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Sample records for tidal project puget

  1. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  2. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  3. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  4. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced...

  6. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4Energy Smooth Brome Monitoring at RockyProject |

  7. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in North America Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR...

  8. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project : Summary of the Supplemental Draft Environmental Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    BPA and Puget Sound Power and Light (Puget Power) are proposing to upgrade the existing electric transmission power system in the Whatcom and Skagit County area of northwest Washington to increase the capacity of the US-Canada Intertie transmission system. The project would satisfy the need to provide more ability to store and return energy with Canada, would provide additional capacity on the Intertie for anticipated increases in power transactions, and would increase flexibility in operation of the US and Canadian hydroelectric system. It would protect Puget Power`s local system against thermal overloads, and improve local reliability. In November 1993, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Whatcom County (Washington) published a draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the proposed Northwest Washington Transmission Project. In order to present some shifts in need for the project and to permit additional review, BPA and Whatcom County have elected to issue a Supplemental Draft EIS. This Summary presents background material, explains project needs and purposes, and then focuses on alternatives and the possible effects.

  9. Puget Sound Reinforcement Project : Planning for Peak Power Needs : Scoping Report, Part A, Summary of Public Comments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-07-01

    This report summarizes public participation in the environmental scoping process for the Puget Sound Reinforcement Project, a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound area utilities study of voltage stability in northwestern Washington state. The environmental scoping phase of the Puget Sound project consisted of a series of public meetings and a public comment period. The content of these meetings is summarized in 2.0, Public Involvement. In 3.0, Comment Summary, the report summarizes comments received via meetings, mail and phone. The report ends with a description of the next steps in the project. Chapter 4.0, describes the decision process to be used by BPA and area utilities. Chapter 5.0 describes opportunities for public participation in decisions to be made about the future reliability of Puget Sound's electricity supply.

  10. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound Power & Light Company (Puget Power) propose to upgrade the existing high-voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit counties area between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995. A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the project was issued in November 1993, followed by a 45-day public comment period. Public response to the DEIS included the identification of several new transmission route alternatives in the Lake Whatcom area. BPA issued a Supplemental DEIS in April 1995 to provide a second public review-and-comment period. Rebuilding an existing 230-kV line to a double-circuit 230-kV transmission line was identified in the Supplemental DEIS as the Proposed Action. The Supplemental DEIS also examined in detail a North Shore Road alternative which was proposed by some members of the public. Public comments on the EIS were listed and responded to in the Supplemental DEIS. In May 1995, a second set of open houses and public meetings was held to review the Supplemental DEIS. Electromagnetic field (EMF) effects raised as an issue in the DEIS continued to be an issue of public concern in the meetings. The EIS has identified impacts that would generally be classified as low to moderate and localized. Effects on soils and water resources in sensitive areas (e.g., near Lake Whatcom) would be low to moderate; there would be little change in magnetic fields; noise levels would remain at existing levels; and land use and property value impacts would be minimal. Threatened and endangered species would not be adversely affected, and all proposed actions in wetlands would be covered by a Corps of Engineers Nationwide Permit. Visual and socioeconomic would be low to moderate. There would be no effect on cultural resources.

  11. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  12. MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbine operating in a narrow, tidal channel. The site is a generalized version of Tacoma Narrows, Puget Sound, Washington. The resource is a mixed, mainly semidiurnal tidal...

  14. EIS-0173: Bonneville Power Administration/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the environmental impacts of an upgrade that BPA and Puget Sound Power & Light Company are considering implementing on the existing high-voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit Counties area of the State of Washington, between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995.

  15. MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  6. MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. MHK Projects/Paimpol Brehat tidal farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  13. MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. MHK Projects/Angoon Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  17. MHK Projects/Pennamaquan Tidal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

  19. MHK Projects/Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

  1. Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

  2. MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers Island Tidal Energy

  3. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  4. Measurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    tides. The tidally averaged power removed from the tidal currents by form drag was 0.2 W m22 , whichMeasurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors SALLY J. WARNER AND PARKER MACCREADY the tidal form drag on a sloping ridge in 200 m of water that forms a 1-km headland at the surface in Puget

  5. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK ProjectsHawaii < MHK ProjectsITRI

  6. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/AlaskaInformation Project <

  7. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska

  8. MHK Projects/Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHK Projects Jump to:BrilliantClarence Strait

  9. MHK Projects/Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31BondurantCETO3 GardenCod

  10. MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31BondurantCETO3

  11. MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOyster 800 Project

  12. MHK Projects/Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend < MHK Projects Jump

  13. MHK Projects/Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend < MHKTWEC Project <

  14. Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    contracts will be in place for 20 years -- making them the first long-term tidal energy power purchase agreements in the United States. The implications of these agreements are...

  15. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  16. MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidal

  17. MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects JumpRockaway

  18. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects2 <Messina

  19. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDay 12:wasProjects | DepartmentAliMarkovitz

  20. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  1. Investigation of the 2-body system with a rotating central body (e. g. earth-moon system) within the Projective Unified Field theory: the transfer of rotational angular momentum and energy from the central body to the orbital 2-body system, the tidal and the non-tidal influences (mechanical, general-relativistic Lense-Thirring effect and cosmological PUFT-contributions)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Schmutzer

    2005-02-25

    In this treatise the well-known 2-body problem with a rotating central body is systematically reinvestigated on the basis of the Projective Unified Field Theory (PUFT) under the following aspects (including the special case of the Newton mechanics): First, equation of motion with abstract additional terms being appropriate for the interpretation of the various effects under discussion: tidal friction effect as well as non-tidal effects (e.g. rebound effect as temporal variation of the moment of inertia of the rotating body, general-relativistic Lense-Thirring effect, new scalaric effects of cosmological origin, being an outcome of the scalarity phenomenon of matter (PUFT). Second, numerical evaluation of the theory. Key words: two-body problem with rotating central body -- tidal and non-tidal effects -- scalaric-cosmological influence of the expanding cosmos on the 2-body system.

  2. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  3. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  4. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal...

  5. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  6. Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-11-19

    Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

  7. Tidal Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. For tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude.

  8. China Camp's race against the tides: Predicting tidal marsh survival through comparison of project sea level rise elevations and sediment accretion rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannah, Whitney; Kuhn, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    average marsh plain sediment accretion at 0.2 inches per2004. Tidal Oscillation of Sediment between a River and a2001. Is There Enough Sediment? Presentation at the State of

  9. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Michael Leroy; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Xue, Huijie; Johnson, Teresa R.

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as well as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.

  10. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  11. PUGET SOUND ENERGY, INC- 14-123-LNG

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on September 4,  2014, by Puget Sound Energy, Inc. requesting authorization to import and export a combined total of up...

  12. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2012-09-01

    Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded an RPD of 50% between years. However, they did not exceed the bioaccumulation critical values or the critical body residues corresponding to the no observed effect dose (NOED) and the lowest observed effect dose (LOED) with one exception. The Cd concentrations exceeded the NOED and LOED for the Manchester Lab Pier and the Pike Place Market samples. For the PAHs and PCB, the 2012 data were generally lower than 2010 and some cases significantly lower for PAHs and none of the available invertebrate benchmarks were exceeded.

  13. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7, 2011 | DepartmentFundsPreservationof Energy2 DOE

  16. Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7, 2011 | DepartmentFundsPreservationof Energy2 DOE1

  17. Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7, 2011 | DepartmentFundsPreservationof Energy2

  18. Manta Wings: Wave Energy Testing Floats to Puget Sound

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Power Technologies plans to test an intermediate-scale version of its wave energy converter device in Puget Sound later this year. The device, which is called Manta because its movements are similar to those of a manta stingray, sits like an iceberg on the water.

  19. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  20. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliams -Centre, | Open

  1. THE BANANA PROJECT. IV. TWO ALIGNED STELLAR ROTATION AXES IN THE YOUNG ECCENTRIC BINARY SYSTEM EP CRUCIS: PRIMORDIAL ORIENTATION AND TIDAL ALIGNMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Simon H.

    With observations of the EP Cru system, we continue our series of measurements of spin-orbit angles in eclipsing binary star systems, the BANANA project (Binaries Are Not Always Neatly Aligned). We find a close alignment ...

  2. Animal Behavior Area, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle and Department of Psychology, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Sean

    of Psychology, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma Thresholds of Response in Nest Thermoregulation by Worker

  3. Integrated Modeling and Decision-Support System for Water Management in the Puget Sound Basin: Snow Caps to White Caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Voisin, Nathalie; Richey, Jeff; Wang, Taiping; Taira, Randal Y.; Constans, Michael; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Tesfa, Teklu K.

    2013-12-31

    Final Report for the EPA-sponsored project Snow Caps to White Caps that provides data products and insight for water resource managers to support their predictions and management actions to address future changes in water resources (fresh and marine) in the Puget Sound basin. This report details the efforts of a team of scientists and engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) to examine the movement of water in the Snohomish Basin, within the watershed and the estuary, under present and future conditions, using a set of linked numerical models.

  4. Temperature and Tidal Dynamics in a Branching Estuarine System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Richard Wayne

    2012-01-01

    distribution of tidal energy. When specific locations ordissipation which may alter tidal energy in other parts ofAdditionally, changes to tidal energy reflection within a

  5. Reconnaissance survey of eight bays in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, J.A.; Crecelius, E.A.; Pearson, W.H.; Fellingham, G.W.; Elston, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1983 to 1985, Battelle/Marine Research Laboratory conducted reconnaissance-level field and laboratory studies to better characterize toxic contamination problems occurring in selected urban-industrialized bays (Bellingham Bay, Port Gardner - Everett Harbor, Fourmile Rock - Elliot Bay dump site vicinity, Sinclair Inlet) of Puget Sound. It was envisioned that this goal was best achieved by simultaneously determining levels of contamination in selected baseline or 'reference bays' (Samish Bay, Case Inlet, Dabob Bay, Sequim Bay). Two major tasks composed this effort. The first was conducted in 1983 and consisted of preliminary or screening surveys to collect and analyze sediment samples from 101 stations distributed in the four urban-industrialized bays (Figure 1), and at 80 stations distributed in the four baseline bays (Figure 2). The second task was undertaken in 1984 and involved detailed surveys and analyses of the same bays, but at a limited number of stations (32 in urban embayments, 16 in baseline bays). The stations to be resampled in 1984 were the ''cleanest'' of the clean and the ''dirtiest'' of the dirty as determined by the 1983 sediment chemical analyses, and within restrictions imposed by sediment type.

  6. Tidal evolution of close binary asteroid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, PA; Margot, JL

    2010-01-01

    a positive fractional power of the tidal frequency (at leasttidal bulges of the components as these will depend on the square (or higher powers)power, natural deviations from a spherical shape may exceed the amplitude of the tidal

  7. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  8. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such as gasoline and/or diesel) combustion as source inputs of combustion by-products to the atmosphere of the region and subsequently to the waters of Puget Sound.

  9. Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    amplitude [N x 107 ] phase relative to the velocity [deg] power [W x107 ] 1 2 3 4 tidal excursion parameterDissecting the pressure field in tidal flow past a headland: When is form drag "real?" Sally Warner waves eddies H L LHH H L L LH #12;Numerical model Gaussian-shaped headland Barotropic tidal velocity D L

  10. Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Kramer, Mirko Previsic, Peter Nelson, Sheri Woo

    2010-06-17

    To accelerate the adoption of these emerging marine hydrokinetic technologies, navigational and environmental issues and concerns must be identified and addressed. As hydrokinetic projects move forward, various stakeholders will need to be engaged; one of the key issues that project proponents face as they engage stakeholders is that many conflicting uses and environmental issues are not well-understood. Much of this lack of understanding comes from a limited understanding of the technologies themselves. To address this issue, in September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC, was selected by the Department of Energy, under their market acceleration program, to apply a scenario-based assessment approach to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector. The goal was to improve understanding of potential environmental and navigation impacts of these technologies and focus stakeholders on the critical issues. To meet this goal, the study established baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios captured variations in technical approaches and deployment scales and thus grounded the analysis in realistic constraints. The work conducted under this award provides an important foundation to other market acceleration activities carried out by the DoE and other stakeholders in this sector. The scenarios were then evaluated using a framework developed by H.T. Harvey & Associates to identify and characterize key environmental concerns and uncertainties. In collaboration with PCCI and the U.S. Coast Guard, navigation issues were assessed and guidelines developed to assure the safe operation of these systems. Finally, the work highlights “next steps” to take to continue development and adoption of marine hydrokinetic energy. Throughout the project, close collaboration with device developers, project developers and regulatory stakeholders was pursued to ensure that assumptions and constraints are realistic. Results concur with most of the permitting hurdles experienced by on-going projects in the U.S., and specific recommendations are provided for identifying and addressing them. While many areas of further research were identified, the study did not identify any major “show-stopper,” largely because these technologies have a relatively low environmental risk-profile if compared to other activities routinely permitted in the marine environment. The frameworks and representative scenarios developed provide an objective and transparent tool for stakeholders, regulators and developers to assist in the decision-making process for siting wave and tidal energy plants, and meet our goal of improving understanding between all stakeholders. The final product consists of three reports: Report 1 - Wave Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of four different wave energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations - A site characterization of two potential deployment sites located in Hawaii and California - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 2 - Tidal Energy Scenarios This report includes: - A technology characterization of three tidal energy technologies, including major technical specifications, device performance, and technical siting considerations. - A site characterization of one potential deployment location in the Puget Sound, Washington - Outlines of device installation, O&M and decommissioning activities - Navigational demarcation requirements - Deployment Scenarios, identifying all the major life-cycle-related impacts Report 3 - Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns This report describes frameworks for identifying key environmental effects and applies them to the wave and tidal energy deployment scenarios described in the first two reports. It highlights critical issues and recommendations for future research

  11. General relativistic tidal heating for Moller pseudotensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau Loi So

    2015-09-30

    Thorne elucidated that the relativistic tidal heating is the same as the Newtonian theory. Moreover, Thorne also claimed that the tidal heating is independent of how one localizes gravitational energy and is unambiguously given by a certain formula. Purdue and Favata calculated the tidal heating for different classical pseudotensors including Moller and obtained the results all matched with the Newtonian perspective. After re-examined this Moller pseudotensor, we find that there does not exist any tidal heating value. Thus we claim that the relativistic tidal heating is pseudotensor independent under the condition that if the peusdotensor is a Freud typed superpotential.

  12. General relativistic tidal heating for Moller pseudotensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Lau Loi

    2015-01-01

    Thorne elucidated that the relativistic tidal heating is the same as the Newtonian theory. Moreover, Thorne also claimed that the tidal heating is independent of how one localizes gravitational energy and is unambiguously given by a certain formula. Purdue and Favata calculated the tidal heating for different classical pseudotensors including Moller and obtained the results all matched with the Newtonian perspective. After re-examined this Moller pseudotensor, we find that there does not exist any tidal heating value. Thus we claim that the relativistic tidal heating is pseudotensor independent under the condition that if the peusdotensor is a Freud typed superpotential.

  13. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Bruce Albert

    2014-05-07

    The Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association was awarded a U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program grant (DE-EE0005624) for the Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (Project). The goal of the Project was to perform a feasibility study to determine if a tidal energy project would be a viable means to generate electricity and heat to meet long-term fossil fuel use reduction goals, specifically to produce at least 30% of the electrical and heating needs of the tribally-owned buildings in False Pass. The Project Team included the Aleut Region organizations comprised of the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association (APIA), and Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association (APICDA); the University of Alaska Anchorage, ORPC Alaska a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC), City of False Pass, Benthic GeoScience, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The following Project objectives were completed: collected existing bathymetric, tidal, and ocean current data to develop a basic model of current circulation at False Pass, measured current velocities at two sites for a full lunar cycle to establish the viability of the current resource, collected data on transmission infrastructure, electrical loads, and electrical generation at False Pass, performed economic analysis based on current costs of energy and amount of energy anticipated from and costs associated with the tidal energy project conceptual design and scoped environmental issues. Utilizing circulation modeling, the Project Team identified two target sites with strong potential for robust tidal energy resources in Isanotski Strait and another nearer the City of False Pass. In addition, the Project Team completed a survey of the electrical infrastructure, which identified likely sites of interconnection and clarified required transmission distances from the tidal energy resources. Based on resource and electrical data, the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  14. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL – A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  15. Dynamical modeling of tidal streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bovy, Jo, E-mail: bovy@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    I present a new framework for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams. The framework consists of simple models for the initial action-angle distribution of tidal debris, which can be straightforwardly evolved forward in time. Taking advantage of the essentially one-dimensional nature of tidal streams, the transformation to position-velocity coordinates can be linearized and interpolated near a small number of points along the stream, thus allowing for efficient computations of a stream's properties in observable quantities. I illustrate how to calculate the stream's average location (its 'track') in different coordinate systems, how to quickly estimate the dispersion around its track, and how to draw mock stream data. As a generative model, this framework allows one to compute the full probability distribution function and marginalize over or condition it on certain phase-space dimensions as well as convolve it with observational uncertainties. This will be instrumental in proper data analysis of stream data. In addition to providing a computationally efficient practical tool for modeling the dynamics of tidal streams, the action-angle nature of the framework helps elucidate how the observed width of the stream relates to the velocity dispersion or mass of the progenitor, and how the progenitors of 'orphan' streams could be located. The practical usefulness of the proposed framework crucially depends on the ability to calculate action-angle variables for any orbit in any gravitational potential. A novel method for calculating actions, frequencies, and angles in any static potential using a single orbit integration is described in the Appendix.

  16. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

    2008-11-13

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  17. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound and Northwest Straits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-12-10

    The hydrodynamic model used in this study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) developed by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth. The unstructured grid and finite volume framework, as well as the capability of wetting/drying simulation and baroclinic simulation, makes FVCOM a good fit to the modeling needs for nearshore restoration in Puget Sound. The model domain covers the entire Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, San Juan Passages, and Georgia Strait at the United States-Canada Border. The model is driven by tide, freshwater discharge, and surface wind. Preliminary model validation was conducted for tides at various locations in the straits and Puget Sound using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide data. The hydrodynamic model was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment model (GNOME) to predict particle trajectories at various locations in Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated that the Puget Sound GNOME model is a useful tool to obtain first-hand information for emergency response such as oil spill and fish migration pathways.

  18. Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2013-01-02

    Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

  19. TIDAL NOVAE IN COMPACT BINARY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jim; Lai Dong [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Compact binary white dwarfs (WDs) undergoing orbital decay due to gravitational radiation can experience significant tidal heating prior to merger. In these WDs, the dominant tidal effect involves the excitation of outgoing gravity waves in the inner stellar envelope and the dissipation of these waves in the outer envelope. As the binary orbit decays, the WDs are synchronized from outside in (with the envelope synchronized first, followed by the core). We examine the deposition of tidal heat in the envelope of a carbon-oxygen WD and study how such tidal heating affects the structure and evolution of the WD. We show that significant tidal heating can occur in the star's degenerate hydrogen layer. This layer heats up faster than it cools, triggering runaway nuclear fusion. Such 'tidal novae' may occur in all WD binaries containing a CO WD, at orbital periods between 5 minutes and 20 minutes, and precede the final merger by 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  20. MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation,Lyons,International

  1. MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave Park <Energy

  2. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend < MHKTWECThe

  3. Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open Energy Information ThreeTianDi GrowthTibagiTidal

  4. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  5. Dispersion and Tidal Dynamics of Channel-Shoal Estuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holleman, Christopher Dean

    2013-01-01

    San Pablo Bay: ? M 2 and tidal energy flux for the hNS0? M 2 and tidal energy flux for hNS0. . . . . . . . . . .areas dissipate incident tidal energy, countering the added

  6. Sandia Energy - Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Water Power Technology Development Tidal & Current Modeling Development and...

  7. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M~"AGEMENT ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Miller Miller & Hanson Page 1 of2 STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE: Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project...

  8. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pani, Paolo; Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole mom...

  9. The Arches Cluster: Extended Structure and Tidal Radius

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, Matthew W; Anderson, Jay; Ghez, Andrea M; Morris, Mark R; Clarkson, William I

    2015-01-01

    At a projected distance of ~26 pc from Sgr A*, the Arches cluster provides insight to star formation in the extreme Galactic Center (GC) environment. Despite its importance, many key properties such as the cluster's internal structure and orbital history are not well known. We present an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster (R > 6.25") using HST WFC3IR. Using proper motions we calculate membership probabilities for stars down to F153M = 20 mag (~2.5 M_sun) over a 120" x 120" field of view, an area 144 times larger than previous astrometric studies of the cluster. We construct the radial profile of the Arches to a radius of 75" (~3 pc at 8 kpc), which can be well described by a single power law. From this profile we place a 3-sigma lower limit of 2.8 pc on the observed tidal radius, which is larger than the predicted tidal radius (1 - 2.5 pc). Evidence of mass segregation is observed throughout the cluster and no tidal tail structures are apparent along the orbital path. ...

  10. Tidal deformations of a spinning compact object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Pani; Leonardo Gualtieri; Andrea Maselli; Valeria Ferrari

    2015-06-30

    The deformability of a compact object induced by a perturbing tidal field is encoded in the tidal Love numbers, which depend sensibly on the object's internal structure. These numbers are known only for static, spherically-symmetric objects. As a first step to compute the tidal Love numbers of a spinning compact star, here we extend powerful perturbative techniques to compute the exterior geometry of a spinning object distorted by an axisymmetric tidal field to second order in the angular momentum. The spin of the object introduces couplings between electric and magnetic deformations and new classes of induced Love numbers emerge. For example, a spinning object immersed in a quadrupolar, electric tidal field can acquire some induced mass, spin, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole moments to second order in the spin. The deformations are encoded in a set of inhomogeneous differential equations which, remarkably, can be solved analytically in vacuum. We discuss certain subtleties in defining the multipole moments of the central object, which are due to the difficulty in separating the tidal field from the linear response of the object in the solution. By extending the standard procedure to identify the linear response in the static case, we prove analytically that the Love numbers of a Kerr black hole remain zero to second order in the spin. As a by-product, we provide the explicit form for a slowly-rotating, tidally-deformed Kerr black hole to quadratic order in the spin, and discuss its geodesic and geometrical properties.

  11. Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

    2012-09-01

    This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

  12. 12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

  13. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2010 Regional Mussel Watch (AMB02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2010-10-20

    The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) and Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton (Shipyard) located in Bremerton, WA are committed to a culture of continuous process improvement for all aspects of Shipyard operations, including reducing the releases of hazardous materials and waste in discharges from the Shipyard. Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, a cooperative project among PSNS&IMF, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders (US Navy, EPA and Ecology 2002) has been helping to improve the environmental quality of the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet Watershed (ENVVEST 2006). An ambient monitoring program for sediment, water, and indigenous mussels began in 2009 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. This document presents the 2010 chemical residue data and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) for the regional mussel watch stations located in Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. Indigenous bivalves were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc. The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These chemical residue data provide the first year of the biota ambient monitoring.

  14. Tidal Forces in Naked Singularity Backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Akash; Roy, Pratim; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2015-01-01

    The end stage of a gravitational collapse process can generically result in a black hole or a naked singularity. Here we undertake a comparative analysis of the nature of tidal forces in these backgrounds. The effect of such forces is generically exemplified by the Roche limit, which predicts the distance within which a celestial object disintegrates due to the tidal effects of a second more massive object. In this paper, using Fermi normal coordinates, we numerically compute the Roche limit for a class of non-rotating naked singularity backgrounds, and compare them with known results for Schwarzschild black holes. Our analysis indicates that there might be substantially large deviations in the magnitudes of tidal forces in naked singularity backgrounds, compared to the black hole cases. If observationally established, these can prove to be an effective indicator of the nature of the singularity at a galactic centre.

  15. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  16. Tidal analysis of water level in continental boreholes Version 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily

    tidal analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4.3.1 The "credo

  17. The rotation and fracture history of Europa from modeling of tidal-tectonic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose

    2011-01-01

    the tidal stresses. They adopted a power-law viscoelasticpower of the model. However, the mechanics of tidal walking

  18. Tidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    of three, we quantify various tidal network properties including common power law relationships which have common power law relationships quantified for terrestrial systems to tidal systems and use these analysesTidal networks 2. Watershed delineation and comparative network morphology Andrea Rinaldo,1 Sergio

  19. Enhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    to demand into high­value demand­following power; and second, it can simultaneously serve as a tidal powerEnhancing Electrical Supply by Pumped Storage in Tidal Lagoons David J.C. MacKay Cavendish/3/07 Summary The principle that the net energy delivered by a tidal pool can be increased by pumping extra

  20. Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Tidal networks 3. Landscape-forming discharges and studies in empirical geomorphic relationships peak ebb and flood discharges throughout a tidal network and use this model to investigate scaling flows are driven by spring (astronomical) tidal fluctuations (rather than precipitation- induced runoff

  1. Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary I. Matsuyama1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Rotational stability of tidally deformed planetary bodies I. Matsuyama1 and F. Nimmo2 Received 11 consider the true polar wander (rotational variations driven by mass redistribution) of tidally deformed planetary bodies. The rotation pole of bodies without tidal deformation is stabilized by the component

  2. Research papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calibration derived from a set of sensitivity experiments to model parameters. The tidal energy budgetResearch papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin Nguyen Nguyet Minh a,c , Marchesiello of this study is to revisit the dominant physical processes that characterize tidal dynamics in the Gulf

  3. TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Jensen& Aat Barendregt 7. Animal communities in North American tidal fresh- water wetlands Christopher W Struyf, Tom Maris, Tom Cox & Patrick Meire 12. Carbon flows, nutrient cycling, and food webs in tidal

  4. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  6. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Appendix E, Transmission Reinforcement Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this appendix to the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) report is to provide an update of the latest study work done on transmission system options for the Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Also included in the attachments to the EIS are 2 reports analyzing the voltage stability of the Puget Sound transmission system and a review by Power Technologies, Inc. of the BPA voltage stability analysis and reactive options. Five transmission line options and several reactive options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAFRP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. Plans were designed to provide at least 500 MVAR reactive margin.

  7. Contaminant Mass Balance for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crecelius, Eric A.; Johnston, Robert K.; Leather, Jim; Guerrero, Joel; Miller, Martin C.; Brandenberger, Jill M.

    2003-04-03

    Sinclair Inlet and Dyes Inlets have historically received contaminates from military installations, industrial activities, municipal outfalls, and other nonpoint sources. For the purpose of determining a ?total maximum daily load? (TMDL) of contaminants for the Inlets, a contaminant mass balance for the sediments is being developed. Sediment cores and traps were collected from depositional areas of the Inlets and surface sediment grabs were collected from fluvial deposits associated with major drainage areas into the Inlets. All sediment samples were screened using X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) for metals, UV fluorescence for organics (PAHs), and immunoassay for PCBs. A subset of split-samples was analyzed using ICP/MS for metals and GC/MS for phthalates, PAHs, and PCBs. Sediment cores were age-dated using radionuclides to determine the sedimentation rate and the history of sediment contamination. Streams and storm water outfalls were sampled in both the wet and dry seasons to assess loading from the watershed. Seawater samples collected from the marine waters of the Inlets and boundary passages to central Puget Sound were used to estimate the exchange of contaminates with central Puget Sound. The historical trends from the cores indicate that contamination was at a maximum in the middle of the 1900s and decreased significantly by the late 1900s. The thickness of the contaminated sediment is in the range of 30 to 50 cm.

  8. Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dissecting the pressure field in tidal flow past a headland: When is form drag "real?" Sally Warner of oscillating flow H L HL velocity form drag power average power floodslack work done on system #12;0 0 0 0 90 180 270 360 90 180 270 360 0 degrees Drag of oscillating flow H L HL velocity form drag power average

  9. Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Potential Presence of Endangered Wildlife Species at the University of Delaware Wind Power Project wind power project site, we conducted an analysis of the suitability of habitat within the project would be located. Within the tidal marsh there were also tidal creeks and guts. The following list

  10. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Sérsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup –1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  11. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  12. Puget Sound Operational Forecast System - A Real-time Predictive Tool for Marine Resource Management and Emergency Responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Chase, Jared M.; Wang, Taiping

    2009-12-01

    To support marine ecological resource management and emergency response and to enhance scientific understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes in Puget Sound, a real-time Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OFS) was developed by the Coastal Ocean Dynamics & Ecosystem Modeling group (CODEM) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PS-OFS employs the state-of-the-art three-dimensional coastal ocean model and closely follows the standards and procedures established by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS). PS-OFS consists of four key components supporting the Puget Sound Circulation and Transport Model (PS-CTM): data acquisition, model execution and product archive, model skill assessment, and model results dissemination. This paper provides an overview of PS-OFS and its ability to provide vital real-time oceanographic information to the Puget Sound community. PS-OFS supports pacific northwest region’s growing need for a predictive tool to assist water quality management, fish stock recovery efforts, maritime emergency response, nearshore land-use planning, and the challenge of climate change and sea level rise impacts. The structure of PS-OFS and examples of the system inputs and outputs, forecast results are presented in details.

  13. VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait of Juan de Fuca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait Oil Spill Maritime Simulation Incident Data Expert Judgment & Accident Data Oil Outflow Model TOTAL 2010 TRAFFIC DENSITY 75.2% - NON Focus Vessel 17.0% - CARGO Focus Vessel 7.8% - OIL Focus Vessel + 100

  14. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  15. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2HeldTidal Energy Resource

  16. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

  17. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that will harness the power of the massive tides of Cobscook Bay to generate clean electricity. At a public dedication event this afternoon, Portland-based Ocean Renewable...

  18. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24, 2012 - 2:40pm Addthis Captain Gerald "Gerry" Morrison, Vice President of Perry Marine & Consctruction. | Photo Courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company. Captain Gerald...

  19. MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave Park < MHKIsland Bend

  20. MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave Park

  1. MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave ParkDouglas County WaveEast

  2. MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter

  3. MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon CoveHydroKachemak

  4. MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf

  5. MHK Projects/Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|

  6. MHK Projects/Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|Myette Point <

  7. MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|MyetteNavitasOrcadian

  8. MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend < MHKTWECTheGeneration Ltd

  9. MHK Projects/Turnagain Arm Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend <

  10. MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal

  11. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  12. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE for Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and Restoring Tidal Salt Marsh and Associated Habitats over) Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and (2) Restoring tidal salt marsh

  13. Reference Model #1 - Tidal Energy: Resource Dr. Brian Polagye

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    constituents, as well as the aharmonic response to these currents induced by local topography and bathymetry. Aharmonic currents are not described by tidal constituents, but are...

  14. Investigation of Tidal Exchange and the Formation of Tidal Vortices at Aransas Pass, Texas, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whilden, Kerri Ann

    2015-08-11

    Laboratory and field measurements are presented as part of a study of tidal exchange through Aransas Pass, Texas. At the mouth of Aransas Pass, the input of circulation by the ebb tide forces the formation of a starting-jet dipole vortex...

  15. The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    . They are most abundant along the Atlantic Seaboard from New Jersey to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast). Tidal creeks are especially abundant in low-energy systems such as protected areas behind barrier. As an example, the four southernmost coastal counties in North Carolina (Onslow, Pender, New Hanover

  16. Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open Energy Information ThreeTianDi GrowthTibagiTidalTest

  17. Wind and tidal response of a semi-enclosed bay, Bahía Concepción, Baja California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponte, Aurélien L. S.

    2009-01-01

    J. H. , 1973: Tidal patterns and energy balance in the GulfTable 4.1). Because the tidal energy is similar between boththe mouth. Some energy is captured by the tidal analysis at

  18. Ocean Tidal Dissipation and its Role in Solar System Satellite Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Erinna

    2013-01-01

    Significant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean2001. Estimates of M 2 tidal energy dissipation from TOPEX/e.g. the ocean kinetic energy and tidal dissipation, using a

  19. Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    tidal disruption rate as a function of pericenter distance at various energies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Tidal disruption rate as a function of pericenter distance at various energies2.5: Spectral energy distributions for tidal flares around a

  20. Binary asteroid systems: Tidal end states and estimates of material properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, PA; Margot, JL

    2011-01-01

    tidal evolution and then discuss stability limits and energyon tidal evolution. Angular momentum and energy content Theenergy can be dissipated as heat as a result of internal friction due to tidal ?

  1. Results of an in-situ mussel bioassay in the Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houkal, D.; Rummel, B.; Shephard, B.

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological evaluation in the Puget Sound, Washington, an in situ bioassay using the blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) was conducted to determine the effect of sediment-borne chemicals on bioaccumulation and growth of shellfish. The assay included four sample stations from a contaminated embayment (Sinclair Inlet) and one station from a reference site (Holmes Harbor). At each station, 300 mussels were deployed 1 meter above the sediment surface and maintained for a period of 3 months. The length and total weight of each mussel was measured at the beginning of the exposure period and the length, total weight, tissue weight, and shell weight of each mussel was measured at the end of the exposure period. Composite tissue samples from 100 mussels were collected at the beginning and end of the exposure period and analyzed for semivolatile organic chemicals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, inorganic chemicals, organotin, and lipids. Water quality measurements (including temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll a) were made at each station every two weeks during the assay to characterize environmental factors influencing mussel bioaccumulation and growth. Weight growth was similar among stations in Sinclair Inlet, but was significantly greater in all Sinclair Inlet stations compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. Length growth was statistically indistinguishable among stations in Sinclair Inlet. Only one Sinclair Inlet station had a significantly greater length growth compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. The influence of water quality on mussel growth is presented. The correlation between sediment chemistry and bioaccumulation is discussed.

  2. Lyman Alpha Absorption and Tidal Debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon L. Morris

    1994-09-29

    The origin and evolution of structure in the Universe is one of the major questions occupying astronomers today. An understanding of the Lyalpha absorbers seen in QSO spectra is an important part of this program since such absorbers can be traced back to very high redshifts. Their mere existence places constraints on the physical state of the intergalactic medium. The discovery of Lyalpha absorbers at low redshift allows us to estimate for the first time what fraction of low redshift Lyalpha absorbers are (i) randomly distributed, (ii) distributed like galaxies but not physically associated with luminous objects, (iii) actually part of the halos of luminous galaxies, or (iv) tidal tails within galaxy groups. Results from the sightline to the QSO 3C273 suggest that the majority of the absorbers are not associated with galaxies, but that there is a significant subset that are. The absorbers associated with galaxies may be produced in enormous gaseous disks surrounding normal spiral galaxies, or may be tidal material bound up in small groups of galaxies

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal Marshes Using Fine Scientists 2010 Abstract Tidal marsh monitoring and restoration can benefit from the union of fine developed statistical models with relatively high explanatory power. In each case, models were improved

  4. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop Comprehensive Coastal Inventory has produced several GIS tools for the tidal shoreline management trade

  5. Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 ) solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Enhancing tidal harmonic analysis: Robust (hybrid L1 =L2 ) solutions Keith E. Leffler Ã, David A 24 February 2008 Accepted 28 April 2008 Keywords: Tides Tidal analysis Harmonic analysis Robust is calculated from the power spectrum of the residual, a calculation that filters broad spectrum noise

  6. Tilted Baroclinic Tidal Vortices MIGUEL CANALS AND GENO PAWLAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacCready, Parker

    Tilted Baroclinic Tidal Vortices MIGUEL CANALS AND GENO PAWLAK Department of Ocean and Resources coherence. It is suggested that this may lead to a conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. 1 mixing of coastal waters (Mul- ler and Garrett 2003). Of particular importance is the tidally driven case

  7. Tidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge FRANOIS PTRLIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    ). Satellite altimetry has shown deep-sea tidal energy losses concentrated at submarine ridges and island arcsTidal Conversion at a Submarine Ridge FRANÇOIS PÉTRÉLIS Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Ecole received 30 July 2003, in final form 20 January 2004) ABSTRACT The radiative flux of internal wave energy

  8. CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTROL ID: 1187959 TITLE: Climate destabilization on tidally locked exoplanets PRESENTATION TYPE-zone rocky planets, should be tidally locked. We will discuss two different feedbacks that can destabilize cause a runaway climate shift. We use an idealized energy balance model to illustrate the scope

  9. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for ?13C and ?15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, ?13C, and ?15N.

  10. 3. Fluvial Processes in Puget Sound Rivers and the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the Bonneville Power Administration spent an average of $44 million a year on habitat restoration projects

  11. Tidal deformation of a slowly rotating material body. External metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Landry; Eric Poisson

    2015-07-31

    We construct the external metric of a slowly rotating, tidally deformed material body in general relativity. The tidal forces acting on the body are assumed to be weak and to vary slowly with time, and the metric is obtained as a perturbation of a background metric that describes the external geometry of an isolated, slowly rotating body. The tidal environment is generic and characterized by two symmetric-tracefree tidal moments E_{ab} and B_{ab}, and the body is characterized by its mass M, its radius R, and a dimensionless angular-momentum vector \\chi^a new quantities, which we designate as rotational-tidal Love numbers. All these Love numbers are gauge invariant in the usual sense of perturbation theory, and all vanish when the body is a black hole.

  12. Confusion around the tidal force and the centrifugal force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Takuya; Boffin, Henri M J

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the tidal force, whose notion is sometimes misunderstood in the public domain literature. We discuss the tidal force exerted by a secondary point mass on an extended primary body such as the Earth. The tidal force arises because the gravitational force exerted on the extended body by the secondary mass is not uniform across the primary. In the derivation of the tidal force, the non-uniformity of the gravity is essential, and inertial forces such as the centrifugal force are not needed. Nevertheless, it is often asserted that the tidal force can be explained by the centrifugal force. If we literally take into account the centrifugal force, it would mislead us. We therefore also discuss the proper treatment of the centrifugal force.

  13. Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

  14. Uncovering CDM halo substructure with tidal streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Ibata; G. F. Lewis; M. J. Irwin

    2001-10-31

    Models for the formation and growth of structure in a cold dark matter dominated universe predict that galaxy halos should contain significant substructure. Studies of the Milky Way, however, have yet to identify the expected few hundred sub-halos with masses greater than about 10^6 Msun. Here we propose a test for the presence of sub-halos in the halos of galaxies. We show that the structure of the tidal tails of ancient globular clusters is very sensitive to heating by repeated close encounters with the massive dark sub-halos. We discuss the detection of such an effect in the context of the next generation of astrometric missions, and conclude that it should be easily detectable with the GAIA dataset. The finding of a single extended cold stellar stream from a globular cluster would support alternative theories, such as self-interacting dark matter, that give rise to smoother halos.

  15. Tidal Downsizing model. I. Numerical methods: saving giant planets from tidal disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Tidal Downsizing (TD) is a recently developed planet formation theory that supplements the classical Gravitational disc Instability (GI) model with planet migration inward and tidal disruptions of GI fragments in the inner regions of the disc. Numerical methods for a detailed population synthesis of TD planets are presented here. As an example application, the conditions under which GI fragments collapse faster than they migrate into the inner $a\\sim$ few AU disc are considered. It is found that most gas fragments are tidally or thermally disrupted unless (a) their opacity is $\\sim 3$ orders of magnitude less than the interstellar dust opacity at metallicities typical of the observed giant planets, or (b) the opacity is high but the fragments accrete large dust grains (pebbles) from the disc. Case (a) models produce very low mass solid cores ($M_{\\rm core} < 0.1$ Earth masses) and follow a negative correlation of giant planet frequency with host star metallicity. In contrast, case (b) models produce massiv...

  16. Palomar 5 and its Tidal Tails: A Search for New Members in the Tidal Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzma, Pete; Keller, Stefan; Maunder, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a search for members of the globular cluster Palomar 5 and its associated tidal tails. The analysis has been performed using intermediate and low resolution spectroscopy with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Based on kinematics, line strength and photometric information, we identify 39 new red giant branch stars along $\\sim$20$^{\\circ}$ of the tails, a larger angular extent than has been previously studied. We also recover eight previously known tidal tail members. Within the cluster, we find seven new red giant and one blue horizontal branch members and confirm a further twelve known red giant members. In total, we provide velocity data for 67 stars in the cluster and the tidal tails. Using a maximum likelihood technique, we derive a radial velocity for Pal 5 of $-57.4 \\pm 0.3$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $1.2\\pm0.3$ km s$^{-1}$. We confirm and extend the linear velocity gradient along the tails of $1.0 \\pm 0.1$ km s$^{-1}$ deg$^...

  17. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were generated locally by a propagating beam of internal tidal energy which had originatedUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Reflecting tidal wave beams and local generation mecha- nism: tidal flow over steep topography forces a propagating beam of internal tidal wave

  18. Hydrodynamic analysis of a vertical axis tidal current turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gretton, Gareth I.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal currents can be used as a predictable source of sustainable energy, and have the potential to make a useful contribution to the energy needs of the UK and other countries with such a resource. One of the technologies ...

  19. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. ...

  20. Geomorphic structure of tidal hydrodynamics in salt marsh creeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    .1029/2007WR006289. 1. Introduction [2] Salt marshes are important transitional areas between terrestrial providing preferen- tial pathways for marsh flooding and drainage during the tidal cycle. Because

  1. Sandia Energy - Tidal Energy Resource Assessment in the East River Tidal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization andStochasticunique wind(CREW)Tidal

  2. A Bright Year for Tidal Disruptions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metzger, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the BH at super-Eddington rates. Being tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction f_in few 1e4 K, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically-discovered TDE flares. For BHs with relatively high masses M_BH > 1e7 M_sun the ejecta can become ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare which is instead dominated by thermal X-ray emission. We predict total radiated energies consistent with those of observed TDE flares, and ejecta velocities that agree with the measured emission line widths. The peak optical luminosity for M_BH wind, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of o...

  3. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5?20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  4. EQUATORIAL SUPERROTATION ON TIDALLY LOCKED EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Polvani, Lorenzo M., E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The increasing richness of exoplanet observations has motivated a variety of three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric circulation models of these planets. Under strongly irradiated conditions, models of tidally locked, short-period planets (both hot Jupiters and terrestrial planets) tend to exhibit a circulation dominated by a fast eastward, or 'superrotating', jet stream at the equator. When the radiative and advection timescales are comparable, this phenomenon can cause the hottest regions to be displaced eastward from the substellar point by tens of degrees longitude. Such an offset has been subsequently observed on HD 189733b, supporting the possibility of equatorial jets on short-period exoplanets. Despite its relevance, however, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for generating the equatorial superrotation in such models have not been identified. Here, we show that the equatorial jet results from the interaction of the mean flow with standing Rossby waves induced by the day-night thermal forcing. The strong longitudinal variations in radiative heating-namely intense dayside heating and nightside cooling-trigger the formation of standing, planetary-scale equatorial Rossby and Kelvin waves. The Rossby waves develop phase tilts that pump eastward momentum from high latitudes to the equator, thereby inducing equatorial superrotation. We present an analytic theory demonstrating this mechanism and explore its properties in a hierarchy of one-layer (shallow-water) calculations and fully 3D models. The wave-mean-flow interaction produces an equatorial jet whose latitudinal width is comparable to that of the Rossby waves, namely the equatorial Rossby deformation radius modified by radiative and frictional effects. For conditions typical of synchronously rotating hot Jupiters, this length is comparable to a planetary radius, explaining the broad scale of the equatorial jet obtained in most hot-Jupiter models. Our theory illuminates the dependence of the equatorial jet speed on forcing amplitude, strength of friction, and other parameters, as well as the conditions under which jets can form at all.

  5. General relativistic tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau Loi So

    2015-05-18

    In 1998 Thorne claimed that all pseudotensors give the same tidal work as the Newtonian theory. In 1999, Purdue used the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the tidal heating and the result matched with the Newtonian gravity. Soon after in 2001, Favata employed the same method to examine the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and M{\\o}ller pseudotensors, all of them give the same result as Purdue did. Inspired by the work of Purdue and Favata, for the completeness, here we manipulate the tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors. We obtained the same tidal work as Purdue achieved. In addition, we emphasize that a suitable gravitational energy-momentum pseudotensor requires fulfill the inside matter condition and all of the classical pseudotensors pass this test except M$\\o$ller. Moreover, we constructed a general pseudotesnor which is modified by 13 linear artificial higher order terms combination with Einstein pseudotensor. We find that the result agrees with Thorne's prediction, i.e., relativistic tidal work is pseudotensor independent.

  6. NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brennan T; Neary, Vincent S; Stewart, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

  7. Variability in tidal disruption events: gravitationally unstable streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of the tidal disruption of a solar mass star by a $10^6M_{\\odot}$ black hole. These, for the first time, cover the full time evolution of the tidal disruption event, starting well before the initial encounter and continuing until more than 90% of the bound material has returned to the vicinity of the hole. Our results are compared to the analytical prediction for the rate at which tidally-stripped gas falls back. We find that, for our chosen parameters, the overall scaling of the fallback rate, $\\dot{M}_{\\rm{fb}}$, closely follows the canonical $t^{-5/3}$ power-law. However, our simulations also show that the self-gravity of the tidal stream, which dominates the tidal gravity of the hole at large distances, causes some of the debris to recollapse into bound fragments before returning to the hole. This causes $\\dot{M}_{\\rm{fb}}$ to vary significantly around the $t^{-5/3}$ average. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the event Swift J1644+57.

  8. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

  9. A spatial characterization of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy tidal tails

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, Matthew; Cole, Nathan; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Willett, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Desell, Travis [Department of Computer Science, U. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 52802 (United States); Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Varela, Carlos [Department of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Yanny, Brian, E-mail: newbym2@rpi.edu, E-mail: heidi@rpi.edu [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We measure the spatial density of F turnoff stars in the Sagittarius dwarf tidal stream, from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, using statistical photometric parallax. We find a set of continuous, consistent parameters that describe the leading Sgr stream's position, direction, and width for 15 stripes in the north Galactic cap, and three stripes in the south Galactic cap. We produce a catalog of stars that has the density characteristics of the dominant leading Sgr tidal stream that can be compared with simulations. We find that the width of the leading (north) tidal tail is consistent with recent triaxial and axisymmetric halo model simulations. The density along the stream is roughly consistent with common disruption models in the north, but possibly not in the south. We explore the possibility that one or more of the dominant Sgr streams has been misidentified, and that one or more of the ''bifurcated'' pieces is the real Sgr tidal tail, but we do not reach definite conclusions. If two dwarf progenitors are assumed, fits to the planes of the dominant and ''bifurcated'' tidal tails favor an association of the Sgr dwarf spheroidal galaxy with the dominant southern stream and the ''bifurcated'' stream in the north. In the north Galactic cap, the best fit Hernquist density profile for the smooth component of the stellar halo is oblate, with a flattening parameter q = 0.53, and a scale length of r {sub 0} = 6.73. The southern data for both the tidal debris and the smooth component of the stellar halo do not match the model fits to the north, although the stellar halo is still overwhelmingly oblate. Finally, we verify that we can reproduce the parameter fits on the asynchronous MilkyWay@home volunteer computing platform.

  10. Laboratory Analysis of Vortex Dynamics For Shallow Tidal Inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whilden, Kerri Ann

    2010-10-12

    OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Ocean... Engineering LABORATORY ANALYSIS OF VORTEX DYNAMICS FOR SHALLOW TIDAL INLETS A Thesis by KERRI ANN WHILDEN Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved...

  11. On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power Systems - A Discussion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power Systems - A Discussion of Sea Testing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On the Natural Frequency of Tidal Current Power...

  12. Snacktime for Hungry Black Holes: Theoretical Studies of the Tidal Disruption of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strubbe, Linda Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    bound gas onto the BH powers the tidal disruption flare, andof an X-ray Power-law The candidate tidal disruption eventstidal disruption spectra will contain a high-energy power-

  13. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–Sanof pulsing events to sustainability. Estuaries Coasts 18:Evaluating tidal marsh sustainability in the face of sea-

  14. On the implications of incompressibility of the quantum mechanical wavefunction in the presence of tidal gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    of being the tidal gravitational potential energy operator,the energy shift is negative, the tidal gravitational …eldtidal gravitational …eld is treated as a perturbation to the energy

  15. Cover. Insert, ground-shaking damage from the 1949 Puget Sound earthquake to unrein-forced masonry in Seattle, Wash. Photograph by George Cankonen, Seattle Times. Back-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    -607-89262-5 95­37559 CIP #12;III CONTENTS VOLUME 2 EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS An Introduction to Predicting Earthquake................................................ 307 GROUND-MOTION PREDICTION Engineering Characterization of Earthquake Strong Ground Motions#12;Cover. Insert, ground-shaking damage from the 1949 Puget Sound earthquake to unrein- forced

  16. MHK Projects/Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishersInformationSanGuemes

  17. MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon CoveHydro Gen < MHKIcy

  18. MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon CoveHydroKachemak Bay

  19. MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf MoonKillisnooLeanconLive

  20. MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterReliance LightSalem

  1. MHK Projects/San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterReliance LightSalemInformation

  2. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterRelianceSandySeagenOrkney <

  3. MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal Island < MHKs Island

  4. MHK Projects/Willapa Bay Tidal Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal IslandWestWaveWillapa Bay

  5. Using gaps in N-body tidal streams to probe missing satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngan, W. H. W.; Carlberg, R. G., E-mail: ngan@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S3H4 (Canada)

    2014-06-20

    We use N-body simulations to model the tidal disruption of a star cluster in a Milky-Way-sized dark matter halo, which results in a narrow stream comparable to (but slightly wider than) Pal-5 or GD-1. The mean Galactic dark matter halo is modeled by a spherical Navarro-Frenk-White potential with subhalos predicted by the ?CDM cosmological model. The distribution and mass function of the subhalos follow the results from the Aquarius simulation. We use a matched filter approach to look for 'gaps' in tidal streams at 12 length scales from 0.1 kpc to 5 kpc, which appear as characteristic dips in the linear densities along the streams. We find that, in addition to the subhalos' perturbations, the epicyclic overdensities (EOs) due to the coherent epicyclic motions of particles in a stream also produce gap-like signals near the progenitor. We measure the gap spectra—the gap formation rates as functions of gap length—due to both subhalo perturbations and EOs, which have not been accounted for together by previous studies. Finally, we project the simulated streams onto the sky to investigate issues when interpreting gap spectra in observations. In particular, we find that gap spectra from low signal-to-noise observations can be biased by the orbital phase of the stream. This indicates that the study of stream gaps will benefit greatly from high-quality data from future missions.

  6. An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    An Estimate of Tidal Energy Lost to Turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK Scripps an estimate of 3 1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km of the ridge and Toole 1997). Another closely related question is that of where tidal energy gets removed from the ocean

  7. The E ect of Barriers on The Tidal Range in Yong Ming Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interest in constructing tidal barrages, either to control the tide or to extract power. CorrespondinglyThe E ect of Barriers on The Tidal Range in Estuaries Yong Ming Tang Abstract Numerical simulations of the shallow water equations are used to study the e ect of topographic barriers on the tidal range

  8. Underestimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back­of­envelope models of tidal power special cases) the power in tidal waves is not equal to the kinetic energy flux across a plane. These backUnder­estimation of the UK Tidal Resource David J.C. MacKay Cavendish Laboratory, University

  9. Under-estimation of the UK Tidal David J.C. MacKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David J.C.

    there and would deliver up to 40 GW (peak). In this note, I present back-of-envelope models of tidal power special cases) the power in tidal waves is not equal to the kinetic energy flux across a plane. These backUnder-estimation of the UK Tidal Resource David J.C. MacKay Cavendish Laboratory, University

  10. Three-Dimensional Tidal Flow in an Elongated, Rotating Basin CLINTON D. WINANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Three-Dimensional Tidal Flow in an Elongated, Rotating Basin CLINTON D. WINANT Integrative-dimensional tidal circulation in an elongated basin of arbitrary depth is described with a linear, constant parcels tend to corkscrew into and out of the basin in a tidal period. The axial flow is only weakly

  11. 2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2306 JOURNAL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Chaotic Trajectories of Tidally Perturbed Inertial ABSTRACT It is shown that tidal perturbations of a geopotential height in an inviscid, barot~opic atmos formulation of both ~he free, inertial, and the tidally forced problems permitted the application o~ the twi

  12. MARCH 2007 1 Tidal mixing hotspots governed by rapid parametric subharmonic instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    at 21S demonstrate a rapid transfer of energy (over only a few days) to waves of half the tidal the generation site; overall 40 % of the tidal energy is dissipated locally. Further simulations indicate.9nearly 80 % of tidal energy is dissipated locally. Poleward of the critical latitude, M2/2

  13. Internal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    that tidal energy is both converted into internal waves, which radiate away from the topography, and used of tidal mixing for global climate models, the physical processes governing the transfer of energy fromInternal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge Sonya Legg

  14. Are mesoscale eddies in shelf seas formed by baroclinic instability of tidal fronts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ric

    Are mesoscale eddies in shelf seas formed by baroclinic instability of tidal fronts? G. Badin,1 R; accepted 23 July 2009; published 27 October 2009. [1] The formation of eddies along tidal fronts signals are dampened by air-sea interaction and eroded by wind and tidal mixing. High-resolution CTD

  15. Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon U. H. Faul,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free Moon F. Nimmo,1 U. H. Faul,2 and E. J. Successful models can reproduce the dissipation factor (Q) measured at both tidal and seismic frequencies, and the tidal Love numbers h2 and k2, without requiring any mantle melting. However, the frequency

  16. Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into state-of-the-art climate models. Calculation of the tidal energy flux depends on 7 1 Tidal mixing around the Maritime continent: implications for1 paleoclimate simulations2, New Haven, CT, 06511 4 Abstract 5 Tidal mixing provides an important source

  17. Critical bifurcation of shallow microtidal landforms in tidal flats and salt marshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Critical bifurcation of shallow microtidal landforms in tidal flats and salt marshes Sergio by the Editorial Board April 14, 2006 (received for review September 25, 2005) Shallow tidal basins are characterized by extensive tidal flats and salt marshes that lie within specific ranges of elevation, whereas

  18. Seasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal and meridional winds above

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conserve wave energy. When propagating into the MLT region, the horizontal wind tidal amplitude can reachSeasonal variations of semidiurnal tidal perturbations in mesopause region temperature and zonal, Colorado (40.6°N, 105.1°W). The observed monthly results are in good agreement with MF radar tidal

  19. Spatial variability within a single parautochthonous Paratethyan tidal flat deposit (Karpatian, Lower Miocene Kleinebersdorf, Lower Austria)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuschin, Martin

    Spatial variability within a single parautochthonous Paratethyan tidal flat deposit (Karpatian and Diplodonta rotundata points to a low-energy coastal setting with at least partly nutrient-rich sediment the interpretation of a parautochthonous to slightly transported tidal flat deposit. Key words: tidal flat, diversity

  20. Europa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    ; Pappalardo and Head, 2001], and 3) a seafloor plume model in which tidal energy focused in the silicate ice in the shallow crust of Europa. We show that tidal energy can be preferentially focused in risingEuropa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

  1. Tidal and Wind Mixing versus Thermal Stratification in the South Atlantic Bight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    ) these fluctuations are controlled by the cycles of tidally forced mixing, heat flux, wind and river discharge. During overcome the tendency for tidal power to produce a well-mixed system". Additionally, they expressed some: heat flux, evaporation-precipitation, fresh water input, wind stress work, bottom tidal work

  2. Virtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the applicability of linear theory to global predictions of the conversion of tidal energy into internal wave energy of the energy budget of the oceans requires a determination of the efficiency of conversion of tidal energyVirtual Seafloor Reduces Internal Wave Generation by Tidal Flow Likun Zhang* and Harry L. Swinney

  3. Identifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    sitessas a primary source of fecal indicator bacteria in the water column and subtidal sediments and magnitude of pollutant sources potentially responsible for the impairment. While this information mayIdentifying Pollutant Sources in Tidally Mixed Systems: Case Study of Fecal Indicator Bacteria from

  4. Squeezars: Tidally powered stars orbiting a massive black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, T; Alexander, Tal; Morris, Mark

    2003-01-01

    We propose that there exists a class of transient sources, "squeezars", which are stars caught in highly eccentric orbits around a massive (m<10^8 Mo) black hole (MBH), whose atypically high luminosity (up to a significant fraction of their Eddington luminosity) is powered by tidal interactions with the MBH. Their existence follows from the presence of a mass sink, the MBH, in the galactic center, which drives a flow of stars into nearly radial orbits to replace those it has destroyed. We consider two limits for the stellar response to tidal heating: surface heating with radiative cooling ("hot squeezars") and bulk heating with adiabatic expansion ("cold squeezars"), and calculate the evolution of the squeezar orbit, size, luminosity and effective temperature. The squeezar formation rate is only ~0.05 that of tidal disruption flares, but squeezar lifetimes are many orders of magnitude longer, and so future observations of squeezars in nearby galaxies can probe the tidal process that feeds MBHs and the effe...

  5. General relativistic tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So, Lau Loi

    2015-01-01

    In 1998 Thorne claimed that all pseudotensors give the same tidal work as the Newtonian theory. In 1999, Purdue used the Landau-Lifshitz pseudotensor to calculate the tidal heating and the result matched with the Newtonian gravity. Soon after in 2001, Favata employed the same method to examine the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and M{\\o}ller pseudotensors, all of them give the same result as Purdue did. Inspired by the work of Purdue and Favata, for the completeness, here we manipulate the tidal work for Papapetrou, Weinberg and Goldberg pseudotensors. We obtained the same tidal work as Purdue achieved. In addition, we emphasize that a suitable gravitational energy-momentum pseudotensor requires fulfill the inside matter condition and all of the classical pseudotensors pass this test except M$\\o$ller. Moreover, we constructed a general pseudotesnor which is modified by 13 linear artificial higher order terms combination with Einstein pseudotensor. We find that the result agrees with Thorne's prediction, i.e., rel...

  6. Squeezars: Tidally powered stars orbiting a massive black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tal Alexander; Mark Morris

    2003-05-05

    We propose that there exists a class of transient sources, "squeezars", which are stars caught in highly eccentric orbits around a massive (mpowered by tidal interactions with the MBH. Their existence follows from the presence of a mass sink, the MBH, in the galactic center, which drives a flow of stars into nearly radial orbits to replace those it has destroyed. We consider two limits for the stellar response to tidal heating: surface heating with radiative cooling ("hot squeezars") and bulk heating with adiabatic expansion ("cold squeezars"), and calculate the evolution of the squeezar orbit, size, luminosity and effective temperature. The squeezar formation rate is only ~0.05 that of tidal disruption flares, but squeezar lifetimes are many orders of magnitude longer, and so future observations of squeezars in nearby galaxies can probe the tidal process that feeds MBHs and the effects of extreme tides on stars. The mean number of squeezars orbiting the Galactic MBH is estimated at 0.1-1.

  7. Pasture and Soil Management Following Tidal Saltwater Intrusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Redmon, Larry; McFarland, Mark L.; Feagley, Sam E.

    2009-05-26

    When land is flooded by saltwater, as after a hurricane tidal surge, it can long-term effects on soil productivity and fertility. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded pasture land. Having soil tested for salinity is an important step....

  8. Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    ; however, the contribution of alternative fuel sources to overall energy is still small. In the United are under development in the Northeast, includ- ing Roosevelt Island in New York City's East RiverP A P E R Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem Services Perspective A U

  9. Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography NEIL J. BALMFORTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Tidal Conversion by Supercritical Topography NEIL J. BALMFORTH University of British Columbia topography on the ocean floor. The ocean is treated as infinitely deep, and the topography consists. The calculations extend the previous results of Balmforth et al. for subcritical topography (wherein waves

  10. First-post-Newtonian quadrupole tidal interactions in binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Vines; Éanna É. Flanagan

    2014-10-09

    We consider tidal coupling in a binary stellar system to first-post-Newtonian order. We derive the orbital equations of motion for bodies with spins and mass quadrupole moments and show that they conserve the total linear momentum of the binary. We note that spin-orbit coupling must be included in a 1PN treatment of tidal interactions in order to maintain consistency (except in the special case of adiabatically induced quadrupoles); inclusion of 1PN quadrupolar tidal effects while omitting spin effects would lead to a failure of momentum conservation for generic evolution of the quadrupoles. We use momentum conservation to specialize our analysis to the system's center-of-mass-energy frame; we find the binary's relative equation of motion in this frame and also present a generalized Lagrangian from which it can be derived. We then specialize to the case in which the quadrupole moment is adiabatically induced by the tidal field (in which case it is consistent to ignore spin effects). We show how the adiabatic dynamics for the quadrupole can be incorporated into our action principle and present the simplified orbital equations of motion and conserved energy for the adiabatic case. These results are relevant to gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

  11. Energy Localization Invariance of Tidal Work in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Favata

    2000-08-24

    It is well known that, when an external general relativistic (electric-type) tidal field E(t) interacts with the evolving quadrupole moment I(t) of an isolated body, the tidal field does work on the body (``tidal work'') -- i.e., it transfers energy to the body -- at a rate given by the same formula as in Newtonian theory: dW/dt = -1/2 E dI/dt. Thorne has posed the following question: In view of the fact that the gravitational interaction energy between the tidal field and the body is ambiguous by an amount of order E(t)I(t), is the tidal work also ambiguous by this amount, and therefore is the formula dW/dt = -1/2 E dI/dt only valid unambiguously when integrated over timescales long compared to that for I(t) to change substantially? This paper completes a demonstration that the answer is no; dW/dt is not ambiguous in this way. More specifically, this paper shows that dW/dt is unambiguously given by -1/2 E dI/dt independently of one's choice of how to localize gravitational energy in general relativity. This is proved by explicitly computing dW/dt using various gravitational stress-energy pseudotensors (Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, Moller) as well as Bergmann's conserved quantities which generalize many of the pseudotensors to include an arbitrary function of position. A discussion is also given of the problem of formulating conservation laws in general relativity and the role played by the various pseudotensors.

  12. Empirical, probabilistic, and modelling approaches to assess cross-media impacts to marine sediments at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, W.L.; Vita, C.L.; Schrock, W.; Leicht, G.

    1996-12-31

    Dredge spoils, industrial fill, and liquid wastes from the 1940s to 1970s have resulted in inorganic and organic contamination of soils, groundwater, and marine sediments near the U.S.S. Missouri and Charleston Beach parking lots at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), in Bremerton, Washington. Extensive collection of environmental data from several studies including the recently completed Remedial Investigation conducted under CERCLA have confirmed contaminant levels above federal risk screening levels and state regulatory criteria for several heavy metals and organic compounds, including pesticides and PCBs. Although the correlation between contamination in marine sediments and those in on-shore fill appears to be strong, there is little evidence that a viable transport pathway currently exists from soils to groundwater and thence to sediments. Several methods used to estimate chemical mass flux from soil to groundwater to sediments and marine waters of Sinclair Inlet are corroborative in this regard. Nonetheless, this result is vexing because present groundwater concentrations exceed ARARs, yet are below levels of concern in terms of mass flux to marine waters. Despite the marginal risks posed by groundwater, various remedial alternatives, including perimeter containment using a subsurface waste-stabilized containment wall, were evaluated to determine whether chemical flux could be reduced to levels below those observed at the present time. Three-dimensional flow modelling and transport modelling also confirmed that chemical fluxes were limited in magnitude and could be addressed with more conventional remedial approaches.

  13. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 1. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  14. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 2. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  15. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington). Part 1. Volume 2 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  16. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the Washington-Oregon Planning Area (Puget Sound Area, Washington) Part 2. Volume 1 of 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This report presents socio-economic profiles of the counties in the Puget Sound Area of the Washington-Oregon Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service. The Puget Sound Area includes Whatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, King, Pierce, Thurston, Mason, and Kitsap counties. It presents baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in Washington, Oregon, and California which may be potentially affected by offshore oil and gas development. Each profile includes socio-economic characteristics organized under the following eight headings: demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and other characteristics. The focus of each socio-economic profile is 1980, but the time period 1970 to 2000 is covered, to the extent possible with existing data, to provide a historical context and an understanding of expected trends. Each county's socio-economic profile was prepared using time-series data from secondary sources obtained primarily from federal, state, and local government agencies.

  17. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. I. Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    A formula for the tidal dissipation rate in a spherical body is derived from first principles to correct some mathematical inaccuracies found in the literature. The development is combined with the Darwin-Kaula formalism for tides. Our intermediate results are compared with those by Zschau and Platzman. When restricted to the special case of an incompressible spherical planet spinning synchronously without libration, our final formula can be compared with the commonly used expression from Peale and Cassen. However, the two turn out to differ, as in our expression the contributions from all Fourier modes are positive-definite, which is not the case with the formula from Peale and Cassen. Examples of the application of our expression for the tidal damping rate are provided in the work by Makarov and Efroimsky (Paper II) published back to back with the current paper.

  18. On the circulation and tidal flushing of Mobile Bay, Alabama 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, George Belden

    1953-01-01

    of Symbols, Tables ~ . . . I, INTRODUCTION Historical B. Classification of Estuaries C. Ob]ectives II. GENERAL DISCUSSION OF NOBILE BAY A. Geomorphological B. Geological C. Biological iii ~ ~ vi ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o sic.... Collection of Data 27 2B V, ANALYSIS OF THE DATA A. Methods B. Distribution of Temperature, Salinity, and Fresh Water Page 30 30 C. Circulation D. Mass Transport . E. Tidal Flushing of Mobile Bay . VI ~ SUMMAHY AND CONCLUSIONS VII, BIBLIOGRAPHY...

  19. Severn Tidal Power Group STpg | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission DevelopmentLakes, North Carolina:Severn Tidal

  20. Forced libration of tidally synchronized planets and moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Valeri V; Dorland, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dissipation of kinetic energy, when it is strong enough, tends to synchronize the rotation of planets and moons with the mean orbital motion, or drive it into long-term stable spin-orbit resonances. As the orbital motion undergoes periodic acceleration due to a finite orbital eccentricity, the spin rate oscillates around the equilibrium mean value too, giving rise to the forced, or eccentricity-driven, librations. Both the shape and amplitude of forced librations of synchronous viscoelastic planets and moons are defined by a combination of two different types of perturbative torque, the tidal torque and the triaxial torque. Consequently, forced librations can be tidally dominated (e.g., Io and possibly Titan) or deformation-dominated (e.g., the Moon) depending on a set of orbital, rheological, and other physical parameters. With small eccentricities, for the former kind, the largest term in the libration angle can be minus cosine of the mean anomaly, whereas for the latter kind, it is minus sine of the ...

  1. TidGen Power System Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, Christopher R.; McEntee, Jarlath

    2013-12-30

    ORPC Maine, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC (collectively ORPC), submits this Final Technical Report for the TidGen® Power System Commercialization Project (Project), partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-EE0003647). The Project was built and operated in compliance with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) pilot project license (P-12711) and other permits and approvals needed for the Project. This report documents the methodologies, activities and results of the various phases of the Project, including design, engineering, procurement, assembly, installation, operation, licensing, environmental monitoring, retrieval, maintenance and repair. The Project represents a significant achievement for the renewable energy portfolio of the U.S. in general, and for the U.S. marine hydrokinetic (MHK) industry in particular. The stated Project goal was to advance, demonstrate and accelerate deployment and commercialization of ORPC’s tidal-current based hydrokinetic power generation system, including the energy extraction and conversion technology, associated power electronics, and interconnection equipment capable of reliably delivering electricity to the domestic power grid. ORPC achieved this goal by designing, building and operating the TidGen® Power System in 2012 and becoming the first federally licensed hydrokinetic tidal energy project to deliver electricity to a power grid under a power purchase agreement in North America. Located in Cobscook Bay between Eastport and Lubec, Maine, the TidGen® Power System was connected to the Bangor Hydro Electric utility grid at an on-shore station in North Lubec on September 13, 2012. ORPC obtained a FERC pilot project license for the Project on February 12, 2012 and the first Maine Department of Environmental Protection General Permit issued for a tidal energy project on January 31, 2012. In addition, ORPC entered into a 20-year agreement with Bangor Hydro Electric Company on January 1, 2013 for up to 5 megawatts at a price of $215/MWh, escalating at 2.0% per year.

  2. On the tidal radius of satellites on prograde and retrograde orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajda, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A tidal radius is a distance from a satellite orbiting in a host potential beyond which its material is stripped by the tidal force. We derive a revised expression for the tidal radius of a rotating satellite which properly takes into account the possibility of prograde and retrograde orbits of stars. Besides the eccentricity of the satellite orbit, the tidal radius depends also on the ratio of the satellite internal angular velocity to the orbital angular velocity. We compare our formula to the results of two $N$-body simulations of dwarf galaxies orbiting a Milky Way-like host on a prograde and retrograde orbit. The tidal radius for the retrograde case is larger than for the prograde. We introduce a kinematic radius separating stars still orbiting the dwarf galaxy from those already stripped and following the potential of the host galaxy. We find that the tidal radius matches very well the kinematic radius.

  3. Analysis of tidal current observations over the northeastern shelf of the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durham, Donald L

    1967-01-01

    LIST OF FIGURES Chapter TABLE OF CONTENTS Page vi vii IV INTRODUCTION A. Statement of Problem B. Literature Review 1. Tidal Current Theory 2. Tidal Current Observations INSTRUMENTATION AND DATA COLLECTION A. Selection and Modification... of Equipment B. September 1965 Survey DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS A. The Surface Tide 1. General 2. Gulf of Mexico B. Current Components C. Spectral Analysis D. Harmonic Analysis E. Tidal Ellipse F, Temperature CONCLUSIONS 1 1 2 2 11 15 15 21...

  4. Mechanisms generating modification of benthos following tidal flat invasion by a Spartina hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, C; Grosholz, E D; Levin, L A; Blake, R

    2006-01-01

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  5. MECHANISMS GENERATING MODIFICATION OF BENTHOS FOLLOWING TIDAL FLAT INVASION BY A SPARTINA HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neira, Carlos; Grosholz, Edwin D; Levin, Lisa A; Blake, Rachael

    2006-01-01

    1997. Kinetics of tidal resuspension of microbiota: testingare susceptible to resuspension following bio- turbation (in barnacle recruitment and resuspension of adult benthic

  6. Modeling the Effects of Tidal Energy Extraction on Estuarine Hydrodynamics in a Stratified Estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-15

    A three-dimensional coastal ocean model with a tidal turbine module was used in this paper to study the effects of tidal energy extraction on temperature and salinity stratification and density driven two-layer estuarine circulation. Numerical experiments with various turbine array configurations were carried out to investigate the changes in tidally mean temperature, salinity and velocity profiles in an idealized stratified estuary that connects to coastal water through a narrow tidal channel. The model was driven by tides, river inflow and sea surface heat flux. To represent the realistic size of commercial tidal farms, model simulations were conducted based on a small percentage of the total number of turbines that would generate the maximum extractable energy in the system. Model results indicated that extraction of tidal energy will increase the vertical mixing and decrease the stratification in the estuary. Extraction of tidal energy has stronger impact on the tidally-averaged salinity, temperature and velocity in the surface layer than the bottom. Energy extraction also weakens the two-layer estuarine circulation, especially during neap tides when tidal mixing the weakest and energy extraction is the smallest. Model results also show that energy generation can be much more efficient with higher hub height with relatively small changes in stratification and two-layer estuarine circulation.

  7. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office What are the key documents? Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource pdf here Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

  8. Jets from Tidal Disruptions of Stars by Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian H. Krolik; Tsvi Piran

    2012-02-07

    Tidal disruption of main sequence stars by black holes has generally been thought to lead to a signal dominated by UV emission. If, however, the black hole spins rapidly and the poloidal magnetic field intensity on the black hole horizon is comparable to the inner accretion disk pressure, a powerful jet may form whose luminosity can easily exceed the thermal UV luminosity. When the jet beam points at Earth, its non-thermal luminosity can dominate the emitted spectrum. The thermal and non-thermal components decay differently with time. In particular, the thermal emission should remain roughly constant for a significant time after the period of maximum accretion, beginning to diminish only after a delay, whereas after the peak accretion rate, the non-thermal jet emission decays, but then reaches a plateau. Both transitions are tied to a characteristic timescale $t_{\\rm Edd}$ at which the accretion rate falls below Eddington. Making use of this timescale in a new parameter-inference formalism for tidal disruption events with significant emission from a jet, we analyze the recent flare source Swift J2058. It is consistent with an event in which a main sequence solar-type staris disrupted by a black hole of mass $\\sim 4 \\times 10^7 M_{\\odot}$. The beginning of the flat phase in the non-thermal emission from this source can possibly be seen in the late-time lightcurve. Optical photometry over the first $\\simeq 40$ d of this flare is also consistent with this picture, but is only weakly constraining because the bolometric correction is very uncertain. We suggest that future searches for main sequence tidal disruptions use methods sensitive to jet radiation as well as to thermal UV radiation.

  9. The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeterInformation Policy andInstitute JumpWash Tidal Barrier

  10. List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of RefuelingRoomList ofSolarTidal

  11. MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050Enermar <OMIS D E < MHKSPERBOY <subsea tidal

  12. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower, Wave and Tidal » Technology

  13. Sandia Energy - Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization andStochasticunique wind(CREW)Tidal &

  14. EIS-0317-S1: Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has completed a supplemental draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) for the proposed Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project. The proposed line in central King County, Washington is needed to accommodate electrical growth and reliability concerns in the Puget Sound area. The SDEIS analyzes four additional transmission alternatives not analyzed in detail in the draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) issued in June 2001, and a number of non-transmission alternatives.

  15. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  16. Relativistic effects on tidal disruption kicks of solitary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gafton, Emanuel; Guillochon, James; Korobkin, Oleg; Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Solitary stars that wander too close to their galactic centres can become tidally disrupted, if the tidal forces due to the supermassive black hole (SMBH) residing there overcome the self-gravity of the star. If the star is only partially disrupted, so that a fraction survives as a self-bound object, this remaining core will experience a net gain in specific orbital energy, which translates into a velocity "kick" of up to $\\sim 10^3$ km/s. In this paper, we present the result of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of such partial disruptions, and analyse the velocity kick imparted on the surviving core. We compare $\\gamma$ = 5/3 and $\\gamma$ = 4/3 polytropes disrupted in both a Newtonian potential, and a generalized potential that reproduces most relativistic effects around a Schwarzschild black hole either exactly or to excellent precision. For the Newtonian case, we confirm the results of previous studies that the kick velocity of the surviving core is virtually independent of the ratio of the...

  17. The Magellanic Bridge: The Nearest Purely Tidal Stellar Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Harris

    2006-12-04

    We report on observations of the stellar populations in twelve fields spanning the region between the Magellanic Clouds, made with the Mosaic-II camera on the 4-meter telescope at the Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The two main goals of the observations are to characterize the young stellar population (which presumably formed in situ in the Bridge and therefore represents the nearest stellar population formed from tidal debris), and to search for an older stellar component (which would have been stripped from either Cloud as stars, by the same tidal forces which formed the gaseous Bridge). We determine the star-formation history of the young inter-Cloud population, which provides a constraint on the timing of the gravitational interaction which formed the Bridge. We do not detect an older stellar population belonging to the Bridge in any of our fields, implying that the material that was stripped from the Clouds to form the Magellanic Bridge was very nearly a pure gas.

  18. Tidal Dwarf Galaxies: Disc Formation at z=0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelli, Federico; Brinks, Elias; McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    Collisional debris around interacting and post-interacting galaxies often display condensations of gas and young stars that can potentially form gravitationally bound objects: Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs). We summarise recent results on TDGs, which are originally published in Lelli et al. (2015, A&A). We study a sample of six TDGs around three different interacting systems, using high-resolution HI observations from the Very Large Array. We find that the HI emission associated to TDGs can be described by rotating disc models. These discs, however, would have undergone less than one orbit since the time of the TDG formation, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that TDGs are in dynamical equilibrium, we find that the ratio of dynamical mass to baryonic mass is consistent with one, implying that TDGs are devoid of dark matter. This is in line with the results of numerical simulations where tidal forces effectively segregate dark matter in the halo from baryonic matter i...

  19. HAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dushaw, Brian

    HAWAIIAN OCEAN MIXING EXPERIMENT (HOME): FARFIELD PROGRAM HAWAIIAN TIDAL ENERGY BUDGET Principal). This tidal energy budget will determine limits on the energy dissipated in the nearfield of the Hawaiian and ocean acoustic tomography have brought a new dimension to the subject. We propose to measure the energy

  20. JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    JULY 2005 1 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the Hawaiian Ridge JODY M. KLYMAK1 of the ridge, giving an estimate of 3±1.5 GW of tidal energy lost to turbulence dissipation within 60 km relation- ship between the energy in the semi-diurnal internal tide (E) and the depth

  1. ORNL/TM-2012/301 Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    ORNL/TM-2012/301 Experimental Test Plan ­ DOE Tidal And River Reference Turbines August 2012 Test Plan ­ DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines Vincent S. Neary1 Craig Hill2 Leonardo P. Chamorro 2 16, 2012 Prepared for: Wind and Water Power Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency

  2. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  3. Post Doctoral (OR Research Engineer) fellowship Distributed Control of a Tidal Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condat, Laurent

    Post Doctoral (OR Research Engineer) fellowship Distributed Control of a Tidal Farm Context on con- trol systems and power systems) and ALSTOM-ocean (world- wide leader in turbines construction and operating a tidal farm of 30-200 MW. Successful applicants will work at GIPSA-lab (Grenoble) (http

  4. Numerical and Analytical Estimates of M2 Tidal Conversion at Steep Oceanic Ridges EMANUELE DI LORENZO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    of mechanical energy required to mix the global ocean (Garrett and St. Laurent 2002). Tidal forces perform aboutNumerical and Analytical Estimates of M2 Tidal Conversion at Steep Oceanic Ridges EMANUELE DI) ABSTRACT Numerical calculations of the rate at which energy is converted from the external to internal

  5. Can Earth's rotation and tidal despinning drive plate tectonics? Federica Riguzzi a,c,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Earth's rotation and tidal despinning drive plate tectonics? Federica Riguzzi a,c, , Giuliano January 2009 Accepted 10 June 2009 Available online xxxx Keywords: Plate tectonics Earth's rotation Tidal despinning Earth's energy budget We re-evaluate the possibility that Earth's rotation contributes to plate

  6. Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Vibrio litoralis sp. nov., isolated from a Yellow Sea tidal flat in Korea Young-Do Nam,1,2 Ho-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strains, MANO22DT and MANO22P, were isolated from a tidal flat area of Dae and energy sources. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strains belong

  7. Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    Expressions for Tidal Conversion at Seafloor Topography using Physical-Space Integrals Norbert and a potential source of the required mechanical energy is the generation and breaking of internal gravity waves (Egbert and Ray, 2000; Ledwell et al., 2000). Tidal dissipation has long been recognized as important

  8. Laboratory studies of eddy structures and exchange processes through tidal inlets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolau del Roure, Francisco

    2009-06-02

    , Germany, which has the capability to generate a sinusoidal flow that simulates a series of tidal cycles. A set of idealized inlets were arranged in the tank, and by varying the tidal period and the maximum velocity, three different types of life...

  9. Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    Cross-shore sediment transport and the equilibrium morphology of mudflats under tidal currents D of suspended sediment transport under cross-shore tidal currents on an intertidal mudflat. We employ a Lagrangian formulation to obtain periodic solutions for the sediment transport over idealized bathymetries

  10. Cross-shore suspended sediment transport under tidal currents Andrew J. Hogg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    Cross-shore suspended sediment transport under tidal currents Andrew J. Hogg1 and David Pritchard2-mail: david@bpi.cam.ac.uk Abstract The transport of sediment over an intertidal mudflat by a cross-shore tidal-layer approximation. It is found that the sediment transport comprises advection with the mean flow, deposition

  11. Chapter 5 -Sediment, Nutrient, and Vegetation Trends Along the Tidal, Forested Pocomoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 5 - Sediment, Nutrient, and Vegetation Trends Along the Tidal, Forested Pocomoke River-tidal upstream sites. Floodplain sediments in the past W.H. Conner, T.W. Doyle, and K.W. Krauss (eds.), Ecology]). These sediments overlie hundreds of meters of Tertiary (2-65 mybp) greensands and clay- silt. The Tertiary

  12. Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot Boronowski Committee Integration of Wave and Tidal Power into the Haida Gwaii Electrical Grid by Susan Margot only be practical at power penetration levels less than 20%. #12;iv Table of Contents Supervisory

  13. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Grace Brush, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Dan Bain, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School. Through this project, the team proposes to develop a variety of resources: a set of general, web

  14. Scaling laws to quantify tidal dissipation in star-planet systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auclair-Desrotour, Pierre; Poncin-Lafitte, Christophe Le

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems evolve over secular time scales. One of the key mechanisms that drive this evolution is tidal dissipation. Submitted to tides, stellar and planetary fluid layers do not behave like rocky ones. Indeed, they are the place of resonant gravito-inertial waves. Therefore, tidal dissipation in fluid bodies strongly depends on the excitation frequency while this dependence is smooth in solid ones. Thus, the impact of the internal structure of celestial bodies must be taken into account when studying tidal dynamics. The purpose of this work is to present a local model of tidal gravito-inertial waves allowing us to quantify analytically the internal dissipation due to viscous friction and thermal diffusion, and to study the properties of the resonant frequency spectrum of the dissipated energy. We derive from this model scaling laws characterizing tidal dissipation as a function of fluid parameters (rotation, stratification, diffusivities) and discuss them in the context of star-planet systems.

  15. Modeling Tidal Stream Energy Extraction and its Effects on Transport Processes in a Tidal Channel and Bay System Using a Three-dimensional Coastal Ocean Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-02-28

    This paper presents a numerical modeling study for simulating in-stream tidal energy extraction and assessing its effects on the hydrodynamics and transport processes in a tidal channel and bay system connecting to coastal ocean. A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) module was implemented in a three-dimensional (3-D) coastal ocean model using the momentum sink approach. The MHK model was validated with the analytical solutions for tidal channels under one-dimensional (1-D) conditions. Model simulations were further carried out to compare the momentum sink approach with the quadratic bottom friction approach. The effects of 3-D simulations on the vertical velocity profile, maximum extractable energy, and volume flux reduction across the channel were investigated through a series of numerical experiments. 3-D model results indicate that the volume flux reduction at the maximum extractable power predicted by the 1-D analytical model or two-dimensional (2-D) depth-averaged numerical model may be overestimated. Maximum extractable energy strongly depends on the turbine hub height in the water column, and which reaches a maximum when turbine hub height is located at mid-water depth. Far-field effects of tidal turbines on the flushing time of the tidal bay were also investigated. Model results demonstrate that tidal energy extraction has a greater effect on the flushing time than volume flux reduction, which could negatively affect the biogeochemical processes in estuarine and coastal waters that support primary productivity and higher forms of marine life.

  16. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    tidal freshwater marsh sites in the Delta Site name Coordinates Area (ha) Elevation above MSL (cm) Salinity regime Energy

  17. Modeling Tidal Freshwater Marsh Sustainability in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta Under a Broad Suite of Potential Future Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Schoellhamer, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Table 1 Location and basic characteristics of tidal freshwater marsh sites in the Delta Site name Coordinates

  18. Optical Detection of the Pictor A Jet and Tidal Tail: Evidence against an IC/CMB jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentry, Eric S; Hardcastle, Martin J; Perlman, Eric S; Birkinshaw, Mark; Worrall, Diana M; Lenc, Emil; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Urry, C Megan

    2015-01-01

    New images from the Hubble Space Telescope of the FRII radio galaxy Pictor A reveal a previously undiscovered tidal tail, as well as a number of jet knots coinciding with a known X-ray and radio jet. The tidal tail is approximately 5" wide (3 kpc projected), starting 18" (12 kpc) from the center of Pictor A, and extends more than 90" (60 kpc). The knots are part of a jet observed to be about 4' (160 kpc) long, extending to a bright hotspot. These images are the first optical detections of this jet, and by extracting knot flux densities through three filters we set constraints on emission models. While the radio and optical flux densities are usually explained by synchrotron emission, there are several emission mechanisms which might be used to explain the X-ray flux densities. Our data rule out Doppler boosted inverse Compton scattering as a source of the high energy emission. Instead, we find that the observed emission can be well described by synchrotron emission from electrons with a low energy index ($p\\s...

  19. Ocean energy projects may menace marine lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Ocean energy projects may menace marine migration lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com Published Monday, Dec. Scientists increasingly believe these marine creatures and others use the earth's magnetic fields to navigate vast distances. But as the search for green energy turns to the oceans, there are concerns that tidal

  20. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to characterize the conversion of tidal energy to radiated internal wave power. Whether the hydrostatic ( , shape)/SIW, where Ptide is the effective tidal power that interacts with the topography, and /8 of the oceans. Therefore, it is useful to measure the total power PIW converted from barotropic tidal motions

  1. Estimation vido haute frquence de la topographie inter-tidale d'une plage sableuse : application la

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation vidéo haute fréquence de la topographie inter- tidale d'une plage sableuse : application outil vidéo d'estimation haute fréquence de la topographie inter-tidale. Cet outil est basé sur le suivi : We present a tool to estimate inter-tidal topography using video images. This tool is based

  2. Tidal front affects the size of prey used by a top marine predator, the short-tailed shearwater (Puffinus tenuirostris)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tidal front affects the size of prey used by a top marine predator, the short-tailed shearwater densities of small euphausiids were associated with a tidal front on the north side of Akutan Pass. At most sites elsewhere in the Bering Sea, away from tidal fronts, shearwaters selected larger (14.2­20.1 mm

  3. MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <Avalon Tidal <

  4. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY 10003 (United States); Gezari, Suvi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casillas 601, La Serena (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oestman, Linda [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Smith, Mathew [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Gelfand, Joseph [New York University-Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Drake, Andrew J., E-mail: s.vanvelzen@astro.ru.nl [Center for Advance Computing Research, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this work is quantification of the power spectrum of extreme flares in AGNs.

  5. Circularization of Tidally Disrupted Stars around Spinning Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    We study the circularization of tidally disrupted stars on bound orbits around spinning supermassive black holes by performing three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations with Post-Newtonian corrections. Our simulations reveal that debris circularization depends sensitively on the efficiency of radiative cooling. There are two stages in debris circularization if radiative cooling is inefficient: first, the stellar debris streams self-intersect due to relativistic apsidal precession; shocks at the intersection points thermalize orbital energy and the debris forms a geometrically thick, ring-like structure around the black hole. The ring rapidly spreads via viscous diffusion, leading to the formation of a geometrically thick accretion disk. In contrast, if radiative cooling is efficient, the stellar debris circularizes due to self-intersection shocks and forms a geometrically thin ring-like structure. In this case, the dissipated energy can be emitted during debris circularization as a precurso...

  6. A 22 Degree Tidal Tail for Palomar 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Grillmair; O. Dionatos

    2006-03-02

    Using Data Release 4 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have applied an optimal contrast, matched filter technique to trace the trailing tidal tail of the globular cluster Palomar 5 to a distance of 18.5 degrees from the center of the cluster. This more than doubles the total known length of the tail to some 22 degrees on the sky. Based on a simple model of the Galaxy, we find that the stream's orientation on the sky is consistent at the 1.7 sigma level with existing proper motion measurements. We find that a spherical Galactic halo is adequate to model the stream over its currently known length, and we are able to place new constraints on the current space motion of the cluster.

  7. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2014-01-01

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{c...

  8. Tidal Charged Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-12-28

    We show that Randall Sundrum tidal charged spherically symmetric vacuum brane black holes could be act as a particle accelerator with ultrahigh center-of-mass energy in the limiting case of \\emph{ maximal black hole tidal charge}. For non-extremal Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is finite. While for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole, the center-of-mass energy is \\emph{infinite}. We have also derived the center-of-mass energy at ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) or LSCO(Last Stable Circular Orbit) or MSCO(Marginally Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole. We show visually the differences between Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m black hole and Randall Sundrum tidal charged BH. We have found that for maximally Randall Sundrum tidal charged black hole the center-of-mass energy is satisfied the following inequality: $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb}}>E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO}}$ i.e. $E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{+} = \\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}: E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{mb} = \\left(\\frac{3+\\sqrt{5}}{2}\\right)\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}}:E_{cm}\\mid_{r_{ISCO} = 4\\frac{M}{M_{p}^2}} = \\infty: 3.23 : 2.6$. Which is exactly \\emph{similar} to the spherically symmetric extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole.}

  9. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  10. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  11. Tidal energy effects of dark matter halos on early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentinuzzi, T; D'Onofrio, M

    2010-01-01

    Tidal interactions between neighboring objects span across the whole admissible range of lengths in nature: from, say, atoms to clusters of galaxies i.e. from micro to macrocosms. According to current cosmological theories, galaxies are embedded within massive non-baryonic dark matter (DM) halos, which affects their formation and evolution. It is therefore highly rewarding to understand the role of tidal interaction between the dark and luminous matter in galaxies. The current investigation is devoted to Early-Type Galaxies (ETGs), looking in particular at the possibility of establishing whether the tidal interaction of the DM halo with the luminous baryonic component may be at the origin of the so-called "tilt" of the Fundamental Plane (FP). The extension of the tensor virial theorem to two-component matter distributions implies the calculation of the self potential energy due to a selected subsystem, and the tidal potential energy induced by the other one. The additional assumption of homeoidally striated d...

  12. How does vegetation affect sedimentation on tidal marshes? Investigating particle capture and hydrodynamic controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    How does vegetation affect sedimentation on tidal marshes? Investigating particle capture stems, or enhanced settling due to a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy within flows through kinetic energy in the fertilized canopy. Our newly developed models of biologically mediated sedimentation

  13. Sudden increase in tidal response linked to calving and acceleration at a large Greenland outlet glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Juan, J.; Elosegui, P.; Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Davis, J. L.; Hamilton, Gordon S.; Stearns, Leigh; Anderson, M. L.; Ekstrom, G.; Ahlstrom, A. P.; Stenseng, L.; Khan, S. A.; Forsberg, R.

    2010-06-23

    [1] Large calving events at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers are associated with glacial earthquakes and near-instantaneous increases in glacier flow speed. At some glaciers and ice streams, flow is also modulated in a regular way by ocean tidal...

  14. Saltwater Incursion into Micro Tidal Wetlands: Case Studies from Matagorda, Texas and Humacao, Puerto Rico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colon, Ricardo J.

    2013-08-27

    Global climate change threatens the survival of microtidal wetlands by altering fundamental hydrological aspects such as precipitation patterns and tidal exchange. The combination of these stressors results in increased flooding period and soil...

  15. Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

  16. Dispersion Mechanisms of a Tidal River Junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Phillip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    a Tidal River Junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta,networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta,transport and fate in the Sacramento–San Joaquin delta using

  17. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Bir, Lawson, Li_2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic Engineering OMAE2011 June 19-24, 20111, Rotterdam, the Netherland OMAE2011-50063 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE COMPOSITE BLADE ABSTRACT This...

  18. ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    i ORGANIC MATTER DISTRIBUTION AND TURNOVER ALONG A GRADIENT FROM FOREST TO TIDAL CREEK A Thesis. A nested plot design was used to harvest vegetation, obtain soil cores, and collect quantitative data... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .18 Qualitative Vegetation Analysis

  19. Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy to create jobs and strengthen U.S. global competitiveness," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. "The Eastport tidal energy...

  20. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartment of EnergyOF THEJulyEnergy

  1. MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT Wave ParkDouglas County

  2. MHK Projects/Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough Bend < MHKTWECTheGenerationTown of

  3. Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS on the internetMagneticPlasma

  4. Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport) |AdministrationStanfordLabMailCharles Hanley

  5. Measurement of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert

    2014-09-01

    We report an observational estimate of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) in inactive galaxies based on a successful search for these events among transients in galaxies using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82). This search yielded 186 nuclear flares in galaxies, 2 of which are excellent TDF candidates. Because of the systematic nature of the search, the very large number of galaxies, the long time of observation, and the fact that non-TDFs were excluded without resorting to assumptions about TDF characteristics, this study provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the TDF rate. To compute the rate of optical stellar tidal disruption events, we simulate our entire pipeline to obtain the efficiency of detection. The rate depends on the light curves of TDFs, which are presently still poorly constrained. Using only the observed part of the SDSS light curves gives a model-independent upper limit to the optical TDF rate, N-dot <2×10{sup ?4} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1} (90% CL), under the assumption that the SDSS TDFs are representative examples. We develop three empirical models of the light curves based on the two SDSS light curves and two more recent and better-sampled Pan-STARRS TDF light curves, leading to our best estimate of the rate: N-dot {sub TDF}=(1.5--2.0){sub ?1.3}{sup +2.7}×10{sup ?5} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1}. We explore the modeling uncertainties by considering two theoretically motivated light curve models, as well as two different relationships between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity, and two different treatments of the cutoff in the visibility of TDFs at large M {sub BH}. From this we conclude that these sources of uncertainty are not significantly larger than the statistical ones. Our results are applicable for galaxies hosting black holes with mass in the range of a few 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} M {sub ?}, and translates to a volumetric TDF rate of (4-8) × 10{sup –8±0.4} yr{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, with the statistical uncertainty in the exponent.

  6. Fourier and autocorrelation analysis of estuarine tidal rhythmites, lower Breathitt Formation (Pennsylvania), eastern Kentucky, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martino, R.L.; Sanderson, D.D. (Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation in eastern Kentucky reveal a rhythmic pattern of siliciclastic sedimentation in a marginal marine coastal setting. A 15-23 m thick stratigraphic interval of thinly interbedded, fine sandstone and shale displays tidally generated features such as flaser and wavy current ripple bedding, bipolar paleocurrents, and cyclic thickening and thinning of mud-draped sandstone layers. A statistical analysis of sand layer thickness was carried out using shale partings as bounding surfaces for the individual sand units. Fourier and autocorrelation analyses were performed on two vertical sequences containing a total of over 2,100 layers. The results reveal the presence of four cycles of thickness variation. First-order cycles consist of alternating thick-thin sand layers. These daily couplets may reflect unequal flood and ebb currents during a single tidal cycle or dominant and subordinate tidal deposits in an ebb or flood dominated semidiurnal or mixed system. Second-order cycles typically consist of 11-14 sand layers and reflect spring-neap variations in tidal range and current velocities. Third-order cycles are usually composed of 24-35 layers and are formed in response to monthly variations in tidal range resulting from the ellipticity of the moon's orbit. Fourth-order cycles generally contain about 150 layers (range, 100-166) and were caused by seasonal maxima in tidal range associated with the solstice (winter, summer) and seasonal minima associated with the equinox (spring, fall).

  7. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  8. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  9. Gravitational self-force corrections to two-body tidal interactions and the effective one-body formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Thibault Damour

    2014-09-24

    Tidal interactions have a significant influence on the late dynamics of compact binary systems, which constitute the prime targets of the upcoming network of gravitational-wave detectors. We refine the theoretical description of tidal interactions (hitherto known only to the second post-Newtonian level) by extending our recently developed analytic self-force formalism, for extreme mass-ratio binary systems, to the computation of several tidal invariants. Specifically, we compute, to linear order in the mass ratio and to the 7.5$^{\\rm th}$ post-Newtonian order, the following tidal invariants: the square and the cube of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal tensor, the square of the gravitomagnetic quadrupolar tidal tensor, and the square of the gravitoelectric octupolar tidal tensor. Our high-accuracy analytic results are compared to recent numerical self-force tidal data by Dolan et al. \\cite{Dolan:2014pja}, and, notably, provide an analytic understanding of the light ring asymptotic behavior found by them. We transcribe our kinematical tidal-invariant results in the more dynamically significant effective one-body description of the tidal interaction energy. By combining, in a synergetic manner, analytical and numerical results, we provide simple, accurate analytic representations of the global, strong-field behavior of the gravitoelectric quadrupolar tidal factor. A striking finding is that the linear-in-mass-ratio piece in the latter tidal factor changes sign in the strong-field domain, to become negative (while its previously known second post-Newtonian approximant was always positive). We, however, argue that this will be more than compensated by a probable fast growth, in the strong-field domain, of the nonlinear-in-mass-ratio contributions in the tidal factor.

  10. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (near the Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$) and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits.

  11. "Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian; Cheng, Roseanne M; Shiokawa, Hotaka

    2015-01-01

    A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius (~ 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1} erg). Recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al., 2015) have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, ~ 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g ~ 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3} cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates (e.g.A...

  12. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (n...

  13. Tidal Downsizing Model. IV. Destructive feedback in planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    I argue that feedback is as important to formation of planets as it is to formation of stars and galaxies. Energy released by massive solid cores puffs up pre-collapse gas giant planets, making them vulnerable to tidal disruptions by their host stars. I find that feedback is the ultimate reason for some of the most robust properties of the observed exoplanet populations: the rarity of gas giants at all separations from $\\sim 0.1$ to $\\sim 100$~AU, the abundance of $\\sim 10 M_\\oplus$ cores but dearth of planets more massive than $\\sim 20 M_\\oplus$. Feedback effects can also explain (i) rapid assembly of massive cores at large separations as needed for Uranus, Neptune and the suspected HL Tau planets; (ii) the small core in Jupiter yet large cores in Uranus and Neptune; (iii) the existence of rare "metal monster" planets such as CoRoT-20b, a gas giant made of heavy elements by up to $\\sim 50$\\%.

  14. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  15. Jet and disk luminosities in tidal disruption events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piran, Tsvi; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDE) in which a star is devoured by a massive black hole at a galac- tic center pose a challenge to our understanding of accretion processes. Within a month the accretion rate reaches super-Eddington levels. It then drops gradually over a time scale of a year to sub-Eddington regimes. The initially geometrically thick disk becomes a thin one and eventually an ADAF at very low accretion rates. As such, TDEs explore the whole range of accretion rates and configurations. A challenging question is what the corresponding light curves of these events are. We explore numerically the disk luminosity and the conditions within the inner region of the disk using a fully general relativistic slim disk model. Those conditions determine the magnitude of the magnetic field that engulfs the black hole and this, in turn, determines the Blandford-Znajek jet power. We estimate this power in two different ways and show that they are self-consistent. We find, as expected earlier from analytic argu- ments ...

  16. SKA as a powerful hunter of jetted Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnarumma, I; Fender, R; Komossa, S; Paragi, Z; Van Velzen, S; Prandoni, I

    2015-01-01

    Observational consequences of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can enable us to discover quiescent SMBHs and constrain their mass function. Moreover, observing jetted TDEs (from previously non-active galaxies) provides us with a new means of studying the early phases of jet formation and evolution in an otherwise "pristine" environment. Although several (tens) TDEs have been discovered since 1999, only two jetted TDEs have been recently discovered in hard X-rays, and only one, Swift J1644+57, has a precise localization which further supports the TDE interpretation. These events alone are not sufficient to address those science issues, which require a substantial increase of the current sample. Despite the way they were discovered, the highest discovery potential for {\\em jetted} TDEs is not held by current and up-coming X-ray instruments, which will yield only a few to a few tens events per year. In fact, the best strategy is to use the Square Kilometer Array to detect TDEs an...

  17. "Circularization" vs. Accretion -- What Powers Tidal Disruption Events?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvi Piran; Gilad Svirski; Julian Krolik; Roseanne M. Cheng; Hotaka Shiokawa

    2015-04-07

    A tidal disruption event (TDE) takes place when a star passes near enough to a massive black hole to be disrupted. About half the star's matter is given elliptical trajectories with large apocenter distances, the other half is unbound. To "circularize", i.e., to form an accretion flow, the bound matter must lose a significant amount of energy, with the actual amount depending on the characteristic scale of the flow measured in units of the black hole's gravitational radius ($\\sim 10^{51} (R/1000R_g)^{-1}$~erg). Recent numerical simulations \\citep{Shiokawa+2015} have revealed that the circularization scale is close to the scale of the most-bound initial orbits, $\\sim 10^3 M_{BH,6.5}^{-2/3} R_g \\sim 10^{15} M_{BH,6.5}^{1/3}$~cm from the black hole, and the corresponding circularization energy dissipation rate is $\\sim 10^{44} M_{BH,6.5}^{-1/6}$~erg/s. We suggest that the energy liberated during circularization, rather then energy liberated by accretion onto the black hole, powers the observed optical TDE candidates. The observed rise times, luminosities, temperatures, emission radii, and line widths seen in these TDEs \\citep[e.g.][]{Arcavi+2014} are all more readily explained in terms of heating associated with circularization than in terms of accretion.

  18. Tidal Accelerometry: Exploring the Cosmos Via Gravitational Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Timir; Wescott, Mike; Jeong, Yeuncheol; Morawiec, Pawel; Gambrell, James; Overcash, Dan; Zhang, Huaizhou; Voulgaris, George

    2010-01-01

    Newtonian gravitation is non-radiative but is extremely pervasive and penetrates equally into every media because it cannot be shielded. The extra terrestrial fgravity is responsible for earth's trajectory. However its correlation or geodesic deviation is manifested as semi-diurnal and diurnal tides. Tidal signals, A(t) are temporal modulations in the field differential which can be observed in a wide variety of natural and laboratory situations. A(t) is a quasi-static, low frequency signal which arises from the relative changes in positions of the detector and source and is not part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Isaac Newton was the first to recognize the importance of tides in astrometry and attempetd to estimate lunar mass from ocean tides. By a case study we show, how the systematics of the gravitational correlation can be used for calibration and de-trending which can significantly increase the confidence level of high precision experiments. A(t) can also be used to determine the distribution of celes...

  19. Scaling laws to understand tidal dissipation in fluid planetary regions and stars I - Rotation, stratification and thermal diffusivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auclair-Desrotour, P; Poncin-Lafitte, C Le

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dissipation in planets and stars is one of the key physical mechanisms driving the evolution of star-planet and planet-moon systems. Several signatures of its action are observed in planetary systems thanks to their orbital architecture and the rotational state of their components. Tidal dissipation inside the fluid layers of celestial bodies are intrinsically linked to the dynamics and the physical properties of the latter. This complex dependence must be characterized. We compute the tidal kinetic energy dissipated by viscous friction and thermal diffusion in a rotating local fluid Cartesian section of a star/planet/moon submitted to a periodic tidal forcing. The properties of tidal gravito-inertial waves excited by the perturbation are derived analytically as explicit functions of the tidal frequency and local fluid parameters (i.e. the rotation, the buoyancy frequency characterizing the entropy stratification, viscous and thermal diffusivities) for periodic normal modes. The sensitivity of the resul...

  20. Subtropical catastrophe: Significant loss of low-mode tidal energy at J. A. MacKinnon and K. B. Winters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    Subtropical catastrophe: Significant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9°° J. A. MacKinnon and K with a northward baroclinic tidal flux of approximately 1.7 kW/m. After an initial spinup period, energy is quickly of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9°, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L15605, doi:10.1029/ 2005GL023376. 1

  1. Two-and three-dimensional double-sandbar system behaviour under intense wave forcing and a mesomacro tidal range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­macro tidal range R. Almar a,b,Ã, B. Castelle a,b , B.G. Ruessink c , N. Se´ne´chal a,b , P. Bonneton a,b , V­macro tidal environment Storm impact Nearshore Video imaging Short-term morphodynamics Truc Vert Beach a b s t r a c t Five weeks of hourly, 10-min time-exposure video images were used to analyze the meso­macro-tidal

  2. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.

  3. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Dopplermore »Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.« less

  4. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  5. Framework for Identifying Key Environmental Concerns in Marine Renewable Energy Projects- Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Kramer; Mirko Previsic; Peter Nelson; Sheri Woo

    2010-06-17

    Marine wave and tidal energy technology could interact with marine resources in ways that are not well understood. As wave and tidal energy conversion projects are planned, tested, and deployed, a wide range of stakeholders will be engaged; these include developers, state and federal regulatory agencies, environmental groups, tribal governments, recreational and commercial fishermen, and local communities. Identifying stakeholders’ environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development will help developers address and minimize potential environmental effects. Identifying important concerns will also assist with streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles by the industry in the U.S. today. In September 2008, RE Vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to conduct a scenario-based evaluation of emerging hydrokinetic technologies. The purpose of this evaluation is to identify and characterize environmental impacts that are likely to occur, demonstrate a process for analyzing these impacts, identify the “key” environmental concerns for each scenario, identify areas of uncertainty, and describe studies that could address that uncertainty. This process is intended to provide an objective and transparent tool to assist in decision-making for siting and selection of technology for wave and tidal energy development. RE Vision worked with H. T. Harvey & Associates, to develop a framework for identifying key environmental concerns with marine renewable technology. This report describes the results of this study. This framework was applied to varying wave and tidal power conversion technologies, scales, and locations. The following wave and tidal energy scenarios were considered: ? 4 wave energy generation technologies ? 3 tidal energy generation technologies ? 3 sites: Humboldt coast, California (wave); Makapu’u Point, Oahu, Hawaii (wave); and the Tacoma Narrows, Washington (tidal) ? 3 project sizes: pilot, small commercial, and large commercial The possible combinations total 24 wave technology scenarios and 9 tidal technology scenarios. We evaluated 3 of the 33 scenarios in detail: 1. A small commercial OPT Power Buoy project off the Humboldt County, California coast 2. A small commercial Pelamis Wave Power P-2 project off Makapu’u Point, Oahu, Hawaii 3. A pilot MCT SeaGen tidal project, sited in the Tacoma Narrows, Washington This framework document used information available from permitting documents that were written to support actual wave or tidal energy projects, but the results obtained here should not be confused with those of the permitting documents1. The main difference between this framework document and permitting documents of currently proposed pilot projects is that this framework identifies key environmental concerns and describes the next steps in addressing those concerns; permitting documents must identify effects, find or declare thresholds of significance, evaluate the effects against the thresholds, and find mitigation measures that will minimize or avoid the effects so they can be considered less-than-significant. Two methodologies, 1) an environmental effects analysis and 2) Raptools, were developed and tested to identify potential environmental effects associated with wave or tidal energy conversion projects. For the environmental effects analysis, we developed a framework based on standard risk assessment techniques. The framework was applied to the three scenarios listed above. The environmental effects analysis addressed questions such as: ? What is the temporal and spatial exposure of a species at a site? ? What are the specific potential project effects on that species? ? What measures could minimize, mitigate, or eliminate negative effects? ? Are there potential effects of the project, or species’ response to the effect, that are highly uncertain and warrant additional study? The second methodology, Raptools, is a collaborative approach useful for evaluating multiple characteristi

  6. General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Cheng, Roseanne M; Piran, Tsvi; Noble, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accu...

  7. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptista, António M. [Oregon Health & Science University, Science and Technology Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary/plume variability, the role of the estuary and plume on salmon survival, and functional changes in the estuary-plume system in response to climate and human activities.

  8. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by the planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  9. Macroscopic traversable wormholes with zero tidal forces inspired by noncommutative geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

    2015-01-08

    This paper addresses the following issues: (1) the possible existence of macroscopic traversable wormholes, given a noncommutative-geometry background, and (2) the possibility of allowing zero tidal forces, given a known density. It is shown that whenever the energy density describes a classical wormhole, the resulting solution is incompatible with quantum field theory. If the energy density originates from noncommutative geometry, then zero tidal forces are allowed. Also attributable to the noncommutative geometry is the violation of the null energy condition. The wormhole geometry satisfies the usual requirements, including asymptotic flatness.

  10. Detection of Gravitational Wave Emission by Supermassive Black Hole Binaries Through Tidal Disruption Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayasaki, Kimitake

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers produce binaries of supermassive black holes, which emit gravitational waves prior to their coalescence. We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to study the tidal disruption of stars by such a binary in the final centuries of its life. We find that the gas stream of the stellar debris moves chaotically in the binary potential and forms accretion disks around both black holes. The accretion light curve is modulated over the binary orbital period owing to relativistic beaming. This periodic signal allows to detect the decay of the binary orbit due to gravitational wave emission by observing two tidal disruption events that are separated by more than a decade.

  11. Aggradation of gravels in tidally influenced fluvial systems: upper Albian (Lower Cretaceous) on the cratonic margin of the North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González, Luis A.

    Aggradation of gravels in tidally influenced fluvial systems: upper Albian (Lower Cretaceous for the required water supply flux. Regardless of temporal scale, gravels were transported during `high-energy at the mouths of the river system, and tidal effects were transmitted at least 200 km inland from

  12. Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Energy Spectra, Reynolds Stresses, Turbulence Production, and Dissipation in a Tidally Driven Bottom Boundary Layer L. LUZNIK,* R. GURKA,*, W. A. M. NIMMO SMITH,# W. ZHU,* J. KATZ) site] are examined, covering the accelerating and decelerating phases of a single tidal cycle

  13. will appear in Journal of Geophysical Research, 2001. Observations of turbulence in a tidal beam and across a coastal ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Ren-Chieh

    1 will appear in Journal of Geophysical Research, 2001. Observations of turbulence in a tidal beam the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate exceeded 10-6 W kg-1 , and the diapycnal eddy diffusivity K varied by a factor of 100 with a semidiurnal tidal periodicity; the isopycnal displacement confirmed

  14. Factors Determining the Location of the Chlorophyll Maximum and the Fate of Algal Production within the Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bukaveckas, Paul A.

    that cause the formation of a chlorophyll maximum within the tidal freshwater James River. Phyto- plankton in their dominant mode of hydrodynamics, tidal freshwaters share a number of features in common with rivers of the saline estuary. Their hydrodynamics are dominated by bi- directional flow but are subject to considerable

  15. Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency radar measured by a high-frequency (HF) radar. The Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) was deployed at the U. M., and L. K. Shay, Surface M2 tidal currents along the North Carolina shelf observed with a high-frequency

  16. MHK Projects/Hannibal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove Tidal ProjectHannibal

  17. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  18. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Dissipation at tidal and seismic frequencies in a melt-free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    be readily detectable with future seismological observations. 1. Introduction The rate at which tidal energyJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Dissipation at tidal and seismic of Phobos provides a constraint on the tidal dissipation factor, Q, within Mars. We model viscoelastic

  19. A simple parameterization of turbulent tidal mixing near supercritical topography JODY M. KLYMAK1, SONYA LEGG2, AND ROBERT PINKEL3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    MAY 2010 1 A simple parameterization of turbulent tidal mixing near supercritical topography JODY M Jolla CA, 98105, USA (Manuscript received , in final form ) ABSTRACT A simple parameterization for tidal wave modes that have non-rotating phase speeds slower than the tidal advection speed are assumed

  20. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    & Sciences Project Title Visualize Physical Principles with Virtual Lab Modules Audience Undergraduate provide easy access to digital information, but don't provide experience with right- hand screws, electric of the last generation of physics students. The result is that today's students don't have an intuitive

  1. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    . Pedagogical Issue One of the challenges in teaching the Introduction to Computer Music course is the lack flow and practices. These resources will provide an online space through which students will be able piece of this project will be an animated studio walkthrough requiring user interaction and providing

  2. PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF INTERTIDAL CORALLINE ALGAE DURING A SIMULATED TIDAL CYCLE1 Rebecca J, Lobban and Harrison 1997, Helmuth and Hofmann 2001). During high tide, intertidal algae are underwater algae may be emerged and exposed to increased light stress, elevated air tem- peratures, and increased

  3. Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged flooding, University of New Hampshire, USA. 2 Numerical Methods Lab., Dartmouth College, USA. 3 Ocean Process Analysis Lab., University of New Hampshire, USA. Abstract Current, sea level and bed load transport

  4. Tidal heating of Earth-like exoplanets around M stars: Thermal, magnetic, and orbital evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The internal thermal and magnetic evolution of rocky exoplanets is critical to their habitability. We focus on the thermal-orbital evolution of Earth-mass planets around low mass M stars whose radiative habitable zone overlaps with the "tidal zone". We develop a thermal-orbital evolution model calibrated to Earth that couples tidal dissipation, with a temperature-dependent Maxwell rheology, to orbital circularization and migration. We illustrate thermal-orbital steady states where surface heat flow is balanced by tidal dissipation and cooling can be stalled for billions of years until circularization occurs. Orbital energy dissipated as tidal heat in the interior drives both inward migration and circularization, with a circularization time that is inversely proportional to the dissipation rate. We identify a peak in the internal dissipation rate as the mantle passes through a visco-elastic state at mantle temperatures near 1800 K. Planets orbiting a 0.1 solar-mass star within $0.07$ AU circularize before 10 G...

  5. EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    484 EVALUATION OF TIDAL INLETS CHANNEL MIGRATION AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA are analyzed to understand common factors that contribute to channel migration for inlets with/without jetties depth sufficient for reliable navigation in critical shoaling areas. In addition, ebb shoals have been

  6. Radar interferometry for measuring tidal strains across cracks on David Sandwell,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    Radar interferometry for measuring tidal strains across cracks on Europa David Sandwell,1 Paul and the plate has been relatively thin ($2 km) [Carr et al., 1998]. However, the present-day average shell relationships and a variety of morphologic characteristics [Carr et al., 1998; Greenberg et al., 1998]. Simple

  7. TIDAL ENERGY SITE RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS, BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    , Wind and Water Power Technologies, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak fashion, we can develop tidal energy site classes that map to standard TEC designs, similar to the wind over a representative period of record, to design the structural loading and power capacity of the TEC

  8. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  9. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  10. FLORAL AND FAUNAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FRAGMENTED AND UNFRAGMENTED BAHAMIAN TIDAL CREEKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Valentine-Rose1,7 , Julia A. Cherry1,2 , J. Jacob Culp1,3 , Kathryn E. Perez1,4 , Jeff B. Pollock1 , D, mangroves, seagrass macroalgal beds, as well as tidal creeks; Dahlgren and Marr 2004), have been identified

  11. Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Tidally driven ice speed variation at Helheim Glacier, Greenland, observed with terrestrial radar Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA 4 Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University is usually packed with dense ice melange. Helheim Glacier accelerated and retreated between 2000 and 2005

  12. Transformations of galaxies. III. Encounter dynamics and tidal response as functions of galaxy structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal interactions between disc galaxies depend on galaxy structure, but the details of this relationship are incompletely understood. I have constructed a three-parameter grid of bulge/disc/halo models broadly consistent with $\\Lambda$CDM, and simulated an extensive series of encounters using these models. Halo mass and extent strongly influence the dynamics of orbit evolution. In close encounters, the transfer of angular momentum mediated by the dynamical response of massive, extended haloes can reverse the direction of orbital motion of the central galaxies after their first passage. Tidal response is strongly correlated with the ratio $v_\\mathrm{e} / v_\\mathrm{c}$ of escape to circular velocity within the participating discs. Moreover, the same ratio also correlates with the rate at which tidal tails are reaccreted by their galaxies of origin; consequently, merger remnants with `twin tails', such as NGC 7252, may prove hard to reproduce unless $(v_\\mathrm{e} / v_\\mathrm{c})^2 \\lesssim 5.5$. The tidal morp...

  13. Tidal wave in 102Pd: Rotating condensate of up to seven d-bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Frauendorf; M. A. Caprio; J. Sun

    2012-02-08

    The yrast states of even even vibrational and transitional nuclei are inter- preted as a rotating condensate of interacting d-bosons and the corresponding semi-classical tidal wave concept. A simple experimental manifestation of the anharmonicity caused by the boson interaction is found. The interpretation is substantiated by calculations based on the Collective Model and the Cranking Model.

  14. Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekton Density Patterns in Tidal Ponds and Adjacent Wetlands Related to Pond Size and Salinity pond sizes (diameter 750 m=large), and two habitat types (pond, adjacent marsh) in the Barataria Bay Estuary, Louisiana. Nekton assemblages of ponds and the adjacent marsh

  15. Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winant, Clinton D.

    Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual to tidal periods. G. Monismith (2004), Covariation of coastal water temperature and microbial pollution at interannual the relationship between water temperature and fecal pollution in the surf zone at Huntington and Newport Beach

  16. An Alternative Model for the Tidal Evolution of the Earth-Moon-Sun System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbab I. Arbab

    2007-09-12

    We have found that the expansion of the universe has immense consequences on our local systems. We present a model based on cosmic expansion that fits well with observation. The close approach problem inflicting tidal theory is averted in this model. We have shown that the astronomical and geological changes of our local systems are of the order of Hubble constant.

  17. ORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4 IIHRORNL/TM-2011/419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy

  18. Asymmetric mixing transport: a horizontal transport mechanism for sinking plankton and sediment in tidal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Asymmetric mixing transport: a horizontal transport mechanism for sinking plankton and sediment in tidal flows James M. Pringle1 and Peter J.S. Franks2 SIO-UCSD, Mail Stop 0218 La Jolla, California 92093-0218 Running Head: Asymmetric Mixing Transport and Plankton 1 jmpringle@ucsd.edu 2 pfranks@ucsd.edu 1 #12

  19. Research papers Assessment of coastal density gradients near a macro-tidal estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polton, Jeff

    Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK a r t i c l e i n f o of a variety of factors ­ time and spatial (horizontal and vertical) scales are small, tidal currents factor, with wind forcing tending to reinforce it for wind speeds greater than 5­10 m sÀ1 . Near bed

  20. General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotaka Shiokawa; Julian H. Krolik; Roseanne M. Cheng; Tsvi Piran; Scott C. Noble

    2015-01-18

    We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the tidal debris motion, we track such a system until ~80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly-bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make the characteristic radius comparable to the semi-major axis of the most-bound material, not the tidal radius as previously thought. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is non-monotonic and slow, requiring ~3--10x the orbital period of the most tightly-bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accumulation time. Deflection by shocks does, however, remove enough angular momentum and energy from some mass for it to move inward even before most of the mass is accumulated into the accretion flow. Although the accretion rate rises sharply and then decays roughly as a power-law, its maximum is ~0.1x the previous expectation, and the duration of the peak is ~5x longer than previously predicted. The geometric mean of the black hole mass and stellar mass inferred from a measured event timescale is therefore ~0.2x the value given by classical theory.

  1. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  2. Tidal Disruption Flares as the Source of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    2012-10-03

    The optical spectral energy distributions of two tidal disruption flares identified by van Velzen et al. (2011) in archival SDSS data, are found to be well-fit by a thin-accretion-disk model. Furthermore, the inferred Supermassive Black Hole mass values agree well with the SMBH masses estimated from the host galaxy properties. Integrating the model SEDs to include shorter wavelength contributions provides an estimate of the bolometric luminosities of the accretion disks. The resultant bolometric luminosities are well in excess of the minimum required for accelerating UHECR protons. In combination with the recent observational estimate of the TDF rate (van Velzen and Farrar, these Proceedings), the results presented here strengthen the case that transient jets formed in tidal disruption events may be responsible for accelerating all or most UHECRs.

  3. The X-ray through Optical Fluxes and Line Strengths of Tidal Disruption Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Nathaniel; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Observations of luminous flares resulting from the possible tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes have raised a number of puzzles. Outstanding questions include the origin of the optical and ultraviolet (UV) flux, the weakness of hydrogen lines in the spectrum, and the occasional simultaneous observation of x-rays. Here we study the emission from tidal disruption events (TDEs) produced as radiation from black hole accretion propagates through an extended, optically thick envelope formed from stellar debris. We analytically describe key physics controlling spectrum formation, and present detailed radiative transfer calculations that model the spectral energy distribution (SED) and optical line strengths of TDEs near peak brightness. The steady-state transfer is coupled to a non local thermodynamic equilibrium treatment of the excitation and ionization states of hydrogen, helium and oxygen (as a representative metal). Our calculations show how an extended envelope can reprocess a fraction of sof...

  4. Tidal Disruption Flares as the Source of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Glennys R

    2012-01-01

    The optical spectral energy distributions of two tidal disruption flares identified by van Velzen et al. (2011) in archival SDSS data, are found to be well-fit by a thin-accretion-disk model. Furthermore, the inferred Supermassive Black Hole mass values agree well with the SMBH masses estimated from the host galaxy properties. Integrating the model SEDs to include shorter wavelength contributions provides an estimate of the bolometric luminosities of the accretion disks. The resultant bolometric luminosities are well in excess of the minimum required for accelerating UHECR protons. In combination with the recent observational estimate of the TDF rate (van Velzen and Farrar, these Proceedings), the results presented here strengthen the case that transient jets formed in tidal disruption events may be responsible for accelerating all or most UHECRs.

  5. CONSTRAINING TIDAL DISSIPATION IN STARS FROM THE DESTRUCTION RATES OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penev, Kaloyan; Jackson, Brian; Spada, Federico; Thom, Nicole

    2012-06-01

    We use the distribution of extrasolar planets in circular orbits around stars with surface convective zones detected by ground-based transit searches to constrain how efficiently tides raised by the planet are dissipated on the parent star. We parameterize this efficiency as a tidal quality factor (Q{sub *}). We conclude that the population of currently known planets is inconsistent with Q{sub *} < 10{sup 7} at the 99% level. Previous studies show that values of Q{sub *} between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} are required in order to explain the orbital circularization of main-sequence low-mass binary stars in clusters, suggesting that different dissipation mechanisms might be acting in the two cases, most likely due to the very different tidal forcing frequencies relative to the stellar rotation frequency occurring for star-star versus planet-star systems.

  6. Non-linear evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures from tidal torques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Catelan; Tom Theuns

    1996-04-15

    We discuss the non-linear evolution of the angular momentum L acquired by protostructures, like protogalaxies and protoclusters, due to tidal interactions with the surrounding matter inhomogeneities. The primordial density distribution is assumed to be Gaussian and the non-linear dynamics of the collisionless mass fluid is followed using Lagrangian perturbation theory. For a Cold Dark Matter spectrum, the inclusion of the leading-order Lagrangian correction terms results in a value of the rms ensemble average ^{1/2} which is only a factor of 1.3 higher than the corresponding linear estimate, irrespective of the scale. Consequently, the predictions of linear theory are rather accurate in quantifying the evolution of the angular momentum of protostructures before collapse sets in. In the Einstein-de Sitter universe, the initial torque is a good estimate for the tidal torque over the whole period during which the object is spun up.

  7. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  8. Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

  9. Newtonian wormholes with spherical symmetry and tidal forces on test particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo Luz; José P. S. Lemos

    2015-05-23

    A spherically symmetric wormhole in Newtonian gravitation in curved space, enhanced with a connection between the mass density and the Ricci scalar, is presented. The wormhole, consisting of two connected asymptotically flat regions, inhabits a spherically symmetric curved space. The gravitational potential, gravitational field and the pressure that supports the fluid that permeates the Newtonian wormhole are computed. Particle dynamics and tidal effects in this geometry are studied. The possibility of having Newtonian black holes in this theory is sketched.

  10. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Tidal torques dynamical friction and the structure of clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo; M. Gambera

    2001-05-22

    We study the joint effect of tidal torques and dynamical friction on the collapse of density peaks solving numerically the equations of motion of a shell of barionic matter falling into the central regions of a cluster of galaxies. We calculate the evolution of the expansion parameter, a(t), of the perturbation using a coefficient of dynamical friction eta_{cl} obtained from a clustered system and taking into account the gravitational interaction of the quadrupole moment of the system with the tidal field of the matter of the neighboring proto-galaxies. We show that within high-density environments, such as rich clusters of galaxies, tidal torques and dynamical friction slow down the collapse of low-nu peaks producing an observable variation of the parameter of expansion of the shell. As a consequence a bias of dynamical nature arises because high-density peaks preferentially collapse to form halos within which visible objects eventually will condense. For a standard Cold Dark Matter model this dynamical bias can account for a substantial part of the total bias required by observations on cluster scales.

  12. Tidally dominated depositional environment for the Mt. Simon Sandstone in central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L.; Lasemi, Z. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Several hundred feet of core from the upper part of the Mt. Simon in central Illinois have been examined macroscopically. Grain sizes and their systematics, bedding characteristics, sedimentary structures, and relationships among beds show that the upper Mt. Simon Sandstone is composed of a series of fining-upward cycles up to 10 m (30 feet) thick. A typical cycle consists, in ascending order, of a sandy subtidal facies, a mixed sand and mud intertidal-flat facies, and a muddy upper tidal-flat facies upward through the succession, the maximum and average grain size becomes progressively finer and the cycles thinner. The lower sandstone of each cycle contains beds that are massive to cross bedded and cross laminated; some beds show scoured reactivation surfaces. A few cycles contain a middle unit characterized by flaser and lenticular bedding and abundant mudcracks. Mudcracks also are common in the shale beds at the top of each cycle. Sedimentary structures such as reactivation surfaces, flaser and lenticular bedding, and mudcracks suggest that these cycles were deposited in peritidal environments. The presence of Skolithos in some cycles suggests very shallow marine conditions. The within-cycle upward fining is caused by regression or progradation that reflects a progressive decrease in current velocity from subtidal to intertidal parts of the tidal flat. Frequent flooding of the tidal flat resulted in repeated fining-upward cycles within the upper part of the Mt. Simon Sandstone.

  13. Joint transmission system projects to improve system reliability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 12 JOINT NEWS RELEASE Bonneville Power Administration Puget Sound Energy Seattle City Light Snohomish PUD FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, January 24, 2012 CONTACT: Mike Hansen,...

  14. Avian Communities in Tidal Salt Marshes of San Francisco Bay: A Review of Functional Groups by Foraging Guild and Habitat Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    2006). San Francisco Bay song spar- rows are adapted to highswallows (Hirundinidae), savannah spar- rows (Passerculussurvival in tidal-marsh song spar- rows was maximized when

  15. project management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

  16. Project Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published its Record of Decision announcing and explaining DOE’s chosen project alternative and describing any commitments for mitigating potential environmental impacts. The NEPA process...

  17. Project Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

  18. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects that involve UCSD faculty members and graduate students from the structural engineering (SE), mechanical and aerospace engineering (MAE), electrical and computer...

  19. RESEARCH PROJECTS February 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schenato, Luca

    RESEARCH PROJECTS FP7 February 13 #12; FP7 COOPERATION #12; INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH PROJECTS FP7 COOPERATION ENERGY PROJECT ACRONYM: EFONET PROJECT TITLE: Energy foresight network PROJECT

  20. The variation of the tidal quality factor of convective envelopes of rotating low-mass stars along their evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, S

    2015-01-01

    More than 1500 exoplanets have been discovered around a large diversity of host stars (from M- to A-type stars). Tidal dissipation in their convective envelope is a key actor that shapes the orbital architecture of short-period systems and that still remains unknown. Using a simplified two-layer assumption and grids of stellar models, we compute analytically an equivalent modified tidal quality factor, which is proportional to the inverse of the frequency-averaged dissipation due to the viscous friction applied by turbulent convection on tidal waves. It leads the conversion of their kinetic energy into heat and tidal evolution of orbits and spin. During their Pre-Main-Sequence, all low-mass stars have a decrease of the equivalent modified tidal quality factor for a fixed angular velocity of their convective envelope. Next, it evolves on the Main Sequence to an asymptotic value that is minimum for $0.6M_{\\odot}$ K-type stars and that increases by several orders of magnitude with increasing stellar mass. Finall...

  1. Tidal disruption jets as the source of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, Glennys R

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the spectacular, blazar-like tidal disruption event (TDE) candidates Swift J1644+57 and J2058+05 show that the conditions required for accelerating protons to 10^{20} eV appear to be realized in the outer jet, and possibly in the inner jet as well. Direct and indirect estimates of the rate of jetted-TDEs, and of the energy they inject, are compatible with the observed flux of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and the abundance of presently contributing sources. Thus TDE-jets can be a major source of UHECRs, even compabile with a pure proton composition.

  2. Tidal Waves in $^{102}$Pd: A Rotating Condensate of Multiple $d$ bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Ayangeakaa; U. Garg; M. A. Caprio; M. P. Carpenter; S. S. Ghugre; R. V. F. Janssens; F. G. Kondev; J. T. Matta; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Patel; D. Seweryniak; J. Sun; S. Zhu; S. Frauendorf

    2013-02-02

    Low-lying collective excitations in even-even vibrational and transitional nuclei may be described semi-classically as quadrupole running waves on the surface of the nucleus ("tidal waves"), and the observed vibrational-rotational behavior can be thought of as resulting from a rotating condensate of interacting $d$ bosons. These concepts have been investigated by measuring lifetimes of the levels in the yrast band of the $^{102}$Pd nucleus with the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method. The extracted $B(E2)$ reduced transition probabilities for the yrast band display a monotonic increase with spin, in agreement with the interpretation based on rotation-induced condensation of aligned $d$ bosons.

  3. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows: Experimental Studies on the Turbulence of Multiphase Plumes and Tidal Vortices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Duncan Burnette

    2011-08-08

    stream_source_info BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 163756 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859..., the turbulent energy spectra in inertial particle plumes followed the same modulation as the bubble plumes. PIV experiments from the tidal starting-jet vortices detail the influence of a finite channel length using identified vortice. The results show...

  4. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporationIt's Potential from Tidal Streams in the United

  5. MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <Avalon Tidal

  6. MHK Projects/Barfield Point | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to:Projects/Alaska 31 <Avalon TidalBarfield

  7. Tidal sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayes, David W. (Aiken, SC)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for pumping a sample of water or other liquid that uses the energy generated from the rise and fall of the liquid level to force a sample of the liquid into a collection vessel. A suction vessel and booster vessel with interconnecting tubing and check valves are responsive to an oscillating liquid level to pump a portion of said liquid into a collection vessel.

  8. A scaling relation of the evolving tidal fields in a ?CDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Springel, Volker, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: volker@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    We report the finding of a scaling relation among the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter A, the linear density rms fluctuation ?(r) and the linear growth factor D(z). Using the tidal field derived from the Millennium Simulation on 512{sup 3} grids at z = 0,2,5 and 127, we calculate the largest eigenvalues ? of the local tidal tensor at each grid resolution and measure its distance-averaged two-point correlation function, ?{sub ?}, as a function of the cosines of polar angles cos ? in the local principal axis frame. We show that ?{sub ?} is quite anisotropic, increasing toward the directions of minimal matter compression, and that the anisotropy of ?{sub ?} increases as the redshift z decreases and as the upper distance cutoff r{sub c} decreases. Fitting the numerical results to an analytic fitting model ?{sub ?}(cos ?)?(1+Acos {sup n}?){sup ?1}, it is found that the best fit value of A, dubbed the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter, varies systematically with ?(r{sub c}) and D(z), allowing us to determine the simple empiral scaling relation A(r{sub c},z) = 0.8 D{sup 0.76}(z) ?(r{sub c})

  9. On large and small tidal lags. The virtual identity of two rheophysical theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this letter is to discuss the virtual identity of two recent tidal theories: the creep tide theory of Ferraz-Mello (Cel. Mech. Dyn. Astron. 116, 109, 2013) and the Maxwell model developed by Correia et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 571, A50, 2014). It includes the discussion of the basic equations of the theories, which, in both cases, include an elastic and an anelastic component, and shows that the basic equations of the two theories are equivalent and differ by only a numerical factor in the anelastic tide. It also includes a discussion of the lags: the lag of the full tide (geodetic), dominated by the elastic component, and the phase of the anelastic tide. In rotating rocky bodies not trapped in a spin-orbit resonance (e.g., the Earth) the geodetic lag is close to zero and the phase of the anelastic tide is close to 90 degrees. The results obtained from combining tidal solutions from satellite tracking data and from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data, by Ray et al., are extended to determine the...

  10. A STATISTICAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE GALACTIC POTENTIAL AND TESTING GRAVITY WITH COLD TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penarrubia, Jorge; Walker, Matthew G.

    2012-11-20

    We introduce the Minimum Entropy Method, a simple statistical technique for constraining the Milky Way gravitational potential and simultaneously testing different gravity theories directly from 6D phase-space surveys and without adopting dynamical models. We demonstrate that orbital energy distributions that are separable (i.e., independent of position) have an associated entropy that increases under wrong assumptions about the gravitational potential and/or gravity theory. Of known objects, 'cold' tidal streams from low-mass progenitors follow orbital distributions that most nearly satisfy the condition of separability. Although the orbits of tidally stripped stars are perturbed by the progenitor's self-gravity, systematic variations of the energy distribution can be quantified in terms of the cross-entropy of individual tails, giving further sensitivity to theoretical biases in the host potential. The feasibility of using the Minimum Entropy Method to test a wide range of gravity theories is illustrated by evolving restricted N-body models in a Newtonian potential and examining the changes in entropy introduced by Dirac, MONDian, and f(R) gravity modifications.

  11. Discovery of an outflow from radio observations of the tidal disruption event ASASSN-14li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kate D; Guillochon, James; Zauderer, Bevin A; Williams, Peter K G

    2015-01-01

    The tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBH) lights up dormant systems and can be used to probe accretion and outflow processes. Theoretical calculations indicate that most tidal disruption events (TDEs) lead to super-Eddington accretion, which in turn drives outflows. The discovery of luminous radio emission from the $\\gamma$-ray TDE Sw J1644+57 revealed the formation of a relativistic jetted outflow, but such events represent $\\lesssim 1\\%$ of the TDE population. Direct evidence for outflows in the bulk of the TDE population, discovered through optical, ultraviolet (UV), and X-ray observations, has been lacking. Here we report the discovery of transient radio emission from the nearby optically-discovered TDE ASASSN-14li (distance of 90 Mpc), making it the first normal TDE detected in the radio, and unambiguously pointing to the formation of a non-relativistic outflow with a kinetic energy of $\\approx 10^{48}$ erg, a velocity of $\\approx 12,000-39,000$ km s$^{-1}$, and a mass of $\\approx ...

  12. Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2014-11-18

    The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast time intervals, while orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ on the other hand, form well-defined basins of escape. It was also observed, that for energy levels close to the critical escape energy the escape rates of orbits are large, while for much higher values of energy most of the orbits have low escape periods or they escape immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the dissolution process and the escape mechanism in open star clusters.

  13. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ?2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ?2.44 ± 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ?20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ? 0.09 keV (?10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1? level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ?}) ? 5.5 ± 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  14. Gravitational acceleration and tidal effects in spherical-symmetric density profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caimmi, R

    2015-01-01

    Pure power-law density profiles, $\\rho(r)\\propto r^{b-3}$, are classified in connection with the following reference cases: (i) isodensity, $b=3$, $\\rho=$ const; (ii) isogravity, $b=2$, $g=$ const; (iii) isothermal, $b=1$, $v=[GM(r)/r]^{1/2}=$ const; (iv) isomass, $b=0$, $M=$ const. A restricted number of different families of density profiles including, in addition, cored power-law, generalized power-law, polytropes, are studied in detail with regard to both one-component and two-component systems. Considerable effort is devoted to the existence of an extremum point (maximum absolute value) in the gravitational acceleration within the matter distribution. Predicted velocity curves are compared to the data inferred from observations. Tidal effects on an inner subsystem are investigated and an application is made to globular clusters within the Galaxy. To this aim, the tidal radius is defined by balancing the opposite gravitational forces from the Galaxy and the selected cluster on a special point of the clust...

  15. Ultra-Close Encounters of Stars With Massive Black Holes: Tidal Disruption Events With Prompt Hyperaccretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Evans; Pablo Laguna; Michael Eracleous

    2015-06-01

    A bright flare from a galactic nucleus followed at late times by a $t^{-5/3}$ decay in luminosity is often considered the signature of the complete tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole. The flare and power-law decay are produced when the stream of bound debris returns to the black hole, self-intersects, and eventually forms an accretion disk or torus. In the canonical scenario of a solar-type star disrupted by a $10^{6}\\; M_\\odot$ black hole, the time between the disruption of the star and the formation of the accretion torus could be years. We present fully general relativistic simulations of a new class of tidal disruption events involving ultra-close encounters of solar-type stars with intermediate mass black holes. In these encounters, a thick disk forms promptly after disruption, on timescales of hours. After a brief initial flare, the accretion rate remains steady and highly super-Eddington for a few days at $\\sim 10^2\\,M_\\odot\\,{\\rm yr}^{-1}$.

  16. Illuminating Massive Black Holes With White Dwarfs: Orbital Dynamics and High Energy Transients from Tidal Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Guillochon, James; Samsing, Johan

    2014-01-01

    White dwarfs (WDs) can be tidally disrupted only by massive black holes (MBHs) with masses less than approximately $10^5 M_\\odot$. These tidal interactions feed material to the MBH well above its Eddington limit, with the potential to launch a relativistic jet. The corresponding beamed emission is a promising signpost to an otherwise quiescent MBH of relatively low mass. We show that the mass transfer history, and thus the lightcurve, are quite different when the disruptive orbit is parabolic, eccentric, or circular. The mass lost each orbit exponentiates in the eccentric-orbit case leading to the destruction of the WD after several tens of orbits and making it difficult to produce a Swift J1644+57-like lightcurve via this channel. We then examine the stellar dynamics of clusters surrounding these MBHs to show that single-passage WD disruptions are substantially more common than repeating encounters in eccentric orbits. The $10^{49}$ erg s$^{-1}$ peak luminosity of these events makes them visible to cosmologi...

  17. Probing the tidal disruption flares of massive black holes with high-energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Dai, Zi-Gao; Cheng, K S

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered high-energy transient Swift J164449.3+573451 (Sw J1644+57) is thought to arise from the tidal disruption of a passing star by a dormant massive black hole. Modeling of the broadband emission suggests the presence of a powerful relativistic jet, which contributes dominantly to the observed X-ray emission. Here we suggest that high energy protons accelerated by internal shocks in the jets produce ~0.1-10 PeV neutrinos through photomeson interactions with X-ray photons. The large X-ray fluence (7*10^{-4} erg cm^{-2}) and high photopion efficiency, together with the insignificant cooling of secondary mesons, result in bright neutrino emission expected from Sw J1644+57 if the jet composition is matter-dominated. One to several neutrinos may be detected by a Km^3-scale detector from one tidal disruption event similar to Sw J1644+57, thereby providing a powerful probe of the composition of the jets.

  18. Infrared emission from tidal disruption events --- probing the pc-scale dust content around galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wenbin; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01

    Recent UV-optical surveys have been successful in finding tidal disruption events (TDEs), in which a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (BH). These TDEs release a huge amount of radiation energy ~ 10^51-52 erg into the circum-nuclear medium. If the medium is dusty, most of the radiation energy will be absorbed by dust grains within ~ 1 pc from the BH and re-radiated in the infrared. We calculate the dust emission lightcurve from a 1-D radiative transfer model, taking into account the time-dependent heating, cooling and sublimation of dust grains. We show that the dust emission peaks at 3-10 microns and has typical luminosities ~ 10^42-43 erg/s (with sky covering factor of dusty clouds ranging from 0.1-1). This is detectable by current generation of telescopes. In the near future, James Webb Space Telescope will be able to perform photometric and spectroscopic measurements, in which silicate or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features may be found. Observations at rest-frame wavelengt...

  19. OBLIQUITIES OF HOT JUPITER HOST STARS: EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL INTERACTIONS AND PRIMORDIAL MISALIGNMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Arriagada, Pamela; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel D.

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence that the obliquities of stars with close-in giant planets were initially nearly random, and that the low obliquities that are often observed are a consequence of star-planet tidal interactions. The evidence is based on 14 new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (for the systems HAT-P-6, HAT-P-7, HAT-P-16, HAT-P-24, HAT-P-32, HAT-P-34, WASP-12, WASP-16, WASP-18, WASP-19, WASP-26, WASP-31, Gl 436, and Kepler-8), as well as a critical review of previous observations. The low-obliquity (well-aligned) systems are those for which the expected tidal timescale is short, and likewise the high-obliquity (misaligned and retrograde) systems are those for which the expected timescale is long. At face value, this finding indicates that the origin of hot Jupiters involves dynamical interactions like planet-planet interactions or the Kozai effect that tilt their orbits rather than inspiraling due to interaction with a protoplanetary disk. We discuss the status of this hypothesis and the observations that are needed for a more definitive conclusion.

  20. Milky Way mass and potential recovery using tidal streams in a realistic halo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonaca, Ana; Geha, Marla; Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Diemand, Jürg; Hogg, David W.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method for determining the Galactic gravitational potential based on forward modeling of tidal stellar streams. We use this method to test the performance of smooth and static analytic potentials in representing realistic dark matter halos, which have substructure and are continually evolving by accretion. Our FAST-FORWARD method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to compare, in six-dimensional phase space, an 'observed' stream to models created in trial analytic potentials. We analyze a large sample of streams that evolved in the Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, which represents a realistic Galactic halo potential. The recovered potential parameters are in agreement with the best fit to the global, present-day VL2 potential. However, merely assuming an analytic potential limits the dark matter halo mass measurement to an accuracy of 5%-20%, depending on the choice of analytic parameterization. Collectively, the mass estimates using streams from our sample reach this fundamental limit, but individually they can be highly biased. Individual streams can both under- and overestimate the mass, and the bias is progressively worse for those with smaller perigalacticons, motivating the search for tidal streams at galactocentric distances larger than 70 kpc. We estimate that the assumption of a static and smooth dark matter potential in modeling of the GD-1- and Pal5-like streams introduces an error of up to 50% in the Milky Way mass estimates.

  1. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  2. An unstructured C-grid based method for 3-D global ocean dynamics: Free-surface formulations and tidal test cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    and tidal test cases G.R. Stuhne *, W.R. Peltier Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George numerical framework based on an energy-con- serving Arakawa C-grid discretization could be applied to ocean models. Tidal simulations are much more manageable that full-fledged OGCM climate simulations, being

  3. Using tidally induced water pressure changes to measure in-situ permeability: a1 comparison with long-term pumping tests2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily

    Using tidally induced water pressure changes to measure in-situ permeability: a1 comparison of California, Santa Cruz, United States6 (2) University of Guelph, G360 Centre for Applied Groundwater Research KEY POINTS13 Earth tidal responses yield hydraulic properties consistent with pumping tests14 Scale

  4. Radar Remote Sensing Estimates of Waves and Wave Forcing at a Tidal Inlet GUILLERMO M. DAZ MNDEZ AND MERRICK C. HALLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    Radar Remote Sensing Estimates of Waves and Wave Forcing at a Tidal Inlet GUILLERMO M. DÍAZ MÉNDEZ transformation through a tidal inlet is investigated with radar remote sensing. The frequency of wave breaking-wave conditions, in good agreement (R 5 0.95) with observations. 1. Introduction Remote sensing technology offers

  5. Stratigraphy, pollen history and geochronology of tidal marshes in a Gulf of Maine estuarine system: Climatic and relative sea level impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Stratigraphy, pollen history and geochronology of tidal marshes in a Gulf of Maine estuarine system stratigraphy pollen accretion relative sea level climate effects Sedimentologic and stratigraphic. The results of this study indicate that the sedimentology and stratigraphy of moderate-size tidal marshes

  6. CAPITAL PROJECT PROPOSAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransenBusiness networkingFleetPuget Dr.HomeGas ReserveCAPITAL

  7. Seasonal patterns of coarse sediment transport on a mixed sand and gravel beach due to vessel wakes, wind waves, and tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horner-Devine, Alex

    a mechanism for post-storm recovery, re-distributing sediment onshore. Morphologic response occurs. Mason and Coates (2001) identified hydraulic conductivity, infiltration and groundwater, wave reflection latitudes including on low energy, fetch restricted coasts such as the Puget Sound region (Finla

  8. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    accelerates the project schedule and significantly reduces the project total life cycle cost. Current Baseline (FY99 MYWP) Revised Project Baseline Project Scope: ...

  9. Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry L. Swinney, and M. S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Internal wave and boundary current generation by tidal flow over topography Amadeus Dettner, Harry turbulence and small-scale internal waves above deep-ocean topography Phys. Fluids 25, 106604 (2013); 10.1063/1.4826888 Topographically induced internal solitary waves in a pycnocline: Secondary generation and selection criteria Phys

  10. The variation of tidal dissipation in the convective envelope of low-mass stars along their evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, S

    2015-01-01

    Since 1995, more than 1500 exoplanets have been discovered around a large diversity of host stars (from M- to A-type stars). Tidal dissipation in stellar convective envelopes is a key actor that shapes the orbital architecture of short-period systems. Our objective is to understand and evaluate how tidal dissipation in the convective envelope of low-mass stars (from M to F types) depends on their mass, evolutionary stage and rotation. Using a simplified two-layer assumption, we compute analytically the frequency-averaged tidal dissipation in their convective envelope. This dissipation is due to the conversion into heat of the kinetic energy of tidal non wave-like/equilibrium flow and inertial waves because of the viscous friction applied by turbulent convection. Using grids of stellar models allows us to study the variation of the dissipation as a function of stellar mass and age on the Pre-Main-Sequence and on the Main-Sequence for stars with masses spanning from $0.4$ to $1.4M_{\\odot}$. As shown by observat...

  11. Environmental links to interannual variability in shellfish toxicity in Cobscook Bay and eastern Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Maine, a strongly tidally mixed coastal region Hannah M. Horecka, Andrew C. Thomas n , Ryan A. Weatherbee School of Marine Sciences, 5706 Aubert Hall, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Harmful algal blooms Gulf of Maine Cobscook Bay Shellfish toxicity a b s t r a c

  12. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosswog, Stephan

    Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3 1 in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate

  13. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 5, PAGES 811-814, MARCH 1, 2001 Parameterizing Tidal Dissipation over Rough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven

    of barotropic tidal energy. The first line of evidence comes from observations of mix- ing in the abyssal Brazil ocean, the energy flux carried by internal waves generated over rough topog- raphy dominates the energy issues. The first is whether including a parameterization for internal wave energy-flux in a model

  14. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    2008-01-15

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  15. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  16. Project Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference) | SciTechProjectITER Project

  17. Project Tour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference)Project Tour Project Tour See NMSSUP from

  18. Microscopic unitary description of tidal excitations in high-energy string-brane collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe D'Appollonio; Paolo Di Vecchia; Rodolfo Russo; Gabriele Veneziano

    2013-11-15

    The eikonal operator was originally introduced to describe the effect of tidal excitations on higher-genus elastic string amplitudes at high energy. In this paper we provide a precise interpretation for this operator through the explicit tree-level calculation of generic inelastic transitions between closed strings as they scatter off a stack of parallel Dp-branes. We perform this analysis both in the light-cone gauge, using the Green-Schwarz vertex, and in the covariant formalism, using the Reggeon vertex operator. We also present a detailed discussion of the high energy behaviour of the covariant string amplitudes, showing how to take into account the energy factors that enhance the contribution of the longitudinally polarized massive states in a simple way.

  19. Inefficient highly eccentric accretion and the low luminosity of stellar tidal disruption events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svirski, Gilad; Krolik, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disk at the pericenter scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, $\\sim10^{44}\\,\\rm{erg\\,s^{-1}}$, implies that we observe only $\\sim1\\%$ of the energy expected from accretion. Moreover, recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al. 2015) have shown that dissipation via hydrodynamical shocks is insufficient to circularize debris orbits on the pericenter scale, and the debris flow retains its initial semi-major axis scale throughout the first $\\sim10$ orbits of the event. Motivated by these numerical results, Piran et al. (2015) suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocenter between freshly infalling material and earlier-arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature, and the large radius implied by the obser...

  20. Compact object mergers: Observations of supermassive binary black holes and stellar tidal disruption events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komossa, S

    2015-01-01

    The capture and disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and the formation and coalescence of binaries, are inevitable consequences of the presence of SMBHs at the cores of galaxies. Pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and binary SMBHs are important stages in the evolution of galaxy mergers, and an intense search for these systems is currently ongoing. In the early and advanced stages of galaxy merging, observations of the triggering of accretion onto one or both BHs inform us about feedback processes and BH growth. Identification of the compact binary SMBHs at parsec and sub-parsec scales provides us with important constraints on the interaction processes that govern the shrinkage of the binary beyond the "final parsec". Coalescing binary SMBHs are among the most powerful sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe. Stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) appear as luminous, transient, accretion flares when part of the stellar material is accreted by the SMBH. About 30 events have b...

  1. Microscopic unitary description of tidal excitations in high-energy string-brane collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Vecchia, Paolo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The eikonal operator was originally introduced to describe the effect of tidal excitations on higher-genus elastic string amplitudes at high energy. In this paper we provide a precise interpretation for this operator through the explicit tree-level calculation of generic inelastic transitions between closed strings as they scatter off a stack of parallel Dp-branes. We perform this analysis both in the light-cone gauge, using the Green-Schwarz vertex, and in the covariant formalism, using the Reggeon vertex operator. We also present a detailed discussion of the high energy behaviour of the covariant string amplitudes, showing how to take into account the energy factors that enhance the contribution of the longitudinally polarized massive states in a simple way.

  2. Orbital decay of hot Jupiters due to nonlinear tidal dissipation within solar-type hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Essick, Reed

    2015-01-01

    We study the orbital evolution of hot Jupiters due to the excitation and damping of tidally driven $g$-modes within solar-type host stars. Linearly resonant $g$-modes (the dynamical tide) are driven to such large amplitudes in the stellar core that they excite a sea of other $g$-modes through weakly nonlinear interactions. By solving the dynamics of large networks of nonlinearly coupled modes, we show that the nonlinear dissipation rate of the dynamical tide is several orders of magnitude larger than the linear dissipation rate. As a result, we find that the orbits of planets with mass $M_p > 0.5M_J$ and period $P M_J$ and $Psolar-type hosts and could generate detectable transit-timing variations in the near future.

  3. Electromagnetic Transients Powered by Nuclear Decay in the Tidal Tails of Coalescing Compact Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Luke F; Lee, William H; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The possibility that long tidal tails formed during compact object mergers may power optical transients through the decay of freshly synthesized r-process material is investigated. Precise modeling of the merger dynamics allows for a realistic determination of the thermodynamic conditions in the ejected debris. The results of hydrodynamic and full nuclear network calculations are combined to calculate the resultant r-process abundances and the heating of the material by their decays. The subsequent homologous structure is mapped into a radiative transfer code to synthesize emergent model light curves and determine how their properties (variability and color evolution) depend on the mass ratio and orientation of the merging binary. The radiation emanating from the ejected debris, though less spectacular than a typical supernova, should be observable in transient surveys and we estimate the associated detection rates. The case for (or against) compact object mergers as the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts ...

  4. Globular cluster scale sizes in giant galaxies: The case of M87 and the role of orbital anisotropy and tidal filling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Jeremy J.; Sills, Alison; Harris, William E.

    2013-12-20

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the outer regions of M87 in order to study its globular cluster (GC) population out to large galactocentric distances. We discuss, particularly, the relationship between GC effective radii r{sub h} and projected galactocentric distance R {sub gc}. The observations suggest a shallow trend r{sub h}?R{sub gc}{sup 0.14} out to R {sub gc} ? 100 kpc, in agreement with studies of other giant elliptical galaxies. To theoretically reproduce this relationship, we simulate GC populations with various distributions of orbits. For an isotropic distribution of cluster orbits, we find a steeper trend of r{sub h}?R{sub gc}{sup 0.4}. Instead, we suggest that (1) if the cluster system has an orbital anisotropy profile, where orbits become preferentially radial with increasing galactocentric distance, and (2) if clusters become more tidally underfilling with galactocentric distance, then the observed relationship can be recovered. We also apply this approach to the red and blue GC populations separately and predict that red clusters are preferentially underfilling at large R {sub gc} and have a more isotropic distribution of orbits than blue clusters.

  5. A LUMINOUS, FAST RISING UV-TRANSIENT DISCOVERED BY ROTSE: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinkó, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Marion, G. H. [Department of Astronomy, McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yuan, F.; Akerlof, C. [Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Quimby, R. M. [Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kahiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Guillochon, J., E-mail: vinko@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on 2009 January 21. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ?10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by {sup 56}Ni—{sup 56}Co radioactive decay. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift, the peak magnitude of the OT is close to –22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a Sun-like star by the central supermassive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  7. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  8. Lemon Project Spring Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fashing, Norman

    Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation." The BOV defined Lemon "as a long- term research project

  9. Hydropower Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-02

    The Water Power Program helps industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Through support for public, private, and nonprofit efforts, the Water Power Program promotes the development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced hydropower devices and pumped storage hydropower applications. These technologies help capture energy stored by diversionary structures, increase the efficiency of hydroelectric generation, and use excess grid energy to replenish storage reserves for use during periods of peak electricity demand. In addition, the Water Power Program works to assess the potential extractable energy from domestic water resources to assist industry and government in planning for our nation’s energy future. From FY 2008 to FY 2014, DOE’s Water Power Program announced awards totaling approximately $62.5 million to 33 projects focused on hydropower. Table 1 provides a brief description of these projects.

  10. PROJECT SUMMARY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - . . -Pathways)PROJECT SUMMARY 1 TITLE

  11. Hallmark Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |ReferencePowerHaier: OrderProject

  12. Custom Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in ActinideRailCurrent ResearchInnovationCustom-Projects

  13. Project Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALofDefineEnergy NationalDepartmentProjectNE I&C

  14. Project Gnome

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference) | SciTechProject Gnome Double Beta Decay

  15. Project Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference) | SciTechProjectITERFebruaryStorage

  16. About Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery ActARM OverviewAbout GEDOE Projects

  17. Line Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H2015Tray and|Projects Pages default

  18. A continuum of H- to He-rich tidal disruption candidates with a preference for E+A galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; De Cia, Annalisa; Tal, David; Sullivan, Mark; Pan, Yen-Chen; Cenko, S. Bradley; Yan, Lin; Yang, Chen-Wei; Howell, D. A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Cohen, Judith G.; Tang, Sumin; Xu, Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E.; and others

    2014-09-20

    We present the results of a Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) archival search for blue transients that lie in the magnitude range between 'normal' core-collapse and superluminous supernovae (i.e., with –21 ? M {sub R} {sub (peak)} ? – 19). Of the six events found after excluding all interacting Type IIn and Ia-CSM supernovae, three (PTF09ge, 09axc, and 09djl) are coincident with the centers of their hosts, one (10iam) is offset from the center, and a precise offset cannot be determined for two (10nuj and 11glr). All the central events have similar rise times to the He-rich tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, and the event with the best-sampled light curve also has similar colors and power-law decay. Spectroscopically, PTF09ge is He-rich, while PTF09axc and 09djl display broad hydrogen features around peak magnitude. All three central events are in low star formation hosts, two of which are E+A galaxies. Our spectrum of the host of PS1-10jh displays similar properties. PTF10iam, the one offset event, is different photometrically and spectroscopically from the central events, and its host displays a higher star formation rate. Finding no obvious evidence for ongoing galactic nuclei activity or recent star formation, we conclude that the three central transients likely arise from the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole. We compare the spectra of these events to tidal disruption candidates from the literature and find that all of these objects can be unified on a continuous scale of spectral properties. The accumulated evidence of this expanded sample strongly supports a tidal disruption origin for this class of nuclear transients.

  19. POSSIBLE ORIGIN OF THE G2 CLOUD FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A KNOWN GIANT STAR BY SGR A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillochon, James; Loeb, Abraham [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The Institute for Theory and Computation, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico, E-mail: jguillochon@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    The discovery of the gas cloud G2 on a near-radial orbit about Sgr A* has prompted much speculation on its origin. In this Letter, we propose that G2 formed out of the debris stream produced by the removal of mass from the outer envelope of a nearby giant star. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of the returning tidal debris stream with cooling and find that the stream condenses into clumps that fall periodically onto Sgr A*. We propose that one of these clumps is the observed G2 cloud, with the rest of the stream being detectable at lower Br? emissivity along a trajectory that would trace from G2 to the star that was partially disrupted. By simultaneously fitting the orbits of S2, G2, and ?2000 candidate stars, and by fixing the orbital plane of each candidate star to G2 (as is expected for a tidal disruption), we find that several stars have orbits that are compatible with the notion that one of them was tidally disrupted to produce G2. If one of these stars were indeed disrupted, it last encountered Sgr A* hundreds of years ago and has likely encountered Sgr A* repeatedly. However, while these stars are compatible with the giant disruption scenario given their measured positions and proper motions, their radial velocities are currently unknown. If one of these stars' radial velocity is measured to be compatible with a disruptive orbit, it would strongly suggest that its disruption produced G2.

  20. Tidally distorted exoplanets: Density corrections for short-period hot-Jupiters based solely on observable parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Moulds, V.; Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J.; Littlefair, S. P.

    2014-07-10

    The close proximity of short-period hot-Jupiters to their parent star means they are subject to extreme tidal forces. This has a profound effect on their structure and, as a result, density measurements that assume that the planet is spherical can be incorrect. We have simulated the tidally distorted surface for 34 known short-period hot-Jupiters, assuming surfaces of constant gravitational equipotential for the planet, and the resulting densities have been calculated based only on observed parameters of the exoplanet systems. Comparing these results to the density values, assuming the planets are spherical, shows that there is an appreciable change in the measured density for planets with very short periods (typically less than two days). For one of the shortest-period systems, WASP-19b, we determine a decrease in bulk density of 12% from the spherical case and, for the majority of systems in this study, this value is in the range of 1%-5%. On the other hand, we also find cases where the distortion is negligible (relative to the measurement errors on the planetary parameters) even in the cases of some very short period systems, depending on the mass ratio and planetary radius. For high-density gas planets requiring apparently anomalously large core masses, density corrections due to tidal deformation could become important for the shortest-period systems.

  1. PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Organization Examples

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is responsible for supporting the FDH and RL project offices with adequate day-to-day planning and review technical management, coordination, control, and reporting of project...

  2. Stellar and gas dynamical model for tidal disruption events in a quiescent galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mageshwaran, T

    2015-01-01

    A detailed model of the tidal disruption events (TDE) has been constructed using stellar dynamical and gas dynamical inputs that include black hole mass $M_{\\bullet}$, specific orbital energy $E$ and angular momentum $J$, star mass $M_{\\star}$ and radius $R_{\\star}$ and pericenter of the star orbit $r_{p}(E,\\hspace{1mm}J,\\hspace{1mm}M_{\\bullet})$. We have solved the steady state Fokker- Planck equation using the standard loss cone theory for the galactic density profile $\\rho (r) \\propto r^{-\\gamma}$ and stellar mass function $\\xi(m) $ where $m=M_{\\star}/M_{\\odot}$ and obtained the feeding rate of stars to the black hole integrated over the phase space as $\\dot{N}_{t} \\propto M_{\\bullet}^\\beta$ where $\\beta= -0.3\\pm 0.01$ for $M_{\\bullet}>10^7 M_{\\odot}$ and $\\sim 6.8 \\hspace{1mm} \\times 10^{-5}$ Yr$^{-1}$ for $\\gamma=0.7$. Using this we model the in fall rate of the disrupted debris, $\\dot{M}(E,\\hspace{1mm}J,\\hspace{1mm}m,\\hspace{1mm}t)$ and discuss conditions for the disk formation and find that the accreti...

  3. Swift J1112.2-8238: A Candidate Relativistic Tidal Disruption Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, G C; Stanway, E R; Tanvir, N R; Cenko, S B; Berger, E; Chornock, R; Cucchiaria, A

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of Swift J1112.2-8238, and identify it as a candidate relativistic tidal disruption flare (rTDF). The outburst was first detected by Swift/BAT in June 2011 as an unknown, long-lived (order of days) $\\gamma$-ray transient source. We show that its position is consistent with the nucleus of a faint galaxy for which we establish a likely redshift of $z=0.89$ based on a single emission line that we interpret as the blended [OII]$\\lambda3727$ doublet. At this redshift, the peak X/$\\gamma$-ray luminosity exceeded $10^{47}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, while a spatially coincident optical transient source had $i^{\\prime} \\sim 22$ (M$_g \\sim -21.4$ at $z=0.89$) during early observations, $\\sim 20$ days after the Swift trigger. These properties place Swift J1112.2-8238 in a very similar region of parameter space to the two previously identified members of this class, Swift J1644+57 and Swift J2058+0516. As with those events the high-energy emission shows evidence for variability over the first few days, while...

  4. Unbound Debris Streams and Remnants Resulting From the Tidal Disruptions of Stars by Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillochon, James; Chen, Xian; Johnson, Michael D; Berger, Edo

    2015-01-01

    The kinetic energy of a star in orbit about a supermassive black hole is a significant fraction of its rest mass energy when its periapse is comparable to its tidal radius. Upon its destruction, a fraction of this energy is extracted and injected into the stellar debris, half of which becomes unbound from the black hole, with the fastest material moving at $\\sim 0.03 c$. In this paper, we present a formalism for determining the fate of these unbound debris streams (UDSs) as they depart from the black hole and interact with the surrounding gas. As the density and velocity varies along the length of a UDS, we find that hydrodynamical drag quickly shapes UDSs into loop-like structures, with the densest portions of the streams leading portions of lower density. As UDSs travel outwards, their drag against the ISM increases quadratically with distance, which causes UDSs to deposit their momentum and energy into the ambient medium before the surrounding shocked ISM has a chance to cool. This sudden injection of $\\si...

  5. Tidal Disruption and Magnetic Flux Capture: Powering a Jet from a Quiescent Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    The transient Swift J1644+57 is believed to have been produced by an unlucky star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (BH) leading to a tidal disruption event. This unusual flare displayed highly super-Eddington X-ray emission which likely originated in a relativistic, collimated jet. This presents challenges to modern accretion and jet theory as upper limits of prior BH activity, which we obtain from the radio afterglow of this event, imply that both the pre-disruption BH and stellar magnetic fluxes fall many orders of magnitude short of what is required to power the observed X-ray luminosity. We argue that a pre-existing, "fossil" accretion disc can contain a sufficient reservoir of magnetic flux and that the stellar debris stream is capable of dragging this flux into the BH. To demonstrate this, we perform local, 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the disc--stream interaction and demonstrate that the interface between the two is unstable to mixing. This mixing entrains a sufficient amount o...

  6. EVIDENCE FOR A MILKY WAY TIDAL STREAM REACHING BEYOND 100 kpc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., CA 91225 (United States); Catelan, M.; Torrealba, G. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Av. Vicuna Mackena 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Prieto, J. L. [Department of Astronomy, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We present the analysis of 1207 RR Lyrae found in photometry taken by the Catalina Survey's Mount Lemmon telescope. By combining accurate distances for these stars with measurements for {approx}14,000 type-ab RR Lyrae from the Catalina Schmidt telescope, we reveal an extended association that reaches Galactocentric distances beyond 100 kpc and overlaps the Sagittarius stream system. This result confirms earlier evidence for the existence of an outer halo tidal stream resulting from a disrupted stellar system. By comparing the RR Lyrae source density with that expected based on halo models, we find the detection has {approx}8{sigma} significance. We investigate the distances, radial velocities, metallicities, and period-amplitude distribution of the RR Lyrae. We find that both radial velocities and distances are inconsistent with current models of the Sagittarius stream. We also find tentative evidence for a division in source metallicities for the most distant sources. Following prior analyses, we compare the locations and distances of the RR Lyrae with photometrically selected candidate horizontal branch stars and find supporting evidence that this structure spans at least 60 Degree-Sign of the sky. We investigate the prospects of an association between the stream and the unusual globular cluster NGC 2419.

  7. TURBOVELOCITY STARS: KICKS RESULTING FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF SOLITARY STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manukian, Haik; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); O'Leary, Ryan M., E-mail: jfg@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-10

    The centers of most known galaxies host supermassive black holes (SMBHs). In orbit around these black holes are a centrally concentrated distribution of stars, both in single and in binary systems. Occasionally, these stars are perturbed onto orbits that bring them close to the SMBH. If the star is in a binary system, the three-body interaction with the SMBH can lead to large changes in orbital energy, depositing one of the two stars on a tightly-bound orbit, and its companion into a hyperbolic orbit that may escape the galaxy. In this Letter, we show that the disruption of solitary stars can also lead to large positive increases in orbital energy. The kick velocity depends on the amount of mass the star loses at pericenter, but not on the ratio of black hole to stellar mass, and are at most the star's own escape velocity. We find that these kicks are usually too small to result in the ejection of stars from the Milky Way, but can eject the stars from the black hole's sphere of influence, reducing their probability of being disrupted again. We estimate that {approx} 10{sup 5} stars, {approx} 1% of all stars within 10 pc of the galactic center, are likely to have had mass removed by the central black hole through tidal interaction, and speculate that these 'turbovelocity' stars will at first be redder, but eventually bluer, and always brighter than their unharassed peers.

  8. Hyperaccretion during tidal disruption events: Weakly bound debris envelopes and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: eric.coughlin@colorado.edu, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [Also at Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, UCB 391, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. (United States)

    2014-02-01

    After the destruction of the star during a tidal disruption event (TDE), the cataclysmic encounter between a star and the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of a galaxy, approximately half of the original stellar debris falls back onto the hole at a rate that can initially exceed the Eddington limit by orders of magnitude. We argue that the angular momentum of this matter is too low to allow it to attain a disk-like configuration with accretion proceeding at a mildly super-Eddington rate, the excess energy being carried away by a combination of radiative losses and radially distributed winds. Instead, we propose that the infalling gas traps accretion energy until it inflates into a weakly bound, quasi-spherical structure with gas extending nearly to the poles. We study the structure and evolution of such 'zero-Bernoulli accretion' flows as a model for the super-Eddington phase of TDEs. We argue that such flows cannot stop extremely super-Eddington accretion from occurring, and that once the envelope is maximally inflated, any excess accretion energy escapes through the poles in the form of powerful jets. We compare the predictions of our model to Swift J1644+57, the putative super-Eddington TDE, and show that it can qualitatively reproduce some of its observed features. Similar models, including self-gravity, could be applicable to gamma-ray bursts from collapsars and the growth of SMBH seeds inside quasi-stars.

  9. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  10. Spitzer View of Massive Star Formation in the Tidally Stripped Magellanic Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C -H Rosie; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko; Gordon, Karl D; Sewi?o, Marta; Whitney, Barbara A; Fukui, Yasuo; Madden, Suzanne C; Meade, Marilyn R; Meixner, Margaret; Oliveira, Joana M; Robitaille, Thomas P; Seale, Jonathan P; Shiao, Bernie; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2014-01-01

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper we present analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., {\\it in situ, current} massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using {\\it Spitzer} mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are $\\sim10 M_\\odot$, $\\ll45 M_\\odot$ found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and...

  11. Gas dynamics in tidal dwarf galaxies: disc formation at z=0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lelli, F; Brinks, E; Bournaud, F; McGaugh, S S; Lisenfeld, U; Weilbacher, P M; Boquien, M; Revaz, Y; Braine, J; Koribalski, B S; Belles, P -E

    2015-01-01

    Tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) are recycled objects that form within the collisional debris of interacting/merging galaxies. They are expected to be devoid of non-baryonic dark matter, since they can form only from dissipative material ejected from the discs of the progenitor galaxies. We investigate the gas dynamics in a sample of six bona-fide TDGs around three interacting and post-interacting systems: NGC 4694, NGC 5291, and NGC 7252 ("Atoms for Peace"). For NGC 4694 and NGC 5291 we analyse existing HI data from the Very Large Array (VLA), while for NGC 7252 we present new HI observations from the Jansky VLA together with long-slit and integral-field optical spectroscopy. For all six TDGs, the HI emission can be described by rotating disc models. These HI discs, however, have undergone less than a full rotation since the time of the interaction/merger event, raising the question of whether they are in dynamical equilibrium. Assuming that these discs are in equilibrium, the inferred dynamical masses are consis...

  12. Tidal Downsizing Model. III. Planets from sub-Earths to Brown Dwarfs: structure and metallicity preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We present improved population synthesis calculations in the context of the Tidal Downsizing (TD) hypothesis for planet formation. Our models provide natural explanations and/or quantitative match to exoplanet observations in the following categories: (i) most abundant planets being super-Earths; (ii) cores more massive than $\\sim 5-15 M_\\oplus$ are enveloped by massive metal-rich atmospheres; (iii) the frequency of occurrence of close-in gas giant planets correlates strongly with metallicity of the host star; (iv) no such correlation is found for sub-Neptune planets; (v) presence of massive cores in giant planets; (vi) the composition of gas giant planets is over-abundant in metals compared to their host stars; (vii) this over-abundance decreases with planet's mass, as observed; (viii) a deep valley in the planet mass function between masses of $\\sim 10-20 M_\\oplus$ and $\\sim 100 M_\\oplus$. We provide a number of observational predictions distinguishing the model from Core Accretion: (a) composition of the m...

  13. Tidal Stream Morphology as an Indicator of Dark Matter Halo Geometry: the Case of Palomar 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, Sarah; Johnston, Kathryn V; Price-Whelan, Adrian M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an example where the morphology of a single stellar stream can be used to rule out a specific galactic potential form without the need for velocity information. We investigate the globular cluster Palomar5 (Pal 5), which is tidally disrupting into a cold, thin stream mapped over 22 degrees on the sky with a typical width of 0.7 degrees. We generate models of this stream by fixing Pal 5's present-day position, distance and radial velocity via observations, while allowing its proper motion to vary. In a spherical dark matter halo we easily find models that fit the observed morphology. However, no plausible Pal 5 model could be found in the triaxial potential of Law & Majewski (2010), which has been proposed to explain the properties of the Sagittarius stream. In this case, the long, thin and curved morphology of the Pal5 stream alone can be used to rule out such a potential configuration. Pal 5 like streams in this potential are either too straight, missing the curvature of the observati...

  14. Evolution of the angular momentum of protogalaxies from tidal torques: Zel'dovich approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Catelan; Tom Theuns

    1996-04-15

    The growth of the angular momentum L of protogalaxies induced by tidal torques is reconsidered within the Zel'dovich approximation. We obtain a general expression for the ensemble expectation value of the square of L in terms of the first and second invariant of the inertia tensor of the Lagrangian volume enclosing the protoobject's collapsing mass. We then specialize the formalism to the particular case in which this volume is centered on a peak of the smoothed Gaussian density field and approximated by an isodensity ellipsoid. The result is the appropriate analytical estimate for the rms angular momentum of peaks to be compared against simulations that make use of the Hoffman-Ribak algorithm to set up a constrained density field that contains a peak with given shape. Extending the work of Heavens & Peacock, we calculate the joint probability distribution function for several spin parameters and peak mass M using the distribution of peak shapes, for different initial power spectra. The values of observed specific angular momentum versus mass are well fitted by our theoretical isoprobability contours. In contrast, the observed lower values for the specific angular momentum for ellipticals of the same mass cannot be accounted for within our linear regime investigation, highlighting the importance of strongly non-linear phenomena to explain the spin of such objects.

  15. Water gate array for current flow or tidal movement pneumatic harnessing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorlov, Alexander M. (Brookline, MA)

    1991-01-01

    The invention, which provides a system for harnessing power from current flow or tidal movement in a body of water, comprises first and second hydro-pneumatic chambers each having ingress and egress below the water surface near the river or ocean floor and water gates operative to open or seal the ports to the passage of water. In an exemplary embodiment, the gates are sychronized by shafts so that the ingress ports of each chamber are connected to the egress ports of each other chamber. Thus, one set of gates is closed, while the other is open, thereby allowing water to flow into one chamber and build air pressure therein and allowing water to flow out of the other chamber and create a partial vacuum therein. A pipe connects the chambers, and an air turbine harnesses the air movement within the pipe. When water levels are equilibrated, the open set of gates is closed by a counterweight, and the other set is allowed to open by natural force of the water differential. The water gates may be comprised of a plurality of louvers which are ganged for simultaneous opening and closing. The system is designed to operate with air turbines or other pneumatic devices. Its design minimizes construction cost and environmental impact, yet provides a clean renewable energy source.

  16. Tidally-driven Roche-Lobe Overflow of Hot Jupiters with MESA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valsecchi, Francesca; Rasio, Frederic A; Marchant, Pablo; Rogers, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Many exoplanets have now been detected in orbits with ultra-short periods, very close to the Roche limit. Building upon our previous work, we study the possibility that mass loss through Roche lobe overflow (RLO) may affect the evolution of these planets, and could possibly transform a hot Jupiter into a lower-mass planet (hot Neptune or super-Earth). We focus here on systems in which the mass loss occurs slowly ("stable mass transfer" in the language of binary star evolution) and we compute their evolution in detail with the binary evolution code MESA. We include the effects of tides, RLO, irradiation and photo-evaporation of the planet, as well as the stellar wind and magnetic braking. Our calculations all start with a hot Jupiter close to its Roche limit, in orbit around a sun-like star. The initial orbital decay and onset of RLO are driven by tidal dissipation in the star. We confirm that such a system can indeed evolve to produce lower-mass planets in orbits of a few days. The RLO phase eventually ends a...

  17. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Association of Collegiate Computing Services) Project Management Institute (PMI) Events & Training: UVA Local Support Partners (LSP) program training Project Management Institute webinars Project Management Institute events Scrum Alliance events Learning

  18. Project Management Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-08-05

    The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

  19. PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    PROJECT MANAGEMENT Professional Organizations: Project Management Institute International Association of Project and Program Management (IAPPM) Events & Training: UVa Center for Leadership Excellence classes SkillSoft classes PMO Symposium through PMI Project Management Institute (PMI) webinars American

  20. Perspectives on Project Finance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern Brothers & Co.

  1. Community Renewables Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered introduction and barriers to individual renewable projects, resources for community and group buy projects, and permitting guidelines.

  2. Computer Vision Project Topics Project Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    (contour projection?). step5: choose a tolerance value(3 or 5 pixels) to evaluate the image with eachComputer Vision Project Topics CSc I6716 Spring2011 #12;Project Reports 1. Introduction (problem up with Nikolaos Markou? · Key Components ­ The project is to find a target image from bunch

  3. Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is used as a foundation for all development, land use, and transportation activities at UBC. LBS Project Services is a fee-for-service provider of development, design, and project management servicesProject Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2

  4. Project 07382: Design Guidelines for Department of Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monmouth; Jim Dolph, Portsmouth Naval Shipyard; Layna Goodman, Naval Base Kitsap; Greg Hammer, Brooks; Kristen Wenzel, Texas Military Forces; Vicki Whitt, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard; Pung (Paul) Wong, Mc

  5. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30

    In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

  6. MHK Projects/Hope Field Point Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidalHope Field

  7. MHK Projects/Huffman Light Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf Moon Cove TidalTidalHopeHuffman

  8. Optical-infrared flares and radio afterglows from the tidal disruption of Jovian planets by their host star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    When a Jovian planet gets sufficiently close to its host star to be tidally disrupted, its debris stream deposits energy on the star's surface, producing an expanding bubble of hot plasma. We study the radiation from the bubble and show that it includes optical-infrared prompt emission and a subsequent radio afterglow. The prompt emission from M31 and Large Magellanic Cloud is detectable by optical-near infrared transient surveys with a large field of view at an event rate of a few events per year. The subsequent radio afterglows are detectable for $10^{3-4}$~years.

  9. Constraining the High-Density Behavior of Nuclear Symmetry Energy with the Tidal Polarizability of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Fattoyev; J. Carvajal; W. G. Newton; Bao-An Li

    2012-10-12

    Using a set of model equations of state satisfying the latest constraints from both terrestrial nuclear experiments and astrophysical observations as well as state-of-the-art nuclear many-body calculations of the pure neutron matter equation of state, the tidal polarizability of canonical neutron stars in coalescing binaries is found to be a very sensitive probe of the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy which is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich nucleonic matter. Moreover, it changes less than $\\pm 10%$ by varying various properties of symmetric nuclear matter and symmetry energy around the saturation density within their respective ranges of remaining uncertainty.

  10. Constraining the High-Density Behavior of Nuclear Symmetry Energy with the Tidal Polarizability of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattoyev, F J; Newton, W G; Li, Bao-An

    2012-01-01

    Using a set of model equations of state satisfying the latest constraints from both terrestrial nuclear experiments and astrophysical observations as well as state-of-the-art nuclear many-body calculations of the pure neutron matter equation of state, the tidal polarizability of canonical neutron stars in coalescing binaries is found to be a very sensitive probe of the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy which is among the most uncertain properties of dense neutron-rich nucleonic matter. Moreover, it changes less than $\\pm 10%$ by varying various properties of symmetric nuclear matter and symmetry energy around the saturation density within their respective ranges of remaining uncertainty.

  11. Projective ML Didier Remy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémy, Didier

    Projective ML Didier Remy INRIA-Rocquencourt Apr 10, 1992 Abstract We propose a projective lambda calculus as the ba- sis for operations on records. Projections operate on elevations, that is, records projective ML from this calculus by adding the ML Let typing rule to the simply typed projective calculus. We

  12. Project Reports for Haida Corporation- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Reynolds Creek Hydroelectric Project ("Reynolds Creek" or the "Project") is a 5 MW hydroelectric resource to be constructed on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, approximately 10 miles east of Hydaburg.

  13. Puget Sound Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic Utility District No 2 Jump to:PuebloEnergy Inc

  14. Project Selection - Record Keeping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    4-H members have many project areas to choose from, depending on where they live. Members should consult with their parents and 4-H leaders when choosing a project. This publication outlines project considerations.

  15. Clean Coal Projects (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation directs the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board to facilitate the construction and implementation of clean coal projects by expediting the permitting process for such projects.

  16. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  17. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Actual & Forecast FY 2011...

  18. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2011 Target FY 2011 Forecast FY 2011 Pre- &...

  19. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Actual FY 2010 Pre- &...

  20. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Primary Performance Metrics FY 2010 Target FY 2010 Forecast FY 2010 Pre- &...

  1. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP...

  2. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Final FY 2012 Pre- & Post-CAP Final...

  3. Contract/Project Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2 nd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

  4. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 st Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

  5. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 rd Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Performance Metrics and Targets ContractProject Management Performance Metrics FY 2009 Target FY 2009 Actual Comment 1....

  6. Contract/Project Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Third Quarter Overall Contract and Project Management Improvement Performance Metrics and Targets 1 ContractProject Management Performance Metric FY 2012 Target FY 2012 Forecast...

  7. Project 1640 Palomar Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project 1640 Palomar Procedures Version 0.1 7/7/08 2:11:08 PM #12;2 Project 1640 Design..................................................................................................................... 1 Palomar Procedures

  8. Project Finance and Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  9. Falls Creek Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavus Electric Company; Richard Levitt; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-06-12

    This project was for planning and construction of a 700kW hydropower project on the Fall River near Gustavus, Alaska.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  11. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used to determine the inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modeling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  12. PS1-10jh Continues to Follow the Fallback Accretion Rate of a Tidally Disrupted Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gezari, S; Lawrence, A; Rest, A; Jones, D O; Berger, E; Challis, P M; Narayan, G

    2015-01-01

    We present late-time observations of the tidal disruption event candidate PS1-10jh. UV and optical imaging with HST/WFC3 localize the transient to be coincident with the host galaxy nucleus to an accuracy of 0.023 arcsec, corresponding to 66 pc. The UV flux in the F225W filter, measured 3.35 rest-frame years after the peak of the nuclear flare, is consistent with a decline that continues to follow a $t^{-5/3}$ power-law with no spectral evolution. Late epochs of optical spectroscopy obtained with MMT ~ 2 and 4 years after the peak, enable a clean subtraction of the host galaxy from the early spectra, revealing broad helium emission lines on top of a hot continuum, and placing stringent upper limits on the presence of hydrogen line emission. We do not measure Balmer H\\delta absorption in the host galaxy strong enough to be indicative of a rare, post-starburst "E+A" galaxy as reported by Arcavi et al. (2014). The light curve of PS1-10jh over a baseline of 3.5 yr is best modeled by fallback accretion of a tidall...

  13. Characterization of mean velocity and flow structures in rivers and tidal flow is crucial for the annual energy production estimation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    · Characterization of mean velocity and flow structures in rivers and tidal flow is crucial for the annual energy production estimation and structural design of MHK devices. · ADCP moving vessel. FV data This research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. 5

  14. In: J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, 126(3): 305-313, 2000. Reservoir Model of Ebb-Tidal Shoal Evolution and Sand Bypassing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Ebb-Tidal Shoal Evolution and Sand Bypassing By Nicholas C. Kraus,1 Member, ASCE ABSTRACT A mathematical model is presented for calculating the change in volume and sand-bypassing rate at ebb reservoir can fill to a maximum (equilibrium) volume. The ratio of the input longshore sand transport rate

  15. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2014-06-07

    This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

  16. Livingston Campus Geothermal Project The Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Livingston Campus Geothermal Project The Project: Geothermal power is a cost effective, reliable is a Closed Loop Geothermal System involving the removal and storage of approximately four feet of dirt from the entire Geothermal Field and the boring of 321 vertical holes reaching a depth of 500 feet. These holes

  17. Bad prospects for the detection of giant stars' tidal disruption: effect of the ambient medium on bound debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Most massive galaxies are thought to contain a supermassive black holes in their centre surrounded by a tenuous gas environment, leading to no significant emission. In these quiescent galaxies, tidal disruption events represent a powerful detection method for the central black hole. Following the disruption, the stellar debris evolve into an elongated gas stream, which partly falls back towards the disruption site and accrete onto the black hole producing a luminous flare. Using an analytical treatment, we investigate the interaction between the debris stream and the gas environment of quiescent galaxies. Although we find dynamical effects to be negligible, we demonstrate that Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can lead to the dissolution of the stream into the ambient medium before it reaches the black hole, likely dimming the associated flare. Furthermore, we find this effect to be enhanced for disruptions involving more massive black holes and/or giant stars. Consequently, although disruptions of evolved stars h...

  18. Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, Teresa A.

    Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title of the project?) Excellent Very Good Good Fair Unsatisfactory COMMENTS: #12;Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for REU) #12;Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Poster Presentation PROJECT.#.: ...Title.. PARTICIPANTS: DATE

  19. Pile Structure Program, Projected Start Date : January 1, 2010 (Implementation).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Chris; Corbett, Catherine [Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership; Ebberts, Blaine [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2009-07-27

    The 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion includes Reasonable and Prudent Alternative 38-Piling and Piling Dike Removal Program. This RPA directs the Action Agencies to work with the Estuary Partnership to develop and implement a piling and pile dike removal program. The program has since evolved to include modifying pile structures to enhance their habitat value and complexity by adding large woody debris. The geographic extent of the Pile Structure Program (PSP) includes all tidally-influenced portions of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam; however, it will focus on the mainstem. The overarching goal of the PSP is to enhance and restore ecosystem structure and function for the recovery of federally listed salmonids through the active management of pile structures. To attain this goal, the program team developed the following objectives: (1) Develop a plan to remove or modify pile structures that have lower value to navigation channel maintenance, and in which removal or modification will present low-risk to adjacent land use, is cost-effective, and would result in increased ecosystem function. (2) Determine program benefits for juvenile salmonids and the ecosystem through a series of intensively monitored pilot projects. (3) Incorporate best available science and pilot project results into an adaptive management framework that will guide future management by prioritizing projects with the highest benefits. The PSP's hypotheses, which form the basis of the pilot project experiments, are organized into five categories: Sediment and Habitat-forming Processes, Habitat Conditions and Food Web, Piscivorous Fish, Piscivorous Birds, and Toxic Contaminant Reduction. These hypotheses are based on the effects listed in the Estuary Module (NOAA Fisheries in press) and others that emerged during literature reviews, discussions with scientists, and field visits. Using pilot project findings, future implementation will be adaptively managed to maximize program benefits and address limiting factors.

  20. Sample Project Execution Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The project execution plan (PEP) is the governing document that establishes the means to execute, monitor, and control projects.  The plan serves as the main communication vehicle to ensure that...