinly interbedded, fine sandstone and shale displays tidally generated features such as flaser and wavy current ripple bedding, bipolar paleocurrents, and cyclic thickening and thinning of mud-draped sandstone layers. A statistical analysis of sand layer thickness was carried out using shale partings as bounding surfaces for the individual sand units. Fourier and autocorrelation analyses were performed on two vertical sequences containing a total of over 2,100 layers. The results reveal the presence of four cycles of thickness variation. First-order cycles consist of alternating thick-thin sand layers. These daily couplets may reflect unequal flood and ebb currents during a single tidal cycle or dominant and subordinate tidal deposits in an ebb or flood dominated semidiurnal or mixed system. Second-order cycles typically consist of 11-14 sand layers and reflect spring-neap variations in tidal range and current velocities. Third-order cycles are usually composed of 24-35 layers and are formed in response to monthly variations in tidal range resulting from the ellipticity of the moon's orbit. Fourth-order cycles generally contain about 150 layers (range, 100-166) and were caused by seasonal maxima in tidal range associated with the solstice (winter, summer) and seasonal minima associated with the equinox (spring, fall).

Martino, R.L.; Sanderson, D.D. (Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis Earth Tidal Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Earth Tidal Analysis Details Activities (6) Areas (4) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir hydraulic parameters. Thermal: Dictionary.png Earth Tidal Analysis: Earth tidal analysis is the measurement of the impact of tidal and barometric fluctuations on effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

136

The Amenity Value of Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................... 100 6.4.2 Final Model......................................................................... 101 6.4.3 The Effects of Wetland Amenities in Savannah ................. 102 6.4.4 The Implicit Prices of Wetland Attributes... Table 6-4 Determinants of Basic Model in Savannah .............................................. 101 Table 6-5 Determinants of Final Model in Savannah ............................................... 102 Table 6-6 Determinants of Basic Model...

Gao, Shan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

137

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 10031014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1003 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 1003­1014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists WETLAND AND UPLAND USE PATTERNS IN SEMI-AQUATIC SNAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND CONSERVATION John H. Roe1) in northwestern Ohio and southern Michigan, USA, to investigate differences in the use of wetland and upland

Canberra, University of

138

WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 6674 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

66 WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 66­74 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists LINKING ACTIONS TO OUTCOMES IN WETLAND MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW OF U.S. STATE WETLAND MANAGEMENT Megan K. La Peyre1,3 , Margaret A. Reams2 , and Irving A. Mendelssohn1 1 Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute Louisiana State

La Peyre, Megan

139

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land wetlands continues, it has the potential to alter the distribution of wetland birds, a group that has

Gawlik, Dale E.

140

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment of GHG emissions (N2O and CH4) Types of constructed wetland · Stormwater wetlands · Retention ponds

Heal, Kate

142

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

143

Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Electric Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Electric Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW19 8UY Product Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Tidal | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Tidal Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

145

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Estuarine Microbial Food Web Patterns in a Lake Erie Coastal P.J. Lavrentyev1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estuarine Microbial Food Web Patterns in a Lake Erie Coastal Wetland P.J. Lavrentyev1 , M.J. Mc protists were examined relative to microbial food web dynamics (growth, grazing, and nitrogen cycling rates pattern. Large light/dark NH4 + uptake differences were observed in the hypereutrophic OWC interior

Jochem, Frank J.

147

Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90-Protection Of Wetlands 90-Protection Of Wetlands SOURCE: The provisions of Executive Order 11990 of May 24, 1977, appear at 42 FR 26961, 3 CFR, 1977 Comp., p. 121, unless otherwise noted. By virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and statutes of the United States of America, and as President of the United States of America, in furtherance of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et s eq.), in order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new construction in wetlands wherever there is a practicable alternative, it is hereby ordered as follows: SECTION 1. (a) Each agency shall provide leadership and shall take action to minimize the

149

Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

Eke, Paul Emeka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High-resolution survey of tidal energy towards power generation and influence of sea-level-rise: A case study at coast of New Jersey, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The first and a crucial step in development of tidal power, which is now attracting more and more attention worldwide, is a reliable survey of temporal and spatial distribution of tidal energy along coastlines. This paper first reviews the advance in assessment of tidal energy, in particular marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy, and discusses involved challenges and necessary approaches, and then it makes a thorough survey as an illustrative case study on distributions and top sites of MHK energy within the Might-Atlantic-Bight (MAB) with emphasis on the New Jersey (NJ) coastlines. In view of the needs in actual development of tidal power generation and sensitivity of tidal power to flow speed, the former being proportional to the third power of the latter, a high-resolution and detailed modeling is desired. Data with best available accuracy for coastlines, bathymetry, tributaries, etc. are used, meshes as fine as 20 m and less for the whole NJ coast are generated, and the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) and high performance computing (HPC) facilities are employed. Besides comparison with observation data, a series of numerical tests have been made to ensure reliability of the modeling results. A detailed tidal energy distribution and a list of top sites for tidal power are presented. It is shown that indeed sea-level-rise (SLR) affects the tidal energy distribution significantly. With SLR of 0.5 m and 1 m, tidal energy in NJ coastal waters increases by 21% and 43%, respectively, and the number of the top sties tends to decrease along the barrier islands facing the Atlantic Ocean and increase in the Delaware Bay and the Delaware River. On the basis of these results, further discussions are made on future development for accurate assessment of tidal energy.

H.S. Tang; S. Kraatz; K. Qu; G.Q. Chen; N. Aboobaker; C.B. Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Wading Into Wetlands .  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Fall 2011 Volume 8 Issue 4 Wading Into Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Of the Fungi and the Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Barking Beetle Sugar Fix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Schmutz Leading Plant Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 In the News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7 The oceans capture significant amounts of carbon, but the processes involved in their contribution to managing the global carbon budget are still not fully understood. One of the questions that remains only partially answered is how marine microbes process carbon without the aid of the sun. Many marine organ- isms rely on sunlight to produce the food they need to survive, but the light does not penetrate all the way to the bottom of the ocean. In the September 2, 2011 issue of Science, DOE JGI scientists and longtime collaborators employed single cell sequencing techniques to identify a pathway by which microbes in the "twilight

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated constructed wetlands Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wetland TRODUINCTION Wetland ecosystems, including constructed wetlands for wastewater... in constructed ... Source: Brix, Hans - Biologisk Institut, Aarhus Universitet...

153

Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands Research Program identify;.-- Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 August 1993 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification

Gray, Matthew

155

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

230 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230­243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists HYDROLOGIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AN ALLUVIAL FAN AND A SLOPE WETLAND IN THE CENTRAL ROCKY MOUNTAINS, USA Scott Abstract: Slope wetlands generally occur at breaks in slope where discharging ground water maintains moist

MacDonald, Lee

156

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 112 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 1­12 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists PLANT DIVERSITY, COMPOSITION, AND INVASION OF RESTORED AND NATURAL PRAIRIE POTHOLE WETLANDS: IMPLICATIONS of Botany 353 Bessey Hall Iowa State University Ames, Iowa, USA 50011-1020 Abstract: Hundreds of wetlands

157

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 7791 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

77 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 77­91 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY OF PLAYA WETLANDS: THE ROLE OF LANDSCAPE AND ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS Dianne District Palatka, Florida, USA 32178 Abstract: Wetland habitats continue to be lost at a unsettling rate

Willig, Michael

158

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

562 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562­572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists INVERTEBRATE EGG BANKS OF RESTORED, NATURAL, AND DRAINED WETLANDS IN THE PRAIRIE POTHOLE REGION OF THE UNITED relic egg banks in the sediments and dispersal of eggs into wetlands is believed to be important

159

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465­474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists MAPPING WETLANDS AND RIPARIAN AREAS USING LANDSAT ETM IMAGERY AND DECISION-TREE-BASED MODELS Corey Baker of wetlands and riparian zones influence the ecological functions present on a landscape. Accurate and easily

Lawrence, Rick L.

160

TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V., E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil [US Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

163

Nebraska's Wetlands By Ted LaGrange,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

completely dry. Many wetlands receive their water from groundwater aquifers while others are totally moves through the wetland, a series of chemical transformations take place that tie-up or alter marshes, playa wetlands in the south-west, and many more types. However, through much of the state

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

164

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

165

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

166

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

167

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-3557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area (WRA) ACCESS REQUEST FORM All tours are required to complete this form and have Phone No. E-mail Purpose of Tour ­ (Access to these wetlands is limited for research and educational

Queitsch, Christine

168

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Prepared Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents the results

169

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class

Gray, Matthew

170

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Executive;Dovetail Consulting Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents

171

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS Title: CLARIFICATION OF "NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES" IN THE WETLAND DEFINITION Issued: 02/11/82 Expires: 12/31/84 Originator: DAEN-CWO-N Description: DEFINES NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES, CONVERTED WETLANDS, AND ABNORMAL PRESENCE OF AQUATIC VEGETATION 1. This letter will serve

US Army Corps of Engineers

172

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

173

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-5557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PERMIT REQUEST FORM Name of Principal Investigator Position is it important that this study be done at the UWB-CCC wetland site? . What parts of the site will you need access

Queitsch, Christine

174

European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

175

Sandia National Laboratories: Tidal Energy Resource Assessment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of current speed * temporal variation of power density * temporal variation of turbulence intensity * tidal energy resource assessment * Verdant Power Inc. Comments are closed....

176

Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Address: De Weel 20 Place: Zijdewind Zip: 1736KB Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 31 226 423411 Website: http:...

177

Category:Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Earth Tidal Analysis page? For detailed information on Earth Tidal Analysis, click here. Category:Earth Tidal Analysis Add.png Add a new Earth...

178

Impact of different tidal renewable energy projects on the hydrodynamic processes in the Severn Estuary, UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Severn Estuary, located in the UK between south east Wales and south west England, is an ideal site for tidal renewable energy projects, since this estuary has the third highest tidal range in the world, with a spring tidal range approaching 14 m. The UK Government recently invited proposals for tidal renewable energy projects from the estuary and many proposals were submitted for consideration. Among the proposals submitted and subsequently shortlisted were: the Cardiff–Weston Barrage, the Fleming Lagoon and the Shoots Barrage, all three of which are nationally public interest. Therefore a two-dimensional finite volume numerical model, based on an unstructured triangular mesh, has been refined to study the hydrodynamic impact and flood inundation extent, post construction, of all three of these proposed tidal power projects. The model-predicted hydrodynamic processes have been analysed in detail, both without and with the structures, including the discharge processes at key sections, the contours of maximum and minimum water levels, the envelope curves of high and low water levels, the maximum tidal currents, the local velocity fields around the structures and the mean power output curves. Simulated results indicate that: (i) although the construction of the Cardiff–Weston Barrage would have an adverse impact on a range of environmental aspects, due to there being approximately a 50% decrease in the peak discharge entering the upstream region, it would reduce the maximum water levels upstream of the barrage by typically 0.3–1.2 m, which could be positive in respect of coastal flooding; (ii) the construction of the Fleming Lagoon would have little influence on the hydrodynamic processes in the Severn Estuary; and (iii) the construction of the Shoots Barrage would decrease the maximum water levels upstream of the M4 bridge by between 0.3 and 1.0 m, but it could lead to an increase in the maximum water levels downstream of the barrage by typically 20–30 cm.

Junqiang Xia; Roger A. Falconer; Binliang Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Invasive cordgrass modifies wetland trophic function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1999. Expansion of Phragmites australis into tidal wetlandsand the common reed Phragmites australis to brackish-marsh

Levin, Lisa A; Neira, C; Grosholz, E D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

D. J. Hansen

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant - polishing · Encouraged by SEPA in its guidance · Normally small scale ­ several houses · Benefits of natural wetlands · Enhance self-purification capacity of watercourses · Reduce flood risk · But some large scale examples · Valleyfield Reedbed, Fife · 8000pe, 4.5 hectares · CAR licence conditions

Heal, Kate

182

Tidal Heating of Extra-Solar Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extra-solar planets close to their host stars have likely undergone significant tidal evolution since the time of their formation. Tides probably dominated their orbital evolution once the dust and gas had cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget that governed the planet's physical properties, including its radius, which in many cases may be measured by observing transit events. Typically, tidal heating increases as a planet moves inward toward its star and then decreases as its orbit circularizes. Here we compute the plausible heating histories for several planets with measured radii, using the same tidal parameters for the star and planet that had been shown to reconcile the eccentricity distribution of close-in planets with other extra-solar planets. Several planets are discussed, including for example HD 209458 b, which may have undergone substantial tidal heating during the past billion years, perhaps enough to explain its large measured radius. Our models also show that GJ 876 d may have experienced tremendous heating and is probably not a solid, rocky planet. Theoretical models should include the role of tidal heating, which is large, but time-varying.

Brian Jackson; Richard Greenberg; Rory Barnes

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

Moser, Lee, Justin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this wetland assessment in compliance with DOE requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) for the floodplain and wetland environmental review of the proposed F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina (Figure 1-1). DOE is proposing to install underground barrier wall/base injection systems to replace the pump/treat/reinjection systems previously used to remediate the contaminated groundwater associated with the closed F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at SRS. EIS-0120; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wetland Assessment for the

185

EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

120: Wetland Assessment 120: Wetland Assessment EIS-0120: Wetland Assessment F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this wetland assessment in compliance with DOE requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) for the floodplain and wetland environmental review of the proposed F- and H-Area Groundwater Remediation Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina (Figure 1-1). DOE is proposing to install underground barrier wall/base injection systems to replace the pump/treat/reinjection systems previously used to remediate the contaminated groundwater associated with the closed F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at SRS. EIS-0120; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Wetland Assessment for the

186

Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado. Notice of Floodplain and Wetland Action 5-20-2011 Floodplain and Wetland Assessment...

187

Executive Order 11990-Protection Of Wetlands | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90-Protection Of Wetlands Executive Order 11990-Protection Of Wetlands in order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the...

188

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

list of sources that may be used in determining the location of floodplains and wetlands, and allowing floodplain and wetland assessments for actions proposed to be taken...

189

Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wetland Rules (Vermont) Wetland Rules (Vermont) Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland

190

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil,… (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

192

Alaska ADEC Wetlands Regulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska ADEC Wetlands Regulation Author Alaska Division of Water Published Alaska Department...

193

12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

194

Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics 6321 Coastal oceanography · Instructor: Dr. Iakov Afanassiev · Office: Physics C-4065 · email: yakov@physics.mun.ca · Course Times: TBD Room TBD · Office Hours: unlimited · Web Page: http://www.physics

deYoung, Brad

196

draft data, November 2005 1 Mercury and Methylmercury Processes in North San Francisco Bay Tidal Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Westcott and Kalff 1996; Xun et al. 1987), dissolved or total organic carbon (Barkay et al. 1997; Krabbenhoft et al. 1995; Westcott and Kalff 1996), and wetting and drying cycles (Krabbenhoft et al., 2005

197

Methyl mercury dynamics in a tidal wetland quantified using in situ optical measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, particle sorption, and random episodic events such as wind storms and precipitation. Correlation significant risks to humans and wildlife as methylmercury (MeHg) is concentrated in aquatic food webs effects on the immune and endocrine systems (Mergler et al. 2007; Tan et al. 2009). In fish and wildlife

Boss, Emmanuel S.

198

Tidal Wetland Vegetation in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calystegia sepium, Phragmites australis, Typha lati- folia,maculosa N Phau Phragmites australis N Sala Salix lasiolepisarvensis N Phau Phragmites australis N Sala Salix lasiolepis

Vasey, Michael C.; Parker, V. Thomas; Callaway, John C.; Herbert, Ellen R.; Schile, Lisa M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimated Ultraviolet Radiation Doses in Wetlands in Six National Parks Stephen A. Diamond,1 ABSTRACT Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280­320-nm wave- lengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates

Knapp, Roland

200

Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

Wright, Bruce Albert [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association] [Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the

202

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agriculturalhas been available to help guide that selection. We

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands Bradford P # Society of Wetland Scientists 2011 Abstract Depressional wetlands are distributed through- out the United and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other

204

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH WHITE HOUSE OFFICE. The Interagency Working Group on Federal Wetlands Policy IV. Five Principles for Federal Wetlands Policy V wetlands program that reflects a new broad-based consensus among Federal agencies. For years, many have

US Army Corps of Engineers

205

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management What is a Jurisdictional Wetland? 1) Know the 3 USACE criteria that are necessary for an area to be classified as a jurisdictional wetland. 2 to meet USACE jurisdictional wetland criteria, and how to calculate percent dominance using the 50

Gray, Matthew

206

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

207

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source methane from wetlands will respond to future climatic change. Dr. Paul Bodelier (Netherlands Institute

Mühlemann, Oliver

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 constructed wetland Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . Wetland ecology Hammer, D.A. ed. 1989. Constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment: municipal... OF WETLAND SYSTEMS Autumn 2008 Instructor: Tom Whillans ESC B202.1...

209

Wetland regulations affecting coal mining and oil and gas operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the total acreage of wetlands in Appalachia is relatively small, the impact of wetlands on coal mining and the oil and gas industry can be significant. Wetlands are strongly protected from degradation and diminution under both federal and state regulatory programs, and both environmental protection groups and the public are concerned about the disturbance of natural wetlands. If an owner or operator of site is unable to obtain an appropriate permit, the presence of wetlands may completely preclude energy development. This article strives to provide an insight into the regulatory scheme surrounding wetlands and the risks of wetlands development.

Tokarz, A.P. [Bowles Rice McDavid Graff & Love, Charleston, WV (United States); Dulin, B.E. [Univ. Center for Environmental, Geotechnical, and Applied Sciences, Huntington, WV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip CF23 8RS Product Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates 51.48125°, -3.180734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.48125,"lon":-3.180734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Platform Test Platform Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Tidal Energy Test Platform Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Offshore Berth Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Tidal Testing Platform is presently a 10.7m long x 3m wide pontoon barge with a derrick and an opening for deploying tidal energy devices. The platform is intentionally configured to be adaptive for the changing needs of different devices. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None

212

Tidal Sails AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sails AS Sails AS Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Sails AS Address Standgaten 130 Place Haugesund Zip 5531 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +32 474 98 06 16 Website http://www.tidalsails.com Region Norway LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Tidal Sails This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tidal_Sails_AS&oldid=678479" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

213

Tidal Dissipation in Rotating Giant Planets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many extrasolar planets orbit sufficiently close to their host stars that significant tidal interactions can be expected, resulting in an evolution of the spin and orbital properties of the planets. The accompanying dissipation of energy can also be an important source of heat, leading to the inflation of short-period planets and even mass loss through Roche lobe overflow. Tides may therefore play an important role in determining the observed distributions of mass, orbital period, and eccentricity of the extrasolar planets. In addition, tidal interactions between gaseous giant planets in the solar system and their moons are thought to be responsible for the orbital migration of the satellites, leading to their capture into resonant configurations. Traditionally, the efficiency of tidal dissipation is simply parameterized by a quality factor Q, which depends, in principle, in an unknown way on the frequency and amplitude of the tidal forcing. In this paper we treat the underlying fluid dynamical problem with the aim of determining the efficiency of tidal dissipation in gaseous giant planets such as Jupiter, Saturn, or the short-period extrasolar planets. Efficient convection enforces a nearly adiabatic stratification in these bodies, which may or may not contain solid cores. With some modifications, our approach can also be applied to low-mass stars with extended convective envelopes. In cases of interest, the tidal forcing frequencies are typically comparable to the spin frequency of the planet but are small compared to its dynamical frequency. We therefore study the linearized response of a slowly and possibly differentially rotating planet to low-frequency tidal forcing. Convective regions of the planet support inertial waves, which possess a dense or continuous frequency spectrum in the absence of viscosity, while any radiative regions support generalized Hough waves. We formulate the relevant equations for studying the excitation of these disturbances and present a set of illustrative numerical calculations of the tidal dissipation rate. We argue that inertial waves provide a natural avenue for efficient tidal dissipation in most cases of interest. In the presence of a solid core, the excited disturbance tends to be localized on a web of rays rather than resembling a smooth eigenfunction. The resulting value of Q depends, in principle, in a highly erratic way on the forcing frequency, but we provide analytical and numerical evidence that the frequency-averaged dissipation rate may be asymptotically independent of the viscosity in the limit of small Ekman number. For a smaller viscosity, the tidal disturbance has a finer spatial structure and individual resonances are more pronounced. In short-period extrasolar planets, tidal dissipation via inertial waves becomes somewhat less efficient once they are spun down to a synchronous state. However, if the stellar irradiation of the planet leads to the formation of a radiative outer layer that supports generalized Hough modes, the tidal dissipation rate can be enhanced, albeit with significant uncertainty, through the excitation and damping of these waves. The dissipative mechanisms that we describe offer a promising explanation of the historical evolution and current state of the Galilean satellites, as well as the observed circularization of the orbits of short-period extrasolar planets.

G. I. Ogilvie; D. N. C. Lin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Incoherent internal tidal currents in the deep ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

‘Eleven months’ current meter observations from the deep Bay of Biscay were examined for the residual (incoherent internal tidal; icIT) signal, left after harmonic analysis using eight tidal constituents (larg...

Hans van Haren

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy storage inherent in large tidal turbine farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Research articles 1006 154 139 140 Energy storage inherent in large tidal turbine...in channels have short-term energy storage. This storage lies in the inertia...channels. inertia|renewable energy|storage|tidal|current|power| 1...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion...

218

Zarillo, G. A., and Brehin, F. G. A. 2007. Hydrodynamic and Morphologic Modeling at Sebastian Inlet, FL. Proceedings Coastal Sediments '07 Conference, ASCE Press, Reston,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inlet, FL. Proceedings Coastal Sediments '07 Conference, ASCE Press, Reston, VA, 1297-1310. HYDRODYNAMIC Modeling System (CMS) to investigate the morphological response to time varying forcing, sediment texture evolution of tidal inlet shoals is an important management tool, since they control sediment budgets. Inlet

US Army Corps of Engineers

219

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

220

Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation such as wetlands, hydrology, nonpoint source pollution, modeling, ecosystems, water resource management, watershed

Schweik, Charles M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems such as the rocky intertidal of the northeast United States and eastern Canada, the open beaches rarely exceeds 3.0 m at high tide, and some tidal creeks contain broad intertidal sand or mud flats

Mallin, Michael

222

Tidal Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Generation Ltd Address University Gate East Park Row Place Bristol, United Kingdom Zip BS1 5UB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product Tidal Generation is developing a 1MW fully submerged tidal turbine to generate electricity from tidal currents in water depths up to 50m. Phone number 4.41E+11 Website http://www.tidalgeneration.co. Coordinates 42.55678°, -88.050449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.55678,"lon":-88.050449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Tidal energy from the Severn Estuary  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... , a tidal power scheme could possess much of the flexibility of highly versatile, conventional hydroelectric stations, and many types of project have been suggested. To assess in 1974 the ... opt for thermal energy schemes (few are even now able to rely on further conventional hydroelectric sources, and stations which require fossil fuels are unlikely to be favoured in large ...

T. L. Shaw

1974-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

2008 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008. Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.'

David Teel

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Relativistic tidal properties of neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the various linear responses of neutron stars to external relativistic tidal fields. We focus on three different tidal responses, associated to three different tidal coefficients: (i) a gravito-electric-type coefficient G\\mu_\\ell=[length]^{2\\ell+1} measuring the \\ell^{th}-order mass multipolar moment GM_{a_1... a_\\ell} induced in a star by an external \\ell^{th}-order gravito-electric tidal field G_{a_1... a_\\ell}; (ii) a gravito-magnetic-type coefficient G\\sigma_\\ell=[length]^{2\\ell+1} measuring the \\ell^{th} spin multipole moment G S_{a_1... a_\\ell} induced in a star by an external \\ell^{th}-order gravito-magnetic tidal field H_{a_1... a_\\ell}; and (iii) a dimensionless ``shape'' Love number h_\\ell measuring the distortion of the shape of the surface of a star by an external \\ell^{th}-order gravito-electric tidal field. All the dimensionless tidal coefficients G\\mu_\\ell/R^{2\\ell+1}, G\\sigma_\\l/R^{2\\ell+1} and h_\\ell (where R is the radius of the star) are found to have a strong sensitivity to the value of the star's ``compactness'' c\\equiv GM/(c_0^2 R) (where we indicate by c_0 the speed of light). In particular, G\\mu_\\l/R^{2\\l+1}\\sim k_\\ell is found to strongly decrease, as c increases, down to a zero value as c is formally extended to the ``black-hole (BH) limit'' c^{BH}=1/2. The shape Love number h_\\ell is also found to significantly decrease as c increases, though it does not vanish in the formal limit c\\to c^{BH}. The formal vanishing of \\mu_\\ell and \\sigma_\\ell as c\\to c^{BH} is a consequence of the no-hair properties of black holes; this suggests, but in no way proves, that the effective action describing the gravitational interactions of black holes may not need to be augmented by nonminimal worldline couplings.

Thibault Damour; Alessandro Nagar

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

A model for the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon in harvested tidal freshwater marshes to surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems and its response to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The tidal freshwater marshes dominated by Phragmites australis (common reed) in the Chongxi Wetland are important components of the Yangtze River estuary in China. The litter from P. australis is exported to the surrounding estuarine area and the sea with the tidal flushing in the form of plant residue, particulate organic matter, and dissolved organic matter and is an important organic carbon resource of the East China Sea. A model was constructed using STELLA® software (version 9.1.3) to simulate the contribution of macrophyte-derived organic carbon to surrounding estuary and ocean ecosystems. The model is based on the monitoring and observational data from field surveys and published information on the Chongxi Wetland from 2008 to 2011, and the response of the total organic carbon flowing out of the wetland to global changes was also predicted in conditions of plant shoots that were annually harvested in winter. The results demonstrate the following: (1) the annual contributed organic carbon is 891 g C m?2, of which 612 g C m?2 flows out of the wetland directly as plant residue; (2) total organic carbon continually increases after a short decrease at the start of April of 2010, retains a high value from mid-July to mid-November and rapidly decreases to approximately zero during the harvest of the aboveground plant organs; and (3) accumulated annual organic carbon contributions to the surrounding estuarine and oceanic ecosystems are predicted to increase as the global average temperature rises, and the sea level increases.

Jiarui Zhang; Sven E. Jørgensen; Jianjian Lu; Søren N. Nielsen; Qiang Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deep Gen Tidal Turbines Deep Gen Tidal Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Gen Tidal Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The DEEP Gen 1 MW fully submerged tidal turbine best exploits resources in depths 30m The horizontal axis turbine is inexpensive to construct and easy to install due to the lightweight 80 tons MW support structure allows rapid removal and replacement of powertrains enabling safe maintenance in a dry environment and is located out of the wave zone for improved survivability

228

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System Second Edition #12; 1997 by the Wetlands Research Centre, University Wetlands Conservation Council (Canada) · Wetlands Research Centre, University of Waterloo Copies

Laval, Université

229

Mechanisms Controlling Phosphorus Retention Capacity in Freshwater Wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wetlands tested as wastewater filtration systems...HOOK, J.E., RECYCLING TREATED MU 148...WETLANDS AS A TERTIARY WASTEWATER-TREATMENT ALTERNATIVE...E. Sopper, in Recycling Treated Municipal Wastewater and Sludge Through...

CURTIS J. RICHARDSON

1985-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Characterization of Contaminant Levels in the P-Area Wetland...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18.2 ha in one of the smaller wetlands within DB known as Bay 96. Note: On the SRS GIS wetlands layer, Bay 96 includes additional area that did not receive CCW. For the...

231

Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last century wetlands have considerably decreased. The principal cause is urbanization, especially in large urban regions such as the Houston area. In order to protect the remaining wetlands, they have to be monitored carefully. However...

Villeneuve, Julie

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

Special points of inter-National Wetlands In-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special points of inter- est National Wetlands In- daba 2011 18 to 21 October 2011 Didima Resort & Confer- ence Centre Central Drakensberg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa www.wetlands.za.net/indaba Welcome

Wagner, Stephan

233

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2008 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

234

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA By KELLY CHINNERS REISS at the H.T. Odum Center for Wetlands for stimulating discussion and valuable input along the way of gratitude to the land owners and managers who allowed access to the 118 wetlands throughout Florida

Slatton, Clint

235

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

236

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to the Functional Assessment of Forested Wetlands in Alluvial Valleys of East Texas Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC

US Army Corps of Engineers

237

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS: A NATIONWIDESURVEY OF STATE; 8QFODVVLILHG 1RRISDJHV 3ULFH )RUP'27)#12; 5HSURGXFWLRQRIFRPSOHWHGSDJHDXWKRUL]HG #12;WETLANDS Title: Development of a Mechanism to Compare On-Site vs. Off-Site Wetlands Mitigation Conducted

Texas at Austin, University of

238

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Hawai`i and Pacific Islands Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-5 February 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

239

The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 #12;PREFACE The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in February 1994, and actions to better understand and conserve Tennessee's wetlands resources. This is the third edition goals for the upcoming years. The development of a Wetlands Strategy in Tennessee began in the fall

Gray, Matthew

240

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plains Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers March 2010 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-9 April 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

242

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

243

TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants treatment systems aesthetically pleasing. Wetland species of all growth forms have been used in treatment

Brix, Hans

244

Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 3 OBJECTIVES Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands goal. The action the Interagency Wetlands Committee recognized the validity of these objectives and the need for their continued the state's wetlands resource base more completely and identify the critical functions of the major types

Gray, Matthew

245

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

246

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Alaska Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2007 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

247

MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oceana Energy Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Kennebec *MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project *MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal

248

MHK Technologies/Tidal Sails | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sails Sails < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Sails.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Sails AS Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Sails device is a series of underwater sails affixed to wires strung across the tidal stream at an angle The sails are driven back and forth by the tidal flow between two stations at one of which the generator is installed Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 26:04.6 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Tidal_Sails&oldid=681675

249

California Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Coastal Management Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Coastal Management ProgramLegal...

250

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their ability to control floods. Regulations will be enacted with the consent of the Maryland Agricultural

251

MHK Technologies/Tidal Lagoons | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Lagoons Tidal Lagoons < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Lagoons.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Electric Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Dandong City *MHK Projects/Swansea Bay Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description idal Lagoons are situated a mile or more offshore in high tidal range areas, and use a rubble mound impoundment structure and low-head hydroelectric bulb turbines. Shallow tidal flats provide the most economical sites. Multi-cell Tidal Lagoons provide higher load factors (about 62%) and have the flexibility to shape the output curve in order to dispatch power in response to demand price signals. The impoundment structure is a conventional rubble mound breakwater (loose rock, concrete, and marine sheetpiles are among the types of appropriate materials for the impoundment structure), with ordinary performance specifications and is built from the most economical materials. The barrage is much shorter than an impoundment structure with the same output capacity, but the barrage is a much larger structure. The offshore tidal generator uses conventional low-head hydroelectric generation equipment and control systems. The equipment consists of a mixed-flow reversible bulb turbine, a generator, and the control system. Manufacturers/suppliers include Alstom, GE, Kvaerner, Siemens, Voith, Sulzer, and others.

252

Tidal Marsh Vegetation of China Camp, San Pablo Bay, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at China Camp continued throughout most of the 20th century,Camp tidal marsh that escaped diking and intensive agricultural modifica- tion in the 19th century:

Baye, Peter R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in North America Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR...

254

Hybrid Offshore Wind and Tidal Turbine Power System to Compensate for Fluctuation (HOTCF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hybrid system proposed in this study involves an offshore-wind turbine and a complementary tidal turbine that supplies grid power. The hybrid wind–tidal system consistently combines wind power and tidal power...

Mohammad Lutfur Rahman; Shunsuke Oka; Yasuyuki Shirai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers Wetlands used as part of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands;Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 January 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation

US Army Corps of Engineers

256

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543­546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 543 Neotropical wetlands: building links among wetland scientists J.F. Gottgens1, * and R in revised form 7 November 2003 Key words: Conservation, Millennium wetland conference, Neotropical wetlands

Gottgens, Hans

257

11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Wetlands Across the US But there is hope... Everything Is Connected Need Drives wastewater treatment faciliOes, combined sewer overflows, municipal stormwater, industry Annual cost of eutrophica1on in US freshwaters is es1mated to be $2.2B (Dodds

Gray, Matthew

258

2000 SSSAJ: Volume 75: Number 5 SeptemberOctober 2011 Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 75:20002007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from and extreme tidal events in coastal freshwater wetlands. Seawater affects soil biogeochemical processes in a freshwater wetland soil exposed to varying concentrations (3.5, 14, and 35 g kg-1) of seawater or salt (Na

Florida, University of

259

The Equilibrium Tide Model for Tidal Friction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive from first principles the equations governing (a) the quadrupole tensor of a star distorted both by rotation and by the presence of a companion in a possibly eccentric orbit; (b) a functional form for the dissipative force of tidal friction, based on the concept that the rate of energy loss from a time-dependent tide should be a positive-definite function of the rate of change of the quadrupole tensor as seen in the frame that rotates with the star; and (c) the equations governing the rates of change of the magnitude and the direction of the stellar rotation, the orbital period and eccentricity, based on the concept of the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector. Our analysis leads relatively simply to a closed set of equations, valid for arbitrary inclination of the stellar spin to the orbit. The results are equivalent to classical results based on the rather less clear principle that the tidal bulge lags behind the line of centers by some time determined by the rate of dissipation. Our analysis gives the effective lag time as a function of the dissipation rate and the quadrupole moment. We discuss briefly some possible applications of the formulation.

Peter P. Eggleton; Ludmila G. Kiseleva; Piet Hut

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Tidal disruption flares of stars from moderately recoiled black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......distribution and the uncertain physics of the last stages of...time-averaged tidal disruption rates. We then fit these functions...2.2Tidal disruption physics Stars that pass within a radius of an...characteristic mass return rate is (Phinney 1989......

Nicholas Stone; Abraham Loeb

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dynamics, diffusion and geomorphological significance of tidal residual eddies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... or parabolic sand ridges in tidal areas, such as the Flemish Banks in the Southern Bight of the North Sea. We now know that nearly all shallow tidal areas where ... Numerical/hydraulic7,19 model\t0.1\t2\t5x10-5\t4.10-1\tA\t44

J. T. F. Zimmerman

1981-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Technology AS Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address PO Box 399 Place Harstad Zip 9484 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2001 Phone number (+47) 77 06 08 08 Website http://http://www.hydratidal.i Region Norway LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: MORILD Demonstration Plant Morild 2 This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System Morild Power Plant This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydra_Tidal_Energy_Technology_AS&oldid=678333

263

A review of the tidal current energy resource in Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As interest in renewable energy sources is steadily on the rise, tidal current energy is receiving more and more attention from politicans, industrialists, and academics. In this article, the conditions for and potential of tidal currents as an energy resource in Norway are reviewed. There having been a relatively small amount of academic work published in this particular field, closely related topics such as the energy situation in Norway in general, the oceanography of the Norwegian coastline, and numerical models of tidal currents in Norwegian waters are also examined. Two published tidal energy resource assessments are reviewed and compared to a desktop study made specifically for this review based on available data in pilot books. The argument is made that tidal current energy ought to be an important option for Norway in terms of renewable energy.

Mårten Grabbe; Emilia Lalander; Staffan Lundin; Mats Leijon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

MHK Technologies/TidalStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TidalStar TidalStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage TidalStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The horizontal axis TidalStar device uses a bidirectional twin rotor turbine to produce approximately 50 kW at peak capacity in both ebb and flood tides Technology Dimensions Length (m) 6 Width (m) 6 Freeboard (m) 1 Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 5 Device Testing Date Submitted 46:38.3 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/TidalStar&oldid=681677

265

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of operating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of polishing electroplating wastewater in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland. Electroplating wastewater treatment or polishing in constructed wetlands (CWs) was studied to a very limited degree. Four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

268

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes .5% dis- count rate). Marine waters, wetlands, swamps, agricultural lands, and forests provide natural goods and services . The 1 . David Batker et al ., Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes

Vermont, University of

269

A retrieval of coastal water constituent concentrations by least-squares inversion of a radiance model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-component model of water color including phytoplankton pigment, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and suspended sediments has been developed and applied to coastal waters. A feature of the model is the possibility of varying the parameters describing the spectral backscatter of sediment and the spectral absorption of DOM when inverting the water-leaving radiance model. A linear least-squares technique is used to retrieve optical properties from the water-leaving radiance model. The radiance model is inverted to obtain the optical properties for each set of the parameter values. The set providing the minimum standard error of least squares inversion is taken as the final solution. An analysis of sensitivity of the solution to random radiance measurement errors was carried out. The application of the approach to coastal waters subject to tidal resuspension is discussed.

Vasilkov, A.P. [Management Unit of the Mathematical Models of the North Sea and Scheldt Estuary, Brussels (Belgium)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ARM - Lesson Plans: Coastal Erosion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of this activity is to study the coastal erosion (or deposition) by waves and sea level rise at a particular area. Materials Each student or group of students will need the...

271

Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since at the edge of the wetland." You plunge ahead, under the pine canopy, beyond the band of sweetgums. You wade back in forest. Your feet remain dry. You curse the tour leader. What wetland? Timing is everything

Georgia, University of

272

Wetland plant communities, Galveston Bay system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is the culmination of a field investigation of wetland plant communities, and is one phase of the project, Trends and Status of Wetland and Aquatic Habitats of the Galveston Bay System, Texas, sponsored by the Galveston Bay National Estuary Program. For purpose of the topical report, wetlands are defined and classified in terms of more classical definitions, for example, salt, brackish, and fresh marshes, in accordance with project requirements. More than 150 sites were examined in the Galveston Bay system.

White, W.A.; Paine, J.G.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland modelling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 42 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetlands pilot Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

several watersheds for functional assessments of wetlands and their position on the landscape... of hydrogeomorphic assessments, habitat availability and wetland functional...

279

Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from space shuttle photography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from space shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, the authors calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 1O[sup 9] m[sup 3]. Furthermore, the velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiaohai; Klemas, V. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Persistent DDE in the Mesopotamian Wetlands of Southern Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Screening of potential pollutants in surface sediments revealed that almost all persistent organochlorine pesticides were not detected in the newly flooded Mesopotamian wetlands of southern Iraq. This observation...

Ali A. Z. DouAbul; Sama S. Mohammed…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Operating experience with constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are treating a variety of municipal, industrial, and runoff wastewaters. The growing interest in this technology is based on 20 years of research demonstrating the beneficial effects of wetlands on water quality, particularly their ability to assimilate carbonaceous and nitrogenous wastes. Constructed wetlands are an attractive option for applications where a land-intensive, natural' treatment technology is desired and where ancillary wildlife benefits will enhance a project's overall environmental balance sheet. This paper summarizes design and operating experience from constructed wetlands representing a variety of applications, including pilot systems in place at several US pulp mills.

Knight, R. (CH2M Hill, Gainesville, FL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

FEMA - Executive Order 11990 - Protection of Wetlands 1977 |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Protection of Wetlands 1977 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Executive OrderExecutive Order: FEMA - Executive Order 11990 -...

286

Best Practices for Southern California Coastal Wetland Restoration and Management in the Face of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scenarios. As project-specific climate change implicationsmeet long-term project goals under climate change. BMP: Useto do a scoping project like the Climate Change Implications

Fejtek, Stacie M.; Gold, Mark; MacDonald, Glen M.; Jacobs, Dave K.; Ambrose, Richard F.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

An evaluation of the potential of coastal wetlands for hurricane surge and wave energy reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential, a segmented marsh may offer comparable surge protection to that of a continuous marsh. Wave heights are generally increased within the marsh due to the transmission of wave energy through marsh channels. Results presented in this thesis may assist...

Loder, Nicholas Mason

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and · improved shoreline planting suggestions and an updated list of plant vendors. See the new website at: http, bulkheads, groins, marsh sills and offshore breakwaters are already in place. A comprehensive manual

289

Evaluation and integration of ancillary datasets for coastal wetland landcover classification using Landsat TM Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

romeri anus Spartina spartinae Scirpus mari timus Typha spp. Phragmi tes australis other common species Borrichia frutescens Eleochari s parvula Typha spp. Scirpus olneyi Monanthochloe li ttoralis Iva frutescens Limonium nashii Suaeda spp...

Hinson, James Mithland

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Index of Biotic Condition Based on Bird Assemblages in Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phragmites australis tended to yield IBC values that were lower than expected based on environmental

Howe, Robert W.

291

Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the current speeds, current directions, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s?1, and a turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s?1. Flood and ebb flow directions are nearly bi-directional, with a higher current speed during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and the power densities derived from the current measurements can be significantly influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current speed data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current speed measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. This discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.

Budi Gunawan; Vincent S. Neary; Jonathan Colby

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to tidal and barometric effects to tidal and barometric effects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River,

293

MHK Technologies/Jiangxia Tidal Power Station | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jiangxia Tidal Power Station Jiangxia Tidal Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Jiangxia Tidal Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization China Guodian Corporation Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description There are 6 bulb turbine generator units operating in both ebb and flood tides with a total installed capacity up to 3 9 MW Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 3 9 Device Testing Date Submitted 14:15.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Jiangxia_Tidal_Power_Station&oldid=681601

294

Global Calculation of Tidal Energy Conversion into Vertical Normal Modes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A direct calculation of the tidal generation of internal waves over the global ocean is presented. The calculation is based on a semianalytical model, assuming that the internal tide characteristic slope exceeds the bathymetric slope (subcritical ...

Saeed Falahat; Jonas Nycander; Fabien Roquet; Moundheur Zarroug

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Severn Tidal Power Group STpg | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Group STpg Jump to: navigation, search Name: Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http:http:www.reuk.co.uks This...

296

MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsea tidal turbine subsea tidal turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description It is characterised by a turbine configuration on the seafloor, without impinging on the surface. These turbines are stabilised by gravity and/or are anchored according to the nature of the seafloor. They are pre-orientated in the direction of the tidal currents, and the profile of their symmetrical blades helps to capture the ebb and flow. The rotor activated, at slow speeds (10 to 15 rpm), by the tides powers a generator, which exports the electricity produced to the coast via a submarine cable anchored and embedded at its landfall.

297

MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stream Turbine Stream Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization StatoilHydro co owned by Hammerfest Strong Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A fully operational 300kW prototype tidal turbine has been running in Norway since 2003 and has achieved good results It s the world s first tidal turbine to supply electricity directly to the onshore grid In the autumn of 2008 Hammerfest Str�m signed an intention agreement with Scottish Power to further develop tidal technology in the UK A 1 MW turbine is currently under development

298

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado A Users Guide: Colorado Natural Heritage Program 254 General Services Bldg. Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado: User Guide to the Classification Project. Colorado Natural

299

Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title in 1987, assigning Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) responsibility for making wetland Surveys · Farm Service Agency crop compliance slides · U.S. Weather Service data · U.S. Fish and Wildlife

US Army Corps of Engineers

300

Conservation and Management of Vernal Pools/Temporary Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10/18/2011 1 Conservation and Management of Vernal Pools/Temporary Wetlands Katherine E. Edwards astatic waters · Geographically isolated wetlands · Vernal pools · Specifics- Carolina Bays, Karst ponds adjacent water bodies ­ hydrologically connected by groundwater ­ BUT pools DO NOT have continuous surface

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coastal mesoscale changes on Matagorda Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the coastal geomorphology of Matagorda Island. Based on the statistical and morphometric analysis of the coastal landforms, the island was divided into three distinct sub-environments: an erosional eastern zone, a transitional mixed zone, and a depositional...

Lariscy, Kevin William

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Local Coastal Programs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Local Coastal ProgramsLegal Abstract California Local Coastal Programs, current through August 5, 2014....

303

California Coastal Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Coastal ActLegal Abstract California Coastal Act 30000-30900,...

304

MHK Technologies/Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Scotrenewables Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Scotrenewables EMEC Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine (SRTT) system is a free-floating rotor-based tidal current energy converter. The concept in its present configuration involves dual counter-rotating horizontal axis rotors driving generators within sub-surface nacelles, each suspended from separate keel and rotor arm sections attached to a single surface-piercing cylindrical buoyancy tube. The device is anchored to the seabed via a yoke arrangement. A separate flexible power and control umbilical line connects the device to a subsea junction box. The rotor arm sections are hinged to allow each two-bladed rotor to be retracted so as to be parallel with the longitudinal axis of the buoyancy tube, giving the system a transport draught of less than 4.5m at full-scale to facilitate towing the device into harbors for maintenance.

305

MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stream Stream < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Stream Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Thames at Chiswick Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The TidalStream SST (Semi-Submersible Turbine) is designed for deep water, typically 60m+ (e.g., Pentland Firth) where it is too deep to mount turbines rigidly to the seabed and too rough for surface floaters to survive. Tidal Stream SST consists of turbines connected to unique semi-submersible spar buoys that are moored to the seabed using anchors through swing-arms. This ensures automatic alignment to the tidal flow to maximize energy capture. By blowing the water ballast, the device will rise, rotate, and float to the surface still tethered to the base to allow for on- or off-site maintenance. By releasing the tether arm the device can be towed to a harbor at the end of its life or for major repair or exchange.

306

Part II, Conclusion: Ecology and Regional Context of Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management and restoration; • Integration with a national system of reserves that employ similar approaches to conservation science

Ferner, Matthew C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Part II, Conclusion: Ecology and Regional Context of Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scales. the estuarine salinity gradient from predominantlyend of the estuarine salinity gradient (Vasey and others).

Ferner, Matthew C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are defined as projects that will permanently impact 5,000 square feet or more of wetlands or waterways, including the 100-year floodplain and are located in an area identified as

309

Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

Hinderer, Tanja [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: tph25@cornell.edu

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

TWO NEW TIDALLY DISTORTED WHITE DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identify two new tidally distorted white dwarfs (WDs), SDSS J174140.49+652638.7 and J211921.96-001825.8 (hereafter J1741 and J2119). Both stars are extremely low mass (ELM, {<=} 0.2 M{sub Sun }) WDs in short-period, detached binary systems. High-speed photometric observations obtained at the McDonald Observatory reveal ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming in both systems; J1741, with a minimum companion mass of 1.1 M{sub Sun }, has one of the strongest Doppler beaming signals ever observed in a binary system (0.59% {+-} 0.06% amplitude). We use the observed ellipsoidal variations to constrain the radius of each WD. For J1741, the star's radius must exceed 0.074 R{sub Sun }. For J2119, the radius exceeds 0.10 R{sub Sun }. These indirect radius measurements are comparable to the radius measurements for the bloated WD companions to A-stars found by the Kepler spacecraft, and they constitute some of the largest radii inferred for any WD. Surprisingly, J1741 also appears to show a 0.23% {+-} 0.06% reflection effect, and we discuss possible sources for this excess heating. Both J1741 and J2119 are strong gravitational wave sources, and the time-of-minimum of the ellipsoidal variations can be used to detect the orbital period decay. This may be possible on a timescale of a decade or less.

Hermes, J. J.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Brown, Warren R., E-mail: jjhermes@astro.as.utexas.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

311

Constructed Wetlands as a Mitigation Strategy to Reduce Pesticide Loads in Agricultural Tailwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlling the water purification capacity of wetlandsaffecting the water purification capacity of wetlands ( 19,

Budd, Robert L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach Proposed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mark David project will combine research, education, and extension on using tile-fed constructed wetlands and wood of wetlands using three constructed in 1994, while at the same time install two additional wetlands in other

David, Mark B.

313

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2010 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

314

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry­1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse

Amelung, Falk

315

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2011 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

316

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2012 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands

Gray, Matthew

317

GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 2 GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of the State of Tennessee to provide the maximum practicable wetlands benefits to Tennessee and her citizens by conserving, enhancing, and restoring the acreage, quality, and biological diversity of Tennessee wetlands. The management of wetlands

Gray, Matthew

318

Coastal Ohio Wind Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Protection Act (Massachusetts) Protection Act (Massachusetts) Wetlands Protection Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes regulations regarding the removal, dredging, filling,

320

Coastal modelling for flood defence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...follows. Before our review of coastal modelling...This is followed by a review of the state-of-the-art...indicated. Since this is a review paper, rather than a...until in September 1952 plans for increasing dyke heights...this was that the safety standard for the design water...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

RENCI Engagement Center for Coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

those related to coastal hazards CICS- NC Coopertive Institute for Climate and Satellites provides foci for collaborative research in support of NOAA mission goals related to satel- lite and climate data MAPS, MARSHES adaptation, this project assimilates results from the NCEESLR project and adds analytical visualization

322

Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

The land value impacts of wetland restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract U.S. regulations require offsets for aquatic ecosystems damaged during land development, often through restoration of alternative resources. What effect does large-scale wetland and stream restoration have on surrounding land values? Restoration effects on real estate values have substantial implications for protecting resources, increasing tax base, and improving environmental policies. Our analysis focuses on the three-county Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, North Carolina region, which has experienced rapid development and extensive aquatic ecological restoration (through the state's Ecosystem Enhancement Program [EEP]). Since restoration sites are not randomly distributed across space, we used a genetic algorithm to match parcels near restoration sites with comparable control parcels. Similar to propensity score analysis, this technique facilitates statistical comparison and isolates the effects of restoration sites on surrounding real estate values. Compared to parcels not proximate to any aquatic resources, we find that, 1) natural aquatic systems steadily and significantly increase parcel values up to 0.75 mi away, and 2) parcels restoration sites have significantly lower sale prices, while 3) parcels >0.5 mi from EEP sites gain substantial amenity value. When we control for intervening water bodies (e.g. un-restored streams and wetlands), we find a similar inflection point whereby parcels aquatic ecosystem restoration programs and increased public information about their value.

Nikhil Kaza; Todd K. BenDor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area(1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Notes Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters. References Hanson, J. M. (29 May 1980) Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects

325

MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Lunar Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Lunar Energy St David s Peninsula Pembrokeshire South Wales UK *MHK Projects/Lunar Energy Wando Hoenggan Waterway South Korea Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description he Rotech Tidal Turbine (RTT) is a bi-directional horizontal axis turbine housed in a symmetrical venturi duct. The Venturi duct draws the existing ocean currents into the RTT in order to capture and convert energy into electricity. Use of a gravity foundation will allow the RTT to be deployed quickly with little or no seabed preparation at depths in excess of 40 meters. This gives the RTT a distinct advantage over most of its competitors and opens up a potential energy resource that is five times the size of that available to companies using pile foundations.

326

NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

Smith, Brennan T [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KESC Tidal Generator KESC Tidal Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage KESC Tidal Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kinetic Energy Systems Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Newfound Harbor Project Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Generator is based on free flow hydrodynamics for regions that have flood and ebb tides. Strategically attached to bridges, pilings, river, channel, or sea bottoms, this multi-directional generator contains two sets of turbine blades. As the tide flows inward the inward turbine blades opens to maximum rotor diameter while the outward turbine closes into the outward cone-shaped hub to create a hydro dynamically clean surface for water to flow without drag. The center diameter is 75% of the diameter of the turbine blades at full rotor extension for stability.

328

Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules state the standards for classification of water supply. Each stream in North Carolina has a classification based upon its designated uses. These rules provide the Environmental Management Commission a method of setting standards. The rules also establish the physical, chemical, and biological standards required to protect each stream class. Each stream in

329

Impact of plant assemblages on nutrient removal in constructed wetlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four different mesocosm scale constructed wetlands - monoculture (Carexstipata), self-designed (passive) community, mixed planted monoculture-passive community and a non-vegetated control - were compared to assess the effects of plant community composition on the removal of inorganic nutrients from agricultural runoff (synthetic tile water). The mixed and self-designed systems consistently produced effluent NO3-N concentrations significantly below 10 mg/L, and had higher rates of evapotranspiration. Results indicate the type and composition of the plant community can impact the performance of constructed wetlands. Therefore, self-design of the plant community through the existing seed bank may increase the effectiveness of wetlands in treating agricultural runoff.

III">Ralph E. Spayd III; Shirley E. Clark; Katherine H. Baker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators THG Generators THG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Ramsey Sound Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system, involving relatively small revolving blades which gather power to a central collector, where electricity is generated. The generator, which is situated under water, is 80 metres square, stands at 15 metres high, and is designed to run for a minimum of ten years without service.

332

MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delay Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Delay utilizes an existing natural land formation such as a peninsula or isthmus that creates a natural tidal barrier separating moving rising and falling bodies of seawater As the seawater on each side of the natural barrier rises and falls the device captures the energy resulting from the difference in water levels across the barrier using proven hydroelectric technology The device utilizes a standard impulse turbine installed in siphon pipe over under the natural barrier

333

Tidal waves as yrast states in transitional nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The yrast states of transitional nuclei are described as quadrupole waves running over the nuclear surface, which we call tidal waves. In contrast to a rotor, which generates angular momentum by increasing the angular velocity at approximately constant deformation, a tidal wave generates angular momentum by increasing the deformation at approximately constant angular velocity. The properties of the tidal waves are calculated by means of the cranking model in a microscopic way. The calculated energies and E2 transition probabilities of the yrast states in the transitional nuclides with $Z$= 44, 46, 48 and $N=56, 58, ..., 66$ reproduce the experiment in detail. The nonlinear response of the nucleonic orbitals results in a strong coupling between shape and single particle degrees of freedom.

S. Frauendorf; Y. Gu; J. Sun

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix E.Chapman1 and B.Warner2 1 School of Life Sciences, 2 School of Sustainability, Arizona State University,Tempe, AZ Abstract Constructed wetland

Hall, Sharon J.

335

Resource Management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 28, Wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of wetlands on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted in 1990. Wetlands occurring on ORR were identified using National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) maps and field surveys. More than 120 sites were visited and 90 wetlands were identified. Wetland types on ORR included emergent communities in shallow embayments on reservoirs, emergent and aquatic communities in ponds, forested wetland on low ground along major creeks, and wet meadows and marshes associated with streams and seeps. Vascular plant species occurring on sites visited were inventoried, and 57 species were added to the checklist of vascular plants on ORR. Three species listed as rare in Tennessee were discovered on ORR during the wetlands survey. The survey provided an intensive ground truth of the wetlands identified by NWI and offered an indication of wetlands that the NWI remote sensing techniques did not detect.

Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be

337

MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kendall Head Tidal Energy Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

338

MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrage Barrage < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description No information provided Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 01:04.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Tidal_Barrage&oldid=681672" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

339

Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009... Major Subject: Ocean Engineering LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree...

Whilden, Kerri Ann

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

340

Extreme Value Analysis of Tidal Stream Velocity Perturbations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a statistical extreme value analysis of maximum velocity perturbations from the mean flow speed in a tidal stream. This study was performed using tidal velocity data measured using both an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the same location which allows for direct comparison of predictions. The extreme value analysis implements of a Peak-Over-Threshold method to explore the effect of perturbation length and time scale on the magnitude of a 50-year perturbation.

Harding, Samuel; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Bryden, Ian

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MHK Technologies/Tidal Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aquascientific Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Race Rocks Demonstration Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Turbine is positioned by anchoring and cabling Energy extraction from flow that is transverse to the rotation axis Turbines utilize both lift and drag Mooring Configuration Gravity base although other options are currently being explored Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10/8/2010

342

New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources July 7, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology Mike Reed Water Power Program Manager, Water Power Program Tidal energy -- a renewable, predictable resource available up and down America's coastlines -- holds great promise for clean energy generation. And now, a first of its kind database gives researchers deeper insight into the potential of this energy resource for the United States.

343

Modelling of the flow field surrounding tidal turbine arrays for varying positions in a channel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in velocity around turbines. This work demonstrated...output and overall efficiency were functions of flow...at arranging tidal turbine arrays such that the...Cummins. 2007 The efficiency of a turbine in a tidal channel...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Tidal Deposits of the Campanian Western Interior Seaway, Wyoming, Utah and Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The large-scale effects of tidal waves entering the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway from the Gulf of Mexico ... southwestern margin of the seaway, in Utah, Colorado and Wyoming are documented. Tidal currents d...

Ronald J. Steel; Piret Plink-Bjorklund…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

346

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

347

DC Connected Hybrid Offshore-Wind and Tidal Turbine Generation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Hybrid Offshore-wind and Tidal Turbine” (HOTT) generation system (Rahman and ... interconnecting method for a DC side cluster of wind and tidal turbine generators system are proposed. This method can be achieved...

Mohammad Lutfur Rahman; Yasuyuki Shirai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration 41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to ensure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

349

DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources March 10, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes. The successful test, which was managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), could help power plants economically meet criteria for water reuse or discharge established by the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System and the Clean Water Act.

350

Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic development and efficiency in the development process.economic development and efficiency in the development process.process has always been the assumption that wetland preservation should be balanced with economic

Steinhoff, Gordon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

H-02 Wetland Studies Annual Report--SREL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of local amphibian populations after the construction and start-up of the DWPF facility (Pechmann et al. 2001). Our current amphibian studies at the H-02 wetlands are a...

352

BOD5 removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The frequency of on-site systems for treatment of domestic wastewater is increasing with new residential development in both rural and low-density suburban areas. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) have emerged as a viable option to achieve...

Melton, Rebecca Hobbs

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Microbial Community Structure and Denitrification in a Wetland Mitigation Bank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...desired levels of ecosystem services. Restoration outcomes remain...freshwater wetland ecosystems. Plant Soil...communities and ecosystem functioning...hydrology in restoration of bottomland...Synchrony in aquatic microbial community...

Ariane L. Peralta; Jeffrey W. Matthews; Angela D. Kent

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

H-02 Constructed Wetland Studies: Amphibians and Plants | SREL...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) on planted bulrush stems Construction of the H-02 treatment wetlands adjacent to H-Area on the Savannah River Site (SRS) began during FY-2007. The...

355

Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and volatile suspended solids, NH?, P, and fecal and total coliforms. Differences between medium types in wetland performance were found for the parameters of BOD? and P, in which tire chip wetlands outperformed gravel wetlands. The average percent reduction...

Richmond, Amanda Yvette

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian - Restoration Project \ , Final Environmental Assessment DOENo. 0941 c Bonneville Power kdmi.nistration, Yakama Indian Nation, Bureawof Indian Affairs % J e;r%mBlYTlON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as a n account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes a n y legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

357

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Long-term hydraulic properties of subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS A Thesis by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree...

Turner, Glenn Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Australian Coastal Experiment: A Search for Coastal-Trapped Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Australian Coastal Experiment (ACE) was conducted in the coastal waters of New South Wales from September 1983 to 1984. The data obtained allow a detailed examination of the dynamics of flow on the continental shelf and slope and in ...

H.J. Freeland; F.M. Boland; J.A. Church; A.J. Clarke; A.M.G. Forbes; A. Huyer; R.L. Smith; R.O.R.Y. Thompson; N.J. White

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barrier Resources Act Barrier Resources Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Barrier Resources Act Year 1982 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] FWS Coastal Barrier Resources Act Webpage[2] The Coastal Barrier Resources Act of the United States was enacted October 18, 1982. The United States Congress passed this Act in order to address the many problems associated with coastal barrier development. CBRA designated various undeveloped coastal barriers, which were illustrated by a set of maps adopted by law, to be included in the John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System (CBRS). These designated areas were made ineligible for both direct and indirect Federal expenditures and financial assistance, which are believed to encourage development of fragile,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIDAL HEATING OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Brian Jackson, Richard Greenberg, and Rory Barnes Lunar and gas cleared away, and as the orbits evolved there was substantial tidal heating within the planets. The tidal heating history of each planet may have contributed significantly to the thermal budget governing

Barnes, Rory

362

An examination of patterns in coastal management: a content analysis of the Coastal Zone Management Journal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN EXAMINATION OF PATTERNS IN COASTAL MANAGEMENT: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF THE COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT JOURNAL A Thesis by JERRI LYNN EVANDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19S7 Major Subject: Reor cation Resource Development AN EXAMINATION OF PATTERNS IN COASTAL NANAGENENT: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF THE COASTAL ZONE NANAGEHENT JOURNAL A Thesi s by Jerri Lynn Evander Approved as to style...

Evander, Jerri Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

363

Connecticut Coastal Community Unemployment and Economic Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................................................................3 Employment Estimates .................................................................................................................................4 Employment Impacts and Multiplier Statistics' (BLS) monthly data 1990 to 2013, for Connecticut's coastal communities adversely affected

Alpay, S. Pamir

364

Summary Notes Marine and Coastal Faculty Forum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and affecting (climate) change. Ecological adaptation human (economic, social, political) and natural development as a positive PR vehicle. Examine FAU's existing strengths in marine and coastal issues; identify

Fernandez, Eduardo

365

Mixing in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mixing zone developed at freshwater-seawater interface is one of the most important features in complex coastal hydrogeologic systems, which controls subsurface flow and reactive… (more)

Lu, Chunhui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Enhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/3/07 Summary The principle that the net energy delivered by a tidal pool can be increased by pumping extra water into the pool at high tide or by pumping extra water out of the pool at low tide is well known pumping and generating worsens the intermittency­of­supply problem from which simple tide pools suf­ fer

MacKay, David J.C.

367

Tidal flow over threedimensional topography generates outofforcingplane harmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the barotropic tide [Munk and Wunsch, 1998; Egbert and Ray, 2000]. The transfer of this barotropic energy from energy conversion from the barotropic to the baroclinic tide. The generation of internal waves by tidal circulation is maintained by roughly 2 TW of mixing energy, about half of which is extracted from

Texas at Austin. University of

368

LOFT as a discovery machine for jetted Tidal Disruption Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of jetted tidal disruption events. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

Rossi, E M; Fender, R; Jonker, P; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Prandoni, I; Zampieri, L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heartbeat Stars and the Ringing of Tidal Pulsations Kelly Hambleton Andrej Prsa, Don Kurtz, Jim Fuller, Susan Thompson University of Central Lancashire kmhambleton@uclan.ac.uk March 27, 2014 Kelly 3 Summary Conclusions Future Work Kelly Hambleton (UCLan) Heartbeat Stars March 27, 2014 2 / 33 #12

Â?umer, Slobodan

370

Pasture and Soil Management Following Tidal Saltwater Intrusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When land is flooded by saltwater, as after a hurricane tidal surge, it can long-term effects on soil productivity and fertility. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded pasture land. Having soil tested for salinity is an important step....

Provin, Tony; Redmon, Larry; McFarland, Mark L.; Feagley, Sam E.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Influence of tidal parameters on SeaGen flicker performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Figure 12. Impact of flood...the tidal energy converter...quality of wind turbines and...interaction with the grid. In Proc. of the European Wind Energy Conf. (EWEC...characteristics of grid connected wind turbines...Sustainable Energy, October...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Presence and absence of bats across habitat scales in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract During 2001, we used active acoustical sampling (Anabat II) to survey foraging habitat relationships of bats on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Using an a priori information-theoretic approach, we conducted logistic regression analysis to examine presence of individual bat species relative to a suite of microhabitat, stand, and landscape-level features such as forest structural metrics, forest type, proximity to riparian zones and Carolina bay wetlands, insect abundance, and weather. There was considerable empirical support to suggest that the majority of the activity of bats across most of the 6 species occurred at smaller, stand-level habitat scales that combine measures of habitat clutter (e.g., declining forest canopy cover and basal area), proximity to riparian zones, and insect abundance. Accordingly, we hypothesized that most foraging habitat relationships were more local than landscape across this relatively large area for generalist species of bats. The southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) was the partial exception, as its presence was linked to proximity of Carolina bays (best approximating model) and bottomland hardwood communities (other models with empirical support). Efforts at SRS to promote open longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and loblolly pine (P. taeda) savanna conditions and to actively restore degraded Carolina bay wetlands will be beneficial to bats. Accordingly, our results should provide managers better insight for crafting guidelines for bat habitat conservation that could be linked to widely accepted land management and environmental restoration practices for the region.

Ford, W.Mark; Menzel, Jennifer M.; Menzel, Michael A.: Edwards, John W.; Kilgo, John C.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sediment rarefaction resuspension and contaminant release under tidal curren- ts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on experiment in tidal flume, this paper analyzes the sediment rarefactive phenomenon and hydraulic characteristics of sediment resuspension with different physical properties under the effect of tidal current. According to this experiment, sediment resuspension is related to the hydraulic characteristics of overlying water and its own dry density, namely the moisture content of sediment and deposition time. Generally, river sediment can be classified into the upper layer of floating sludge and lower layer of deposit sediment. Incipient velocity goes higher as the sediment layer goes thicker. Based on the experiment, incipient velocity formula of sediment can be obtained. There is a cohesive force among natural fine sediment whose resuspension is almost irrelevant to their diameters. Therefore, the critical incipient velocity is determined by the cohesive force instead of particle diameter. The lower layer of deposit sediment is generally not so easy to start up. And it will be rarified and release into the overlying water when contacting with overlying water. However, this rarefaction release velocity is gentle and slow. Under the same flow condition, annual loss amount of lower layer deposited sediment is about one fifth of upper layer of floating sediment. Flow velocity of tidal river and variation of the water level are asymmetrical, both of which vary under different tidal cycles. During long tidal cycle, flow velocity and water level change in the same phase and amplitude with tide. During the whole ebb and flow, flow direction does not change as the water level goes under the influence of acceleration and deceleration. As the tide cycle increases, the incipient velocity of sediment goes higher. This means that the long period tide cycle plays buffer effect on the resuspension of sediment, which makes the sediment not so easy both to start up and to suspend.

Peng-da CHENG; Hong-wei ZHU; Bao-chang ZHONG; Dao-zeng WANG

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Section 404 permitting in coastal Texas from 1996 - 2003: patterns and effects on streamflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies have found low success of wetland restoration projects required by compensatory mitigation (Josselyn Zedler & Griswold, 1989; Race, 1985). The frequent failure of many mitigation projects occur for many reasons. Created wetlands do not often... of the lost wetland. This is because mitigation does not always require restoration or creation of that same wetland type (Cole & Shafer, 2002). Finally, mitigation projects are often far from the location of the lost wetland. Consequently, wetland...

Highfield, Wesley E.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda Andrea J. Reid1 in their use of hypoxic wetlands in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda: the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae

Chapman, Lauren J.

376

Presence of Avian Influenza Viruses in Waterfowl and Wetlands during Summer 2010 in California: Are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of migratory birds. We collected water and fecal samples at ten wetlands in two regions (Yolo Bypass in fecal samples was higher from wetlands in the Sacramento Valley (11.9%) than in the Yolo Bypass (0

Mladenoff, David

377

Development of a multiple metric index for macroinvertebrates collected from lower Missouri River floodplain wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biological integrity of the aquatic ecosystem has become an important component for assessing wetland condition and quality. Aquatic Invertebrates respond to an assortment of abiotic and biotic factors. Many wetland assessments use multiple tier...

Koontz, Jason Alexander

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program

379

Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread · Precipitation and high water · Adapting to our changing climate · Assisting coastal communities Photo: WDNR #12 source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes

Sheridan, Jennifer

380

HOUSTON-GALVESTON, TEXAS Managing coastal subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOUSTON-GALVESTON, TEXAS Managing coastal subsidence Laura S. Coplin U.S. Geological Survey Monument was closed due to flood- ing caused by subsidence. Galveston Bay Houston Texas City Galveston Lake the 1975 Texas legisla- ture to create the Harris-Galveston Coastal Subsidence District

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis, Seaside Oregon, GIS, flood hazard maps, shoreline change, digital elevation model INTRODUCTION, 2006). The flood maps and GIS data are briefly described here. 100- AND 500-YEAR FLOOD MAPSProceedings of Coastal Zone 07 Portland, Oregon July 22 to 26, 2007 Coastal Zone 07: Wong 1 GIS

382

Riparian wetlands and visitor use management in Big Bend National Park, Texas'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Mexican States of Chihuahua and Coahuila. Big Bend National Park contains about 27,000 acres of wetland

383

Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zone Management Act Zone Management Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Coastal Zone Management Act Year 1972 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description The Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (CZMA; Pub.L. 92-583, 86 Stat. 1280, enacted October 27, 1972, 16 U.S.C. §§ 1451-1464, Chapter 33) is an Act of Congress passed in 1972 to encourage coastal states to develop and implement coastal zone management plans (CZMPs). This act was established as a United States National policy to preserve, protect, develop, and where possible, restore or enhance, the resources of the Nation's coastal zone for this and succeeding generations. References Wikipedia[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration[2] The U.S. Congress recognized the importance of meeting the challenge of

384

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

385

Population and Production Estimates for Decapod Crustaceans in Wetlands of Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population and Production Estimates for Decapod Crustaceans in Wetlands of Galveston Bay, Texas in regularly flooded wetlands of lower Galveston Bay, Texas, with data on small-scale (1�50- m) distribution sizes within shallow wetland habitats of the Galveston Bay system in Texas by combining regression

386

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Colorado Natural Heritage Program-8002 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Prepared for: Colorado. We thank the Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Wetlands Program and Alex

387

A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE LAPLATTE RIVER BASIN approach to examine phosphorus retention in wetlands of the LaPlatte River basin (13,723 ha), Vermont information system. Most wetland variables had significant (p

Wang, Deane

388

Urbanization interferes with the use of amphibians as indicators of ecological integrity of wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wetlands Jacquelyn C. Guzy1,2 *, Earl D. McCoy1 , Anna C. Deyle1 , Shannon M. Gonzalez3 , Neal Halstead1 Consulting Group Inc., 10150 Highland Manor Drive, Suite 200, Tampa, FL 33610, USA Summary 1. Wetlands disturbance. Understanding the responses of wetland species to human disturbance is essential for effective

Dorcas, Michael E.

389

Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

390

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams B.J. D'Arcy*, N. Mc these flows into riparian treatment wetlands for treatment before drainage back into the watercourse at the site is undersized (4950 m2 ) compared to the required wetland area (11,800 m2 ), but accommodating

Heal, Kate

391

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156 /'auteur. . #12;Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward Technical Report Series 156 Pacific and Yukon Region 1992 Canadian Wildlife Service This series mav be cited as: Ward, Peggy. Wetlands

392

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands Jurisdictional Delineations the length of time that wetlands jurisdictional delineations remain valid. In light of the need for national to the provisions in paragraphs 5., 6., and 7. 2. Since wetlands are affected over time by both natural and man

US Army Corps of Engineers

393

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91­104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving 1999 Abstract Constructed wetlands positioned in the landscape between row crop agriculture and surface. A potential exit pathway in constructed wetlands for detained water and possibly NO3 - -N is via seepage

David, Mark B.

394

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds P.C. Stouffer and Jason A's largest migratory routes for Neotropical migratory birds, many of which use the Maurepas wetlands during spring and fall migrations. Large portions of swamp in the Maurepas wetlands have converted to marsh

Stouffer, Phil

395

The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands Kurt F. Moser,1- graphy and soil nutrients (and trace elements), comparing results for created and reference wetlands in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially

396

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

397

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques Zutao of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606, USA Abstract: Wetlands are valuable ecosystems and south-central Canada, characterized by glacially sculpted landscapes and abundant wetlands, is one

Chen, Jiquan

398

Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands be obtained on disk from Neil McLean. Aberdeen Council is applying for funding to implement a wetland

Heal, Kate

399

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Updating Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual by Jacob F. Berkowitz PURPOSE: Regional supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual

US Army Corps of Engineers

400

Title: Amazon Basin/Eugene Wetlands (199205900) and Willamette Valley Wide Acquisition of Priority Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Amazon Basin/Eugene Wetlands (199205900) and Willamette Valley Wide Acquisition of Priority #12;Slide Title Here #12;West Eugene Wetlands Partnership · City of Eugene · The Nature Conservancy sp. in West Eugene Wetlands) Biological Diversity of Willow Creek #12;Federally Listed Species #12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

402

MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cohansey River Tidal Energy Cohansey River Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3829,"lon":-75.2995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

403

MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dorchester Maurice Tidal Dorchester Maurice Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3262,"lon":-74.938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Orient Point Tidal Orient Point Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0748,"lon":-72.9461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gastineau Channel Tidal Gastineau Channel Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":58.295,"lon":-134.407,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

406

MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Project Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3432,"lon":-73.9977,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1055,"lon":-70.7912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

MHK Projects/Paimpol Brehat tidal farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Paimpol Brehat tidal farm Paimpol Brehat tidal farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.869,"lon":-2.98546,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

MHK Projects/Turnagain Arm Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turnagain Arm Tidal Turnagain Arm Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.3378,"lon":-151.875,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

410

MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8146,"lon":-69.8697,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

411

MHK Projects/Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.389,"lon":-70.5134,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1008,"lon":-74.0495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5667,"lon":-73.922,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

414

MHK Projects/Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3501,"lon":-70.3995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Killisnoo Tidal Energy Killisnoo Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.4724,"lon":-134.56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.4072,"lon":-122.643,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

417

MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lubec Narrows Tidal Lubec Narrows Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8652,"lon":-66.9828,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2713,"lon":-73.0883,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

419

MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Energy Project Portugal Tidal Energy Project Portugal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.702,"lon":-9.13445,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

420

MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treat Island Tidal Treat Island Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maurice River Tidal Maurice River Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3261,"lon":-74.9379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

422

MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penobscot Tidal Energy Project Penobscot Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.5404,"lon":-68.7838,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cape May Tidal Energy Cape May Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9668,"lon":-74.963,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

424

MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salem Tidal Energy Salem Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5739,"lon":-75.5438,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

425

MHK Projects/Angoon Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Angoon Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.5034,"lon":-134.58,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seaflow Tidal Energy System Seaflow Tidal Energy System < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.2353,"lon":-3.8356,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Foreland Tidal Energy East Foreland Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.2223,"lon":-151.905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Margate Tidal Margate Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3793,"lon":-74.4384,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7778,"lon":-70.8489,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6324,"lon":-132.936,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Astoria Tidal Energy Astoria Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7172,"lon":-73.9703,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

Tidal power from the Severn. Volume 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim study on the generation of electricity from tidal power in the Severn Estuary has been carried out by the Severn Tidal Power Group (STPG) under a joint funding arrangement with the Department of Energy. Two schemes have been examined, one being an extension to the work carried out by the Severn Barrage Committee in 1981 under the chairmanship of Sir Herman Bondi, and relates to the barrage alignment between Lavernock Point on the Welsh shore and Brean Down on the English shore (known as the Cardiff Weston line). The other scheme would be much smaller with a barrage in the vicinity of English Stones some eight kilometres downstream from the existing Severn Bridge (English Stones scheme). The results of the investigation are presented. This book gives the main details on engineering and cost aspects for the CardiffWeston barrage work and discusses program implementation, economics, environmental and infrasture aspects.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Tidal power from the Severn. Volume 2B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim study on the generation of electricity from tidal power in the Severn Estuary has been carried out by the Severn Tidal Power Group (STPG) under a joint funding arrangement with the Department of Energy. Two schemes have been examined, one being an extension to the work carried out by the Severn Barrage Committee in 1981 under the chairmanship of Sir Herman Bondi, and relates to the barrage alignment between Lavernock Point on the Welsh shore and Brean Down on the English shore (known as the Cardiff Weston line). The other scheme would be much smaller with a barrage in the vicinity of English Stones, some eight kilometres downstream from the existing Severn Bridge (English Stones scheme). The results of the investigation are presented. This book focuses on the engineering and economic aspects of the English Stones scheme.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Atmospheric heat redistribution and collapse on tidally locked rocky planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric collapse is likely to be of fundamental importance to tidally locked rocky exoplanets but remains understudied. Here, general results on the heat transport and stability of tidally locked terrestrial-type atmospheres are reported. First, the problem is modeled with an idealized 3D general circulation model (GCM) with gray gas radiative transfer. It is shown that over a wide range of parameters the atmospheric boundary layer, rather than the large-scale circulation, is the key to understanding the planetary energy balance. Through a scaling analysis of the interhemispheric energy transfer, theoretical expressions for the day-night temperature difference and surface wind speed are created that reproduce the GCM results without tuning. Next, the GCM is used with correlated-k radiative transfer to study heat transport for two real gases (CO2 and CO). For CO2, empirical formulae for the collapse pressure as a function of planetary mass and stellar flux are produced, and critical pressures for atmospher...

Wordsworth, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Cook Inlet Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.6893,"lon":-151.437,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

436

MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BW2 Tidal BW2 Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3264,"lon":-74.9336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avalon Tidal Avalon Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1068,"lon":-74.7463,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.1169,"lon":-122.76,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snowhomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. DOE is a cooperating agency.

440

Extremely Close-In Giant Planets from Tidal Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planets that form around stars born in dense stellar environments are subject to dynamical perturbations from other stars in the system. These perturbations will strip outer planets, forming a population of free-floating planets, some of which will be tidally captured before they evaporate from the system. For systems with velocity dispersion of 1 km/s, Jupiter-mass planets can be captured into orbits with periods of 0.1-0.4 days, which are generally stable over a Gyr, assuming quadratic suppression of eddy viscosity in the convective zones of the host stars. Under this assumption, and that most stars form several massive planets at separations 5-50 AU, about 0.03% of stars in rich, mature open clusters should have extremely close-in tidally captured planets. Approximately 0.005% of field stars should also have such planets, which may be found in field searches for transiting planets. Detection of a population of tidally-captured planets would indicate that most stars formed in stellar clusters. In globular clusters, the fraction of stars with tidally-captured planets rises to 0.1% -- in conflict with the null result of the transit search in 47 Tuc. This implies that, if the quadratic prescription for viscosity suppression is correct, planetary formation was inhibited in 47 Tuc: less than one planet of Jupiter-mass or greater (bound or free-floating) formed per cluster star. Less than half of the stars formed solar-system analogs. Brown dwarfs can also be captured in tight orbits; the lack of such companions in 47 Tuc in turn implies an upper limit on the initial frequency of brown dwarfs in this cluster. However, this upper limit is extremely sensitive to the highly uncertain timescale for orbital decay, and thus it is difficult to draw robust conclusions about the low-mass end of the mass function in 47 Tuc.

B. Scott Gaudi

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004 3.1 GREATER EVERGLADES WETLANDS MODULE 3.1.1 Introduction The remaining portion of the Greater Everglades Wetlands includes a mosaic of inter-connected freshwater wetlands and estuaries (Figure 3

Gawlik, Dale E.

442

MEMORANDUM FOR SWG-2007-1623 Subject: Jurisdictional Determination (JD) for SWG-2007-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands Adjacent to Traditional Navigable Waters (TNWs) Summary The U.S. Environmental Protection wetlands for JD SWG-2007- 1623. This determination is based on our finding that these wetlands are adjacent interdunal wetlands for JD SWG-2007-1623. First, we provide a baseline assessment (in Section II

US Army Corps of Engineers

443

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu) and Chris Graves (cgraves2@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2013 Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 0

Gray, Matthew

444

Removal of nutrients from combined sewer overflows and lake water in a vertical-flow constructed wetland system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is planted with common reed (Phragmites australis). The constructed wetland is intermittently loaded

Brix, Hans

445

Tidal Capture of Stars by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent X-ray observations and theoretical modelling have made it plausible that some ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are powered by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). N-body simulations have also shown that runaway merging of stars in dense star clusters is a way to form IMBHs. In the present paper we have performed N-body simulations of young clusters such as MGG-11 of M82 in which IMBHs form through runaway merging. We took into account the effect of tidal heating of stars by the IMBH to study the tidal capture and disruption of stars by IMBHs. Our results show that the IMBHs have a high chance of capturing stars through tidal heating within a few core relaxation times and we find that 1/3 of all runs contain a ULX within the age limits of MGG-11, a result consistent with the fact that a ULX is found in this galaxy. Our results strengthen the case for some ULX being powered by intermediate-mass black holes.

H. Baumgardt; C. Hopman; S. Portegies Zwart; J. Makino

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Georgia Tech Savannah Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.tidalstreampower.gatech.edu/ Country: United States Web Application Link: www.tidalstreampower.gatech.edu/ Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 32.167482°, -81.212405° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.167482,"lon":-81.212405,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Making coastal research useful – Cases from practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Coastal research deals with that part of the sea, which is significantly affected by the land, and the part of the land, which is significantly affected by the sea. Coasts are in most cases densely populated, and the activities of people are shaping and changing the land/seascape of the coast. Thus, coast encompasses the coastal sea, the coastal land, coastal flora and fauna, and people. Since peoples’ economic and political preferences change and compete, the human impact on the coast changes is contested and subject to societal decision making processes. While some coastal research can help informing and constraining such decisions, many legitimate scientific efforts have little bearing on society. All decision making processes are political, so that scientific knowledge is not the dominant driver in such processes. Using cases from the Institute of Coastal Research of Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, we describe some of these potentially useful parts of science, and discuss under which circumstances the potential usefulness transform into real utility. These cases do not span the full range of coastal science. Important issues are the recognition of alternative knowledge claims, the inevitableness of uncertainties and incompleteness of scientific analysis, the acceptance of the political nature of decisions and the ubiquitous presence of social values. Modesty, self-reflexivity and skepticism are needed on the side of science and an organized exchange with stakeholders and public through designated “border” services.

Hans von Storch; Kay Emeis; Insa Meinke; Andreas Kannen; Volker Matthias; Beate M.W. Ratter; Emil Stanev; Ralf Weisse; Kai Wirtz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Coastal Management Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Act (Georgia) Management Act (Georgia) Coastal Management Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not

449

This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is doing to restore wetlands that are adversely affected by Monticello cleanup project activities. The purpose of the Monticello cleanup projects is to minimize risks to the public and the environment from exposure to uranium mill tailings and radon gas. The cleanup is being performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund. Wetlands Background A wetland is an area along a waterway, body of water, spring, or seep where soils are saturated by surface water or ground water often enough to support vegetation that has adapted to such conditions. While some wetlands are extensive, a wetland also can be an

450

On the origin of virtual wetlands by means of computer aided selection or the preservation of favoured places in the struggle for functional wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??To aid in reclamation planning for the Genesee Coal Mine in Alberta, I qualified the pre-mined state of wetlands and measured land use and land… (more)

Lappin, Kerri Lynne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acre-­?feet   10.    flood  wetlands   inches   11.    the  2006/2007  flood-­?up  season.    Sensor  ……………….  the  summer  until  fall  flood-­?up.   Figure  4.6.        

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project July 24, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Today, Energy Secretary Steven Chu recognized the nation's first commercial, grid-connected tidal energy project off the coast of Eastport, Maine. Leveraging a $10 million investment from the Energy Department, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) will deploy its first commercial tidal energy device into Cobscook Bay this summer. The project, which injected $14 million into the local economy and has supported more than 100 local and supply chain jobs, represents the first tidal energy project in the United States with long-term contracts to sell electricity

453

Fracture orientation analysis by the solid earth tidal strain method | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

orientation analysis by the solid earth tidal strain method orientation analysis by the solid earth tidal strain method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fracture orientation analysis by the solid earth tidal strain method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A new practical method has been developed to estimate subsurface fracture orientation based on an analysis of solid earth tidal strains. The tidal strain fracture orientation technique is a passive method which has no depth limitation. The orientation of either natural or hydraulically stimulated fractures can be measured using either new or old static observation wells. Estimates for total compressibility and areal interconnected porosity can also be developed for reservoirs with matrix permeability using a combination of tidal and barometric strain analysis.

454

MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Korea East West Power Co LTD Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 9 Commercial Scale Production Application Technology Description The tidal current power plant uses current energy that can be differentiated from a typical tidal power plant using marine energy The latter confines water in a dam and when released it gets processed in a turbine to produce electric power The tidal current power plant on the other hand does not need a dam thus concerns of social dislocations and degradation of ecosystems primarily endangering marine life can be avoided

455

DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy Point absorbers generate electricity by converting the energy in waves using a float that rides the waves and is attached to a moored conversion device. The Department of Energy's Water Power Program Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030, Energy.gov News Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States, Energy Citations Database Georgia Tech's Tidal Energy Resources Database U.S. Renewable Resources Atlas , NREL Tidal energy research in WorldWideScience.org OSTI Homepage Mobile Gallery Subscribe to RSS OSTI Blog Get Widgets Get Alert Services OSTI Facebook OSTI Twitter OSTI Google+ Bookmark and Share (Link will open in a new window) Go to Videos Loading...

456

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Coastal Energy (CCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CCAP) CCAP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Coastal Energy (CCAP) Facility Coastal Energy (CCAP) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Coastal Community Action Program Developer Coastal Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Bonneville Power Admin Location Grayland Coordinates 46.793272°, -124.065341° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.793272,"lon":-124.065341,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

International Coastal Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Biofuels Coastal Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name International Coastal Biofuels Place Tazewell, Virginia Zip 24651 Sector Biofuels Product International Coastal Biofuels is a development stage biofuels company that has proposed a biodiesel plant for Wilmington, North Carolina and is currently in negotiations for a second site in South Carolina. Coordinates 37.116177°, -81.518678° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.116177,"lon":-81.518678,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Oregon Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Management Program Coastal Management Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Coastal Management Program Name Oregon Coastal Management Program Address 635 Capitol St. NE Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97301-2540 Website http://www.oregon.gov/LCD/OCMP Coordinates 44.943778°, -123.026308° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.943778,"lon":-123.026308,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF LITTER REMOVAL ON NITROGEN CYCLING IN A TIDAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WETLAND AFTER ERADICATION OF PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS MIKAELA ROBERTSON Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 in these ecosystems. One increasingly common wetland macrophyte, Phragmites australis or the common reed, has been stands of Phragmites. In this study, we examined the effect of Phragmites australis litter on nitrogen

Lovett, Gary M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing of Advanced Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced $10 million to strengthen the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including wave and tidal energy sources.

463

Earth Tidal Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80) 80) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Notes Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

464

SINGH and BHATNAGAR Urban lakes and wetlands: opportunities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, urban water bodies commonly become cesspools due to lack of sanitation facilities. Delhi is continually it is not unusual for some of them to be referred to as lakes. Ponds and tanks are small in size compared to lakes:50,000 scale, however, the mapping for Delhi was carried out at 1:25,000 scale under the National Wetland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

Paparella, Francesco

466

MAPPING OF CENTRALAFRICAFORESTED WETLANDS USING REMOTE SENSING Julie; GOND1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to characterize land cover patterns of the second largest wetland area of the world (The `Cuvette Centrale to the time period of flood and solar intensity for this region, similarly to what is observed in biogeochemical cycles, including the methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) cycles in particular (Matthews, 2000

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

467

Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Streams: Pools (deep and slow parts) and riffles (fast and shallow parts) provide more areas for water'S OS Improve Water Q lit Better Habitat for W tl d S i Outdoor Research F ilit Education Established 2007 Nicholas School of the Environment www.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland Sandy Creek Restoration Project

468

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide mitigation Laetitia ROUX*, Julien chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment construction. The bibliography's study focus on two subjects: the tracer experiments and the constructed

Boyer, Edmond

469

"Wetland Management" Matthew J. Gray, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources University of Tennessee-Knoxville Lecture Structure I. Annual Cycle II. Waterfowl Diet the Annual Cycle Jan JulyMar Apr JuneFeb May Thermo & Pair Bonding Sp Migr Nesting: F Territory: M Broods: F Migration: Shorebirds #12;2 Managing Wetlands Throughout the Annual Cycle: Southeast Jan JulyMar Apr June

Gray, Matthew

470

List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 538 Tidal Energy Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-538) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Environmental Regulations Connecticut Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Biomass/Biogas

471

U.S./EUROPEAN PARTNERSHIPS IN COASTAL ATLASES AND COASTAL/OCEAN INFORMATICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these efforts or to identify best practices in terms of taking lessons learned into consideration (including are intended to advance research in the field by providing recommendations for best practices in coastal web, and the environmental organization Ecotrust, is an interactive map, data, and metadata portal for coastal resources

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

472

Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) Orleans Local Coastal Program (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources The Local Coastal Programs Section provides technical assistance, guidance, and management to parishes in the development, approval, and implementation of local coastal programs (LCP). Once an LCP has received federal and state approval, the parish becomes the permitting authority for coastal uses of

473

Shelf?break tidally induced environmental influences on acoustic propagation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous wave propagation in the 100–500 Hz band in littoral regions depends upon both time?dependent oceanography and bathymetry. The environmental influences interact nonlinearly in the acoustical time variation especially since the diurnal tidesurface height changes creates time?dependent total water depth. A submesoscale hydrodynamic model developed by Shen and Evans is used with tidal forcing and a simple shelf?break bathymetry to produce surface height variation and internal wave activity due to internal tide in a stratified ocean environment. A three?dimensional parabolic equation acoustic model is used to acoustically probe this environment at various bearings relative to the shelf break and the resulting internal tidal dynamics. In particular the acoustical results are examined for three?dimensional effects such as horizontal refraction. First the influence of bathymetry alone is shown and then compared to the full environment due to hydrodynamic action. The relative influences will then be compared by various measures such as modal decomposition acoustic energy summed over depth and signal gain degradation. [This research is sponsored by the ONR.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Magellanic Bridge: The Nearest Purely Tidal Stellar Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on observations of the stellar populations in twelve fields spanning the region between the Magellanic Clouds, made with the Mosaic-II camera on the 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The two main goals of the observations are to characterize the young stellar population (which presumably formed in situ in the Bridge and therefore represents the nearest stellar population formed from tidal debris), and to search for an older stellar component (which would have been stripped from either Cloud as stars, by the same tidal forces which formed the gaseous Bridge). We determine the star-formation history of the young inter-Cloud population, which provides a constraint on the timing of the gravitational interaction which formed the Bridge. We do not detect an older stellar population belonging to the Bridge in any of our fields, implying that the material that was stripped from the Clouds to form the Magellanic Bridge was very nearly a pure gas.

Jason Harris

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

475

Transport and Resuspension of Fine Particles in a Tidal Boundary Layer near a Small Peninsula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors present a theory on the transport and resuspension of fine particles in a tidal boundary layer when the ambient tidal flow is nonuniform due to a peninsula along the coastline. As a first step toward better physical understanding the ...

Chiang C. Mei; Chimin Chian; Feng Ye

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Underestimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physical model of the flow of energy in a tidal wave. In a shallow­water­wave model of tide, the true flow and h is the tide's verti­ cal amplitude. The tidal resource may therefore have been underestimated­page comment on the DTI Energy Review, Salter [2005] suggests that this standard figure may well be an under

MacKay, David J.C.

477

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ a Lagrangian formulation to obtain periodic solutions for the sediment transport over idealized bathymetries

Hogg, Andrew

478

EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions 385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Announcement The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for site selection for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. DOE hereby gives early notice that it will include in the Draft EIS a floodplain and wetland assessment prepared in accordance with the DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) and provides for early public input. DOE/EIS-0385, Department of Energy, Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic

479

EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions EIS-0385: Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Announcement The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) for site selection for expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, as required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. DOE hereby gives early notice that it will include in the Draft EIS a floodplain and wetland assessment prepared in accordance with the DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Part 1022) and provides for early public input. DOE/EIS-0385, Department of Energy, Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetland Actions for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic

480

Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal 6 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy August 29, 2013 - 2:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides and currents. Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the surrounding environment. "Wave and tidal energy represent a large, untapped resource for the United States and responsible development of this clean, renewable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tidal wetlands coastal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To estimate subsurface fracture orientation based on an analysis of solid earth tidal strains. Notes A new practical method has been developed. The tidal strain fracture orientation technique is a passive method which has no depth limitation. The orientation of either natural or hydraulically stimulated fractures can be measured using either new or old static observation wells. Estimates for total compressibility and areal interconnected porosity can also be developed for reservoirs with matrix permeability using a combination of

482

Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal 6 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies August 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Image of machinery to generate energy using tides. As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides, and currents. Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the surrounding environment. "Wave and tidal energy represent a large, untapped resource for the United

483

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment May 4, 2012 - 12:11pm Addthis Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? ORPC will deploy cross flow turbine devices in Cobscook Bay, at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. These devices are designed to generate electricity over a range of

484

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment May 4, 2012 - 12:11pm Addthis Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Hoyt Battey Water Power Market Acceleration and Deployment Team Lead, Wind and Water Power Program What does this project do? ORPC will deploy cross flow turbine devices in Cobscook Bay, at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. These devices are designed to generate electricity over a range of

485

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power

486

Using Geographic Information Systems for the Functional Assessment of Texas Coastal Prairie Freshwater Wetlands Around Galveston Bay.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to deploy a conceptual framework developed by M. Forbes using a geographic information system (GIS) approach to assess the… (more)

Enwright, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Influence of Coastal Wetlands on Hurricane Surge and Damage with Application to Planning under Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncertainties in the surge response arising from land cover for Texas central bays considering several land cover datasets. The uncertainties were quantified based on the mean maximum surge response and inundated area extent. Considering projected SLR...

Ferreira, Celso

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

488

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 - 7070 of 28,560 results. 61 - 7070 of 28,560 results. Rebate Coastal Management Act (Georgia) The Coastal Management Act provides enabling authority for the State to prepare and administer a coastal management program. The Act does not establish new regulations or laws; it is designed to... http://energy.gov/savings/coastal-management-act-georgia Rebate Coastal Marshlands Protection Act (Georgia The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act provides the Coastal Resources Division with the authority to protect tidal wetlands. The Coastal Marshlands Protection Act limits certain activities and... http://energy.gov/savings/coastal-marshlands-protection-act-georgia Rebate Connecticut Environmental Policy Act (Connecticut) Environmental impact reports must be prepared for all proposed projects

489

MHK Technologies/MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Morild 2 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing & Demonstration & Operation Technology Description Hydra Tidal´s Morild II tidal power plant technology at-a-glance: - A unique and patented floating tidal power plant - Prototype has an installed effect of 1,5 MW - Turbine diameter of 23 meters - Each turbine is pitchable - 4 turbines with a total of 8 turbine blades - Unique wooden turbine blades - The MORILD II can be anchored at different depths, thus it can be positioned in spots with ideal tidal stream conditions - The plant carries a sea vessel verification, and is both towable and dockable - The floating installation enables maintenance in surface position, and on site - The MORILD II will be remotely operated, and has on-shore surveillance systems - Technology patented for all relevant territories The Morild power plant is a floating, moored construction based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents. The 4 turbines transmit power via hydraulic transmission to 2 synchronous generators. Can be pitched 180 degrees to utilize energy in both directions. A cable from the transformer on the prototype to shore transfers energy.

490

Chemo-dynamical evolution of tidal dwarf galaxies. II. The long-term evolution and influence of a tidal field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a series of papers, we present detailed chemo-dynamical simulations of tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). After the first paper, where we focused on the very early evolution, we present in this work simulations on the long-term evolution of TDGs, ranging from their formation to an age of 3 Gyr. Dark-matter free TDGs may constitute a significant component of the dwarf galaxy (DG) population. But it remains to be demonstrated that TDGs can survive their formation phase given stellar feedback processes, the time-variable tidal field of the post-encounter host galaxy and its dark matter halo and ram-pressure wind from the gaseous halo of the host. For robust results the maximally damaging feedback by a fully populated invariant stellar IMF in each star cluster is assumed, such that fractions of massive stars contribute during phases of low star-formation rates. The model galaxies are studied in terms of their star-formation history, chemical enrichment and rotational curves. All models evolve into a self-regulated l...

Ploeckinger, Sylvia; Hensler, Gerhard; Kroupa, Pavel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

A large-eddy simulation study of wake propagation and power production in an array of tidal-current turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production in an array of tidal-current turbines Matthew J. Churchfield Ye Li Patrick...performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally periodic...those data are used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Optimization of multiple turbine arrays in a channel with tidally reversing flow by numerical modelling with adaptive mesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tidal energy and wind energy. In a tidal channel...current and hence energy extraction. Also...flow compared with wind turbine arrays where...captured the most energy over a tidal cycle...a) Adaptive grid An initial grid was...large to reduce the impact of high vorticity...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Coastal Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coastal Electric Coop, Inc Coastal Electric Coop, Inc Place South Carolina Utility Id 3844 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CP-1 Commercial CTOU Commercial ED1 Commercial GA Commercial GAM Commercial Industrial Industrial Large Commercial Industrial P1 Commercial Residential Residential Small Commercial Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1320/kWh Commercial: $0.1110/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Coastal_Electric_Coop,_Inc&oldid=410483

494

California Coastal Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: California Coastal Commission Name California Coastal Commission Address 45 Fremont Street, Suite 2000 Place San Francisco, California Zip 94105-2219 Phone number 415-904-5400 Website http://www.coastal.ca.gov/ Coordinates 37.7912419°, -122.397133° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7912419,"lon":-122.397133,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

495

Removal of dissolved metals by the Imperial and Brawley Constructed Wetlands, Imperial Valley, C.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of heavy metal removal by two pilot constructed wetlands in Imperial Valley, California. The… (more)

Bucher, Tiffany N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed… (more)

Grubh, Archis Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the… (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Quantifying Area Changes of Internationally Important Wetlands Due to Water Consumption in LCA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantifying Area Changes of Internationally Important Wetlands Due to Water Consumption in LCA ... This paper presents the inclusion of new, relevant impact categories for agriculture life cycle assessments. ...

Francesca Verones; Stephan Pfister; Stefanie Hellweg

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 57 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: . This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com...

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude saline wetland Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: basins of the world contain numerous freshwater, brackish and saline...