National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ti il ll

  1. Ll

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I,VZTICLE IX - Employee Origin nnd &clusi-n of Undcsirablcs Tho Subcontractor, whcncvor rcquastdd by the Contractor, sh?.ll repcrt to that Gcntrclctor the citizenshiT>, country ...

  2. LL Pm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LL Pm ' F II c iJr Fa, i n m n ys m * t F t F c* F F -- ORAU 89/G-77 IL. 17- Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 18 HENDERSON STREET JOLIET, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 . rlly mfhct Ez of the 8pmnmtng Institutiona of Oak Ridga Asaodatd ThsoplnlonBoxpmnsdhDrDlndonotnnasn IJnm

  3. IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :; / 2. ' b-:-"y .",...4 * .-.a 2 IL !< :. 34 --' -, ' ' < I ,-. g Tvo"l r . . .-i- :- " .1-. . . . . NC0 /L ' J,, ' ;.' , -_I( + ? CENTRAL FILES c -&' { ' c;$y ;;j*' E ,J): ' i' Z, 1; p -^ r-raL-r.nuzT".Fn., , ,..-y - -' -ie .". iJ.&:~e!ct.;;' sf ' ;;i_is ,trip ' JG,' go f-Jj;~ey~ 2123 -:s<j .-&;.z ;y1y rrc&ed recr!p!~-,da.a .b ,&.j.,& .:*3;.. F-Y ' __ ,,,.x+; PC l;ealti: :.2,.i CCI ;et y. tirlr.&g t;1c oy-er at ion c.f sei;a~xl

  4. QN&-ll.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _I .,;r* r . . . . 2:. . QN&-ll. ' _ The Secretary oi Energy' 0;. .- .: . ' Washington, OC-20585 ' . .October 10, 1997 ' ._ : .I . . The ,I%onorable William S. Cohen Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 203Oi .. .y .' *- - jk-ar Mr. Secretary: . . . r The .Congress recently sent to the President for signature the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer responsibility for the Formerly ' Utilized Sites Remedial Action

  5. S?. LL-UIIS WLLM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. 31 12187 IEmN wffi WE ST. Lulls m ST. cows awv m S?. LL-UIIS WLLM ftl M NV 9 HIC ltRElWXDwIDloIC6IC WVCf ., sm. m buTm1Iv IJm-n Fww. DECMPIISSI 1NltEEhU 1"O'S. llE...

  6. 5PECIAL~ NUCLEAR MATEHAL LlCENSE '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : 5PECIAL~ NUCLEAR MATEHAL LlCENSE ' .+ .i.. Pursuant to the Atomic Ener&Ati of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federg Regulations. Ch&ter 1; Part.70, "Special Nucleor' hkteri~l Regulations," a license is hereby issued authoriztng the licensee to ieceive and possess the speck1 nuclear material designated below; to use such special nuclear mote& for then purpose(s) and at the.place(s) designated below;, and to knifer such tioterial to persons autliqtied to receive it in'

  7. A volunteer opportunity that'll grow on you

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Volunteer Opportunity That'll Grow on You Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all...

  8. Ti Leggett | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ti Leggett Deputy Project Directcor & Deputy Director of Operations Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Building 240 - Room 3132 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-1937 tleggett

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Contamination from rubbing off of oxidized uranium during handling. IL.28-3 IL.28-5 ... Aerial photograph of the Granite City, Illinois, Site IL.28-1 - DOE Memo; Wagoner to Price...

  10. IL FS Ecosmart Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Product: IL&FS Ecosmart Ltd., a subsidiary of the Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services (IL&FS) Group, provides environmental services. References: IL&FS...

  11. AIR M A IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MEMORlAL DRIVE AIR M A IL ._~ AtFx=b.-zf .7.-i- M r. s. .II. Gown -~ Gentlemen: Re: A.E.C. Contract No. We assume the weight of the 9-l/2" biscuits will:be 107'poutids approximately; i.e. 100 pounds of thorium per biscuit. A four biscuit charge is not feasible because of crucible dimensions, availability, etc. A three biscuit charge will, when molten, fill the proposed crucible half full. This condition is un- desirable because, due to the low heat of fusion of thorium and the

  12. Program Managers Questions for LL13-MatModelRadDetect-2Jf (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Managers Questions for LL13-MatModelRadDetect-2Jf Citation Details In-Document ... DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Lawrence ...

  13. I'll Take Argonne for $200, Alex | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I'll Take Argonne for $200, Alex I'll Take Argonne for $200, Alex March 10, 2011 - 2:20pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) Argonne National Laboratory is one of the nation's oldest and largest national labs, where more than 3,000 employees do basic and applied research in virtually every scientific disciple. Argonne will also be featured as a question category on Jeopardy! tonight (check your local listings). Quick! Who is the only physicist

  14. M4FT-15LL0806062-LLNL Thermodynamic and Sorption Data FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M.; Wolery, T. J.

    2015-08-31

    This progress report (Milestone Number M4FT-15LL0806062) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within Work Package Number FT-15LL080606. The focus of this research is the thermodynamic modeling of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials and properties and development of thermodynamic databases and models to evaluate the stability of EBS materials and their interactions with fluids at various physicochemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. The development and implementation of equilibrium thermodynamic models are intended to describe chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion.

  15. Category:Chicago, IL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    74 KB SVHospital Chicago IL Commonwealth Edison Co.png SVHospital Chicago IL ... 68 KB SVLargeHotel Chicago IL Commonwealth Edison Co.png SVLargeHotel Chicago I... 75 KB...

  16. Category:Springfield, IL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springfield IL Commonwealth Edison Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 75 KB SVFullServiceRestaurant Springfield IL Commonwealth Edison Co.png...

  17. Characterization of interleukin-15 (IL-15) and the IL-15 receptor complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M.K.; Park, L.S.

    1996-05-01

    IL-15 interacts with a heterotrimeric receptor that consists of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) as well as a specific, high-affinity IL-15-binding subunit, which is designated IL-15R{alpha}. Since both the {beta} and the {gamma} subunits of the IL-2R are required for signaling by either IL-2 or IL-15, it is not surprising that these cytokines share many activities in vitro. However, the differential expression of these cytokines and the {alpha} chains of their receptors within various tissues and cell types suggests that IL-2 and IL-15 may perform at least partially distinct physiological functions. The production of IL-15 by macrophages, and possibly other cell types, in response to environmental stimuli and infectious agents suggests that IL-15 may play a role in protective immune responses, allograft rejection, and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. 56 refs.

  18. IL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ...

  19. Il.-'",.'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... D&D STATUS REPORT NEW BRUNSWICK LABORATORY NEW JERSEY SITE R. A. Wynveen V. R. Veluri W. H. Smith M. J. Robinet H. J. Moe DECEMBER 1981 INDEX Text D&D ......

  20. Structural and Biophysical Studies of the Human IL-7/IL-7R[alpha] Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Craig A.; Dohm, Julie A.; Walsh, Scott T.R.; (OSU); (UPENN)

    2009-03-06

    IL-7 and IL-7R{alpha} bind the {gamma}{sub c} receptor, forming a complex crucial to several signaling cascades leading to the development and homeostasis of T and B cells. We report that the IL-7R{alpha} ectodomain uses glycosylation to modulate its binding constants to IL-7, unlike the other receptors in the {gamma}{sub c} family. IL-7 binds glycosylated IL-7R{alpha} 300-fold more tightly than unglycosylated IL-7R{alpha}, and the enhanced affinity is attributed primarily to an accelerated on rate. Structural comparison of IL-7 in complex to both forms of IL-7R{alpha} reveals that glycosylation does not participate directly in the binding interface. The SCID mutations of IL-7R{alpha} locate outside the binding interface with IL-7, suggesting that the expressed mutations cause protein folding defects in IL-7R{alpha}. The IL-7/IL-7R{alpha} structures provide a window into the molecular recognition events of the IL-7 signaling cascade and provide sites to target for designing new therapeutics to treat IL-7-related diseases.

  1. TiO2 nanotube arrays grown in ionic liquids: high-efficiency in photocatalysis and pore-widening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huaqing; Qu, Jun; Cui, Qingzhou; Xu, Hanbing; Luo, Huimin; Chi, Miaofang; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Wang, Wei; Dai, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Debris-free, long, well-separated TiO2 nanotube arrays were obtained using an ionic liquid (IL) as electrolyte. The high conductivity of IL resulted in fast pore widening and few contaminants from electrolyte decomposition leading to high photocatalytic efficiency in water splitting.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fansteel Metallurgical Corp - IL 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fansteel Metallurgical Corp - IL 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fansteel Metallurgical Corp. (IL.16 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Chicago , Illinois IL.16-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.16-3 Site Operations: Sole producer and supplier of tantalum and columbium metals to the MED. IL.16-1 IL.16-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive materials handled at this site IL.16-2 IL.16-3 Radioactive Materials

  3. Elemental characterization of LL-MA radioactive waste packages with the associated particle technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Toure, M.; El Kanawati, W.; Eleon, C.

    2011-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages with analytical methods and with non-destructive nuclear measurements. This paper concerns fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique (APT), which brings 3D information about the waste material composition. The characterization of volume elements filled with iron, water, aluminium, and PVC in bituminized and fibre concrete LL-MA waste packages has been investigated with MCNP [1] and MODAR data analysis software [2]. APT provides usable information about major elements presents in the volumes of interest. However, neutron scattering on hydrogen nuclei spreads the tagged neutron beam out of the targeted volume towards surrounding materials, reducing spatial selectivity. Simulation shows that small less than 1 L targets can be characterised up to the half-radius of a 225 L bituminized drum, the matrix of which is very rich in hydrogen. Deeper characterization in concrete is possible but limited by counting statistics due to photon attenuation in this dense matrix and, unless large inspection volumes are considered, by the lack of spatial selectivity of the tagged neutron beam due to neutron scattering. (authors)

  4. OFFICZ OF OCCUPAIIOXAL EILhLlH h SAFZETY JAXRS FORRESTAL CAMPUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J* &*r, -A ti.:,?*-cl>- +ysics Gffict. s'wo mics of &jr. : hzs's retort 2nd Sqpcrr-Lng iosea for y& infCrn&ifcn 2nd Is: ThP 2, v-m -- --- , - --- ---- ---- --- . --- "c-- ...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Kankakee Ordnance Plant - IL 32

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Kankakee Ordnance Plant - IL 32 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: KANKAKEE ORDNANCE PLANT (IL.32 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Kankakee , Illinois IL.32-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 IL.32-1 Site Operations: Kankakee Ordnance Plant was cited as a possible location for the disposal of radioactive waste material. There is no indication that any radioactive waste was brought to Kankakee. IL.32-1 IL.32-2 Site Disposition:

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Swenson Evaporator Co - IL 23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Swenson Evaporator Co - IL 23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SWENSON EVAPORATOR CO. (IL.23 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Harvey , Illinois IL.23-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.23-1 Site Operations: Scheduled a raffinate spray drying test that was later cancelled. IL.23-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were handled at this site IL.23-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Vapofier Corp - IL 25

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Vapofier Corp - IL 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Vapofier Corp. (IL.25) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Therm-A-Shield Co. IL.25-1 Location: 11957 Vincennes Avenue , Blue Island , Illinois IL.25-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.25-1 Site Operations: Vapofier Corporation was a subcontractor to the MED during a nine month period in 1944. There is no indication that radioactive materials were handled. IL.25-1 Site Disposition:

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Podbeilniac Corp - IL 22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Podbeilniac Corp - IL 22 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PODBEILNIAC CORP. (IL.22) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Chicago , Illinois IL.22-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.22-2 Site Operations: MED used equipment for a uranium extraction experiment in 1957. IL.22-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed at the site IL.22-2 IL.22-3 IL.22-4

  9. Measurement of the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    The experimental procedures and methods of data analysis used to measure the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering at thirteen different energies in the range 300 to 800 MeV are presented. The results compare favorably with previous data. Good agreement is found with phase shift predictions at energies below 500 MeV.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Armour Research Foundation - IL 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Research Foundation - IL 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Armour Research Foundation of the Illinois Institute of Technology (IL.17 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Illinois Institute of Technology IL.17-1 Location: Technological Center, 10 West 35th Street , Chicago , Illinois IL.17-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 IL.17-3 Site Operations: Facility operated a research reactor and conducted associated research for the AEC beginning in

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Blockson Chemical Co - IL 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Blockson Chemical Co - IL 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Blockson Chemical Co. (IL.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA Region V and the State of Illinios Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Olin Corporation IL.07-1 Location: Patterson Road , Joliet , Illinois IL.07-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 IL.07-1 Site Operations: Process development studies and pilot plant testing of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid during the 1950s. Site Disposition: Eliminated

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Kaiser Aluminum Corp - IL 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Kaiser Aluminum Corp - IL 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: KAISER ALUMINUM CORP. (IL.19 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Dolton , Illinois IL.19-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.19-2 Site Operations: Performed limited duration work extruding uranium billets into three CP-5 fuel elements, circa 1959. IL.19-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Precision Extrusion Co - IL 20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Precision Extrusion Co - IL 20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PRECISION EXTRUSION CO. (IL.20) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 720 East Green Avenue , Bensenville , Illinois IL.20-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.20-2 Site Operations: 1956-1959, metal fabrication - extruded uranium billets. IL.20-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantities of materials handled

  14. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia ; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heavy Minerals Inc - IL 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Heavy Minerals Inc - IL 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Heavy Minerals, Inc. ( IL.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: W.R. Grace Company IL.14-1 Location: 836 South Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.14-2 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.14-1 Site Operations: Submitted a proposal to supply thorium hydroxide to the AEC; no indication that the bid was accepted. IL.14-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication of work done with

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chicago North IL Site -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IL.05-1 - DOE Letter; Whitman to Wallo; Subject: Authority decisions regarding several sites; October 28, 1985 IL.05-2 - DOE Letter; DeLaney to Holesinger; Subject: Radiological ...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rock Island Arsenal - IL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rock Island , Illinois IL.09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.09-2 Site Operations: Site located on a DOD ...

  18. RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t9, S. nTCmI RAMATION V=W Ot TOTS= t sAy VnoffZW COMM1 AV 10i90 2M3 AM=W V A CLSI~LL331M A1N2UW OMA1ID9 V3 WMM I~UMMIM UU &!% W 2W WT AM 0? ?Ml U&O(1 LW pAM Mr MMW31 T!WOLVSD A GUS =-o &L MCMA I h MMK ON PLUPCMTtft GJ DR P -M~ CAM~ 07 W ULOW~ M *!Ti ~~mum 0sflOY iftJ A SLXQT OUT (Wi M I M ra IJJW MarB~ *~ W? $MOM.~ HMP~ IT V=h MMOTM RW1& 07W O RAttcMUU w~A0AO wAf~ K 43)AN wA BE tluywxwD (b(6 l~U %I S~)6 ASSA~ r 6 AM MWOim~~ SUM v~ DM 'VAT M OM1 IN * M S W IMIEf To MIK Row.

  19. Il Woong Jung | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Il Woong Jung Assistant Scientist Education Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Stanford University Research Summary Research interests are in photonic applications for micro- and nano-mechanical devices. Current research focuses on the manipulation of light-matter interaction at the nanoscale, specifically using micro- and nano-mechanical devices to control the optical properties of photonic nanostructures. The aim is to integrate optical nanostructures and nanomechanical devices to create novel

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Register - IL 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Register - IL 15 Site ID (CSD Index Number): IL.15 Site Name: International Register Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Intermatic Inc. Alternate Name Documents: Location: Chicago, Illinois Location Documents: IL.15-1 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Limited testing of centerless grinding techniques for uranium metal for the AEC. Historical Operations Documents: IL.15-2 Eligibility Determination: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered

  1. Facile fabrication of rutile monolayer films consisting of well crystalline nanorods by following an IL-assisted hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng Peng; Liu Xiaodi; Sun, Chuansheng; Ma Jianmin; Zheng Wenjun

    2009-05-15

    In this study, rutile films consisting of rectangular nanorods were facilely deposited on glass substrates from strongly acid solution of TiCl{sub 4}. The highly ordered array of nanorods was realized in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br by following a hydrothermal process. In this process, Degussa P25 nanoparticles served as seeds that were pre-deposited on the substrates to facilitate the array of rutile nanorods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectrum were used to characterize the obtained nanorod films. The measurements showed that the nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, and grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate. The presence of IL was found vital for the formation of rutile nanorods, and the suitable molar ratio of [Bmim]Br to TiCl{sub 4} ranged from 500:1 to 1500:1. The excessive [Bmim]Br may hinder the precipitation of rutile particles. - Graphical abstract: The rutile film consisting of rectangular nanorods is successfully deposited on glass substrate in presence of ionic liquid (IL) of [Bmim]Br. The nanorods were rectangular with width of 100-200 nm and length of more than 1 {mu}m, which grew up typically along c-axis to form the arrays against the substrate.

  2. A=16Al (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not observed) See (1986AN07

  3. A=16Mg (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not observed) See (1986AN07

  4. A=16Na (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not observed) See (1986AN07

  5. A=16Si (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not observed) See (1986AN07

  6. A=19Be (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ

  7. A=19He (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ

  8. A=19Li (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Crane Co - IL 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Crane Co - IL 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Crane Co. (IL.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Chicago , Illinois IL.13-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.13-2 Site Operations: MED activities during late-1940s to early/mid-1950s included the development of valves and possibly the use of test quantities of normal uranium in the development process. IL.13-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote due to

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- GSA 39th Street Warehouse - IL 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GSA 39th Street Warehouse - IL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GSA 39TH STREET WAREHOUSE (IL.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1716 West Pershing Road , Chicago , Illinois IL.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 IL.02-2 IL.02-3 Site Operations: Stored radioactive materials. IL.02-1 IL.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria IL.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Madison - IL 26

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Historical Operations: Conducted experimental work in natural uranium metal extrusion. ... 1992 IL.26-2 - DOE Memorandum; Wagoner to Price (OR); Authorization for Remedial Action at ...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Machine and Metals Inc - IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    24 Metals Inc - IL 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Machine and Metals Inc (IL.24 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: E. Moline , Illinois IL.24-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IL.24-2 IL.24-3 Site Operations: Tested process for dewatering green salt by centrifugation. IL.24-1 IL.24-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited amount of radioactive materials handled

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lindsay Light and Chemical Co - IL 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lindsay Light and Chemical Co - IL 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LINDSAY LIGHT AND CHEMICAL CO. ( IL.10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: West Chicago , Illinois IL.10-3 Evaluation Year: 1995 IL.10-4 Site Operations: Processed thorium ores - chiefly monazite sands - for thorium and rare earth metals. IL.10-1 IL.10-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC licensed operation IL.10-4 Radioactive Materials

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- W E Pratt Manufacturing Co - IL 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    E Pratt Manufacturing Co - IL 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: W.E. PRATT MANUFACTURING CO. (IL.12) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: William E. Pratt Manufacturing Co. Klassing Handbrake Company IL.12-1 IL.12-2 Location: 18 Henderson Street , Joliet , Illinois IL.12-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.12-4 IL.12-5 Site Operations: Performed metal fabrication tasks (machining and grinding). IL.12-1 IL.12-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation

  15. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuniga-Pfluecker, J.C.K.; Kruisbeek, A.M. )

    1990-05-15

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GREAT LAKES CARBON CORP. ( IL.21 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 333 North Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.21-1 Site Operations: Facility performed a limited amount of nuclear fuel fabrication in the 1950s. Facility also developed graphite production under an AEC contract. IL.21-1 IL.21-3 Site Disposition:

  17. A=10F (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). See also (1988AJ01

  18. A=10Ne (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). See also (1988AJ01

  19. A=10O (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). See also (1988AJ01

  20. A=17Al (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Al (1993TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ, 1988WA18, 1992AV03).

  1. A=17He (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1986AJ04, 1988POZS

  2. A=17Li (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1986AJ04, 1988POZS

  3. A=17Mg (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mg (1993TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ, 1988WA18, 1992AV03).

  4. A=17P (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ, 1988WA18, 1992AV03

  5. A=17Si (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Si (1993TI07) (Not observed) See (1983ANZQ, 1988WA18, 1992AV03).

  6. A=18He (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not illustrated) Not observed: See (1982AV1A, 1983ANZQ

  7. A=20Al, etc. (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not observed) See (1972AJ02, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07

  8. A=20Be (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX

  9. A=20n (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chicago South IL Site -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. IL.06-1 - DOE Memorandum; Coffman to LaGrone; Subject: Designation of the University of Chicago ...

  11. Origin State>> CA ID ID IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Energx Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant

  12. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) dependent expression of biologically relevant IL-2 receptors: uncoupling of anti-T3 induced receptor expression with cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitter, A.B.D.; Labus, J.M.; Butler, L.D.

    1986-03-01

    Human peripheral blood T cell expression of IL-2 receptors (IL-2R), detected by both immunocytofluorometry and /sup 125/I-IL-2 binding, was studied using lymphocytes stimulated with monoclonal anti-T3 antibodies (Leu-4, OKT3). Lymphocytes, isolated from healthy individuals, were prescreened and classified as Leu-4 responders or non-responders according to 72 h /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation experiments. Leu-4 non-responder lymphocytes, though capable of normal IL-2R expression and IL-2 secretion when cultured with OKT3 (IgG2a), expressed little to no IL-2R nor secreted IL-2 when stimulated with Leu-4 (IgG1). In addition, the amount of IL-2 secreted by Leu-4 stimulated, Leu-4 responder cells, was one-third- to one-fifth of that detected when OKT3 was used as the stimulant. The addition of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2) to a Leu-4 stimulated, Leu-4 non-responder lymphocyte culture, resulted in the expression of IL-2R and cellular proliferation, indicating that IL-2 upregulated its biologically relevant receptor. As expected, cyclosporin-A (CSA) inhibited the secretion of IL-2 and subsequent proliferation of Leu-4 stimulated, Leu-4 responder cells. Unexpectedly, however, the expression of IL-2R was also blocked. Exogenous rIL-2 partially reversed the effect of CSA on IL-2R expression and proliferation. The results indicate that IL-2 may provide an additional, required signal for optimal IL-2R expression.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11 Quality Hardware and Machine Co - IL 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: QUALITY HARDWARE AND MACHINE CO. (IL.11) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Ravenswood Venture Marden Manufacturing Co. IL.11-1 IL.11-2 Location: 5823/5849 North Ravenswood Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.11-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.11-4 IL.11-5 Site Operations: From 1944 to 1945, entered into subcontracts with the University of Chicago to furnish personnel,

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- C-B Tool Products Co - IL 31

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    C-B Tool Products Co - IL 31 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: C-B Tool Products Co. (IL.31 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 956 East 58th Street , Chicago , Illinois IL.31-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 IL.31-2 Site Operations: Provided personnel, facilities, and equipment to produce special machining of parts for special equipment from materials furnished by the University. IL.31-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Era Tool and Engineering Co - IL 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Era Tool and Engineering Co - IL 29 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Era Tool and Engineering Co. (IL.29 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Audi-Tex Industries, Incorporated IL.29-1 Location: 4555 West Addison Street , Chicago , Illinois IL.29-2 Evaluation Year: 1989 IL.29-3 Site Operations: From February 1944 through June 1944, provided personnel, facilities, and equipment to produce machined parts for special equipment, tools, jigs,

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons - IL 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - IL 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS (IL.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1925 N. Kenmore Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.30-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IL.30-2 Site Operations: Sample sized quantities of radioactive materials were shipped through this location; broker arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. IL.30-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Museum of Science and Industry - IL 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Museum of Science and Industry - IL 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY ( IL.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive , Chicago , Illinois IL.03-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 IL.03-2 IL.03-3 Site Operations: The Metallurgical Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory occupied space in the Museum of Science and Industry from August 15, 1946 to July 15, 1953. Some handling

  18. A=20He (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    He (1998TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX).

  19. A=20Li (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1998TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX).

  20. A=5n (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance parameters.

  1. Acidic environment augments FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamide, Yosuke; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Tobo, Masayuki; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Nakakura, Takashi; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Sato, Koichi; Hisada, Takeshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-08-28

    Although blood pH is maintained in a narrow range of around pH 7.4 in living organisms, inflammatory loci are characterized by acidic conditions. Mast cells tend to reside close to the surface of the body in areas such as the mucosa and skin where they may be exposed to exogenous acids, and they play an important role in immune responses. However, little is known about the effects of extracellular acidification on the functions of mast cell. Here, we found that extracellular acidification increased the dinitrophenyl-conjugated human serum albumin (DNP-HSA)-induced production of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-13 in MC/9 cells or bone marrow-derived mouse mast cells sensitized with anti-DNP IgE. Extracellular acidification also inhibited migration of MC/9 cells toward DNP-HSA. In addition, acidic pH stimulated antigen-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt). These findings suggest that extracellular acidification augmented antigen/IgE-induced and FcεRI-mediated production of IL-6 and IL-13 in mast cells, and that this was associated with the enhancement of p38 MAPK and Akt activation. - Highlights: • Antigen-induced IL-6 and IL-13 production was augmented by acidic pH in mast cells. • Acidic pH-induced actions were associated with activation of p38 MAPK and Akt. • Inhibition of p38 MAPK and Akt attenuated cytokine responses to acidic pH. • Acidic pH effects are not attributable to actions of known proton-sensing GPCRs.

  2. High Cyclability of Ionic Liquid-Produced TiO2 Nanotube Arrays As an Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Huaqing; Martha, Surendra K; Unocic, Raymond R; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) are considered as a potential SEI-free anode material for Li-ion batteries to offer enhanced safety. Organic solutions, dominatingly ethylene glycol (EG)-based, have widely been used for synthesizing TiO{sub 2} NTs via anodization because of their ability to generate long tubes and well-aligned structures. However, it has been revealed that the EG-produced NTs are composited with carbonaceous decomposition products of EG, release of which during the tube crystallization process inevitably causes nano-scale porosity and cracks. These microstructural defects significantly deteriorate the NTs charge transport efficiency and mechanical strength/toughness. Here we report using ionic liquids (ILs) to anodize titanium to grow low-defect TiO{sub 2} NTs by reducing the electrolyte decomposition rate (less IR drop due to higher electrical conductivity) as well as the chance of the decomposition products mixing into the TiO{sub 2} matrix (organic cations repelled away). Promising electrochemical results have been achieved when using the IL-produced TiO{sub 2} NTs as an anode for Li-ion batteries. The ILNTs demonstrated excellent capacity retention without microstructural damage for nearly 1200 cycles of charge-discharge, while the NTs grown in a conventional EG solution totally pulverized in cycling, resulting in significant capacity fade.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Eimco Corp - IL 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eimco Corp - IL 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Eimco Corp. (IL.0-01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Palatine , Illinois IL.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-01-1 Site Operations: Conducted laboratory leaf filtration tests IL.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities at the site IL.0-01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Midwest Manufacturing Co - IL 0-04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midwest Manufacturing Co - IL 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MIDWEST MANUFACTURING CO (IL.0-04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-04-3 Site Operations: Research and development on deep drawing of sheet metal in the mid- 1940s. IL.0-04-3 Site Disposition: Site Disposition IL.0-04-1 IL.0-04-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sciaky Brothers Inc - IL 0-06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sciaky Brothers Inc - IL 0-06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SCIAKY BROTHERS, INC (IL.0-06 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 4915 West 67th Street , Chicago , Illinois IL.0-06-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-06-2 Site Operations: One time operation involving stitch welding of uranium in 1953. IL.0-06-1 IL.0-06-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited operations at the site

  7. Infrared spectroscopy of CaTiO3, SrTiO3, BaTiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Infrared spectroscopy of CaTiO3, SrTiO3, BaTiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3 thin films, and (BaTiO3)5(SrTiO3)5 superlattice grown on SrRuO3SrTiO3(001) substrates Citation Details In-Document ...

  8. Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 meteorite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust using Mssbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimova, Alevtina A.; Petrova, Evgeniya V.; Grokhovsky, Victor I.; Oshtrakh, Michael I. Semionkin, Vladimir A.

    2014-10-27

    Study of Chelyabinsk LL5 ordinary chondrite fragment with a light lithology and its fusion crust, fallen on February 15, 2013, in Russian Federation, was carried out using Mssbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. The Mssbauer spectra of the internal matter and fusion crust were fitted and all components were related to iron-bearing phases such as olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and chromite in the internal matter and olivine, pyroxene, troilite, Fe-Ni-Co alloy, and magnesioferrite in the fusion crust. A comparison of the content of different phases in the internal matter and in the fusion crust of this fragment showed that ferric compounds resulted from olivine, pyroxene, and troilite combustion in the atmosphere.

  9. Magnetic Hardening of CeFe11Ti and the Effect of TiC Addition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetic Hardening of CeFe11Ti and the Effect of TiC Addition Citation ... Publication Date: 2015-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1221660 Report Number(s): IS-J 8423 Journal ID: ISSN ...

  10. The effect of cooling rate during rapid solidification on the structure and texture of NiTi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedraza, A.J.; Godbole, M.J.; Kenik, E.A.; Pedraza, D.F.; Lowndes, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    A study has been conducted on the effects of increasing cooling rate during rapid solidification of NiTi upon the phases that are produced. The hammer and anvil rapid solidification technique and laser melting with a nanosecond excimer laser were used, which allow the cooling rate to be varied by three to four orders of magnitude. Although 1/3 (110) superlattice reflections are seen in the selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns of the splat quenched (SQ) specimens, x-ray diffraction analyses show the presence of only B2 phase and martensite. On the other hand, laser treatment (LT) of the specimens produces a layer that has a Ll/sub 0/ structure with a slight monoclinic distortion. This phase can be envisaged as a small distortion of a B2 unit cell with a volume per atom approx.3.3% lower than the equilibrium B2 phase. Also martensite is present in the layer. SQ alloys exhibited a marked (200) texture due to columnar growth opposite to the direction of heat extraction, while LT produces epitaxial regrowth of the melted layer. No substantial disordering is obtained in NiTi rapidly solidified alloys.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Morse Chemical Co - IL 0-05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Morse Chemical Co - IL 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MORSE CHEMICAL CO. (IL.0-05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 8 South Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.05-3 Site Operations: Submitted a bid to AEC for thorium work; proposal was not accepted; no indication work done for a DOE predecessor at this site. IL.05-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - No work for a DOE

  12. A=16He (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed. See (1982AV1A, 1983ANZQ, 1986AJ04

  13. A=16Li (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1993TI07) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed. Shell model studies (1988POZS) are used to predict J and the magnetic dipole moment....

  14. A=19Mg (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mg (1995TI07) (Not observed) See (1987AJ02) and (1987GU1K, 1987PO01, 1993HI08

  15. #iWNCD W ONTAININO Il@MQWm;

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    decontmlmtlon proceam takee longer than originally anticipated 'U&e order .are urgently required to prevent a shutdown. "Z, mo-1 ' 2lda.p - from 4a6-55 to a possible 4-5-55 based on the receipt of vendor's plantby 1-22-55. #iWNCD W ONTAININO Il@MQWm; ;g hours worked; Hours worked will be observed and under the control of . . M%-.'E.Section . (Copy of Vendorts letter of quotation dated l/5/55 is VAWNWWXlINALORDEt :Y $ u(,507.60 upoDRpuiI9APPROPAk &movND* 0 3375.00 (rllaxlmum) Field

  16. First Measurement of the Ratio sigma_(t-tbar) / sigma_(Z/\\gamma*->ll) and Precise Extraction of the t-tbar Cross Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-04-01

    We report a measurement of the ratio of the t{bar t} to Z/{gamma}* production cross sections in {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 4.6 fb{sup -1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The t{bar t} cross section ratio is measured using two complementary methods, a b-jet tagging measurement and a topological approach. By multiplying the ratios by the well-known theoretical Z/{gamma}* {yields} ll cross section predicted by the standard model, the extracted t{bar t} cross sections are effectively insensitive to the uncertainty on luminosity. A best linear unbiased estimate is used to combine both measurements with the result {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.70 {+-} 0.52 pb, for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  17. Molecular-Level Insights into Photocatalysis from Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2013-06-12

    will start with an examination of how scanning probe techniques are being used to characterize the TiO2(110) surface in ways that are relevant to photocatalysis. We will then discuss specific classes of photochemical reaction on TiO2(110) for which SPM has proven indispensible in providing unique molecular-level insights, and conclude with discussion of future areas in which SPM studies may prove valuable to photocatalysis on TiO2. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. I.L. was partially supported by a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Chemical Imaging Initiative project. PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  18. Association study of schizophrenia and IL-2 receptor {beta} chain gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Yang, Z.W.; Zhang, X.R.; Brar, J.S.

    1995-10-09

    A case-control association study was conducted in Caucasian patients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R, n = 42) and unaffected controls (n = 47) matched for ethnicity and area of residence. Serum interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) concentrations, as well as a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the IL-2RP chain gene, were examined in both groups. No significant differences in IL-2R concentrations or in the distribution of the polymorphism were noted. This study does not support an association between schizophrenia and the IL-2RP gene locus, contrary to the suggestive evidence from linkage analysis in multicase families. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental ...

  20. The permeation behavior of deuterium through 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel with TiN+TiC-TiN multiple films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Y.; Song, J.; Luo, D.; Lei, Q.; Chen, C.

    2015-03-15

    The prevention of tritium losses via permeation through structure components is an important issue in fusion technology. The production of thin layers on materials with low diffusivity and/or low surface recombination constants (so-called permeation barriers) seems to be the most practical method to reduce or hinder the permeation of tritium through materials. TiN+TiC+TiN multiple films are deposited on the surface of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel by ion-beam assisted deposition technology. The characteristics of films are tested by XPS ASEM and XRD, which shows that the film are compact and uniform with a thickness of about 15 μm, and have a good adherence with the substrate below 773 K. The diffraction peaks in the XRD patterns for TiC and TiN are broadened, implying that the multiple films are deposited on the surface of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel. Meanwhile, the C-H bonded CH{sub 4}-appears in the infrared spectra of multiple films, suggesting that the CH{sub 4}- is in a static state, so hydrogen atom cannot migrate from the site bonded with carbon to a neighboring site. The measured deuterium permeability in 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel coated with multiple films is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of pure 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate from 473 K to 773 K. However, this barrier is partly destroyed above 773 K.

  1. A=10C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10C published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  2. A=10N (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10N published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed,...

  3. A=10Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  4. A=10He (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  5. A=18Li (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1995TI07) (Not illustrated) 18Li has not been observed. Shell model calculations described in (1988POZS) predict the ground-state magentic dipole moment and charge and matter radii.

  6. A=18Mg, etc. (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) See (1986AN07) and (1983ANZQ). See also the results of calculations of β+/electron capture half lives for neutron deficient nuclei in (1993HI08

  7. A=6B (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see ( 1984AJ01, 1989GR06 [6Li(π+, π-) at Eπ+ = 180, 240 MeV], 1993PO11 [properties of exotic light nuclei]) (1998SU18

  8. A=6C (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01, 1984AJ01, 1989GR06 [6Li(π+, π-) at Eπ+ = 180, 240 MeV], 1993PO11 [properties of exotic light nuclei]) (1998SU18

  9. A=20B (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not observed) The mass excess of 20B is predicted to be 69.08 MeV (1974TH01). 20B is then unstable with respect to breakup into 19B + n by 0.9 MeV: see 19B in (1995TI07) and (1978AJ03, 1983ANZQ) and see the work on effective interactions for the (0p1s0d) nuclear shell-model space (1992WA22

  10. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-16

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling.

  11. Instability of Hydrogenated TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Schwarz, Ashleigh M.; Oxenford, Lucas S.; Kennedy, John V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Henderson, Michael A.

    2015-11-06

    Hydrogenated TiO2 (H-TiO2) is toted as a viable visible light photocatalyst. We report a systematic study on the thermal stability of H-implanted TiO2 using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Protons (40 keV) implanted at a ~2 atom % level within a ~120 nm wide profile of rutile TiO2(110) were situated ~300 nm below the surface. NRA revealed that this H-profile broadened preferentially toward the surface after annealing at 373 K, dissipated out of the crystal into vacuum at 473 K, and was absent within the beam sampling depth (~800 nm) at 523 K. Photoemission showed that the surface was reduced in concert with these changes. Similar anneals had no effect on pristine TiO2(110). The facile bulk diffusivity of H in rutile, as well as its activity toward interfacial reduction, significantly limits the utilization of H-TiO2 as a photocatalyst. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Irreversible inhibition of RANK expression as a possible mechanism for IL-3 inhibition of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khapli, Shruti M.; Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Gupta, Navita; Yogesha, S.D.; Pote, Satish T.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} IL-3 inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. {yields} IL-3 inhibits RANKL-induced JNK activation. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and NFATc1 transcription factors. {yields} IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally and irreversibly. {yields} IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression. -- Abstract: IL-3, a cytokine secreted by activated T lymphocytes, stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and survival of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibitory action of IL-3 on osteoclast differentiation. We show here that IL-3 significantly inhibits receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). IL-3 down-regulates expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) transcription factors. In addition, IL-3 down-regulates RANK expression posttranscriptionally in both purified osteoclast precursors and whole bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of IL-3 on RANK expression was irreversible. Interestingly, IL-3 inhibits in vivo RANK expression in mice. Thus, we provide the first evidence that IL-3 irreversibly inhibits RANK expression that results in inhibition of important signaling molecules induced by RANKL.

  13. Morphology, deformation, and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in Ti-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.C.; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    The morphologies and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in several Ti-Cr alloys have been examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in order to explore the room-temperature deformability of the Laves phase TiCr{sub 2}. The morphology of the Laves phase was found to be dependent upon alloy composition and annealing temperature. Samples deformed by compression have also been studied using TEM. Comparisons of microstructures before and after deformation suggest an increase in twin, stacking fault, and dislocation density within the Laves phase, indicating some but not extensive room-temperature deformability.

  14. Solution-Derived Bi(ZnTi)O3 - BaTiO3 Thin Films with Bulk-like...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Solution-Derived Bi(ZnTi)O3 - BaTiO3 Thin Films with Bulk-like Permittivity. Abstract not provided. Authors: Meyer, Kelsey Elizabeth ; Kotula, Paul Gabriel ; Brennecka, ...

  15. Carrier-Controlled Ferromagnetism in SrTiO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Williams, James R.; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Kajdos, Adam P.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Allen, S. James; Stemmer, Susanne

    2012-06-27

    Magnetotransport and superconducting properties are investigated for uniformly La-doped SrTiO3 films and GdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures, respectively. GdTiO3/SrTiO3 interfaces exhibit a high-density 2D electron gas on the SrTiO3 side of the interface, while, for the SrTiO3 films, carriers are provided by the dopant atoms. Both types of samples exhibit ferromagnetism at low temperatures, as evidenced by a hysteresis in the magnetoresistance. For the uniformly doped SrTiO3 films, the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping and to coexist with superconductivity for carrier concentrations on the high-density side of the superconducting dome. The Curie temperature of the GdTiO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures scales with themore » thickness of the SrTiO3 quantum well. The results are used to construct a stability diagram for the ferromagnetic and superconducting phases of SrTiO3.« less

  16. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-IL.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IL.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Illinois Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hydroblast Corp - IL 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to HYDROBLAST CORP. IL.0-03-1 - AEC Memorandum; Smith to Malone; Subject: Shipment of Bethlehem Rods, Reference NYC-504; June 22, 1951 ...

  18. r~& 23, u77

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Xt,jF:ti' 33 ildJ.l' d? rr?.;CEWCi, Rild d-lV2; o,lr,aIlt on ur33iuFi rt?coPcxy *Oil fiilOi:l;iOl*iC l:CId ZlAcl iIlVOlVCrf a SZitl.1 .LlCt ;??f:ZAt 0:2CfXtiC;l. 7AOil.C ...

  19. Giant persistent photoconductivity in BaTiO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, Milivoj; anti?, Ana; Gajovi?, Andreja; Zavanik, Janez; ?eh, Miran

    2014-10-13

    The persistent photoconductivity (PPC) effect in nanotube arrays of barium titanate and TiO{sub 2} (BTO/TiO{sub 2}NT) was studied at room temperature under daylight illumination. The BTO/TiO{sub 2}NT heterostructures exhibited a giant PPC effect that was six orders of magnitude higher than the dark conductivity, followed by a slow relaxation for 3 h. The PPC in this material was explained by the existence of defects at the surfaces and the interfaces of the investigated heterostructures. The sample was prepared using a two-step synthesis: the anodization of a Ti-foil and a subsequent hydrothermal synthesis. The structural and electrical characteristics were studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy, field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy.

  20. A=18C (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the 48Ca(18O, 18C)48Ti reaction. 18C is then bound by 4.188 MeV with respect to breakup into 17C + n. See also (1982FI10, 1987AJ02, 1992WA22). 1. 18C(-)18N Qm 11.807 The...

  1. A=18Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not observed) 18Na has not been observed; its atomic mass excess has been estimated to be 25.32 MeV (1993AU05); it is then unbound with respect to proton emission by 1.6 MeV: see (1978AJ03). See also (1986AN07) and (1983ANZQ

  2. A=5Be (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See the Isobar Diagram for 5Be) See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance parameters. The absence of any group structure in the neutron spectrum in the reaction 3He(3He, n)5Be at E(3He) = 18.0 to 26.0 MeV indicates that 5Beg.s

  3. IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation through the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiyomiya, Hiroyasu; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Kaneuji, Takeshi; Mitsugi, Sho; Sakurai, Takuma; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; and others

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a recently discovered proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family. Several studies have reported that IL-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation. However, the mechanism of IL-33 regulation of osteoclastogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of IL-33 on osteoclast formation in vitro. IL-33 suppressed osteoclast formation in both mouse bone marrow cells and monocyte/macrophage cell line RAW264.7 cells induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and/or macrophage stimulating factor (M-CSF). IL-33 also inhibited the expression of RANKL-induced nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), thereby decreasing the expression of osteoclastogenesis-related marker genes, including Cathepsin K, Osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Oc-stamp) and Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap). Blockage of IL-33-ST2 binding suppressed the IL-33-mediated inhibition of NFATc1. RANKL-induced B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1) expression was also suppressed by IL-33, which was followed by the stimulation of anti-osteoclastic genes such as interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8). These results suggest that IL-33-ST2 interactions down-regulate both RANKL-induced NFATc1 activation and osteoclast differentiation via the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8 expression. - Highlights: • IL-33 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast formation. • IL-33 has inhibitory effect on the RANKL-induced NFATc1 expression. • IL-33-induced NFATc1 suppression depends on the regulation of Blimp-1 and IRF-8.

  4. The corrosivity and passivity of sputtered Mg-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Guang -Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cakmak, Ercan; Brady, Michael P.; Gannon, Paul E.; Himmer, Phil; Andrews, Quinn

    2015-11-30

    Our study explored the possibility of forming a “stainless” Mg–Ti alloy. The electrochemical behavior of magnetron-sputtered Mg–Ti alloys was measured in a NaCl solution, and the surface films on the alloys were examined by XPS, SEM and TEM. Increased corrosion resistance was observed with increased Ti content in the sputtered Mg–Ti alloys, but passive-like behavior was not reached until the Ti level (atomic %) was higher than the Mg level. Moreover, the surface film that formed on sputtered Mg–Ti based alloys in NaCl solution was thick, discontinuous and non-protective, whereas a thin, continuous and protective Mg and Ti oxide film was formed on a sputtered Ti–Mg based alloy.

  5. The corrosivity and passivity of sputtered Mg-Ti alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Song, Guang -Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cakmak, Ercan; Brady, Michael P.; Gannon, Paul E.; Himmer, Phil; Andrews, Quinn

    2015-11-30

    Our study explored the possibility of forming a “stainless” Mg–Ti alloy. The electrochemical behavior of magnetron-sputtered Mg–Ti alloys was measured in a NaCl solution, and the surface films on the alloys were examined by XPS, SEM and TEM. Increased corrosion resistance was observed with increased Ti content in the sputtered Mg–Ti alloys, but passive-like behavior was not reached until the Ti level (atomic %) was higher than the Mg level. Moreover, the surface film that formed on sputtered Mg–Ti based alloys in NaCl solution was thick, discontinuous and non-protective, whereas a thin, continuous and protective Mg and Ti oxide filmmore » was formed on a sputtered Ti–Mg based alloy.« less

  6. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ±more » 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.« less

  7. Structural and Morphological Difference Between Ti/TiN/TiCN Coatings Grown in Multilayer and Graded Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, E.; Baena, A.; Agudelo, C.; Castillo, H.; Devia, A.; Marino, A.

    2006-12-04

    Thin films can be grown in super-lattice, multilayers and graded form, having each one advantages and disadvantages. The difference between multilayer and graded coatings is the interface. In multilayers the interface is abrupt and in graded coatings it is diffuse. The interface influences many chemical and physical properties of the materials, and its choice depends on the application. Graded coatings have the advantage of having gradual properties such as thermal expansion coefficient and lattice parameter, avoiding adherence problems due to good match between their component materials. In this work the comparison between some properties of coatings grown as multilayer and graded is performed. The materials are produced using the sputtering DC technique because of its facility to control the deposition parameters and generate a slow growth. The target is a disc of titanium and the samples are made of stainless steel 304. The working gases are argon, nitrogen and methane, which are mixed according to the material to be produced, i.e. Ti layer is grown with argon, the TiN film is produced with a mixture of argon and nitrogen, and the TiCN material is obtained mixing argon, nitrogen and methane. These materials are characterized with AFM in order to determine grain size and with XPS studying the chemical composition and performing depth profiles.

  8. A=3n (1987TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987TI07) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: The weight of experimental evidence reviewed in the previous compilation of Fiarman and Hanna (1975FI08) is strongly against the existence of a bound state of the three-neutron system, and only controversial evidence of 3n resonances was cited. Several experiments carried out more recently have strengthened the evidence against the bound trineutron and have failed to discover resonance structure that cannot be otherwise explained. The most suggestive work is

  9. A Review Corrosion of TI Grade 7 and Other TI Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-05-11

    Titanium alloy degradation modes are reviewed in relation to their performance in repository environments. General corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen induced cracking, microbially influenced corrosion, and radiation-assisted corrosion of Ti alloys are considered. With respect to the Ti Grade 7 drip shields selected for emplacement in the repository at Yucca Mountain, general corrosion, hydrogen induced cracking, and radiation-assisted corrosion will not lead to failure within the 10,000 year regulatory period; stress corrosion cracking (in the absence of disruptive events) is of no consequence to barrier performance; and localized corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion are not expected to occur. To facilitate the discussion, Ti Grades 2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, and 24 are included in this review.

  10. Secretary Chu Announces Agreement on FutureGen Project in Mattoon, IL |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Agreement on FutureGen Project in Mattoon, IL Secretary Chu Announces Agreement on FutureGen Project in Mattoon, IL June 12, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced an agreement with the FutureGen Alliance that advances the construction of the first commercial scale, fully integrated, carbon capture and sequestration project in the country in Mattoon, Illinois. "This important step forward for FutureGen reflects

  11. Nature of Transactions (TI) Code | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Nature of Transactions (TI) Code U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System Nature of Transactions (TI) Code* Nature of Transactions (TI) Code* Code: Description: A Initiates lease and financial responsibility of DOE-owned material B Transfer of lease and financial responsiblity of DOE-owned material C Transfer of DOE-owned material with no change in lease or financial responsibility D Return to DOE for credit

  12. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Vibrating TiB/Ti Cantilever Beam Using Differential Thermography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, Larry; Wyen, Travis; Byrd, Alex

    2008-02-15

    Differential thermography has been used to detect the fluctuating temperatures due the thermoelastic effect for a number of years. This paper examines functionally graded TiB/Ti cantilever beams excited on an electromechanical shaker in fully reversed bending. Finite difference analysis of specimens was used to look at the effect of heat conduction, convection and the fundamental frequency on the surface temperature distribution and compared to experimental data. The thermoelastic effect was also used to detect cracking and the stress field at the tip of the fixture during fatigue.

  13. Ab initio Study of He Stability in hcp-Ti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Yunya; Yang, Li; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.

    2010-12-20

    The stability of He in hcp-Ti was studied using ab initio method based on density functional theory. The results indicate that a single He atom prefers to occupy the tetrahedral site rather than the octahedral site. The interaction of He defects with Ti atoms has been used to explain the relative stabilities of He point defects in hcp-Ti. The relative stability of He defects in hcp-Ti is useful for He clustering and bubble nucleation in metal tritides, which provides the basis for development of improved atomistic models.

  14. Cathodic cage plasma deposition of TiN and TiO{sub 2} thin films on silicon substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sousa, Romulo R. M. de; Sato, Patricia S.; Nascente, Pedro A. P.; Viana, Bartolomeu C.; Alves, Clodomiro; Nishimoto, Akio

    2015-07-15

    Cathodic cage plasma deposition (CCPD) was used for growing titanium nitride (TiN) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films on silicon substrates. The main advantages of the CCPD technique are the uniformity, tridimensionality, and high rate of the film deposition that occurs at higher pressures, lower temperatures, and lower treatment times than those used in conventional nitriding treatments. In this work, the influence of the temperature and gas atmosphere upon the characteristics of the deposited films was investigated. The TiN and TiO{sub 2} thin films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy to analyze their chemical, structural, and morphological characteristics, and the combination of these results indicates that the low-cost CCPD technique can be used to produce even and highly crystalline TiN and TiO{sub 2} films.

  15. Ferroelectric Self-assembled PbTiO3 Perovskite Nanostructures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perovskite Nanostructures onto (100)SrTiO3 Substrates from a Novel Microemulsion-aided Sol-Gel Preparation Figure 1. PbTiO3 nanostructures onto (100) SrTiO3 substrates....

  16. Optimizing optical absorption of TiO{sub 2} by alloying with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Optimizing optical absorption of TiOsub 2 by alloying with TiSsub 2 TiOsub 2 is an attractive material for photocatalytic water splitting, but its band gap is too ...

  17. Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ... ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ...

  18. Effects of hydrochloric acid treatment of TiO{sub 2}nanoparticles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effects of hydrochloric acid treatment of TiOsub 2 nanoparticlesnanofibers bilayer film ... Title: Effects of hydrochloric acid treatment of TiOsub 2 nanoparticlesnanofibers ...

  19. Equation of State Model Quality Study for Ti and Ti64.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, Ann Elisabet; Sanchez, Jason James

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and the titanium alloy Ti64 (6% aluminum, 4% vanadium and the balance ti- tanium) are materials used in many technologically important applications. To be able to computationally investigate and design these applications, accurate Equations of State (EOS) are needed and in many cases also additional constitutive relations. This report describes what data is available for constructing EOS for these two materials, and also describes some references giving data for stress-strain constitutive models. We also give some suggestions for projects to achieve improved EOS and constitutive models. In an appendix, we present a study of the 'cloud formation' issue observed in the ALEGRA code. This issue was one of the motivating factors for this literature search of available data for constructing improved EOS for Ti and Ti64. However, the study shows that the cloud formation issue is only marginally connected to the quality of the EOS, and, in fact, is a physical behavior of the system in question. We give some suggestions for settings in, and improvements of, the ALEGRA code to address this computational di culty.

  20. A=10B (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10B published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 10B located on our website at: (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/10b.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 10.18 preview 10.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ = +1.80064475 ± 0.00000057 μN: see (1989RA17); Q = +84.72

  1. A=19B (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not illustrated) 19B has been observed in the bombardment of Be by 12 MeV/A 56Fe ions (1984MU27) and in the fragmentation of 44 MeV/A 40Ar (1988GU1A) and 55 MeV/A 48Ca (1991MU19). See also (1989DE52). The mass excess adopted by (1993AU05) is 59.360 ± 0.400 MeV. Shell model predictions for low-lying levels are discussed in (1992WA22). See also (1989PO1K, 1990LO11

  2. A=20C (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20C has been observed in heavy ion projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1990MU06, 1991MU19) and in proton-induced target-fragmentation reactions (1987VI13, 1988MU08, 1993WOZZ). The atomic mass excess is 37.560 ± 0.200 MeV (1995AU04). It is then stable with respect to 19C + n and 18C + 2n by 3.3 and 3.5 MeV, respectively. β-delayed neutron emission has been observed (1987GI05, 1990MU06, 1991MU19). The half life and neutron emission probability have been

  3. A=20N (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.770 ± 0.050 MeV (1995AU04). It has been observed in heavy-ion transfer (1989OR03) and projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1988DUZT, 1988MU08, 1990MU06, 1991OR01) and in target fragmentation reactions (1988WO09, 1991RE02, 1993WOZZ). See also the review (1988VI1D). Mass measurements were reported in (1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1989OR03, 1991OR01, 1993WOZZ). Nuclear matter rms radii have been derived from

  4. A=3He (1987TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987TI07) GENERAL: Ground State: Jπ = 1/2+, μ = -2.127624 ± 0.0000011 nm, M - A = 14.93132 ± 0.00003 MeV. General properties of the ground state of the A = 3 system are under 3H above. The wave function is predominantly S-state (~ 90%) with S'-state (1 - 2%) and D-state (~ 9%) admixtures (1975FI08, 1980PA12, 1984CI05, 1984CI09). For 3He the measured magnetic moment is μ = -2.127624 ± 0.0000011 nm (1978LEZA, 1978NE12). Calculations which include both impulse and pion exchange contributions

  5. A=3Li (1987TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987TI07) GENERAL: The previous compilation (1975FI08) listed a small number of references reporting on the four reactions discussed below. Only one of the experiments cited contained any evidence for a 3p resonance, and the discussion suggested that the observed enhancement in 3He(p, n) was more likely a final state interaction. In the work reported since (1975FI08) and listed below, only (1974POZN) contains any mention of the tri-proton, and no evidence for its existence was observed. 1. 2H(p,

  6. A=4HE (1992TI02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    He (1992TI02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 4He) GENERAL: Ground state:Due to non-central forces, the wave function for the Jπ = 0+ ground state of 4He can be a positive-parity mixture of three 1S0, six 3P0, and five 5D0 orthogonal states (1967BE74). Of course, the symmetric S-wave component is the dominant part of the wavefunction, with significant D-wave and almost negligible P-wave contributions. Since the D-state admixture can be inferred from measurements such as the tensor analyzing

  7. A=4Li (1992TI02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1992TI02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 4Li) GENERAL: The stability of 8B against particle decay (1988AJ01), in particular against decay into 4He + 4Li, sets an upper limit of 1.7 MeV on the separation energy of 4Li into p + 3He (1952SH44). The instability of 4H against particle decay (see 4H, GENERAL section) makes the particle stability of 4Li very unlikely, since the Coulomb energy of 4Li is approximately 1.7 MeV larger than that of 4H (1963WE10), and the nuclear energies should be

  8. A=5H (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance parameters. The previous review (1988AJ01) noted that the 9Be(11B, 15O) reaction at E(11B) = 52 - 76 MeV showed no evidence for the formation of 5H (1986BE35, 1987BO40). For the earlier work see (1984AJ01). See also (1987KO47, 1988SEZJ). In several experiments on π- absorption at rest there is some evidence for the formation of a very broad (8 ± 3 MeV) resonance in the 5H system with Er = 7.4 ± 0.7

  9. A=5He (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 5He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 5He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/5he.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 5.1 preview 5.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance

  10. A=5Li (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 5Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 5Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/5li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 5.3 preview 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance

  11. A=6Be (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 6Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 6Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/6be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 6.14 preview 6.14 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 3He(3He, γ)6Be Qm = 11.4884 (b) 3He(3He, p)5Li Qm = 11.17

  12. A=6He (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 6He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 6He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/6he.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 6.1 preview 6.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground State Properties: The interaction radius of 6He, obtained

  13. A=6Li (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 6He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and isted, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 6Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/6li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 6.4 preview 6.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground State Properties: μ = +0.8220473(6) nm, +0.8220567(3) nm:

  14. A=6n (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) 6n has not been observed. See (1979AJ01, 1988AJ01) and references cited there. More recently (1990AL40) reports a search for 6n in a 14C(7Li, 6n) activation experiment at E(7Li) = 82 MeV. No evidence for 6n was obtained. The method of angular potential functions was used by (1989GO18) in a calculation of the properties of multi-neutron systems which indicated that these systems have no bound states. The ground state energy of a six-neutron drop has been computed with

  15. A=7Be (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 7Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 7Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/7be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 7.7 preview 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). The interaction nuclear radius of 7Be is 2.22 ± 0.02 fm

  16. A=7He (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 7He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 7He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/7he.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 7.1 preview 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 7He: The atomic mass excess of 7He is 26.11 ± 0.03 MeV:

  17. A=8B (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8B) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 8B published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 8B located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/8b.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 8.15 preview 8.15 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ = 1.0355 ± 0.0003 μN: see (1996FIZY). Q = 68.3 ± 2.1 mb

  18. A=8He (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 8He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 8He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/8he.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 8.1 preview 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 8He: The atomic mass excess of 8He adopted by us and by

  19. A=9B (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9B) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9B published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9B located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9b.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.13 preview 9.13 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). The low-lying levels of 9B have mainly [441] spatial symmetry and

  20. A=9Be (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.2 preview 9.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ = -1.1778 ± 0.0009 μN: see (1978LEZA); Q = 52.88 ± 0.38 mb:

  1. A=9C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9C) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9C published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9C located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9c.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.16 preview 9.16 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = -1.3914 ± 0.0005 μN (1996MA38). See

  2. A=9He (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9He) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9He located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9he.shtml). Mass of 9He: Although the value adopted in the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation (2003AU02) for the 9He ground state is 40.939 ± 0.029 MeV based on the results

  3. A=9Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.1 preview 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = 3.4391 ± 0.0006 μN (1983CO11). See

  4. A=9N (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1988AJ01). Mass excesses of 46.56 and 46.40 MeV have been estimated from two different mass formulae (2000PO32). 9N would then be proton unbound by ~ 4 MeV. However, mass formulae neither take into account the fact that the last occupied orbit(s) may change near the drip lines nor the fact that an extended low-l orbit leads to a lowered Coulomb energy. The suggested s-wave ground-state of 9He and a Coulomb energy estimated from the 11N ground state

  5. Fabrication of TiO{sub 2} Thick Film for Photocatalyst from Commercial TiO{sub 2} Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asteti, S. Fuji; Syarif, D. Gustaman

    2008-03-17

    Photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} thick film ceramics made of commercial TiO{sub 2} powder has been studied. The TiO{sub 2} powder was nano sized one that was derived from dried TiO{sub 2} suspension. The TiO{sub 2} suspension was made by pouring some blended commercial TiO{sub 2} powder into some amount of water. The paste of TiO{sub 2} was made by mixing the nano sized TiO{sub 2} powder with organic vehicle and glass frit. The paste was spread on a glass substrate. The paste was dried at 100 deg. C and heated at different temperatures (400 deg. C and 500 deg. C) for 60 minutes to produce thick film ceramics. The photocatalytic activity of these films was evaluated by measuring the concentration of a solution of methylene blue where the thick films were inside after being illuminated by UV light at various periods of times. The initial concentration of the methylene blue solution was 5 ppm. Structural analyses were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD analyses showed that the produced thick film ceramic had mainly crystal structure of anatase. According to the photocatalytical data, it was known that the produced thick film ceramics were photocatalyst which were capable of decomposing an organic compound such as the methylene blue.

  6. Electrostatic carrier doping of GdTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Cain, Tyler A.; Zhang, Jack Y.; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Stemmer, Susanne; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Allen, S. James; Klenov, Dmitri O.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2011-12-05

    Heterostructures and superlattices consisting of a prototype Mott insulator, GdTiO{sub 3}, and the band insulator SrTiO{sub 3} are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and show intrinsic electronic reconstruction, approximately 1/2 electron per surface unit cell at each GdTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interface. The sheet carrier densities in all structures containing more than one unit cell of SrTiO{sub 3} are independent of layer thicknesses and growth sequences, indicating that the mobile carriers are in a high concentration, two-dimensional electron gas bound to the interface. These carrier densities closely meet the electrostatic requirements for compensating the fixed charge at these polar interfaces. Based on the experimental results, insights into interfacial band alignments, charge distribution, and the influence of different electrostatic boundary conditions are obtained.

  7. Phase equilibria, formation, crystal and electronic structure of ternary compounds in Ti-Ni-Sn and Ti-Ni-Sb ternary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V.V.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, L.; Stadnyk, Yu.; Melnychenko, N.; Grytsiv, A.; Falmbigl, M.; Skryabina, N.

    2013-01-15

    The phase equilibria of the Ti-Ni-Sn and Ti-Ni-Sb ternary systems have been studied in the whole concentration range by means of X-ray and EPM analyses at 1073 K and 873 K, respectively. Four ternary intermetallic compounds TiNiSn (MgAgAs-type), TiNi{sub 2-x}Sn (MnCu{sub 2}Al-type), Ti{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sn (U{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Sn-type), and Ti{sub 5}NiSn{sub 3} (Hf{sub 5}CuSn{sub 3}-type) are formed in Ti-Ni-Sn system at 1073 K. The TiNi{sub 2}Sn stannide is characterized by homogeneity in the range of 50-47 at% of Ni. The Ti-Ni-Sb ternary system at 873 K is characterized by formation of three ternary intermetallic compounds, Ti{sub 0.8}NiSb (MgAgAs-type), Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 0.45}Sb{sub 2.55} (W{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type), and Ti{sub 5}NiSb{sub 3} (Hf{sub 5}CuSn{sub 3}-type). The solubility of Ni in Ti{sub 0.8}NiSb decreases number of vacancies in Ti site up to Ti{sub 0.91}Ni{sub 1.1}Sb composition. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal section of the Ti-Ni-Sn phase diagram and DOS distribution in hypothetical TiNi{sub 1+x}Sn solid solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-Ni-Sn phase diagram was constructed at 1073 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four ternary compounds are formed: TiNiSn, TiNi{sub 2-x}Sn, Ti{sub 2}Ni{sub 2}Sn, and Ti{sub 5}NiSn{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three ternary compounds exist in Ti-Ni-Sb system at 873 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TiNi{sub 2}Sb compound is absent.

  8. Development of Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn functionally gradient material produced by eutectic bonding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirihara, S.; Takeda, M.; Tsujimoto, T. [Ibaraki Univ., Hitachi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering] [Ibaraki Univ., Hitachi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-07-15

    Although many materials which have a single function have been developed, future needs are anticipated to include materials which have various functions. A functionally gradient material (FGM) which has characteristics of two different materials is a promising candidate for multi-functional material. The present methods for production of FGM, however, are very complicated and costly. In this study the authors answer the serious problem of high production cost by fabricating the FGM by a eutectic bonding method. This fabrication method includes structural control of FGM by changing the cooling process. They describe Ti/Ti{sub 3}Sn FGM obtained by the eutectic bonding method, and tell how the structure of its composition gradient part is changed by controlling the cooling process.

  9. Application of Ti-alloys as compressor discs and blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helm, D.

    1999-07-01

    Ti-alloys are widely used as materials for compressor discs, blades, vanes and housings in modern aero-engines due to their excellent strength-to-weight ratio. Their high corrosion resistance and good weldability are additional factors for their application as main compressor components. A variety of different Ti-alloys have been developed in recent years and introduced into jet engines in order to fulfill the large spectrum of required mechanical properties. The main topic of the present paper is to describe the correlation between essential microstructural features of a number of Ti-alloys for compressor disc and blade applications and such mechanical properties as strength, creep and fatigue resistance, fracture toughness, and crack propagation behavior. It will be shown that for different engine requirements the choice of the suitable alloy, as well as tailoring of microstructural features with the aim to achieve an optimized balance of relevant mechanical properties, is necessary. The influence of thermomechanical treatment on morphology and dimensions of phases, and the resulting correlation to mechanical properties, will be discussed in detail for selected Ti-alloys, i.e., Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and IMI 834 (Ti-5.8Al-4Sn-3.5Zr-0.5Mo-0.7Nb-0.35Si-0.06C). Additionally, effects of surface conditions caused by surface treatment (shot peening) or by service exposure (surface oxidation) will be presented.

  10. IL.26

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... by the AEC Health and Safety Laboratory; (4) establishment of a program for area clearance after each cycle; (5) supply of the uranium billets allocated for a work cycle ...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, IL, Custom

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Libertyville, IL, that scored HERS 45 without PV. This 2,763-square-foot custom home has advanced framed walls with R-20 of open-cell spray foam, R-49 open-cell spray-foam sealed attic, an HRV, and a tankless water heater for hydro coil furnace with high-velocity, small-diameter ducts.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, S.; Gordon, S.; Karsh, M.; Ayers, R.; Olson, D. L.; Wiezman, A.

    2011-06-23

    The nondestructive evaluation of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) alloys for applications such as heat treatment for biomaterials applications (dental) and welding was investigated. Ni-Ti alloys and its ternary alloys are valued for mechanical properties in addition to the shape memory effect. Two analytical approaches were perused in this work. Assessment of the microstructure of the alloy that determines the martensitic start temperature (Ms) of Ni-Ti alloy as a function of heat treatment, and secondly, an attempt to evaluate a Friction Stir Welding, which involves thermo-mechanical processing of the alloy.

  13. A=16B (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target. It is particle unstable. Its mass excess is predicted to be 37.97 MeV; it would then be unstable with respect to decay into 15B + n by 0.93 MeV. See (1985WA02, 1986AJ04). The ground state is predicted to have Jπ = 0- and the first three excited states are predicted to lie at 0.95, 1.10, and 1.55 MeV [Jπ = 2-, 3-, 4-] in a (0 + 1)ℏω space shell model calculation. See (1983ANZQ,

  14. A=16C (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 16C) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.1 preview 16.1 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.2 preview 16.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. 1. 16C(β-)16N Qm = 8.012 The half life of 16C is 0.747 ± 0.008 sec. It decays to 16N*(0.12, 3.35, 4.32) [Jπ = 0-, 1+, 1+]: see Table Prev. Table 16.3 preview 16.3 (in PDF or PS) and (1993CH06). See also (1986AJ04) and see (1986KI05, 1988WA1E, 1992WA1L) for theoretical discussions of

  15. A=16Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.29 preview 16.29 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.32 preview 16.32 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is

  16. A=17C (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17C) The atomic mass excess given by (1988WA18) for 17C is 21035 ± 17 keV. See also (1986AN07). 17C is then stable with respect to 16C + n by 0.73 MeV. Eβ- (max) to 17Ng.s. = 13.16 MeV. See also (1986BI1A). The half-life of 17C has been measured to be 202 ± 17 msec (1986CU01), 220 ± 80 msec (1986DU07), 180 ± 31 msec (1988SA04), and 174 ± 31 msec (1991RE02). Relative intensities of β-delayed gammas were measured by (1986DU07, 1986HU1A, 1986JEZY) [see

  17. A=17Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 17Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 17.26 preview 17.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. (a) 17Ne(β+)17F* → 16O + p Qm = 13.928 (b) 17Ne(β+)17F → 13N + α Qm = 8.711 (c) 17Ne(β+)17F Qm = 14.529 The half-life of 17Ne has been reported as 109.0 ± 1.0 msec (1971HA05) and 109.3 ± 0.6 msec (1988BO39): the weighted mean is 109.2 ± 0.6 and we adopt it. The decay is primarily to the proton unstable states of 17F at 4.65, 5.49, 6.04 and 8.08 MeV

  18. A=18B (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (Not illustrated) 18B has not been observed in the bombardment of Ta by 44 MeV/A Ar ions (1985DE60, 1985LA03, 1986PO13) or in the bombardment of Be by 12 MeV/A 56Fe ions (1984MU27). 18B has been predicted to have a mass excess of 52.3 MeV (1993AU05). It would then be unstable with respect to 17B + n by 0.5 MeV: see (1978AJ03, 1985WA02). 18B is calculated to have Jπ = 4- and to have excited states at 0.62, 0.86 and 1.59 MeV with Jπ = 1-, 2- and 2- (1985PO10).The shell model calculations

  19. A=18F (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 18.23 preview 18.23 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 18.24 preview 18.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). μ1.12 = +2.86 ± 0.03 nm [see (1983AJ01)] Q1.12 = 0.13 ± 0.03 b [see (1983AJ01)]. 1. 18F(β+)18O Qm = 1.655 The positron decay is entirely to the ground state of 18O [Jπ = 0+, T = 1]; the half-life is 109.77 ± 0.05 min [see Table Prev. Table 18.11 preview 18.11 (in PDF or PS) in

  20. A=18N (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18N) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 18.3 preview 18.3 [General Table ] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 18.4 preview 18.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 18N: The atomic mass excess derived from the Q-value of the 18O(7Li, 7Be)18N reaction and adopted by (1993AU05) is 13.117 ± 0.020 MeV (1983PU01). 18N is then stable with respect to breakup into 17N + n by 2.825 MeV. See (1983AJ01) for the earlier work. 1. 18N(β-)18O Qm = -13.899 The

  1. A=18Ne (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 18.35 preview 18.35 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 18.36 preview 18.36 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). For B(E2) of 18Ne*(1.89) and other parameters see (1987RA01) and Table Prev. Table 2 preview 2 in the Introduction. 1. 18Ne(β+)18F Qm = 4.446 The half-life of 18Ne is 1672 ± 8 ms: see (1978AJ03) and (1983AD03). The decay is primarily to 18F*(0, 1.04, 1.70 MeV). In addition there is an

  2. A=19C (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19C) 19C has been observed in the 0.8 GeV proton bombardment of thorium (1986VI09, 1988WO09) and in the fragmentation of 66 MeV/A argon ions (1987GI05) and in 44 MeV/A 22Ne on 181Ta, and in 112 MeV/A 20Ne on 12C (1994RAZW, 1995OZ02). The mass excess adopted by (1993AU05) is 32.23 ± 0.11 MeV. See also (1986VI09, 1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1991OR01). 19C is then stable with respect to decay into 18C + n by 0.16 MeV and into 17C + 2n by 4.35 MeV. The half-life was

  3. A=19N (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19N) 19N has been produced in a number of different multinucleon transfer reactions (1983AJ01, 1987AJ02), and these results lead to an adopted value (1993AU05) of 15.860 ± 0.016 MeV for the mass excess. 19N is then stable with respect to decay into 18N + n by 5.33 MeV. The half-life has been measured to be 0.32 ± 0.10 s (1986DU07), 0.21+0.2-0.1 s (1988MU08), 0.235 ± 0.032 s (1988SA04), 0.300 ± 0.080 s (1988DUZT), 0.329 ± 0.019 s (1991RE02). The neutron

  4. A=19Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 19Na) This nucleus was observed in the 24Mg(p, 6He)19Na reaction at Ep = 54.7 MeV (1969CE01). A study via the 24Mg(3He, 8Li)19Na reaction at E(3He) = 76.3 MeV leads to an atomic mass excess of 12.929 ± 0.012 MeV for 19Na; it is then unstable with respect to breakup into 18Ne + p by 321 ± 13 keV. An excited state at Ex = 120 ± 10 keV is also reported (1975BE38, 1993AU05). See also (1987AJ02) and (1987PO01, 1987SA24, 1988CO15, 1990PO04, 1992AV03

  5. A=19Ne (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 19.26 preview 19.26 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 19.27 preview 19.27 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μg.s. = -1.88542 (8) nm (1982MA39) μ0.239 = -0.740 (8) nm (1978LEZA) 1. 19Ne(β+)19F Qm = 3.238 We adopt the half-life of 19Ne suggested by (1983AD03): 17.34 ± 0.09 s. See also (1978AJ03). The decay is principally to 19Fg.s.: see Table Prev. Table 19.29 preview 19.29 (in PDF or

  6. A=19O (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95TI07) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19O) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 19.1 preview 19.1 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 19.2 preview 19.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. 1. 19O(β-)19F Qm = 4.819 The weighted mean of several half-lives is 26.96 ± 0.07 s: see (1972AJ02, 1987AJ02). The decay is complex: see reaction 34 of 19F and Table Prev. Table 19.23 preview 19.23 (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 19.24 preview 19.24 (in PDF or PS). 2. 9Be(18O,

  7. A=20F (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20F) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 20.4 preview 20.4 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 20.5 preview 20.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μ = +2.0935 (9) nm (1989RA17) Q = -0.042 (3) b (1989RA17) 1. 20F(β-)20Ne Qm = 7.025 The half-life of 20F is (11.163 ± 0.008) s (1992WA04), (11.11 ± 0.04) s (1995IT1C). For earlier measurements see (1987AJ02). 20F decays principally to 20Ne*(1.63): see 20Ne, reaction 37. 2. (a) 6Li(15N,

  8. A=20Mg (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 20Mg) 20Mg has been populated in the 24Mg(α, 8He) reaction at Eα = 127 and 156 MeV, in the 20Ne(3He, 3n) reaction at E(3He) = 70 MeV, and more recently in projectile fragmentation reactions. Reviews of proton rich nuclei and methods of production are presented in (1989AYZU, 1993SO13). See also (1990PO04). The super-allowed decay of 20Mg to the first T = 2 (Jπ = 0+) state of 20Na [Ex = 6.534 ± 0.013 MeV (1995PI03)] has been reported in early work (1979MO02,

  9. A=20Na (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20Na) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 20.32 preview 20.32 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 20.33 preview 20.33 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. μ = 0.3694 ± 0.0002 nm (1975SC20, 1989RA17) 1. 20Na(β+)20Ne Qm = 13.887 20Na decays by positron emission to 20Ne*(1.63) and to a number of other excited states of 20Ne: see Table Prev. Table 20.31 preview 20.31 (in PDF or PS) and reaction 59 in 20Ne. The half-life of 20Na is 447.9

  10. A=20O (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 20O) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 20.1 preview 20.1 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 20.2 preview 20.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. 1. 20O(β-)20F Qm = 3.814 20O decays with a half-life of 13.51 ± 0.05 s to the 1+ states 20F*(1.06, 3.49) with branching ratios (99.973 ± 0.003) and (0.027 ± 0.003)%, log f0t = 3.740 ± 0.006 and 3.65 ± 0.06, respectively (1987AL06). Upper limits for the branching to other states of

  11. A=3H (1987TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1987TI07) (Not illustrated) GENERAL: Ground State: Jπ = 1/2+, μ = 2.978960 ± 0.000001 nm, M - A = 14.94991 ± 0.00003 MeV. The wave function for the triton bound state is calculated to be mostly S-state (~ 90%) with S'-state (~ 1%) and D-state (~ 9%) admixtures depending on the potentials used (1979SA15, 1986IS06). See also (1980HA10, 1980LO091983FR19, 1984CI05, 1984CI09, 1984MU23). The measured magnetic moment for 3H is μ = 2.978960 ± 0.000001 nm (1978LEZA). Calculations which include both

  12. A=4n (1992TI02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4n (1992TI02) GENERAL: The stability of 8He (1968BA48, 1968ME03, 1973FI04, 1988AJ01) sets an upper limit to the total binding energy of 4n, because the decay 8He → 4He + 4n does not occur (1964GO1B, 1964GO25). The most precisely determined mass excess of 8He (1988WA18) yields B(4n) ≤ 3.1 MeV. Noting that in all known nuclei the proton binding energy increases when two neutrons are added, (1964VL1A) show that B(4n) < -Q, where Q is the decay energy for 5H → 3H + 2n. Since Q > 0

  13. A=7B (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7B) The mass excess of 7B adopted by (1997AU04) is 27.870 ± 0.070 MeV. It was obtained by averaging the values of 27.94 ± 0.10 MeV from the 10B(3He, 6He)7B reaction (1967MC14, 1988AJ01) and the value 27.800 ± 0.10 MeV obtained in the 7Li(π+, π-)7B reaction (1981SE1B). The width of the ground state is Γ = 1.4 ± 0.2 MeV: see (1967MC14, 1988AJ01). 7B is unbound with respect to 6Be + p, 5Li + 2p and 4He + 3p by 2.21, 1.61 and 3.38 MeV, respectively. The

  14. A=7H (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (Not illustrated) 7H has not been observed. Attempts have been made to detect it in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf (1982AL33) and in the 7Li(π-, π+) reaction [see (1984AJ01)]. A study of 9Be(π-, 2p) (1987GO25) found no evidence for 7H. See also the review of (1989OG1B) and the 7Li(π-, π+) investigation reported in (1989GR06). The ground state is calculated to have Jπ = 1/2+ and to be unstable with respect to 1n, 2n, 3n and 4n emission. Excited states are predicted at 4.84, 5.00

  15. A=8Be (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Be) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 8Be published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 8Be located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/8be.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 8.9 preview 8.9 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 8Be → 4He4He Qm = 0.0918 Γcm for 8Beg.s. = 5.57 ± 0.25 eV:

  16. A=8C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35094 ± 23 keV (2003AU03); Γcm = 230 ± 50 keV [Jπ = 0+; T = 2]: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.07 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55) and 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied at

  17. Modeling and experimental studies of oxide covered metal surfaces: TiO{sub 2}/Ti a model system. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1991-12-31

    Prior work in our laboratories at the Corrosion Research Center has shown that thin, anodic TiO{sub 2} films formed by the Slow Growth Mode (SGM) on polycrystalline titanium and microcrystalline with a texture that varies from one metal grain to another. Furthermore, the underlying metal grains are mapped by the photoelectrochemical response of the oxide. The same characteristics have also been demonstrated in our laboratory for ZnO grown on Zn. The TiO{sub 2}/Ti system has been chosen for study both because of its importance in energy systems, and because it can serve as a model system for other metal-metal oxide couples. The investigations of anodic TiO{sub 2} films on Ti have shown that the properties of thin films are consistent with the rutile form of the oxide. Both experimental data and theoretical calculations show the close resemblance to results on single crystal TiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the modeling studies reveal that the optical transitions near the bandedge arise from the bulk band structure. The photoelectrochemical properties of anodic TiO{sub 2} films have now been shown to obey the simple Gaertner-Butler model for the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, with a few modifications. The most important deviation has now been shown to be a result of multiple internal reflections in the oxide film.

  18. Modeling and experimental studies of oxide covered metal surfaces: TiO sub 2 /Ti a model system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyrl, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Prior work in our laboratories at the Corrosion Research Center has shown that thin, anodic TiO{sub 2} films formed by the Slow Growth Mode (SGM) on polycrystalline titanium and microcrystalline with a texture that varies from one metal grain to another. Furthermore, the underlying metal grains are mapped by the photoelectrochemical response of the oxide. The same characteristics have also been demonstrated in our laboratory for ZnO grown on Zn. The TiO{sub 2}/Ti system has been chosen for study both because of its importance in energy systems, and because it can serve as a model system for other metal-metal oxide couples. The investigations of anodic TiO{sub 2} films on Ti have shown that the properties of thin films are consistent with the rutile form of the oxide. Both experimental data and theoretical calculations show the close resemblance to results on single crystal TiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the modeling studies reveal that the optical transitions near the bandedge arise from the bulk band structure. The photoelectrochemical properties of anodic TiO{sub 2} films have now been shown to obey the simple Gaertner-Butler model for the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, with a few modifications. The most important deviation has now been shown to be a result of multiple internal reflections in the oxide film.

  19. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent Lighting at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2010-12-10

    This report reviews a demonstration of light-emitting diode (LED) accent lighting compared to halogen (typical) accent lighting in a gallery of the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

  20. TI--CR--AL--O thin film resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Schmid, Anthony P.

    2000-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer in perylene-TiO2 nanoassemblies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ABSTRACT: The photosensitization effect of three perylene dye derivatives on titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) has been investigated. The dyes used, 1,7-dibromoperylene-3,4...

  2. Martensite transformation of epitaxial Ni-Ti films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buschbeck, J.; Kozhanov, A.; Kawasaki, J. K.; James, R. D.; Palmstroem, C. J.

    2011-05-09

    The structure and phase transformations of thin Ni-Ti shape memory alloy films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated for compositions from 43 to 56 at. % Ti. Despite the substrate constraint, temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and resistivity measurements reveal reversible, martensitic phase transformations. The results suggest that these occur by an in-plane shear which does not disturb the lattice coherence at interfaces.

  3. Delivery of human NKG2D-IL-15 fusion gene by chitosan nanoparticles to enhance antitumor immunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Chen; Jie, Leng; Yongqi, Wang; Weiming, Xiao; Juqun, Xi; Yanbing, Ding; Li, Qian; Xingyuan, Pan; Mingchun, Ji; Weijuan, Gong

    2015-07-31

    Nanoparticles are becoming promising carriers for gene delivery because of their high capacity in gene loading and low cell cytotoxicity. In this study, a chitosan-based nanoparticle encapsulated within a recombinant pcDNA3.1-dsNKG2D-IL-15 plasmid was generated. The fused dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene fragment consisted of double extracellular domains of NKG2D with IL-15 gene at downstream. The average diameter of the gene nanoparticles ranged from 200 nm to 400 nm, with mean zeta potential value of 53.8 ± 6.56 mV. The nanoparticles which were loaded with the dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene were uptaken by tumor cells with low cytotoxicity. Tumor cells pre-transfected by gene nanopartilces stimulated NK and T cells in vitro. Intramuscular injection of gene nanoparticles suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice through activation of NK and CD8{sup +} T cells. Thus, chitosan-based nanoparticle delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene vaccine can be potentially used for tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Generation of a nanoparticle for delivery of dsNKG2D-IL-15 gene. • Characterization of the gene nanoparticle. • Antitumor activity mediated by the gene nanoparticle.

  4. A comparative study of precipitation effects in Ti only and Ti-V Ultra Low Carbon (ULC) strip steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, S.W.; Fourlaris, G. . E-mail: g.fourlaris@swansea.ac.uk

    2006-04-15

    Two ULC steel grades were investigated, one based on combined vanadium and titanium additions and the other based on titanium only additions. It has been established that TiC formation during interphase precipitation retards grain growth of the {l_brace}111{r_brace} texture grains during continuous annealing and hence positively affects the r value of the Ti only steel. The formation of newly formed TiC precipitates on dislocations during continuous annealing has been found to result in an increase of the yield strength in both steel grades, as the annealing temperature is increased. It is also confirmed that VC particles formed during the coiling process dissolve during the continuous annealing cycles. Suitable continuous annealing cycles can be adopted to produce high formable steels with a bake hardening potential using the beneficial effects of combined Ti-V additions.

  5. Native SrTiO3 (001) surface layer from resonant Ti L2,3 reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valvidares, Manuel; Huijben, Mark; Yu, Pu; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Kortright, Jeffrey

    2010-11-03

    We quantitatively model resonant Ti L2,3 reflectivity Rs,p(q, hn) from several SrTiO3 (001) single crystals having different initial surface preparations and stored in ambient conditions before and between measurements. All samples exhibit unexpected 300 K Rs(hn) - Rp(hn) anisotropy corresponding to weak linear dichroism and tetragonal distortion of the TiO6 octahedra indicating a surface layer with properties different from cubic SrTiO3. Oscillations in Rs(q) confirm a ubiquitous surface layer 2-3 nm thick that evolves over a range of time scales. Resonant optical constant spectra derived from Rs,p(hn) assuming a uniform sample are refined using a single surface layer to fit measured Rs(q). Differences in surface layer and bulk optical properties indicate that the surface is significantly depleted in Sr and enriched in Ti and O. While consistent with the tendency of SrTiO3 surfaces toward non-stoichiometry, this layer does not conform simply to existing models for the near surface region and apparently forms via room temperature surface reactions with the ambient. This new quantitative spectral modeling approach is generally applicable and has potential to study near-surface properties of a variety of systems with unique chemical and electronic sensitivities.

  6. DFPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIfiNATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    s DFPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIfiNATION Page 1 of3 RECIPIENT :State of Hawaii DBEOT STATE : HI PROJECf TITLE: Loan Loss Reserve Funding Opportunity Announc~ment Number DE-FOA-0000052 Procurement Inslrument Number DE-EEOOOO216 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0000216-001 GO Based on my review ofthe informalion concerning the proposed aClion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS

  7. New SRC APPLE ll Variable Polarization Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Severson; M Bissen; M Fisher; G Rogers; R Reininger; M Green; D Eisert; B Tredinnick

    2011-12-31

    SRC has recently commissioned a new Varied Line-Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) utilizing as its source a 1 m long APPLE II insertion device in short-straight-section 9 of the Aladdin storage ring. The insertion device reliably delivers horizontal, vertical, and right and left circularly polarized light to the beamline. Measurements from an in situ polarimeter can be used for undulator corrections to compensate for depolarizing effects of the beamline. The beamline has only three optical elements and covers the energy range from 11.1 to 270 eV using two varied line-spacing gratings. A plane mirror rotates to illuminate the gratings at the correct angle to cancel the defocus term at all photon energies. An exit slit and elliptical-toroid refocusing mirror complete the beamline. Using a 50 {mu}m exit slit, the beamline provides moderate to high resolution, with measured flux in the mid 10{sup 12} (photons/s/200 mA) range, and a spot size of 400 {mu}m horizontal by 30 {mu}m vertical.

  8. XK-JPH-1l.l

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The main difficulties erlcountered mere',r&ounted: (1) lack of adherence between any eleotraplate placed over the heat treated eina; (2) the diffusion of the base metal through ...

  9. A=6H (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See the Isobar Diagram for 6H) 6H was reported in the 7Li(7Li, 8B)6H reaction at E(7Li) = 82 MeV (1984AL08, 1985AL1G) [σ(θ) ~ 60 nb/sr at θ = 10°] and in the 9Be(11B, 14O)6H reaction at E(11B) = 88 MeV (1986BE35) [σ(θ) ~ 16 nb/sr at θ ~ 8°]. 6H is unstable with respect to breakup into 3H + 3n by 2.7 ± 0.4 MeV, Γ = 1.8 ± 0.5 MeV (1984AL08), 2.6 ± 0.5 MeV, Γ = 1.3 ± 0.5 MeV (1986BE35). The value adopted in the previous review (1988AJ01) is 2.7 ± 0.3 MeV, Γ = 1.6 ± 0.4

  10. Magneto-transport in LaTi{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} oxide heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pramod Dogra, Anjana Budhani, R. C.

    2014-04-24

    We report the growth of ultrathin film of Mn doped LaTiO{sub 3} on TiO{sub 2} terminated SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and their electrical transport characteristics including magnetoresistance (MR). Though the replacement of Mn in LaTiO{sub 3} at the Ti site in dilute limit does not affect the metallic behaviour of films but variation in resistance is observed. Normalised resistance behaviour is explained on the basis of variation in charge carriers and increased interaction between Mn atoms in the system under investigation.

  11. Incorporation of chromium into TiO{sub 2} nanopowders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollbek, Kamila; Sikora, Marcin; Kapusta, Czesław; Szlachetko, Jakub; Radecka, Marta; Lyson-Sypien, Barbara; Zakrzewska, Katarzyna

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Nanopowders of TiO{sub 2}:Cr with different amount of Cr dopant were obtained by flame spray synthesis, FSS. • Increase in the optical absorption and a shift of the absorption edge were observed upon Cr doping. • HERFD-XANES measurements indicated that the average valence state of titanium ions was preserved. • Increasing magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic character was observed upon Cr doping. - Abstract: The paper reports on the results of a study of optical, electronic and magnetic properties of TiO{sub 2} nanopowders doped with Cr ions. Diffused reflectance spectra reveal an increase in the optical absorption and a shift of the absorption edge towards lower energies upon Cr doping. Direct information on the Ti electronic state and the symmetry of its nearest environment is obtained from XANES Ti K-edge spectra. Magnetic behaviour is probed by means of the temperature dependence of DC magnetic susceptibility. Increasing magnetic susceptibility of a paramagnetic character is observed upon increasing chromium doping. The Curie constant of TiO{sub 2}:10 at.% Cr sample (0.12 emu K/mol Oe) is lower than that expected for Cr{sup 3+} (0.1875 emu K/mol Oe) possibly due to the appearance of Cr{sup 4+} or the presence of the orbital contribution to the magnetic moment.

  12. Morphology and structural development of reduced anatase-TiO{sub 2} by pure Ti powder upon annealing and nitridation: Synthesis of TiO{sub x} and TiO{sub x}N{sub y} powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolokang, A.S.; Motaung, D.E.

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that nitriding of titanium is suitable for surface coating of biomaterials and in other applications such as anti-reflective coating, while oxygen-rich titanium oxynitride has been applied in thin film resistors and photocatalysis. Thus in this work anatase was reduced with pure titanium powder during annealing in argon. This was done to avoid any metallic contamination and unwanted residual metal doping. As a result, interesting and different types of particle morphology were synthesized when the pre-milled elemental anatase and titanium powders were mixed. The formation of metastable face centred cubic and monoclinic titanium monoxide was detected by the X-ray diffraction technique. The phases were confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. Raman analysis revealed weak intensity peaks for samples annealed in argon as compared to those annealed under nitrogen. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Reaction of TiO{sub 2} and Ti induced metastable FCC and monoclinic TiO{sub x}. • Compositions of mixed powder were prepared from the unmilled and pre-milled powders. • Nitridation of TiO{sub x} yielded TiO{sub x}N{sub y} phase. • Mixed morphology was observed on all three powder samples.

  13. Keratinocyte-derived IL-24 plays a role in the positive feedback regulation of epidermal inflammation in response to environmental and endogenous toxic stressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Sun Hee; Choi, Dalwoong; Chun, Young-Jin; Noh, Minsoo

    2014-10-15

    Keratinocytes are the major cellular components of human epidermis and play a key role in the modulating cutaneous inflammation and toxic responses. In human chronic skin diseases, the common skin inflammatory phenotypes like skin barrier disruption and epidermal hyperplasia are manifested in epidermal keratinocytes by interactions with T helper (Th) cells. To find a common gene expression signature of human keratinocytes in chronic skin diseases, we performed a whole genome microarray analysis on normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHKs) treated with IFNγ, IL-4, IL-17A or IL-22, major cytokines from Th1, Th2, Th17 or Th22 cells, respectively. The microarray results showed that the four genes, IL-24, PDZK1IP1, H19 and filaggrin, had common expression profiles in NHKs exposed to Th cell cytokines. In addition, the acute phase pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα, also change the gene transcriptional profile of IL-24, PDZK1IP1, H19, and filaggrin in NHKs as those of Th cytokines. Therefore, the signature gene set, consisting of IL-24, PDZK1IP1, H19, and filaggrin, provides essential insights for understanding the process of cutaneous inflammation and toxic responses. We demonstrate that environmental toxic stressors, such as chemical irritants and ultraviolet irradiation stimulate the production of IL-24 in NHKs. IL-24 stimulates the JAK1-STAT3 and MAPK pathways in NHKs, and promotes the secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-1. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived IL-24 participates in the positive feedback regulation of epidermal inflammation in response to both endogenous and environmental toxic stressors. - Highlights: • Cutaneous inflammatory gene signature consists of PDZK1IP1, IL-24, H19 and filaggrin. • Pro-inflammatory cytokines increase IL-24 production in human keratinocytes. • Environmental toxic stressors increase IL-24 production in human keratinocytes. • IL-24 stimulates human keratinocytes to

  14. Water adsorption induced in-plane domain switching on BaTiO{sub 3} surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Wang, B. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study, the influences of the adsorption of water molecules on the changes in the atomic and electric structures of BaTiO{sub 3} surface were investigated using ab initio calculation. Water molecules are molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface, which makes electrons transfer from water molecules to the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The redistribution of electrons in the BaTiO{sub 3} surface layers weakens the Ba-O interactions and strengthens the Ti-O interactions, so that the Ti atom shifts in TiO{sub 2} plane, i.e., an in-plane domain switching. The adsorption of water molecules on BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces also results in a reduction in the surface rumpling.

  15. High-Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources Authors: Perez, F ; Patterson,...

  16. High-Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Ti-concentration aerogels for bright x-ray sources You are accessing a...

  17. Low temperature fabrication of perovskite solar cells with TiO...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the perovskite were fabricated from TiOsub 2 nanoparticles with different grain sizes. ... performance of solar cells was improved by combination of two TiOsub 2 nanoparticles. ...

  18. Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Title: Ti3CrCu4: A possible ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free ...

  19. Conversion of 1,3-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110) (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conversion of 1,3-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conversion of 1,3-Propylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110) The adsorption of...

  20. Interface-Induced Polarization in SrTiO3-LaCrO3 Superlattices...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Through x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy we show that the Ti cations are displaced off-center in the TiO6 ...

  1. FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FIRST-PRINCIPLES PHASE STABILITY IN THE TI-V ALLOY SYSTEM ...

  2. Local Metal and Deuterium Ordering in the Deuterated ZrTiNi C14...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Local Metal and Deuterium Ordering in the Deuterated ZrTiNi C14 Laves Phase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Local Metal and Deuterium Ordering in the Deuterated ZrTiNi ...

  3. Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix This content will become publicly available on August 18, 2016 Title: Deformation behavior of Nb nanowires in TiNiCu shape memory alloy matrix ...

  4. Electric control of magnetism at the Fe/BaTiO3 interface (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Interfacial ...

  5. Electric control of magnetism at the Fe/BaTiO3 interface (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electric control of magnetism at the FeBaTiO3 interface You are accessing a ...

  6. Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LR/RT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using (LRRT)-TDDFT and Active Space EOMCCSD Calculations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Visible Light Absorption of N-Doped TiO2 Rutile Using ...

  7. Electrolyte Gate-Controlled Kondo Effect in SrTiO3 (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrolyte Gate-Controlled Kondo Effect in SrTiO3 Prev Next Title: Electrolyte Gate-Controlled Kondo Effect in SrTiO3 Authors: Lee, Menyoung ; Williams, J. R. ; Zhang, Sipei ...

  8. Coating power RF components with TiN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Hahn, E.

    1995-03-01

    A facility for coating RF power components with thin films of Ti and/or TiN has been in operation for some time at Fermilab supporting the Accelerator Division RF development work and the TESLA program. It has been experimentally verified that such coatings improve the performance of these components as far as withstanding higher electric fields. This is attributed to a reduction in the secondary electron emission coefficient of the surfaces when coated with a thin film containing titanium. The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to describe the facility and the procedure used.

  9. High strength, light weight Ti-Y composites and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Russell, Alan M.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1993-04-06

    A high strength, light weight "in-situ" Ti-Y composite is produced by deformation processing a cast body having Ti and Y phase components distributed therein. The composite comprises elongated, ribbon-shaped Ti and Y phase components aligned along an axis of the deformed body.

  10. High strength, light weight Ti-Y composites and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Ellis, T.W.; Russell, A.M.; Jones, L.L.

    1993-04-06

    A high strength, light weight in-situ'' Ti-Y composite is produced by deformation processing a cast body having Ti and Y phase components distributed therein. The composite comprises elongated, ribbon-shaped Ti and Y phase components aligned along an axis of the deformed body.

  11. Resonance photoelectron spectroscopy of TiX{sub 2} (X = S, Se, Te) titanium dichalcogenides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkvarin, A. S. Yarmoshenko, Yu. M.; Skorikov, N. A.; Yablonskikh, M. V.; Merentsov, A. I.; Shkvarina, E. G.; Titov, A. N.

    2012-11-15

    The photoelectron valence band spectra of TiS{sub 2}, TiSe{sub 2}, and TiTe{sub 2} dichalcogenides are investigated in the Ti 2p-3d resonance regime. Resonance bands in the vicinity of the Fermi energy are found for TiS{sub 2} and TiTe{sub 2}. The nature of these bands is analyzed based on model calculations of the density of electronic states in TiS{sub 2}, TiSe{sub 2}, and TiTe{sub 2} compounds intercalated by titanium atoms. Analysis of experimental data and their comparison with model calculations showed that these bands have different origins. It is found that the resonance enhancement of an additional band observed in TiS{sub 2} is explained by self-intercalation by titanium during the synthesis of this compound. The resonance enhancement in TiTe{sub 2} is caused by occupation of the 3d band in Ti.

  12. Hysteretic electrical transport in BaTiO{sub 3}/Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3}/Ge heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngai, J. H.; Kumah, D. P.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.

    2014-02-10

    We present electrical transport measurements of heterostructures comprised of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} epitaxially grown on Ge. Sr alloying imparts compressive strain to the BaTiO{sub 3}, which enables the thermal expansion mismatch between BaTiO{sub 3} and Ge to be overcome to achieve c-axis oriented growth. The conduction bands of BaTiO{sub 3} and Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} are nearly aligned with the conduction band of Ge, which facilitates electron transport. Electrical transport measurements through the dielectric stack exhibit rectifying behavior and hysteresis, where the latter is consistent with ferroelectric switching.

  13. Induced Ti magnetization at La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and BaTiO3 interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Yaohua; Tornos, J.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Freeland, J. W.; Zhou, H.; Steadman, P.; Bencok, P.; Leon, C.; Santamaria, J.

    2016-04-01

    In artificial multiferroics hybrids consisting of ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and ferroelectric BaTiO3 epitaxial layers, net Ti moments are found from polarized resonant soft x-ray reflectivity and absorption. Moreover, the Ti dichroic reflectivity follows the Mn signal during the magnetization reversal, indicating exchange coupling between the Ti and Mn ions. But, the Ti dichroic reflectivity shows stronger temperature dependence than the Mn dichroic signal. Besides a reduced ferromagnetic exchange coupling in the interfacial LSMO layer, this may also be attributed to a weak Ti-Mn exchange coupling that is insufficient to overcome the thermal energy at elevated temperatures.

  14. Dye sensitized solar cell applications of CdTiO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite thin films deposited from single molecular complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehsan, Muhammad Ali; Khaledi, Hamid; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Huang, Nay Ming; Arifin, Zainudin; Mazhar, Muhammad

    2015-10-15

    A heterobimetallic complex [Cd{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}(μ-O){sub 6}(TFA){sub 8}(THF){sub 6}]·1.5THF (1) (TFA=trifluoroacetato, THF=tetrahydrofuran) comprising of Cd:Ti (1:2) ratio was synthesized by a chemical reaction of cadmium (II) acetate with titanium (IV) isopropoxide and triflouroacetic acid in THF. The stoichiometry of (1) was recognized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic and elemental analyses. Thermal studies revealed that (1) neatly decomposes at 450 °C to furnish 1:1 ratio of cadmium titanate:titania composite oxides material. The thin films of CdTiO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite oxides were deposited at 550 °C on fluorine doped tin oxide coated conducting glass substrate in air ambient. The micro-structure, crystallinity, phase identification and chemical composition of microspherical architectured CdTiO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite thin film have been determined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The scope of composite thin film having band gap of 3.1 eV was explored as photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cell application. - Graphical abstarct: Microspherical designed CdTiO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} composite oxides photoanode film has been fabricated from single source precursor [Cd{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}(μ-O){sub 6}(TFA){sub 8}(THF){sub 6}]·1.5THF via aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition technique for dye sensitized solar cell application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of a heterobimetallic Cd–Ti complex. • Fabrication of CdTiO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} thin film photoelectrode. • Application as dye sensitized photoanode for solar application.

  15. Epitaxial single-crystal thin films of MnxTi1-xO2-δ grown on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Epitaxial single-crystal thin films of MnxTi1-xO2- grown on (rutile)TiO2 substrates with ... Title: Epitaxial single-crystal thin films of MnxTi1-xO2- grown on (rutile)TiO2 ...

  16. Adhesion evaluation of TiN and (Ti, Al)N coatings on titanium 6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, R.D.; Gruss, K.A.; Horie, Y.; Davis, R.F.; Paisley, D.L.; Parthasarthi, S.; Tittmann, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    The metallic components of gas turbine engines are continually subjected to hostile atmospheres. Nitride coatings improve the performance of the metallic compressor blades in these engines. To assess the adhesion of nitride coatings on metals, titanium 6% aluminum 4% vanadium substrates were coated with titanium nitride (TiN) using both cathodic arc and electron beam evaporation. Titanium aluminum nitride ((Ti, Al)N) was also deposited using cathodic arc evaporation. The interfaces of the coated samples were loaded in tension using a high speed shock wave which caused spallation either at the interface, in the coating or in the metal. Scanning acoustic microscopy analysis of the spalled samples detected delaminations at the interface in the samples deposited by cathodic arc evaporation. DYNA2D modeling of plate impact spallation experiments revealed the tensile adhesion strength for TiN deposited by both techniques was {approx} 2.0 GPa. The tensile adhesion strength for (Ti, Al)N was less than 1.5 GPa.

  17. Laser hydrothermal reductive ablation of titanium monoxide: Hydrated TiO particles with modified Ti/O surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blazevska-Gilev, Jadranka; Jandova, Vera; Kupcik, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdenek; Subrt, Jan; Bezdicka, Petr; Pola, Josef

    2013-01-15

    IR laser- and UV laser-induced ablation of titanium monoxide (TM) in hydrogen (50 Torr) is compared to the same process induced in vacuum and shown to result in deposition of hydrated surface modified nanostructured titanium suboxide films. Complementary analyses of the films deposited in vacuum and in hydrogen by Fourier transform infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy allowed to determine different features of both films and propose a mechanism of surface modification of ejected particles, which involves hydrothermal reduction of TM and subsequent reactions of evolved water. The films exert good adhesion to metal and quartz surfaces and are hydrophobic in spite of having their surface coated with adsorbed water. - Graphical abstract: Laser ablation of titanium monoxide (TiO) in hydrogen involves a sequence of H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O eliminations and additions and yields hydrated amorphous nanostructured titanium suboxide which is richer in oxygen than TiO. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR and UV laser ablated particles of titanium monoxide (TiO) undergo amorphization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films deposited in vacuum have TiO stoichiometry and are oxidized in atmosphere. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films deposited in hydrogen are hydrated and have more O in topmost layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films modification in hydrogen is explained by reactions in hydrogen plasma.

  18. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc, Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-11-15

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  19. Expression of low-, intermediate-, and high-affinity IL-2 receptors on B cell lines derived from patients with undifferentiated lymphoma of Burkitt's and non-Burkitt's types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, D.; Rosolen, A.; Wormsley, S.B.; DeBault, L.E.; Colamonici, O.R. )

    1990-08-01

    IL-2 receptors on T cells exist in at least three forms which differ in their ligand-binding affinity. The low-affinity IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) consists of the 55-kDa Tac protein (p55 alpha), the intermediate-affinity site corresponds to the 70-kDa molecule (p70 beta), and the high-affinity IL-2R consists of a noncovalent heterodimeric structure involving both p55 alpha and p70 beta. We studied 24 B cell lines (8 EBV-negative and 16 EBV-positive) for IL-2R expression in the presence or absence of the tumor promoter, teleocidin. 125I-IL-2 radioreceptor binding assays and crosslinking studies demonstrated the sole expression of p55 alpha in EBV-negative cell lines only, whereas p55 alpha present in EBV-positive cell lines was always associated with p70 beta to construct high-affinity IL-2R. p70 beta was not detected in any of the EBV-negative cell lines, but was expressed on most of the EBV-positive cell lines (13 of 16). Our data also indicate that the expression of p55 alpha and p70 beta by radiolabeling correlates with their expression in flow cytometry, and that a large excess of p55 alpha is required to construct high-affinity IL-2R. Coexpression of p55 alpha and p70 beta on human B cells contributed to constructing high-affinity IL-2R hybrid complex as shown by rapid association rate contributed by p55 alpha and slow dissociation rate by p70 beta; teleocidin's ability to induce p55 alpha on cell lines which express p70 beta only, resulting in appearance of high-affinity IL-2R; and blocking p55 alpha by anti-Tac mAb in cell lines which constitutively express high-affinity IL-2R eliminated both high- and low-affinity components. The existence of low, intermediate, and high IL-2R on human B cells bears important future implications for understanding the mechanism of IL-2 signaling and the role of IL-2 in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation.

  20. Eu3+ as a dual probe for the determination of IL anion donor power: A combined luminescence spectroscopic and electrochemical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babai, Arash; Kopiec, Gabriel; Lackmann, Anastasia; Mallick, Bert; Pitula, Slawomir; Tang, Sifu; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-04-01

    This work is aimed at giving proof that Eu(Tf2N)(3) (Tf2N = bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) can act as both an optical and electrochemical probe for the determination of the Lewis acidity of an ionic liquid anion. For that reason the luminescence spectra and cyclic voltammograms of dilute solutions of Eu(Tf2N)(3) in various ionic liquids were investigated. The Eu2+/3+ redox potential in the investigated ILs can be related to the Lewis basicity of the IL anion. The IL cation had little influence. The lower the determined halfwave potential, the higher the IL anion basicity. The obtained ranking can be confirmed by luminescence spectroscopy where a bathochromic shift of the D-5(0) -> F-7(4) transition indicates a stronger Lewis basicity of the IL anion. (C) 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Dual Phase Li4 Ti5O12TiO2 Nanowire Arrays As Integrated Anodes For High-rate Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Jin; Chabot, Victor; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Xingcheng; Chen, Zhongwei

    2014-08-19

    Lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) is well known as a zero strain material inherently, which provides excellent long cycle stability as a negative electrode for lithium ion batteries. However, the low specific capacity (175 mA h g?1) limits it to power batteries although the low electrical conductivity is another intrinsic issue need to be solved. In this work, we developed a facile hydrothermal and ion-exchange route to synthesize the self-supported dual-phase Li4Ti5O12TiO2 nanowire arrays to further improve its capacity as well as rate capability. The ratio of Li4Ti5O12 to TiO2 in the dual phase Li4Ti5O12TiO2 nanowire is around 2:1. The introduction of TiO2 into Li4Ti5O12 increases the specific capacity. More importantly, by interface design, it creates a dual-phase nanostructure with high grain boundary density that facilitates both electron and Li ion transport. Compared with phase-pure nanowire Li4Ti5O12 and TiO2 nanaowire arrays, the dual-phase nanowire electrode yielded superior rate capability (135.5 at 5 C, 129.4 at 10 C, 120.2 at 20 C and 115.5 mA h g?1 at 30 C). In-situ transmission electron microscope clearly shows the near zero deformation of the dual phase structure, which explains its excellent cycle stability.

  2. The Valence and Coordination of Ti in Olivine and Pyroxene in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (US) Sponsoring Org: NASA Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Word ...

  3. C E N T R A L F IL E S

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  4. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  5. Structural and chemical characterization of BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagar, K.; Recnik, A.; Sturm, S.; Gajovic, A.; Ceh, M.

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized with EPD into AAO templates. {yields} Nanorods are composed of crystalline, nanosized grains with pseudo-cubic structure. {yields} Integrowth of hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} polymorph within pseudo-cubic structure was observed. -- Abstract: An electron-microscopy investigation was performed on BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods that were processed by sol-gel electrophoretic deposition (EPD) into anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods grown within the template membranes had diameters ranging from 150 to 200 nm, with an average length of 10-50 {mu}m. By using various electron-microscopy techniques we showed that the processed BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were homogeneous in their chemical composition. The BaTiO{sub 3} nanorods were always polycrystalline and were composed of well-crystallized, defect-free, pseudo-cubic BaTiO{sub 3} grains, ranging from 10 to 30 nm. No intergranular phases were observed between the BaTiO{sub 3} grains. A low-temperature hexagonal polymorph that is coherently intergrown with the BaTiO{sub 3} perovskite matrix was also observed as a minor phase. When annealing the AAO templates containing the BaTiO{sub 3} sol in an oxygen atmosphere the presence of the hexagonal polymorph was diminished.

  6. Synthesis of visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst via surface organic modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Dong Xu Yao Hou Bo; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2007-05-15

    A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to sol-gel-hydrothermal synthesized TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex that was confirmed by the FT-IR and XPS spectra. Due to the existence of surface complex, the absorption edge of as-prepared TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} nanomaterial extended well into visible region. Compared with unmodified TiO{sub 2} and Degussa P25, the TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A visible light-activated TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the surface organic modification to TiO{sub 2}. The surface hydroxyls of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles reacted with the active -NCO groups of tolylene diisocyanate (TDI) to form a surface complex. The TDI-modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts showed higher activity for the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation.

  7. The Effect of Ramp Rate on the C49 to C54 Titanium Disilicide Phase Transformation from Ti and Ti(Ta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAILEY, GLENN A.; HU, YAO ZHI; SMITH, PAUL M.; TAY, SING PIN

    1999-09-22

    The C49 to C54 TiSi{sub 2} transformation temperature is shown to be reduced by increasing the ramp rate during rapid thermal processing and this effect is more pronounced for thinner initial Ti and Ti(Ta) films. Experiments were performed on blanket wafers and on wafers that had patterned polycrystalline Si lines with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sidewall spacers. Changing the ramp rate caused no change in the transformation temperature for 60 nm blanket Ti films. For blanket Ti films of 25 or 40 nm, however, increasing the ramp rate from 7 to 180 C/s decreased the transformation temperature by 15 C. Studies of patterned lines indicate that sheet resistance of narrow lines is reduced by increased ramp rates for both Ti and Ti(Ta) films, especially as the linewidths decrease below 0.4 {micro}m. This improvement is particularly pronounced for the thinnest Ti(Ta) films, which exhibited almost no linewidth effect after being annealed with a ramp rate of 75 C/s.

  8. Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} superstructures of cubic titanium monoxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusev, A. I.

    2013-08-15

    A cubic model is proposed for the Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} (Ti{sub 5} Black-Small-Square O{sub 5}{open_square} {identical_to} Ti{sub 90} Black-Small-Square {sub 18}O{sub 90}{open_square}{sub 18}) superstructure of nonstoichiometric titanium monoxide Ti{sub x}O{sub z} with double imperfection. The unit cell of the cubic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} superstructure has the threefold lattice parameter of the unit cell of the basis disordered B1 structure of Ti{sub x}O{sub z} monoxide and belongs to space group Pm 3-bar m . The channel of the disorder-order transition, i.e., Ti{sub x}O{sub z} (space group Fm 3-bar m)-Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} (space group Pm 3-bar m), includes 75 superstructure vectors of seven stars (k{sub 10}), (k{sub 7}), (k{sub 6(1)}), (k{sub 6(2)}), (k{sub 4(1)}), (k{sub 4(2)}), and (k{sub 1}). The distribution functions of Ti and O atoms over the sites of the cubic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} superstructure are calculated. A comparison of the X-ray and electron diffraction data obtained for ordered TiO{sub 1.087} monoxide with the theoretical simulation results supports the existence of the cubic Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} superstructure. The cubic (space group Pm 3-bar m) Ti{sub 5}O{sub 5} superstructure is shown to be a high-temperature structure relative to the well-known monoclinic (space group C2/m) superstructure of the same type.

  9. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  10. Effect of neutron irradiation on defect evolution in Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallman, Darin J.; He, Lingfeng; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Kohse, Gordon; Sindelar, Robert L.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2015-10-23

    Here, we report on the characterization of defects formed in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples exposed to neutron irradiation – up to 0.1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 350 ± 40 °C or 695 ± 25 °C, and up to 0.4 dpa at 350 ± 40 °C. Black spots are observed in both Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC after irradiation to both 0.1 and 0.4 dpa at 350 °C. After irradiation to 0.1 dpa at 695 °C, small basal dislocation loops, with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 [0001] are observed in both materials. At 9 ± 3 and 10 ± 5 nm, the loop diameters in the Ti3SiC2 and Ti2AlC samples, respectively, were comparable. At 1 × 1023 loops/m3, the dislocation loop density in Ti2AlC was ≈1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in Ti3SiC2, at 3 x 1021 loops/m3. After irradiation at 350 °C, extensive microcracking was observed in Ti2AlC, but not in Ti3SiC2. The room temperature electrical resistivities increased as a function of neutron dose for all samples tested, and appear to saturate in the case of Ti3SiC2. The MAX phases are unequivocally more neutron radiation tolerant than the impurity phases TiC and Al2O3. Based on these results, Ti3SiC2 appears to be a more promising MAX phase candidate for high temperature nuclear applications than Ti2AlC.