National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tidal hydrokinetic technology

  1. Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LiVecchi, Al; Jepsen, Richard Alan

    2010-06-01

    The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOEs Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  3. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  4. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  5. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  6. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  7. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to...

  8. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Form Edit History Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop ...

  10. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program efforts to develop advanced water power devices that ...

  11. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  12. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts in R&D in this area. Learn where marine and hydrokinetic technology research and testing is being done

  14. MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc...

  15. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Water Power Program: ...

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Technology at Florida Atlantic University, are ... Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies WIND AND WATER POWER ... Renewable Power Company's Turbine Generator Unit, NRELPIX ...

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computer Modeling Workshop | Department of Energy Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Fact Sheet (616.51 KB) More Documents & Publications 47688.pdf Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Framework Webinar | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management Framework Webinar Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management Framework Webinar December 16, 2014 9:00AM to 10:30AM EST This webinar is also being offered on the same day in the afternoon at 2:00 p.m. EST. Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the kinetic energy from ocean waves, tides, currents, and ocean thermal resources into electricity. The

  20. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    :MarineandHydrokineticTechnologyProjectMilestone&oldid675523" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other...

  1. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic

  2. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the NREL in Broomfield, Colorado from July 9 - 10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and to collect

  3. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Market Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on aquatic organisms, with early emphasis on the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise from currenttidal, wave and riverine hydrokinetic generators, toxicity...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, ...

  5. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Wind energy costs are significantly lower than natural gas, solar power, or coal with ... efficiency, reduced noise, and longer lifetimes, all this comes at an expensive price. ...

  6. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ORPC's TidGen(tm) turbine generator unit. R&D Opportunity Advanced water power technologies include devices capable of extracting electrical power from waves, water currents, and ...

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Structural Failure: http:www.oceanrenewable.com20110912atlantis-resources-corporation-connects-1mw-tidal- turbine-to-the-national-grid http:...

  8. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop October 26-28, 2005 Washington, D.C. Sponsored by: U.S. Department of Energy OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program March 24, 2006 To access this document and presentations made at the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop visit: http://hydropower.inl.gov/hydrokinetic_wave/ The production of

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  10. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-01

    Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of non-polluting alternatives to fossil and nuclear-fueled power plants to meet growing demand for electrical energy. Two emerging categories of renewable energy technologies, hydrokinetic and wave energy conversion devices, offer ways to tap the energy of moving water without impoundment (dams) or diversion required by many conventional hydroelectric facilities. These technologies include devices designed for deployment in natural streams, tidal estuaries, ocean currents, and constructed waterways, as well as devices designed to capture the energy of ocean waves. On October 26-28, 2005, 54 representatives from government, non-governmental organizations, and private business met to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave technology devices, their stages of development, and the projected cost to bring each to market; (2) identify where these technologies can best operate; (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures; (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. These workshop proceedings include detailed summaries of the 24 presentations made and the discussions that followed.

  11. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Computer Modeling Workshop The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy...

  13. Quadrennial Technology Review 2015: Technology Assessments--Marine and Hydrokinetic Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sam Baldwin, Gilbert Bindewald, Austin Brown, Charles Chen, Kerry Cheung, Corrie Clark, Joe Cresko,

    2015-10-07

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. With more than 50% of the U.S. population living within 50 miles of the nation’s coasts, MHK technologies hold significant potential to supply renewable electricity to consumers in coastal load centers, particularly in the near term in areas with high costs of electricity and longer term in high resource areas in close proximity to major coastal load centers. MHK resource assessments identify a total U.S. technical resource potential of approximately 1250–1850 terawatt-hours (TWh) of generation per year from ocean wave, ocean current, ocean tidal, and river current energy. Of this, the U.S. continental technical resource potential is approximately 500–750 TWh/year. For context, roughly 90,000 homes can be powered by 1 TWh of electricity generation each year. A cost-effective MHK industry could provide a substantial amount of electricity for the nation owing in large part to its unique advantages as a source of energy, including its vast resource potential, its close proximity to major coastal load centers, and its long-term predictability and near-term forecastability.

  14. Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pamphlet that describes the Office of EERE's Water Power Program in fiscal year 2009, including the fiscal year 2009 funding opportunities, the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, the U.S. hydrodynamic testing facilities, and the fiscal year 2008 Advanced Water Projects awards.

  15. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources.

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet (381.97 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resourses 2014 Water Power Program

  17. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Value-Added Options Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snowberg, David; Weber, Jochem

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, the global marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry has suffered a number of serious technological and commercial setbacks. To help reduce the risks of industry failures and advance the development of new technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK Risk Management Framework. By addressing uncertainties, the MHK Risk Management Framework increases the likelihood of successful development of an MHK technology. It covers projects of any technical readiness level (TRL) or technical performance level (TPL) and all risk types (e.g. technological risk, regulatory risk, commercial risk) over the development cycle. This framework is intended for the development and deployment of a single MHK technology—not for multiple device deployments within a plant. This risk framework is intended to meet DOE’s risk management expectations for the MHK technology research and development efforts of the Water Power Program (see Appendix A). It also provides an overview of other relevant risk management tools and documentation.1 This framework emphasizes design and risk reviews as formal gates to ensure risks are managed throughout the technology development cycle. Section 1 presents the recommended technology development cycle, Sections 2 and 3 present tools to assess the TRL and TPL of the project, respectively. Section 4 presents a risk management process with design and risk reviews for actively managing risk within the project, and Section 5 presents a detailed description of a risk registry to collect the risk management information into one living document. Section 6 presents recommendations for collecting and using lessons learned throughout the development process.

  19. MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gen Tidal Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Gen Tidal Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal...

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a

  1. MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd...

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Characterization 2 CurrentTidalRiverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more...

  3. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HYDROPOWER TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM December 2009 PREPARED IN RESPONSE TO THE ENERGY INDEPENDENCE AND SECURITY ACT OF 2007, SECTION 633(B) Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies NOTICE This report is being disseminated by the Department of Energy. As such, it was prepared in compliance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Pub. L. No. 106- 554) and information guidelines

  4. Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address: PO Box 399 Place: Harstad Zip: 9484 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and...

  5. MHK Technologies/Sihwa tidal barrage power plant | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sihwa tidal barrage power plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sihwa tidal barrage power plant.jpg Technology Profile...

  6. MHK Technologies/Jiangxia Tidal Power Station | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jiangxia Tidal Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Jiangxia Tidal Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  7. MHK Technologies/Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Turbine SRTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  8. MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization...

  9. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on ...

  10. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is

  11. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centipod MHK TechnologiesCETO Wave Energy Technology MHK TechnologiesClosed Cycle OTEC MHK TechnologiesCoRMaT MHK TechnologiesCross Flow Turbine MHK TechnologiesCurrent...

  12. MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg...

  13. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn

    2009-12-01

    This report focuses on potential impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies to aquatic environments (i.e. rivers, estuaries, and oceans), fish and fish habitats, ecological relationships, and other marine and freshwater aquatic resources. The report does not address impacts to terrestrial ecosystems and organisms that are common to other electricity-generating technologies (e.g., construction and maintenance of transmission lines) or possible effects on the human environment, including: human use conflicts, aesthetics, viewsheds, noise in the terrestrial environment, light, recreation, transportation, navigation, cultural resources, socioeconomic impacts.

  14. MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing...

  15. MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest...

  16. In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Effects on the Physical Environment ...

  17. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty; Ali, Muhammad; Ravens, Tom

    2013-12-06

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  18. MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine...

  19. MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition Early...

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry.

  1. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Hydrokinetic » Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization With more than 50% of the population living within 50 miles of coastlines, there is vast potential to provide clean, renewable electricity to communities and cities across the United States using marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. In order to understand the full potential for future electricity production that

  3. MHK Technologies/Tidal Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aquascientific Project(s)...

  4. MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization StatoilHydro co owned...

  5. MHK Technologies/TidalStar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search << Return to the MHK database homepage TidalStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine...

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is

  7. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  8. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinq-Mars, Robert S; Burke, Timothy; Irish, James; Gustafson, Brian; Kirtley, James; Alawa, Aiman

    2011-09-01

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. Completed final reporting and deliverables

  9. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Description See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Topic Water Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy

  10. Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

    2010-11-09

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

  11. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Čada, Glenn F.

    2007-04-01

    A new generation of hydropower technologies, the kinetic hydro and wave energy conversion devices, offers the possibility of generating electricity from the movements of water, without the need for dams and diversions. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 encouraged the development of these sources of renewable energy in the United States, and there is growing interest in deploying them globally. The technologies that would extract electricity from free-flowing streams, estuaries, and oceans have not been widely tested. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy convened a workshop to (1) identify the varieties of hydrokinetic energy and wave energy conversion devices and their stages of development, (2) identify where these technologies can best operate, (3) identify the potential environmental issues associated with these technologies and possible mitigation measures, and (4) develop a list of research needs and/or practical solutions to address unresolved environmental issues. The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments.

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9–10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways from the workshop and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts, supply discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest what the most pressing MHK technology needs are and how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources can be utilized to assist the marine energy industry in the most effective manner.

  13. Rochelle Blaustein Joins Office of Technology Transitions as Deputy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  15. MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The TidalStream SST (Semi-Submersible Turbine) is...

  16. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  17. Severn Tidal Power Group STpg | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Jump to: navigation, search Name: Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is...

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects, Fiscal Years 2008-2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-24

    This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects from 2008 to 2014.

  19. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  20. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-29

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  1. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continental United States | Department of Energy and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the

  2. In-stream hydrokinetic power: Review and appraisal

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Zwieten, J.; McAnally, William; Ahmad, Jameel; Davis, Trey; Martin, James; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Cribbs, Allison; Lippert, Renee; Hudon, Thomas; Trudeau, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a review of in-stream hydrokinetic power, which is defined as electric power generated by devices capturing the energy of naturally flowing water-stream, tidal, or open ocean flows-without impounding the water. North America has significant in-stream energy resources, and hydrokinetic electric power technologies to harness those resources have the potential to make a significant contribution to U.S. electricity needs by adding as much as 120 TWh/year from rivers alone to the present hydroelectric power generation capacity. Additionally, tidal and ocean current resources in the U.S. respectively contain 438 TWh/year and 163 TWh/year ofmore » extractable power. Among their attractive features, in-stream hydrokinetic operations do not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions or other air pollution and have less visual impact than wind turbines. Since these systems do no utilize dams the way traditional hydropower systems typically do, their impact on the environment will differ, and a small but growing number of studies support conclusions regarding those impacts. Furthermore, potential environmental impacts include altered water quality, altered sediment deposition, altered habitats, direct impact on biota, and navigability of waterways.« less

  3. In-stream hydrokinetic power: Review and appraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Zwieten, J.; McAnally, William; Ahmad, Jameel; Davis, Trey; Martin, James; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Cribbs, Allison; Lippert, Renee; Hudon, Thomas; Trudeau, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a review of in-stream hydrokinetic power, which is defined as electric power generated by devices capturing the energy of naturally flowing water-stream, tidal, or open ocean flows-without impounding the water. North America has significant in-stream energy resources, and hydrokinetic electric power technologies to harness those resources have the potential to make a significant contribution to U.S. electricity needs by adding as much as 120 TWh/year from rivers alone to the present hydroelectric power generation capacity. Additionally, tidal and ocean current resources in the U.S. respectively contain 438 TWh/year and 163 TWh/year of extractable power. Among their attractive features, in-stream hydrokinetic operations do not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions or other air pollution and have less visual impact than wind turbines. Since these systems do no utilize dams the way traditional hydropower systems typically do, their impact on the environment will differ, and a small but growing number of studies support conclusions regarding those impacts. Furthermore, potential environmental impacts include altered water quality, altered sediment deposition, altered habitats, direct impact on biota, and navigability of waterways.

  4. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental Monitoring Technologies and Field Testing Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders regarding the program’s activities and priorities in MHK environmental monitoring and field testing opportunities.

  5. Tidal Sails AS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sails AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Sails AS Address: Standgaten 130 Place: Haugesund Zip: 5531 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +32 474 98...

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015. 2008-2015 Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Projects (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the House Science and

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's marine and hydrokinetic projects from fiscal years 2008 to 2015. 2008-2015 Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Projects (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Water Power Program: 2011 Peer Review Report Before the House Science and

  8. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, P.

    2012-12-12

    This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account for all technical constraints on energy capture and conversion.

  9. Hydrokinetic Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrokinetic Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydrokinetic Laboratory Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hklabllc.com This company is...

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research &...

  11. Impacts of electromagnetic fields associated with marine and hydrokinetic surrogate technologies on fish movements and behaviors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claisse, Jeremy T.; Pondella, Daniel J.; Williams, Chelsea M.; Zahn, Laurel A.; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2015-09-30

    Marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) and offshore wind devices are being developed and deployed in U.S. and international waters. Electric current flowing through subsea transmission cables associated with these devices will generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), which may interact with, and potentially impact, marine fishes. Some marine fishes can detect electric and/or magnetic fields and use them to navigate, orientate, and sense prey, mates and predators. Over the past five years there have been multiple comprehensive reviews and studies evaluating the potential vulnerability of marine fishes to EMF produced by MHK devices. Most documented effects involve sub-lethal behavioral responses of individual fish when in close proximity to EMF (e.g., fish being repelled by or attracted to fields). These reviews reach conclusions that the current state of research on this topic is still in its infancy and evaluations of potential impacts are associated with great uncertainty. A variety of MHK technologies are likely to be considered for deployment offshore of the Hawaiian Islands, and there is a need to be able to better predict and assess potential associated environmental impacts. The goal of this study was to provide a complementary piece to these previous reviews (e.g., Normandeau et al. 2011) by focusing on marine fish species in the Hawaii region. We compiled the relevant available information, then prioritized fish species as candidates for various paths of future research. To address this, we first developed a list of Hawaii Region Focal Species, which included fishes that are more likely to be sensitive to EMF. We then compiled species-specific information available in the literature on their sensitivity to EMF, as well as life history, movement and habitat use information that could inform an analysis of their likelihood of encountering EMF from subsea cables associated with MHK devices. Studies have only documented EMF sensitivity in 11 of the marine fish

  12. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Department of Energy Awards 37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village New Wave Power ...

  13. Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stream Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Stream Address: 76 Dukes Ave Place: London Zip: W4 2 AK Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 01926...

  14. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation January 6, 2014 - 11:15am Addthis The Water Power Program recently issued a Notice of Intent for a funding opportunity expected to be posted early in 2014, pending congressional appropriations. The Notice of Intent, titled "Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Environmental and

  15. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101, learn

  16. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2013-06-01

    A primary issue of concern of regulatory and resource agencies is how the operation of hydrokinetic turbines will affect local and migratory fish populations. This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments.

  17. DOE’s Deep Capabilities and Wide Possibilities Highlighted at Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When it comes to marine and hydrokinetic technology development, the Department of Energy (DOE) offers deep capabilities and wide possibilities.

  18. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments.

  19. MHK Technologies/Tidal Sails | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to wires strung across the tidal stream at an angle The sails are driven back and forth by the tidal flow between two stations at one of which the generator is installed...

  20. DOE Announces Webinars on Residential Energy Efficiency, Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development Risk Management, and More

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are...

  1. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This workshop focused on information about the technologies and identified potential environmental issues associated with deploying them, and outlined a list of research needs and possible approaches to addressing those issues.

  2. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Development | Department of Energy $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to

  3. Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS - ... Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring ...

  4. MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chitokoloki Project *MHK ProjectsCoal Creek Project *MHK ProjectsHalf Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK ProjectsIndian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects...

  5. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glenn Cada FeATURe: James Ahlgrimm Michael Bahleda BIOeNGINeeRING Tom Bigford Stefanie Damiani Stavrakas The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the authors' organizations. Douglas Hall Mention of a technology, company, or website link Russell Moursund does not imply endorsement. Michael Sale Cada is a research staff member in the Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He can be contacted at cadagf@ornl.gov.

  6. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  7. Gulfstream Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Gulfstream Technologies Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  8. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  9. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power | Department of Energy Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power 16_life_revision_previsic_update.ppt (2.64 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review

  10. DOE Marine and Hydrokinetic Program Strategy Stakeholder Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office will hold a meeting to receive input for DOE’s Outyear Marine and Hydrokinetic Program Strategy based on this Request for Information (RFI) on Wednesday...

  11. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROGRAM C L E A N C I T I E S WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM * April 2011 * Page 2 C L E A N C I T I E S DOEGO-102011-3299 * April 2011

  12. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, ...

  13. MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    surface. These turbines are stabilised by gravity andor are anchored according to the nature of the seafloor. They are pre-orientated in the direction of the tidal currents, and...

  14. MHK Technologies/MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents....

  15. Experimental Design of Hydrokinetic Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual September 2011 Prepared by Vincent S. Neary, Ph.D., P.E. 1 Budi Gunawan, Ph.D. 1 Marshall C. Richmond, Ph.D. P.E. 2 Vibhav Durgesh, Ph.D. 2 Brian Polagye, Ph.D. 3 Jim Thomson, Ph.D. 3 Marian Muste, Ph.D. 4 Arnie Fontaine, Ph.D. 5 1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4

  16. Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

  17. Muroran Institute of Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 81 143 46 5200 Website: www.muroran-it.ac.jpenglish This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This...

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrokinetic Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMarineandHydrokinetic&oldid619739" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  19. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Report that provides an overview of the federal and state regulatory framework for hydrokinetic projects. PDF icon sitinghandbook2009.pdf ...

  20. MHK technology developments include current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology developments include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, for example, hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering, design, and analysis of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high- performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  1. Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Electric Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: SW19 8UY Product: Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates:...

  2. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish 47fish-hkturbineinteractionseprijacobs...

  3. Ecomerit Technologies LLC see Dehlsen Associates LLC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 805.684.2495 X 450 Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  4. Dehlsen Associates see Ecomerit Technologies LLC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 805.684.2495 X 450 Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  5. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics Report that provides an overview of the federal and state regulatory framework for hydrokinetic projects. siting_handbook_2009.pdf (2.43 MB) More Documents & Publications Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics EIS-0488: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0493: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

  6. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi; Ryou, Albert S

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  7. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and

  8. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydropower | Department of Energy Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower July 26, 2016 - 3:00pm Addthis Hydropower Vision: New Report Highlights Future Pathways for U.S. Hydropower Jose Zayas Jose Zayas Wind Energy Technologies Office Director Hydropower has been around for more than a century, and is currently the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable

  9. Economic Impact of Large-Scale Deployment of Offshore Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology in Oregon Coastal Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, T.; Tegen, S.; Beiter, P.

    2015-03-01

    To begin understanding the potential economic impacts of large-scale WEC technology, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct an economic impact analysis of largescale WEC deployment for Oregon coastal counties. This report follows a previously published report by BOEM and NREL on the jobs and economic impacts of WEC technology for the entire state (Jimenez and Tegen 2015). As in Jimenez and Tegen (2015), this analysis examined two deployment scenarios in the 2026-2045 timeframe: the first scenario assumed 13,000 megawatts (MW) of WEC technology deployed during the analysis period, and the second assumed 18,000 MW of WEC technology deployed by 2045. Both scenarios require major technology and cost improvements in the WEC devices. The study is on very large-scale deployment so readers can examine and discuss the potential of a successful and very large WEC industry. The 13,000-MW is used as the basis for the county analysis as it is the smaller of the two scenarios. Sensitivity studies examined the effects of a robust in-state WEC supply chain. The region of analysis is comprised of the seven coastal counties in Oregon—Clatsop, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Lane, Lincoln, and Tillamook—so estimates of jobs and other economic impacts are specific to this coastal county area.

  10. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Regulators Workshop: Lessons from Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. Ian

    2015-09-03

    Ian Baring-Gould presented these lessons learned from wind energy to an audience of marine hydrokinetic regulators. Lessons learned spanned the areas of technology advances, using collaborative approaches to involve key stakeholders; using baseline studies to measure and prioritize wildlife impacts, and look at avoidance and mitigation options early in the process.

  11. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  12. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressor–receptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and

  13. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  14. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake

    2013-05-01

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  15. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spain, Stephen

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide

  16. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

  17. MHK Technologies/HyPEG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profile Primary Organization Hydrokinetic Laboratory Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description Their Hydro kinetically Powered Electrical Generators...

  18. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August ...

  19. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg PDF ...

  20. University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion ... University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential ...

  1. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies This ...

  2. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marine Hydrokinetic Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel marine hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  3. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dress":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Language: English River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Screenshot References: EPRI1 River Atlas2 The...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  5. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy’s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program’s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental

  6. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    FERC pilot project process. The Project compared results obtained from this method to results obtained from other passive hydrophone technologies and to visual observation techniques performed simultaneously. This Final Report makes recommendations on the best practice for future data collection, for ORPC’s work in Cook Inlet specifically, and for tidal power projects in general. This Project developed a marine mammal study design and compared technologies for hydroacoustic and visual data collection with potential for broad application to future tidal and hydrokinetic projects in other geographic areas. The data collected for this Project will support the environmental assessment of future Cook Inlet tidal energy projects, including ORPC’s East Foreland Tidal Energy Project and any tidal energy developments at Fire Island. The Project’s rigorous assessment of technology and methodologies will be invaluable to the hydrokinetic industry for developing projects in an environmentally sound and sustainable way for areas with high marine mammal activity or endangered populations. By combining several different sampling methods this Project will also contribute to the future preparation of a comprehensive biological assessment of ORPC’s projects in Cook Inlet.

  7. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic General Engineer | Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer April 7, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis The Wind and Water Power Technologies Office is seeking applicants for a new position available within the office. See below for more information. Job title: General Engineer-Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

  8. Energy Department Awards More Than $20 Million for Wave and Tidal Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Projects | Department of Energy More Than $20 Million for Wave and Tidal Energy Projects Energy Department Awards More Than $20 Million for Wave and Tidal Energy Projects August 30, 2016 - 1:15pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced 10 organizations selected to receive more than $20 million in funding for new research, development, and demonstration projects that advance and monitor marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems, which generate electricity from ocean waves and tidal

  9. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  10. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Michael Leroy; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Xue, Huijie; Johnson, Teresa R.

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as well as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.

  11. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Technology Developmen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and currenttidal power devices. Areas of focus will be on coatings, composites, and molding processes. System Reliability and Survivability Similar to other early stage...

  12. Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-07-30

    The worlds oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nations growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40 and 70 north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

  13. Triton Sea Wave Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triton Sea Wave Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triton Sea Wave Technologies Address: 22 A Thrakis Zip: 15669 Region: Greece Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

  14. Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oceanic Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hioceanictech.com This...

  15. Teamwork Technology See Tocardo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Jump to: navigation, search Name: Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is...

  16. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-06-09

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

  17. MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overseeing Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDeep Gen Tidal Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  18. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin C.

    2016-01-06

    Underwaternoise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where soundsmore » created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. As a result, a comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.« less

  19. EERE Success Story-Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and Cost EERE Success Story-Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and Cost April ...

  20. Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and Hydrokinetic General Engineer Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Position Available: Marine and ...

  1. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems | Department of Energy Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic Systems January 14, 2015 - 10:30am Addthis The Energy Department's Water Power Program is seeking information from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on the development details of MHK systems that have the greatest potential

  2. Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development Agenda MHK-Summit-Agenda.jpg Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development 2016 Agenda (746.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop Agenda CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011388: Categorical

  3. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort April 10, 2014 - 3:39pm Addthis In an effort to improve future data management and access, DOE's Water Power Program is standing up a Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) Data Repository to manage the receipt, protection, and dissemination of scientific and technical data generated by DOE funded awards. Capabilities of the proposed MHK Data Repository include: Secure and intuitive

  4. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University Consortium | Department of Energy Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium March 21, 2014 - 4:05am Addthis On March 21, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity titled "Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and Development University Consortium." The goal of this funding

  5. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to ...

  6. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report that describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date ... In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment NSD Methodology Report An Assessment of Energy ...

  7. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to evaluate and optimize the technical and environmental performance and cost factors of its hydrokinetic SmarTurbines(tm)-turbines that generate energy from free-flowing rivers. ...

  8. Sandia Energy - Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the Roza Canal, Yakima Washington Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Computational Modeling & Simulation Numerical Simulations of...

  9. MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  10. Sandia Energy - Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design Model, CACTUS Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation Sandia Releases...

  11. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic...

  12. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrokinetic (MHK) Coatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Sandia's Materials & Manufacturing Reliability Program has begun testing their novel MHK coatings at Pacific...

  13. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Industry Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power Devices

  14. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Energy Laboratory's validation of the hydrokinetic energy resource values in the GIS database was different from NREL's previous validations of wind and wave power estimates. ...

  15. Chevron Technology Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Address: 3901 Briarpark Drive Place: Houston Zip: 77042 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  16. Accelerating Climate Technologies: Innovative Market Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that play a neutral broker role with the private sector. The final marine energy case study proposes a similar approach to accelerate hydrokinetic marine energy technology...

  17. Woodshed Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies Ltd Address: Level 50 101 Collins St Place: Melbourne Zip: 3000 Region: Australia Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +613 96539264 Website:...

  18. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference Model...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Capabilities FAQ Request for Testing Safety Technical Staff Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Resilient Electric Infrastructures Military...

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the cost and economics of WEC machines efficiently and accurately g) Development of optimal control strategies for different WEC configurations 44 h) Wave forecasting on the ...

  20. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component)- Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

  1. Tidal Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Ltd EMEC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Gen Tidal Turbines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tidal...

  2. Tidal Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. ...

  3. Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: BS34 8PD Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    robust portfolio of projects to accelerate wave, tidal and current project deployments and ... Learn more about the Water Power Program's work in the following areas of marine and ...

  5. Energy Department Awards $7.4 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave and Tidal Energy Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department today announced four entities selected to receive $7.4 million to spur innovation of next-generation water power component technologies, designed for manufacturability and built specifically for marine and hydrokinetic systems.

  6. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department’s Water Power Program is seeking feedback from the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry regarding the verification and validation of advanced open source MHK design tools and models.

  7. EERE Success Story-New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish EERE Success Story-New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August 22, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis ...

  8. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) | Department of Energy Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) March 24, 2014 - 12:27pm Addthis On March 24, 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a Notice of Intent to issue a funding opportunity

  9. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-06-22

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s-1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s-1. Flood and ebb flow directions are nearlymore » bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.« less

  10. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-06-22

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s-1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s-1. Flood and ebb flow directions are nearly bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.

  11. Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization By: Jacques Beaudry-Losique, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy

  12. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines.

  13. EERE Success Story—New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE has released a report assessing likelihood of fish injury and mortality from the operation of hydrokinetic turbines.

  14. tidal turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tidal turbines - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  15. Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic Reference Models: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levelized Cost of Energy Analysis of Marine and Hydrokinetic Reference Models Preprint D. S. Jenne and Y.-H. Yu National Renewable Energy Laboratory V. Neary Sandia National Laboratories To be presented at the 3 rd Marine Energy Technology Symposium (METS 2015) Washington, D.C. April 27-29, 2015 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-64013 April 2015 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government

  16. New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources July 7, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology Michael Reed Michael Reed Director, Technical and

  17. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Tidal Energy Pty Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDavidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  18. Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

    2011-04-24

    Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

  19. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiu, Henry; van Dam, Cornelis P.

    2013-08-22

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn

  20. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-05-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects

  1. Property:Technology Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CurrentTidal MHK TechnologiesDeep Water Pipelines + Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) MHK TechnologiesDeltaStream + CurrentTidal MHK TechnologiesDenniss Auld Turbine +...

  2. Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department today announced $8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to homes and businesses across the country's coastal regions.

  3. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy,; Roland, I; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habitat, and potential for biofouling

  4. University of Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to study potential bed erosion effects Illinois uses Sandia Labs' reference hydrokinetic turbine to study potential bed erosion effects - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power

  5. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Mirko Previsic RE Vision Consulting Sacramento, California Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-50402 April 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  6. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for

  7. US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S; Chamorro, Leonardo; Hill, Craig; Gunawan, Budi; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

  8. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  9. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-01

    The online information resources included in this fact sheet were developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, and are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research.

  11. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is

  12. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This funding opportunity is supporting the advancement of wave and tidal energy ... To learn about funding opportunities available through the Water Power Program, please ...

  13. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStrai...

  14. Identification and Prioritization of Analysis Cases for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Risk Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-06-16

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of marine and hydrokinetic energy generation projects. The development process consists of two main phases of analysis. In the first phase, preliminary risk analyses will take the form of screening studies in which key environmental impacts and the uncertainties that create risk are identified, leading to a better-focused characterization of the relevant environmental effects. Existence of critical data gaps will suggest areas in which specific modeling and/or data collection activities should take place. In the second phase, more detailed quantitative risk analyses will be conducted, with residual uncertainties providing the basis for recommending risk mitigation and monitoring activities. We also describe the process used for selecting three cases for fiscal year 2010 risk screening analysis using the ERES. A case is defined as a specific technology deployed in a particular location involving certain environmental receptors specific to that location. The three cases selected satisfy a number of desirable criteria: 1) they correspond to real projects whose deployment is likely to take place in the foreseeable future; 2) the technology developers are willing to share technology and project-related data; 3) the projects represent a diversity of technology-site-receptor characteristics; 4) the projects are of national interest, and 5) environmental effects data may be available for the projects.

  15. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patents - Field def missing Was This Project DOE Funded? - Field def missing Collaborators - Field def missing Usage It should be invoked using the corresponding form....

  16. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... turtles (3.1.2.4); avian resources (Section 3.1.2.5); bats (Section 3.1.2.6); fish and essential fish habitat (3.1.2.7); cultural resources (Section 3.1.3.1); commercial and ...

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0-800-81350 SOUTH AFRICA 080-09-82158 SOUTH KOREA 82-2-6744-1091 00798-14800-7797 SPAIN 34-91-414-21-70 800-300-907 SWEDEN 46-8-503-34-825 0200-899-946 SWITZERLAND...

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to have commercial potential. * TRL 12: Scientific research...

  19. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MHK ProjectsMicroturbine River In Stream MHK ProjectsMiette River MHK ProjectsMiller Bend Project MHK ProjectsMilliken Bend Project MHK ProjectsMinas Basin Bay of Fundy...

  20. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.comwimagesdd2Red-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"","text":"

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    energy from air forced through a turbine by the rising and falling motion of a wave. ... pressurizes and depressurizes the air column, pushing or pulling it through a turbine. ...

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy Oscillating Water Column OscillatingWaterColumn.jpg...

  3. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies, Wind and Water Power Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These centers, one run by Oregon State University and the University of Washington and one by the University of Hawaii, are planned with open-water test berths as well as ...

  4. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and...

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example...

  6. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - No field def provided Project Resource - No field def provided Project Nearest Body of Water - No field def provided Coordinates - No field def provided Project Footprint - No...

  7. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Form Edit History...

  8. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic SearchQuerying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Form Edit History...

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from...

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK ... SYDNEY 61-2-8209-1532 1-800-010717 AUSTRIA 43-1-92-81-451 0800-005-806 BELGIUM ...

  11. Deployment Effects of Marin Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, marine and hydrokinetic technologies could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood, due to a lack of technical certainty. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based approach to the emerging wave and tidal technology sectors in order to evaluate the impact of these technologies on the marine environment and potentially conflicting uses. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios will capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental impacts and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders onto the critical issues that need to be addressed. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two other project teams funded by DoE which are focused on regulatory and navigational issues. The results of this study are structured into three reports: 1. Wave power scenario description 2. Tidal power scenario description 3. Framework for

  12. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  13. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  14. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced $4 million to engage America’s research universities in the effort to accelerate the development of the emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry in the United States.

  15. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  17. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial

  18. The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2011-05-09

    Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

  19. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-11-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

  20. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  2. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric

  3. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies

  4. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database

  5. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles

    2011-09-26

    Presentation from the 2011 Water Peer Review in which principal investigator discusses project progess to Investigate areas offshore southeast Florida that appeared most suitable for siting of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of southeast Florida.

  6. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Biopower Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  7. Tidal | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  8. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  9. NREL: National Wind Technology Center Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL: National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. The NWTC advances the development of innovative land-based and offshore wind energy technologies through its research and testing facilities. Researchers draw on years of experience and their wealth of expertise in fluid dynamics and structural testing to also advance marine and hydrokinetic water power

  10. TidalStream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TidalStream Jump to: navigation, search Name: TidalStream Place: Southam, United Kingdom Zip: CV47 0HF Product: UK-based developer of platforms for tidal turbines. Coordinates:...

  11. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  12. Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place: Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip: CF23 8RS Product: Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates:...

  13. Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Address: De Weel 20 Place: Zijdewind Zip: 1736KB Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and...

  14. Sandia Labs participates in DOE Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Development DOE Executive Summit on Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization

  15. Ecological safety of tidal-power projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, M. P.; Shilin, M. B.

    2010-07-15

    The operating regime of tidal power plants requires ecological monitoring of their associated water area.

  16. MHK Technologies/Atlantisstrom | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Profile Primary Organization Atlantisstrom Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Description Five drop shaped...

  17. MHK Technologies/Enermar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Description The Enermar Kobold turbine is a unidirectional vertical axis...

  18. River and Plateau Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village August 18, 2015 - 10:36am Addthis River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager To date, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is the only company to have built, operated and delivered power to a utility grid from a hydrokinetic tidal project, and to a local microgrid from a hydrokinetic

  19. MHK Technologies/Open HydroTurbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CrestEnergy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsPaimpol Brehat tidal farm Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Description See Open...

  20. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Fast-Spectrum Reactors Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Fast-spectrum Reactors Chapter 4:

  1. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Introduction and Background This Technology Assessment summarizes the current state of knowledge of nuclear-renewable hybrid

  2. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Solar Power Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Solar Power Technologies Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Introduction Solar energy

  3. MHK Technologies/Canal Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description...

  4. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  5. Category:Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Earth Tidal Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Earth Tidal Analysis page? For detailed information on Earth Tidal Analysis, click here....

  6. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    turbine operating in a narrow, tidal channel. The site is a generalized version of Tacoma Narrows, Puget Sound, Washington. The resource is a mixed, mainly semidiurnal tidal...

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following online information resources are designed to provide the public access to information pertaining to MHK technologies, projects, and research.

  8. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  9. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Stationary Fuel Cells Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Stationary Fuel Cells Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Introduction to

  10. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Chapter 4: Technology Assessments Introduction The

  11. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Wind Power Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Wind Power Chapter 4: Technology Assessments NOTE: The 2015 U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  13. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  14. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The goal of this funding opportunity is to leverage existing in-situ R&D expertise to advance U.S. MHK technology, while developing intellectual capital for a globally-competitive ...

  15. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Gunawan 1 , V.S. Neary 1 C. Hill 2 and L.P. Chamorro 2 1 Energy-Water-Ecosystems Engineering, Wind and Water Power Technologies, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge...

  16. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  17. MHK Technologies/Pulse Stream 1200 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database homepage Pulse Stream 1200.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Pulse Tidal Ltd Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Description...

  18. MHK Technologies/Pulse-Stream 120 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Pulse Tidal Ltd Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave...

  19. MHK Technologies/Current Catcher | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Primary Organization Offshore Islands Ltd Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description The Current...

  20. MHK Technologies/DeltaStream | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition ...

  1. MHK Technologies/Evopod E35 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 78: Open Water System Testing &...

  2. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  3. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frid, Chris; Andonegi, Eider; Judd, Adrian; Rihan, Dominic; Rogers, Stuart I.; Kenchington, Ellen

    2012-01-15

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  4. Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies | Department of Energy Funding for Demonstration and Testing of Advanced Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing of Advanced Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies March 11, 2014 - 9:11am Addthis The Energy Department today announced $10 million to strengthen the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including wave and tidal energy sources. Through the two funding opportunities

  5. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_ARL_PTO_OMAE_Paper-Abstract...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMAE 2012 - 84074 Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal ... Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good ...

  6. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  7. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide and Storage Value-Added Options Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Value-Added Options Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle

  8. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  9. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  10. SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

    2012-07-15

    Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

  11. Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

    2012-09-21

    A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit

  12. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  13. Tidal Energy Resource Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment Tidal Energy Resource Assessment 51_tidalresource_gtrc_haas.ppt (8.56 MB) More Documents & Publications Ocean current resource assessment Free Flow Energy (TRL 1 2 3 Component) - Design and Development of a Cross-Platform Submersible Generator Optimized for the Conditions of Current Energy Conversion Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web)

  14. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  15. Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydraulic Generators Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Address: 14 Thislesboon Drive Place: Mumbles Zip: SA3 4HY Region: United Kingdom Sector:...

  16. Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC Address: 45 Memorial Circle PO Box 1058 Place: Augusta Zip: 4332 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  17. Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Platform Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Tidal Energy Test Platform Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics...

  18. Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area 1980 1980 Reservoir response to...

  19. European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

  20. Deployment Effects of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies: Wave Energy Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirko Previsic

    2010-06-17

    Given proper care in siting, design, deployment, operation and maintenance, wave energy conversion could become one of the more environmentally benign sources of electricity generation. In order to accelerate the adoption of these emerging hydrokinetic and marine energy technologies, navigational and environmental concerns must be identified and addressed. All developing hydrokinetic projects involve a wide variety of stakeholders. One of the key issues that site developers face as they engage with this range of stakeholders is that, due to a lack of technical certainty, many of the possible conflicts (e.g., shipping and fishing) and environmental issues are not well-understood,. In September 2008, re vision consulting, LLC was selected by the Department of Energy (DoE) to apply a scenario-based assessment to the emerging hydrokinetic technology sector in order to evaluate the potential impact of these technologies on the marine environment and navigation constraints. The project’s scope of work includes the establishment of baseline scenarios for wave and tidal power conversion at potential future deployment sites. The scenarios capture variations in technical approaches and deployment scales to properly identify and characterize environmental effects and navigational effects. The goal of the project is to provide all stakeholders with an improved understanding of the potential range of technical attributes and potential effects of these emerging technologies and focus all stakeholders on the critical issues that need to be addressed. By identifying and addressing navigational and environmental concerns in the early stages of the industry’s development, serious mistakes that could potentially derail industry-wide development can be avoided. This groundwork will also help in streamlining siting and associated permitting processes, which are considered key hurdles for the industry’s development in the U.S. today. Re vision is coordinating its efforts with two

  1. Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects NREL - FY09 Lab Call: Supporting Research and Testing for MHK Presentation from the 2011 Water Program Peer Review Marine and Hydrokinetic ...

  2. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The article reviews the results of that workshop, focusing on potential effects on freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems, and we describe recent national and international developments.

  3. MHK Technologies/Tocardo Aqua 2800 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database homepage Tocardo Aqua 2800.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsIjsselmeer...

  4. MHK Technologies/Pulse Stream 100 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    database homepage Pulse Stream 100.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Pulse Tidal Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsPulse Stream 100...

  5. MHK Technologies/Kinetic Hydropower System KHPS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsRoosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE *MHK ProjectsCornwall Ontario River Energy CORE Technology Resource Click here...

  6. Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVerdant-RooseveltIslandTidalEnergy&oldid680702" ...

  7. The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation Place: Cambridge, England, United Kingdom Zip: CB24 8RX Product: Company building a tidal barrier...

  8. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions

  9. Battelle Memorial Institute Technologies Available for Licensing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America...

  10. MHK Technologies/NAREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Click here Wave Technology Description The in house engineering and prototype testing capabilities of Narec are assisting wave and tidal stream marine developers...

  11. Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2011-05-01

    The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

  12. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian Polagye Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center University of Washington, Seattle, WA Introduction Reference Model 1 is a tidal turbine operating in a narrow, ...

  13. 12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

  14. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  15. BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Waters | Department of Energy BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing in Federal Waters June 23, 2014 - 2:30pm Addthis On June 3rd, 2014 the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) issued the first ever lease to test marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices in federal waters to Florida Atlantic University (FAU). Harnessing the power of ocean currents, FAU's Southeast

  16. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  17. Renewable Technology Ventures Ltd RTVL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Renewable Technology Ventures Limited (RTVL), a joint venture between SSE and The Weir Group, is investing in the development of a tidal...

  18. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HK turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we

  19. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total

  20. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage

  1. Property:ProjectTechnology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean +, MHK TechnologiesKensington + MHK ProjectsBW2 Tidal + MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK + MHK ProjectsBioSTREAM Pilot Plant + MHK TechnologiesbioSTREAM + MHK Projects...

  2. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National

  3. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  4. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  5. MHK Technologies/Sabella River Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Sabella Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsSR 01 Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow...

  6. Office of Wind and Hydropower Technologies Wind Energy Program: 2006 Peer Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydropower cover photo is courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (David Hicks). McNary Dam hydroelectric plant generating 980 megawatts of clean energy. http://images.nrel.gov/viewphoto.php?imageId=6315880 Marine and Hydrokinetic cover photo is courtesy of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The OE Buoy is designed around the oscillating water column principle. http://images.nrel.gov/viewphoto.php?imageId=6315871 U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies

  7. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  8. Vortex Hydro Energy Develops Transformational Technology to Harness Energy from Water Currents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laboratory testing of new hydrokinetic energy device to harness energy in slow-moving water currents.

  9. Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tidal & Current Modeling Development and Validation - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  10. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  11. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators Eduard Muljadi, Alan Wright, and Vahan Gevorgian National Renewable Energy Laboratory James Donegan, Cian Marnagh, and Jarlath McEntee Ocean Renewable Power Company Technical Report NREL/TP-5D00-66097 June 2016 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy

  12. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-01-31

    Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of ”eddies” at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

  13. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from

  14. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Technology Delivering science to the marketplace through commercialization, spinoffs and industry partnerships. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Gary Grider (second from right) with the 2015 Richard P. Feynman Innovation Prize. Also pictured (left to right): Duncan McBranch, Chief Technology Officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory; Terry Wallace, Program Associate Director for Global Security at Los Alamos; and Lee

  15. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow ... Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions ...

  16. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The HiWAIS technology is a significant step forward in the warfighter support arena. Honeybees for Explosive Detection Honeybees for Explosive Detection Los Alamos researchers have ...

  17. Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2011-09-01

    In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  18. Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    available in the nation's waves, tidal and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. ... and global wave, tidal, ocean thermal, and continental U.S. river hydrokinetic resources. ...

  19. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Bruce Albert

    2014-05-07

    , the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  20. Able Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Address: 330 Audubon Road Place: Englewood Zip: 7631 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 201-569-2842 Website: www.abletechnologiesllc.com This...

  1. MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Astoria Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  2. MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Islands Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  3. MHK Projects/Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  4. MHK Projects/Angoon Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angoon Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  5. MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  6. MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  7. MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  8. MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  9. MHK Projects/Pennamaquan Tidal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase Phase ? PermitLicense Buildout (MW) 21 Main Overseeing Organization Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13884 Environmental...

  10. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  11. MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3...

  12. MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  13. MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Town Nantucket Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  14. MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  15. MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    East Foreland Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"...

  16. MHK Projects/Turnagain Arm Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turnagain Arm Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP...

  17. MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  18. MHK Projects/Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3...

  19. MHK Projects/Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  20. MHK Projects/Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  1. MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avalon Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom...

  2. MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  3. MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Penobscot Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  4. MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Treat Island Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP"...

  5. MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cook Inlet Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROA...

  6. MHK Projects/Paimpol Brehat tidal farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paimpol Brehat tidal farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  7. MHK Projects/Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3"...

  8. MHK Projects/Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3"...

  9. List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coal with CCS Concentrating Solar Power Energy Storage Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Natural Gas Nuclear Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy BiomassBiogas Hydroelectric...

  10. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  11. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  12. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  13. Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the ...

  14. MHK Projects/Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Country Australia Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Clarence Strait Coordinates -12.083533792616, 131.04972839355 Project...

  15. MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    been operating the Seaflow Tidal Energy System project since May 2003. This was an experimental test rig - the successor, SeaGen is intended for commercial applications Project...

  16. Industrial Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies » Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Marketing Summaries (356) Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories

  17. MHK Technologies/Tidal Lagoons | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to shape the output curve in order to dispatch power in response to demand price signals. The impoundment structure is a conventional rubble mound breakwater (loose rock,...

  18. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basics Hydropower Basics Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Most people associate water power with the Hoover Dam-a huge facility harnessing the power of an entire river behind its walls-but hydropower facilities come in all sizes. Some may be very large, but they can be tiny too, taking advantage of water flows in municipal water facilities or irrigation ditches. They can even be "dam-less," with diversions or run-of-river

  19. MHK Technologies/Tidal Defense and Energy System TIDES | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of its hydro blades to vary the ratio of freely flowing water-to-water contact over its blade surfaces. In 2006, Oceana entered into a Cooperative Research & Development Agreement...

  20. MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system,...

  1. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  2. ORNL/TM-2012/221 Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment in the Florida Strait Vincent S. Neary, ... facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. ... model ocean current turbine (Personal communication, ...

  3. Property:Project(s) where this technology is utilized | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC + MHK TechnologiesDeep Water Pipelines + MHK ProjectsOTEC + MHK TechnologiesDeltaStream + MHK ProjectsDeltaStream +, MHK ProjectsDeltaStream...

  4. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  5. Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Craig

    2015-09-14

    This document represents the final report for the Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, located in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The Project purpose was to license, permit, and install a grid-connected deep-water tidal turbine array (two turbines) to be used as a platform to gather operational and environmental data on tidal energy generation. The data could then be used to better inform the viability of commercial tidal energy generation from technical, economic, social, and environmental standpoints. This data would serve as a critical step towards the responsible advancement of commercial scale tidal energy in the United States and around the world. In late 2014, Project activities were discontinued due to escalating costs, and the DOE award was terminated in early 2015. Permitting, licensing, and engineering design activities were completed under this award. Final design, deployment, operation, and monitoring were not completed. This report discusses the results and accomplishments achieved under the subject award.

  6. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 μPa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 μPa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 μPa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 μPa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  7. Instrumentation of Current Technology Testing and Replicating Harsh Environments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 2 Project Team o Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) o Jarlath McEntee o Monty Worthington o University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) o Faculty o Thomas Ravens o Todd Petersen o Muhammad Ali o Research Assistants o Tim Kirk o Jacob Clark o Angus Bromaghin 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 3 ORPC Technology o TideGen Power System (TGU) o Designed to generate electricity at water depths

  8. Emerging Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to see the progress they've made. Featured Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment Cobscook Bay, Maine, is the site of a tidal energy pilot project led by Ocean Renewable Power Company. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power

  9. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  10. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy Water Power Program conducted the 2014 peer review meeting on marine and hydrokinetic technologies February 24-27. The compiled 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Peer Review Presentations listed below are available for download. Introduction Marine and Hydrokinetics

  11. National Energy Technology Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal NETL Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    StateProvince Maine Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 44.3879, -68.7998 Project Phase Phase 1 Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)...

  13. Pulse Tidal formerly Pulse Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formerly Pulse Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pulse Tidal (formerly Pulse Generation) Place: Hull, England, United Kingdom Zip: HU5 3LP Product: UK-based developer of...

  14. MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Lubec Narrows and Johnson Bay Coordinates 44.8652, -66.9828 Project Phase Phase 1 PermitLicense Buildout...

  15. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for ...

  16. DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy Point absorbers generate electricity by converting the energy in waves using a float that rides the waves and is attached to a moored conversion ...

  17. DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Department of Energy's Water Power Program Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030, Energy.gov News Assessment of Energy Production Potential from ...

  18. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States Final ... Award Number: DE-FG36-08GO18174 Project Title: Assessment of Energy Production Potential ...

  19. Carmelo Vell n | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carmelo Vell n Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carmelo Vell n Region: Spain Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  20. Warrior Girl Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Girl Corporation Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 305-607-9518 Website: http: This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-hydroelectric-power Video Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the...

  2. Current Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Current Electric Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

  3. RDZ Renewables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: (442) 210 45-85 Website: www.rdz-r.comnewenglish This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This...

  4. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-09-01

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening

  5. NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brennan T; Neary, Vincent S; Stewart, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

  6. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  7. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  8. Tidal Energy Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portugal This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Davidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved...

  9. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A

  10. Ocean energy technologies: The state of the art: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, A.D.; Adams, E.E.; Glucksman, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    A state-of-the-art study of ocean energy technologies has been conducted to evaluate their potential use for the generation of electrical power. The more developed technologies are tidal energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), and wave energy. In addition there has been a demonstration of a small ocean current turbine, and proposals have been made for salinity gradient devices and ocean wind turbines. Energy costs were estimated for representative base case systems for tidal, OTEC, and wave energy projects. The tidal energy scheme was predicted to have the lowest energy costs.

  11. Discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B.; Soida, M.; Urbanik, M.; Bomans, D. J. E-mail: soida@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: bomans@astro.rub.de

    2014-05-10

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet. Analysis of the neutral hydrogen distribution shows that it rotates independently of the tidal tail of NGC 3628, with a radial velocity gradient of 35-40 km s{sup 1} over approximately 13 kpc. The galaxy has an extremely high neutral gas content, accounting for a large amount of its total dynamic mass and suggesting a low amount of dark matter. It is located at the tip of the gaseous tail, which strongly suggests a tidal origin. If this is the case, it would be one of the most confident and nearest (to the Milky Way) detections of a tidal dwarf galaxy and, at the same time, the object most detached from its parent galaxy (?140 kpc) of this type.

  12. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Bir, Lawson, Li_2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMAE2011-50063 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE COMPOSITE BLADE ABSTRACT This paper describes the structural design of a tidal turbine composite blade. ...

  13. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing Inc. | Department of Energy Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc. Application from Tidal to export electric energy to Canada. EA-422 Tidal Energy Mktg. (CN).pdf (282.23 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-258-D Brookefield Energy

  14. Energy Storage Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage » Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Marketing Summaries (134) Success Stories (3) Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success

  15. Advanced Materials Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Marketing Summaries (349) Success Stories (3) Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  16. Vehicles and Fuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Marketing Summaries (138) Success Stories (2) Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  17. Solar Photovoltaic Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Marketing Summaries (132) Success Stories (5) Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  18. Biomass and Biofuels Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Marketing Summaries (161) Success Stories (3) Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  19. Building Energy Efficiency Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Marketing Summaries (80) Success Stories (3) Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  20. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of coastal resources in the 74 coastal cities and counties. ... certified Local Coastal Program (LCP), onshore ... LCP to accommodate energy and public works ...

  1. Mario Molina, Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and Ozone Depletion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Resources » Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts in R&D in this area. Learn where marine and hydrokinetic technology research and

  2. Sandia Energy - DOE-Sponsored Reference Model Project Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partnered effort to develop marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team...

  3. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  4. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Environmental Stewardship for Renewable Energy Technologies: MHK Environmental and Resource Characterization Instrumentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This FOA will support the development of instrumentation, associated signal processing algorithms or software, and integration of instrumentation packages for monitoring the environmental impacts of marine and hydrokinetic technologies. It will also support the development and testing of sensors, instrumentation, or processing techniques to collect physical data on ocean waves (e.g., height, period, directionality, steepness). Join us for an informational webinar on March 20, 2014. The purpose of this webinar will be to give applicants a chance to ask questions about the FOA process generally. Reserve your webinar seat now at: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/553062432

  5. MHK Technologies/Vortex Induced Vibrations Aquatic Clean Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or dams. VIVACE converts the horizontal hydrokinetic energy of currents into cylinder mechanical energy. The latter is then converted to electricity through electric power...

  6. Industrial Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Marketing Summaries (356) Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse Industrial Technologies

  7. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. I. Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    A formula for the tidal dissipation rate in a spherical body is derived from first principles to correct some mathematical inaccuracies found in the literature. The development is combined with the Darwin-Kaula formalism for tides. Our intermediate results are compared with those by Zschau and Platzman. When restricted to the special case of an incompressible spherical planet spinning synchronously without libration, our final formula can be compared with the commonly used expression from Peale and Cassen. However, the two turn out to differ, as in our expression the contributions from all Fourier modes are positive-definite, which is not the case with the formula from Peale and Cassen. Examples of the application of our expression for the tidal damping rate are provided in the work by Makarov and Efroimsky (Paper II) published back to back with the current paper.

  8. RBS 1032: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT IN ANOTHER DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksym, W. Peter; Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-09-10

    RBS 1032 is a supersoft (? ? 5), luminous (?10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1}) ROSAT PSPC source which has been associated with an inactive dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026, SDSS J114726.69+494257.8. We have analyzed an XMM-Newton observation that confirms that RBS 1032 is indeed associated with the dwarf galaxy. Moreover, RBS 1032 has undergone a factor of ?100-300 decay since 1990 November. This variability suggests that RBS 1032 may not be a steadily accreting intermediate-mass black hole, but rather an accretion flare from the tidal disruption of a star by the central black hole (which may or may not be intermediate-mass). We suggest that additional tidal disruption events may remain unidentified in archival ROSAT data, such that disruption rate estimates based upon ROSAT All-Sky Survey data may need reconsideration.

  9. High Fidelity Evaluation of Tidal Turbine Performance for Industry Partner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fidelity Evaluation of Tidal Turbine Performance for Industry Partner - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy

  10. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  11. Marine Animal Alert System -- Task 2.1.5.3: Development of Monitoring Technologies -- FY 2011 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Myers, Joshua R.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    The Marine Animal Alert System (MAAS) in development by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is focused on providing elements of compliance monitoring to support deployment of marine hydrokinetic energy devices. An initial focus is prototype tidal turbines to be deployed in Puget Sound in Washington State. The MAAS will help manage the risk of injury or mortality to marine animals from blade strike or contact with tidal turbines. In particular, development has focused on detection, classification, and localization of listed Southern Resident killer whales within 200 m of prototype turbines using both active and passive acoustic approaches. At the close of FY 2011, a passive acoustic system consisting of a pair of four-element star arrays and parallel processing of eight channels of acoustic receptions has been designed and built. Field tests of the prototype system are scheduled for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2011. Field deployment and testing of the passive acoustic prototype is scheduled for the first quarter of FY 2012. The design of an active acoustic system that could be built using commercially available off-the-shelf components from active acoustic system vendors is also in the final stages of design and specification.

  12. Collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2014-05-20

    The degree of disruption in collisions in free space is determined by specific impact energy, and the mass fraction of the largest remnant is a monotonically decreasing function of impact energy. However, it has not been shown whether such a relationship is applicable to collisions under the influence of a planet's tidal force, which is important in ring dynamics and satellite accretion. Here we examine the collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment by using local N-body simulations. We find that outcomes of such a collision largely depend on the impact velocity, the direction of impact, and the radial distance from the planet. In the case of a strong tidal field corresponding to Saturn's F ring, collisions in the azimuthal direction are much more destructive than those in the radial direction. Numerical results of collisions sensitively depend on the impact velocity, and a complete disruption of aggregates can occur even in impacts with velocity much lower than their escape velocity. In such low-velocity collisions, the deformation of colliding aggregates plays an essential role in determining collision outcomes, because the physical size of the aggregate is comparable to its Hill radius. On the other hand, the dependence of collision outcomes on impact velocity becomes similar to the case in free space when the distance from the planet is sufficiently large. Our results are consistent with Cassini observations of the F ring, which suggest ongoing creation and disruption of aggregates within the ring.

  13. Independent Oversight Inspection, Los Alamos National Laboratory - January

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment 46_instream_hydrokinetic_resource_assessment_epri_jacobson.ppt (299 KB) More Documents & Publications Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    8464 E-mail ina.shaw@hq.doe.gov Last Name Shaw First Name Ina Title

  14. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  15. Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project July 24, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Today, Energy Secretary Steven Chu recognized the nation's first commercial, grid-connected tidal energy project off the coast of Eastport, Maine. Leveraging a $10 million investment from the Energy Department, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC)

  16. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 | Department of Energy : Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application from Tidal to export electric energy. Federal Register Notice. EA-422 Tidal Energy Mktg. CN.pdf (170.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric

  17. EERE Success Story-Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Endangered Beluga Whales | Department of Energy Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered Beluga Whales EERE Success Story-Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered Beluga Whales April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With EERE support, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is conducting a two-year study on the effects of tidal turbines on endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska-home to some of the greatest tidal energy potential in the United

  18. MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

  19. MHK Projects/San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  20. MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  1. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Province Alaska Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 59.9669, -152.226 Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization...

  2. MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  3. MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    s Island Tidal Power Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  4. MHK Projects/Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  5. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project | Department of Energy Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project 01_puget_snopud_presentation.pptx (4.28 MB) More Documents & Publications Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Sunlight Photonics (TRL 4 System) - Tidal Energy

  6. MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  7. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Lawson, Li Y, Sale_2011...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODEL OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE ABSTRACT This paper describes the ... of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces ...

  8. MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Passamaquoddy Bay Coordinates 44.9062, -66.99 Project Phase Phase 1 Project...

  9. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As progress on a Maine-based tidal energy project moves forward, local community member Gerald Morrison reflects on its impact.

  10. EERE Success Story-Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis With EERE support, Ocean Renewable Power Company ... of the greatest tidal energy potential in the United States. ... data at the proposed deployment areas near Fire Island ...

  11. Calming the Waters: The Impact of Turbulence on Tidal Energy Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    New research is helping the emerging tidal energy industry learn from their counterparts in the wind industry. By considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence when developing turbine designs,...

  12. Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

  13. Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Water Water America has vast wave, tidal and hydropower resources -- but much of this energy remains untapped. The Energy Department is committed to driving critical research and development efforts to expand electricity generation from these clean energy resources. This includes investments in existing hydropower facilities to equip them with the necessary infrastructure to produce electricity and leading marine and hydrokinetic technology advancements to generate energy from waves,

  14. Water | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Water Water America has vast wave, tidal and hydropower resources -- but much of this energy remains untapped. The Energy Department is committed to driving critical research and development efforts to expand electricity generation from these clean energy resources. This includes investments in existing hydropower facilities to equip them with the necessary infrastructure to produce electricity and leading marine and hydrokinetic technology advancements to generate energy from waves,

  15. Mathematical modeling of stormwater pollution in a tidal embayment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najjar, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    It has been recognized for many years that stormwater runoff provides a transport mechanism for non-point pollutants into the nation's waterways. As more watershed areas continue to urbanize, greater increases in pollutant loadings will continue to impact the water quality of the receiving water bodies. In many instances, the pollutant impact exceeds the assimilative capacity of the receiving water. To estimate the potential impacts of stormwater pollution, mathematical models are constructed. In this dissertation, mathematical models have been constructed to estimate the non-point pollutant loadings from an urbanizing area as well as to model the assimilative capacity of the receiving tidal embayment system. The models are capable of simulating the hydrologic aspects as well as the water quality cycles of the system as a function of urbanization. In determining the response of the receiving water system to stormwater loadings, the change in receiving water quality is modeled spatially as well as temporally. The overall model is composed of three subsystem models: a stormwater model, a hydrodynamic tidal model, and a receiving water quality model. Construction of the stormwater model is based on STORM (Storage, Treatment, Overflow, Runoff Model) by the US Army Corps of Engineers. A ground water component to the model has been added to adjust the model for application to the study area, Lakes Bay, New Jersey. The tidal model is developed from a pseudo two-dimensional approach. The methodology utilizes the link-node concept to simulate the embayment system. Solutions to equations of motion and continuity are solved using a finite difference method. The receiving water quality model is a two-dimensional time variable water quality model which is based in a finite segment approach.

  16. Kaon and pion femtoscopy at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in a hydrokinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2010-05-15

    The hydrokinetic approach that incorporates hydrodynamic expansion of the systems formed in A+A collisions and their dynamical decoupling is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both the STAR and the PHENIX collaborations. The fitting procedure utilizes the two parameters: the maximal energy density at supposed thermalization time 1 fm/c and the strength of the prethermal flows developed to this time. The quark-gluon plasma and hadronic gas is supposed to be in complete local equilibrium above the chemical freeze-out temperature T{sub ch}=165 MeV with the equation of states (EoS) at high temperatures as in the lattice QCD. Below T{sub ch} the EoS in the expanding and gradually decoupling fluid depends on the composition of the hadron-resonance gas at each space-time point and accounts for decays of resonances into the nonequilibrated medium. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached at both used initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and color glass condensate models, however, at different initial energy densities. The discussion as for the approximate pion and kaon m{sub T} scaling for the interferometry radii is based on a comparison of the emission functions for these particles.

  17. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Marketing Summaries (106) Success Stories (1) Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  18. OPTICAL TRANSIENTS FROM THE UNBOUND DEBRIS OF TIDAL DISRUPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasen, Daniel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    In the tidal disruption of a star by a black hole, roughly half of the stellar mass becomes bound and falls into the black hole, while the other half is ejected at high velocity. Several previous studies have considered the emission resulting from the accretion of bound material; we consider the possibility that the unbound debris may also radiate once it has expanded and become transparent. We show that the gradual energy input from hydrogen recombination compensates for adiabatic losses over significant expansion factors. The opacity also drops dramatically with recombination, and the internal energy can be radiated by means of a cooling-transparency wave propagating from the surface layers inward. The result is a brief optical transient occurring {approx} 1 week after disruption and lasting 3-5 days with peak luminosities of 10{sup 40}-10{sup 42} ergs s{sup -1}, depending on the mass of the disrupted star. These recombination powered transients should accompany the X-ray/ultraviolet flare from the accretion of bound material, and so may be a useful signature for discriminating tidal disruption events, especially for lower and intermediate mass black holes.

  19. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  20. Super massive black hole in galactic nuclei with tidal disruption of stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank and Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  1. Sandia Energy - Daniel Laird

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories' Water Power Technologies department which includes Marine Hydrokinetic, Conventional Hydro, and Offshore Wind technologies. Daniel joined...

  2. ENHANCED OFF-CENTER STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTIONS BY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN MERGING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F. K.; Chen, Xian E-mail: chenxian@pku.edu.cn

    2013-04-10

    Off-center stellar tidal disruption flares have been suggested to be a powerful probe of recoiling supermassive black holes (SMBHs) out of galactic centers due to anisotropic gravitational wave radiations. However, off-center tidal flares can also be produced by SMBHs in merging galaxies. In this paper, we computed the tidal flare rates by dual SMBHs in two merging galaxies before the SMBHs become self-gravitationally bounded. We employ an analytical model to calculate the tidal loss-cone feeding rates for both SMBHs, taking into account two-body relaxation of stars, tidal perturbations by the companion galaxy, and chaotic stellar orbits in triaxial gravitational potential. We show that for typical SMBHs with masses 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, the loss-cone feeding rates are enhanced by mergers up to {Gamma} {approx} 10{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, about two orders of magnitude higher than those by single SMBHs in isolated galaxies and about four orders of magnitude higher than those by recoiling SMBHs. The enhancements are mainly due to tidal perturbations by the companion galaxy. We suggest that off-center tidal flares are overwhelmed by those from merging galaxies, making the identification of recoiling SMBHs challenging. Based on the calculated rates, we estimate the relative contributions of tidal flare events by single, binary, and dual SMBH systems during cosmic time. Our calculations show that the off-center tidal disruption flares by un-bound SMBHs in merging galaxies contribute a fraction comparable to that by single SMBHs in isolated galaxies. We conclude that off-center tidal disruptions are powerful tracers of the merging history of galaxies and SMBHs.

  3. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  4. Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Marketing Summaries (74) Success Stories (2) Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success

  5. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R.; Gezari, Suvi; Morrell, Nidia; Zaritsky, Dennis; Oestman, Linda; Smith, Mathew; Gelfand, Joseph; Drake, Andrew J.

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this

  6. MHK Projects/Gastineau Channel Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13606 Environmental Monitoring and...

  7. MHK Projects/Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14395 Environmental Monitoring and...

  8. MHK Projects/Shelter Island Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  9. MHK Projects/Dorchester Maurice Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14223 Environmental Monitoring and...

  10. MHK Projects/Margate Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14224 Environmental Monitoring and...

  11. MHK Projects/Wiscasset Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  12. MHK Projects/Orient Point Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14333 Environmental Monitoring and...

  13. MHK Projects/Cohansey River Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14127 Environmental Monitoring and...

  14. MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14222 Environmental Monitoring and...

  15. MHK Projects/Maurice River Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14234 Environmental Monitoring and...

  16. MHK Projects/Salem Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13849 Environmental Monitoring and...

  17. MHK Projects/Cape May Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-14232 Environmental Monitoring and...

  18. MHK Projects/Killisnoo Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13823 Environmental Monitoring and...

  19. MHK Projects/Rockaway Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Organization Natural Currents Energy Services Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesRED HAWK Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys <<...

  20. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  1. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  2. Measurement of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert

    2014-09-01

    We report an observational estimate of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) in inactive galaxies based on a successful search for these events among transients in galaxies using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82). This search yielded 186 nuclear flares in galaxies, 2 of which are excellent TDF candidates. Because of the systematic nature of the search, the very large number of galaxies, the long time of observation, and the fact that non-TDFs were excluded without resorting to assumptions about TDF characteristics, this study provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the TDF rate. To compute the rate of optical stellar tidal disruption events, we simulate our entire pipeline to obtain the efficiency of detection. The rate depends on the light curves of TDFs, which are presently still poorly constrained. Using only the observed part of the SDSS light curves gives a model-independent upper limit to the optical TDF rate, N-dot <210{sup ?4} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1} (90% CL), under the assumption that the SDSS TDFs are representative examples. We develop three empirical models of the light curves based on the two SDSS light curves and two more recent and better-sampled Pan-STARRS TDF light curves, leading to our best estimate of the rate: N-dot {sub TDF}=(1.5--2.0){sub ?1.3}{sup +2.7}10{sup ?5} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1}. We explore the modeling uncertainties by considering two theoretically motivated light curve models, as well as two different relationships between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity, and two different treatments of the cutoff in the visibility of TDFs at large M {sub BH}. From this we conclude that these sources of uncertainty are not significantly larger than the statistical ones. Our results are applicable for galaxies hosting black holes with mass in the range of a few 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} M {sub ?}, and translates to a volumetric TDF rate of (4-8) 10{sup 80.4} yr{sup 1} Mpc

  3. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Sunlight Photonics (TRL 4 System) - Tidal Energy System for On-shore Power ...

  4. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Bir, Lawson, Li_2011 1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 by ASME Proceedings of the ASME 30th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering OMAE2011 June 19-24, 20111, Rotterdam, the Netherland OMAE2011-50063 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE COMPOSITE BLADE ABSTRACT This paper describes the structural design of a tidal turbine composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the blade external

  5. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Lawson, Li Y, Sale_2011-Abstract.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering OMAE2011 June 19-24, 2011, Rotterdam, The Netherlands OMAE2011-49863 DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE ABSTRACT This paper describes the development of a computational uid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines (HATTs). First, an HATT blade was designed using the blade

  6. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole

    2008-03-17

    community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

  7. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  8. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  9. A modeling study of the potential water quality impacts from in-stream tidal energy extraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system.more » Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. Furthermore, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.« less

  10. Water Power Information Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Power Information Resources Water Power Information Resources How Hydropower Works How Hydropower Works See a detailed view of the inside of a hydropower energy generation system. Read more Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database on OpenEI The DOE Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy. Read more The following resources about water power technologies

  11. EA-1965: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

  12. EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal PNNL Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  14. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal FNAL Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

  15. Geothermal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Marketing Summaries (11) Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse Geothermal Marketing Summaries Geothermal

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal LLNL Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  17. Evolution of accretion disks in tidal disruption events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Matzner, Christopher D. E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-04-01

    During a stellar tidal disruption event (TDE), an accretion disk forms as stellar debris returns to the disruption site and circularizes. Rather than being confined within the circularizing radius, the disk can spread to larger radii to conserve angular momentum. A spreading disk is a source of matter for re-accretion at rates that may exceed the later stellar fallback rate, although a disk wind can suppress its contribution to the central black hole accretion rate. A spreading disk is detectible through a break in the central accretion rate history or, at longer wavelengths, by its own emission. We model the evolution of TDE disk size and accretion rate by accounting for the time-dependent fallback rate, for the influence of wind losses in the early advective stage, and for the possibility of thermal instability for accretion rates intermediate between the advection-dominated and gas-pressure-dominated states. The model provides a dynamic basis for modeling TDE light curves. All or part of a young TDE disk will precess as a solid body because of the Lense-Thirring effect, and precession may manifest itself as a quasi-periodic modulation of the light curve. The precession period increases with time. Applying our results to the jetted TDE candidate Swift J1644+57, whose X-ray light curve shows numerous quasi-periodic dips, we argue that the data best fit a scenario in which a main-sequence star was fully disrupted by an intermediate mass black hole on an orbit significantly inclined from the black hole equator, with the apparent jet shutoff at t = 500 days corresponding to a disk transition from the advective state to the gas-pressure-dominated state.

  18. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.

  19. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Dopplermore » Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.« less

  20. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.