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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Horses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horses Horses Nature Bulletin No. 46 De3cember 29, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation HORSES On and after June 30, 1946, no person shall ride any horse on any driveway, roadway, path or trail within the Forest Preserve District of Cook County, Illinois, unless such person has a rider's license and a license has been issued for such horse, under the provisions of an ordinance recently adopted by the Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners. Each rider's license is good for three years and costs 50 cents. Such license may be revoked for a period of not less than 30 days nor more than one year when the licensee conducts himself or herself in such a manner, while a rider in the Forest Preserve District, as to injure or endanger the person or property of any other person, or the property of the Forest Preserve District.

2

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

3

Climatography of Thunder Events in the Conterminous United States. Part I: Temporal Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average durations of thunder events are greatest (>120 min) in the Oklahoma–Kansas area and least (<60 min) along the west coast and northeast. The average point duration of thunder activity ranges from 10 000 to 12 000 min along the Gulf Coast, ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Summer Cumulus Cloud Seeding Experiments near Yellowknife and Thunder Bay, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summer (June and July) cumulus cloud seeding experiment was conducted in Canada near Yellowknife in 1975 and 1976, and Thunder Bay in 1977 and 1978. Microphysical and dynamical measurements were made with three instrumented aircraft, flying in ...

G. A. Isaac; J. W. Strapp; R. S. Schemenauer; J. I. Macpherson

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Smart Grid Security Educational Training with ThunderCloud: A Virtual Security Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a cloud based virtual smart grid test bed: ThunderCloud, which can be used for domain-specific security educational training applicable to the smart grid environment. The test bed consists of virtual machines connected using ... Keywords: Domain-Specific Security Training, Smart Grid, Virtual Test Bed

Joseph Stites, Ambareen Siraj, Eric L. Brown

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Freeze Branding Horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freeze branding of horses has many advantages. It is safe, economical, simple to do and relatively painless. It can be done on horses of any age and does not damage the horse's hide. This publication gives complete, step-by-step instructions for freeze branding as well as information on branding systems and sites.

Householder, Doug; Webb, Gary; Wigington, Sam; Bruemmer, Jason

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

The LANL/LLNL/AFTAC Black Thunder Coal Mine regional mine monitoring experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cast blasting operations associated with near surface coal recovery provide relatively large explosive sources that generate regional seismograms of interest in monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This paper describes preliminary results of a series of experiments currently being conducted at the Black Thunder Coal Mine in northeast Wyoming as part of the DOE CTBT Research and Development Program. These experiments are intended to provide an integrated set of near-source and regional seismic data for the purposes of quantifying the coupling and source characterization of the explosions. The focus of this paper is on the types of data being recovered with some preliminary implications. The Black Thunder experiments are designed to assess three major questions: (1) how many mining explosions produce seismograms at regional distances that will have to be detected, located and ultimately identified by the National Data Center and what are the waveform characteristics of these particular mining explosions; (2) can discrimination techniques based on empirical studies be placed on a firm physical basis so that they can be applied to other regions where there is little monitoring experience; (3) can large scale chemical explosions (possibly mining explosions) be used to calibrate source and propagation path effects to regional stations, can source depth of burial and decoupling effects be studied in such a controlled environment? With these key questions in mind and given the cooperation of the Black Thunder Mine, a suite of experiments have been and are currently being conducted. This paper will describe the experiments and their relevance to CTBT issues.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Baker, D.F.; Edwards, C.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Composting Horse Manure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncontrolled stockpiles of horse manure can be an unsightly, smelly and fly-infested mess. However, composting manure can eliminate the messy problems and provide a modest additional income for horse enthusiasts, operators of equine facilities and large-animal veterinary clinics. This publication explains what composting is and how to make compost from horse manure. It also provides a case study of a successful composting operation.

Auvermann, Brent W.; McDonald, Lanny; Devin, Robert; Sweeten, John M.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

9

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Roar of the Thunder Dragon: the Bhutanese Audio-visual Industry and the Shaping and Representation of Contemporary Culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roar of the Thunder Dragon: The Bhutanese Audio-visual Industry and the Shaping and Representation of Contemporary Culture Tshewang Dendup? A Bhutanese journalist recently remarked that these days, the phones don’t ring, they sing. And when... , through the support of the BCCI has approached the Ministry of Works and Human Settlement for the allocation of theater space in the urban areas. The MPAB has already received applications from Bumthang and Chukha. Piracy Tobgye of Mila Communications...

Dendup, Tshewang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Horses and Their Kin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horses and Their Kin Horses and Their Kin Nature Bulletin No. 517-A February 16, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HORSES AND THEIR KIN The horse has disappeared from our streets, highways, and most of our agricultural regions. Farm boys no longer learn to say gee, haw, whoa, giddap, and make the clicking sound which also means "go". Except in backwoods country and the western grazing lands, the use of horses is mostly confined to race tracks and bridle paths. In this mechanized age we are apt to forget the dramatic role that this animal played in man's history. As early as 1700 B.C. they pulled the chariots of the Babylonians and age after age, their descendants carried Alexander the Great, Attila, Genghis Khan, the Moors, and Napoleon on their far-flung campaigns of world conquest. Likewise, American history is rich in traditions of the savage horsemen of the Great Plains, the gallant cavalry of our Civil War and Indian campaigns, the Pony Express, the stage coach and the immortal cowboy.

12

Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts Nature Bulletin No. 266-A April 22, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BUCKEYES AND HORSE CHESTNUTS Most children know Longfellow's poem which begins: "Under the spreading chestnut tree the village smithy stands"; but few people know that, actually, the tree which inspired it was a horse chestnut. The native buckeyes and their imported relatives, the horse chestnuts, are much different from the true chestnut but among them are some of our finest street and shade trees. They belong to a family which includes kinds that are large, some that are medium-sized or small, and some that are only shrubs. They are notable for their dense foliage of large toothed leaves, their upstanding showy "candles" of flowers in spring, and their peculiar fruit or nuts. The flowers are white, yellow, red or varicolored, according to the species. The leaves, growing upon thick branchlets which have no fine twigs, have from 3 to 9 large leaflets set upon the end of a long stem like the spread fingers of a human hand .

13

The Atlantic Richfield Company Black Thunder mine haul road dust study. [Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of the effectiveness of various haul road dust control measures was performed at ARCO's Black Thunder Mine near Wright, Wyoming by evaluating both visible observations and quantitative measurements of particle concentrations. In order to evaluate dust control effectiveness both a 300 foot (91.5 meter) and 175 foot (53.4 meter) section of the main coal haul road was selected for testing. The test sections were separated by a 200 foot (61 meter) buffer zone. Each test section was relatively straight and away from interferences from other mine sources. The five haul road treatment test sequences evaluated for control measure effectiveness were: an untreated road segment; water treatment two times per hour; water treatment four times per hour; previously chemically treated segment of haul road (ARCO 2400 dust suppressant); and testing after application of Coherex (10% dilution). By comparing uncontrolled situations with various controlled situations, an estimate of the control efficiency of the dust control measures was determined. Based upon the results of the study a fugitive dust control scheme was selected considering control effectiveness, economics and operational efficiency.

Maxwell, D.R.; Hormel, T.R.; Ives, J.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Preliminary report on the Black Thunder, Wyoming CTBT R and D experiment quicklook report: LLNL input from regional stations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a preliminary summary of the data recorded at three regional seismic stations from surface blasting at the Black Thunder Coal Mine in northeast Wyoming. The regional stations are part of a larger effort that includes many more seismic stations in the immediate vicinity of the mine. The overall purpose of this effort is to characterize the source function and propagation characteristics of large typical surface mine blasts. A detailed study of source and propagation features of conventional surface blasts is a prerequisite to attempts at discriminating this type of blasting activity from other sources of seismic events. The Black Thunder Seismic experiment is a joint verification effort to determine seismic source and path effects that result from very large, but routine ripple-fired surface mining blasts. Studies of the data collected will be for the purpose of understanding how the near-field and regional seismic waveforms from these surface mining blasts are similar to, and different from, point shot explosions and explosions at greater depth. The Black Hills Station is a Designated Seismic Station that was constructed for temporary occupancy by the Former Soviet Union seismic verification scientists in accordance with the Threshold Test Ban Treaty protocol.

Harben, P.E.; Glenn, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mature, Senior and Geriatric Horses: Management, Care and Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas is home to about 1 million horses, the majority of them working horses, competitive event horses and pleasure/recreational riding horses. For owners of horses that have completed their growth, knowing how to take care of their older horses can mean the difference between horses that just survive or animals that thrive.

Martin, M. T.; Scrutchfield, W. L.; Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

16

Feeding Young Horses For Sound Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horse owners must decide whether their young horses will be fed for moderate or rapid growth. One concern is the occurrence of bone and joint disorders in young horses that develop rapidly. Research has shown that this and other problems can be decreased by ensuring that young horses receive proper nutrition. Specific recommendations are included for creep feeding foals and for feeding weanlings and yearlings. Nutritional levels are discussed in relation to the amount of exercise young horses receive.

Gibbs, Pete G.; Potter, Gary D.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

HorsesHorses Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service West Lafayette IN, 47907  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to on a horse facility. Estimate $7 per square foot of floor space as the absolute minimum cost for building will miss the pleasure of having your horse right outside your back door. It normally costs from $200-450 per month to board a horse, depending on the stable services. Extra care and training services

19

Horse Butte Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Butte Wind Project Horse Butte Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Horse Butte Wind Project Facility Horse Butte Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horse Butte Wind 1 LLC Developer Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems Location Bonneville ID Coordinates 43.491689°, -111.789344° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.491689,"lon":-111.789344,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

HorsesHorses Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service West Lafayette IN, 47907  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$7 per square foot of floor space as the absolute minimum cost to build an enclosed barn for horses. Cost will increase as amenities are added. Fencing Safe and adequate fencing is a vital part of a horse the paddock (fenced area), the stronger the fences need to be. Wooden fences are very eye appealing, but cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dead Horse Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Geothermal Project Dead Horse Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Dead Horse Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.896388888889°, -118.37944444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.896388888889,"lon":-118.37944444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Wild Horse and Burro Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Wild Horse and Burro Management Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

23

Energy Extraction from Horse Manure Biogas plant vs. Heating Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wången is a trotting school located in Alsen region in Mid Sweden. Currently they keep almost 105 horses in their premises, which produce 2… (more)

Moazedian, Amitis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Manhattan Project: Picking Horses, November 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

General Leslie Groves PICKING HORSES General Leslie Groves PICKING HORSES (November 1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Leslie Groves (right) moved swiftly to make good on his new timetable by scheduling a decisive meeting of the Military Policy Committee for November 12, 1942, and of the S-1 Executive Committee for November 14. The scientists at each of the institutions doing isotope separation research knew these meetings would determine the uranium-235 separation method to be used in the bomb project; therefore, the keen competition among the institutions added to the sense of urgency created by the war. Ernest Lawrence's team working on the electromagnetic method at the University of California, Berkeley, remained the most optimistic team working on uranium enrichment. The gaseous diffusion research being conducted at Columbia University continued to meet serious difficulties, but it was still considered a viable option. The big loser of the November meetings was the centrifuge process, which was finally dropped from consideration.

25

Wild Horse II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wild Horse II Wind Farm Wild Horse II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse II Wind Farm Facility Wild Horse II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Puget Sound Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Horse Hollow II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow II Wind Farm Horse Hollow II Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243826°, -100.131898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243826,"lon":-100.131898,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Complexes of Horse Heart Cytochrome c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Complexes of Horse Heart Cytochrome c: Ruthenium Bisbipyridine Complexes of Horse Heart Cytochrome c: Characterization and Comparative Intramolecular Electron Transfer Rates Determined by Pulse Radiolysis and Flash Photolysis J. Luo, K. B. Reddy, A. S. Salameh, J. F. Wishart and S. S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 39, 2321-2329 (2000) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: The reaction of [Ru(bpy)2L(H2O)]2+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, L = imidazole, water) with reduced horse heart cytochrome c results in coordination of [RuII(bpy)2L] at the His 33 and His 26 sites. Coordination at the His 33 site gave a diastereomeric [RuII(bpy)2L]-His-cyt c (II) mixture favoring the L-Ru form regardless of the substituent on the bipyridine ligands, while substitution at the more buried His 26 site gave isomeric distribution that varies according to the substituent on the bipyridine

28

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

29

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Facility Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Near Abilene TX Coordinates 32.230566°, -100.047991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.230566,"lon":-100.047991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow Expansion Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Near Abilene TX Coordinates 32.243193°, -100.265633° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243193,"lon":-100.265633,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Plasma Citrulline Levels in Horses at Risk of Acute Laminitis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laminitis is a painful and irreversible disease in horses in which the soft tissue structures of the foot, called the laminae (connecting the coffin bone to the hoof wall), lose blood flow and deteriorate. Without the support of these laminae the coffin bone rotates downward, applying pressure to the sole of the foot and crushing the underlying structures, resulting in severe pain. Laminitis typically progresses through three stages: the early developmental stage is treatable yet undetectable, while the later acute and chronic stages are symptomatic but irreversible. Therefore, the identification of a diagnostic marker capable of detecting the developmental stage would allow earlier and more effective treatment. Laminitis is often triggered by unrelated events occurring elsewhere in the body such as gastrointestinal (GI) upset episodes, typically called “colic”, which involve intestinal epithelial cell death. Human studies have concluded that intestinal epithelium health can be measured using plasma citrulline concentrations. Citrulline is an ?-amino acid circulated in the plasma that is produced mainly by intestinal epithelial cells. We hypothesized that horses in the developmental stage of laminitis would have reduced plasma citrulline concentrations resulting from intestinal epithelial cell death occurring from a GI upset episode. In this study, blood samples were collected from control horses (n=23) and horses at risk for developing laminitis (n=20). Plasma citrulline concentration was measured using chromatography based amino acid analysis. The normal range was then calculated from the control group and compared to the concentrations from horses that did or did not develop laminitis. Five of the 20 cases developed laminitis symptoms and also had reduced plasma citrulline concentrations. If decreased citrulline levels correlate with laminitis onset across a large set of samples, a simple and affordable blood test could be developed in the future to predict the likelihood of the disease progression to the acute and chronic (irreversible) stages. This would allow veterinarians to begin treatments that could significantly reduce the chance of the horse developing the condition, greatly improving their prognosis.

Jackson, Amy Lynn

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Pharmacokinetics of ranitidine HCL in horses and foals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plasma pharmacokinetics of ranitidine HCl were investigated after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration of drug to six healthy adult horses and six healthy foals. Concentrations of ranitidine were determined using normal phase high performance liquid chromatography. Adult horses received 2.2 mg/kg ranitidine PO and IV. Twelve-to sixteen-week-old foals received 2.2 mg ranitidine/kg IV and 4.4 mg ranitidine/kg PO. In adult horses, plasma concentrations of ranitidine HCl declined from a mean of 5,175 ng/ml at 5 minutes to 37 ng/ml at 720 minutes after intravenous administration. A three-exponent equation, [] best described data for all horses. Mean values for model-independent values calculated from the last quantifiable time point were: Vdss, 1.07 L/kg; AUC, 231,126 ng-min/ml; AUMC, 26,970,792 ng-min2/ml; MRT, 112.6 min; and Cl, 9.8 ml/min/kg. Following PO administration, a two-exponent equation, [] best described the data for five horses; data for the remaining horse were best described by a three-exponent equation. Mean values of pharmacokinetic values from the PO study include: AUC, 59,916 ng-min/ml; AUMC, 10,617,263 ng-min2/ml; MAT, 58.9 min; Tmax, 99.2 min; Cmax, 237.2 ng/ml; and F, 27%. In foals, concentrations of ranitidine HCl declined from a mean of 3,266 ng/ml at 5 minutes to 11 ng/ml at 720 minutes after administration. The profile of the plot of concentrations of ranitidine HCl vs. time was best described by a two-exponent equation for two foals; data for the remaining four foals were best described by a three-exponent equation. Mean values for model-independent values were: Vdss, 1.46 L/kg; AUC, 167,442 ng-min/ml; AUMC, 18,068,221 ng-min/ml; MRT, 108.9 min; and Cl, 13.3 ml/min/kg. Following PO administration, a two-exponent equation, [], best described date for five foals; data for the remaining foal were best described by a three-exponent equation. Mean values of the pharmacokinetic values from the PO study include: AUC, 126,413 ng-min/ml; AUMC, 18,038,825 ng-min2/ml; MAT, 32.0 min; Tmax, 57.2 min; Cmax, 635.7 ng/ml; and F, 38%.

Holland, Patricia Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wild Horse Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Wild Horse Wind Power Project Facility Wild Horse Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Puget Sound Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Puget Sound Energy Location Kittitas County Coordinates 47.000782°, -120.190609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.000782,"lon":-120.190609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

White Horse, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse, New Jersey: Energy Resources Horse, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.1906652°, -74.7023816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1906652,"lon":-74.7023816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Physiological responses of young thoroughbred horses to intermittent high-intensity treadmill training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age or extent of previous training in young horses or theirat the outset of the training. Endnotes a Mustang 2200,References 1. Evans DL: Training thoroughbred racehorses. In

Ohmura, Hajime; Matsui, Akira; Hada, Tetsuro; Jones, James H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Beyond injection: Trojan horse underdense photocathode plasma wakefield acceleration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview on the underlying principles of the hybrid plasma wakefield acceleration scheme dubbed 'Trojan Horse' acceleration is given. The concept is based on laser-controlled release of electrons directly into a particle-beam-driven plasma blowout, paving the way for controlled, shapeable electron bunches with ultralow emittance and ultrahigh brightness. Combining the virtues of a low-ionization-threshold underdense photocathode with the GV/m-scale electric fields of a practically dephasing-free beam-driven plasma blowout, this constitutes a 4th generation electron acceleration scheme. It is applicable as a beam brightness transformer for electron bunches from LWFA and PWFA systems alike. At FACET, the proof-of-concept experiment 'E-210: Trojan Horse Plasma Wakefield Acceleration' has recently been approved and is in preparation. At the same time, various LWFA facilities are currently considered to host experiments aiming at stabilizing and boosting the electron bunch output quality via a trojan horse afterburner stage. Since normalized emittance and brightness can be improved by many orders of magnitude, the scheme is an ideal candidate for light sources such as free-electron-lasers and those based on Thomson scattering and betatron radiation alike.

Hidding, B.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Xi, Y.; O'Shea, B.; Andonian, G.; Schiller, D.; Barber, S.; Williams, O.; Pretzler, G.; Koenigstein, T.; Kleeschulte, F.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Corde, S.; White, W. W.; Muggli, P.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Lotov, K. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany) and Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Particle Beam Physics Laboratory, Department for Physics and Astronomy, UCLA (United States); Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado (United States) and 1348 Redwood Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the interconnected Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of potential mitigation strategies. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-6.

Hansen, Barry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: New examples of the use of two-meter temperature (2m) surveys to quickly and inexpensively reveal blind geothermal systems were documented at Dead Horse Wells, the Hawthorne Army Depot, and Emerson Pass, all located in Nevada. In addition, more than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system. And at Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada,

45

Horse Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Horse Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Horse Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Horse Creek Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location North Fork, Idaho Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

46

2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Dead Horse Wells Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Background temperatures between 14.7°C and 17.7°C were encountered in the playa and are likely influenced by near-surface groundwater, as evidenced by abundant greasewood. In comparison, what we interpret as background, or near-background temperatures in the alluvial fan environment averaged about 20°C. The2-meter anomaly is characterized by temperatures up to 37°C (99°F) measured over a distance of more than 1.5 km. Lower, yet still

47

Wild Horse 69-kV transmission line environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Hill County Electric Cooperative Inc. (Hill County) proposes to construct and operate a 69-kV transmission line from its North Gildford Substation in Montana north to the Canadian border. A vicinity project area map is enclosed as a figure. TransCanada Power Corporation (TCP), a Canadian power-marketing company, will own and construct the connecting 69-kV line from the international border to Express Pipeline`s pump station at Wild Horse, Alberta. This Environmental Assessment is prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) as lead federal agency to comply with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), as part of DOE`s review and approval process of the applications filed by Hill County for a DOE Presidential Permit and License to Export Electricity to a foreign country. The purpose of the proposed line is to supply electric energy to a crude oil pump station in Canada, owned by Express Pipeline Ltd. (Express). The pipeline would transport Canadian-produced oil from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada, to Caster, Wyoming. The Express Pipeline is scheduled to be constructed in 1996--97 and will supply crude oil to refineries in Wyoming and the midwest.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Arabian Horse Populations from Syria and other Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans and horses weaved together wonderful stories of adventure and generosity. As a part of human history and civilization, Arabian horses ignite imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries. Here I explored different populations of Arabians representing Middle Eastern and Western populations. The main two aims of this study were to provide the genetic diversity description of Arabians from different origins and to examine the traditional classification system of the breed. A third aim was to tackle the distribution pattern of the genetic variability within the genome to show whether there are differences in relative variability of different types of markers. First, I analyzed the genetic structure of 537Arabian horses from seven populations by using microsatellites. The results consistently showed higher levels of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations compared to the Western populations. All American-Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations. Second, I sequenced the whole mtDNA D-loop of 251 Arabian horses. The whole D-loop sequence was more informative than using just the HVR1. Native populations from the Middle East, such as Syrian, represented a hot spot of genetic diversity. Most importantly, there was no evidence that the Arabian horse breed has clear subdivisions depending on the traditional maternal based strain classification system. Third, I tested the heterozygosity distribution pattern along the genome of 22 Peruvian Paso horses using 232 microsatellites and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The pattern of genetic diversity was completely different between these two markers where no correlation was found. Runs of homozygosity test of SNPs and associated microsatellites noticeably showed that all of associated microsatellites loci were homozygous in the matched case. The findings of this study will help in understanding the evolutionary history and developing breeding and conservation programs of horses. This study provided databases including parentage testing system and maternal lineages that will help to recover the Syrian Arabian population after the armed conflict started in Syria in 2011. The results here can be applied not only to horses, but also to other animal species with similar criteria.

Khanshour, Anas M

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Mineral balance in juvenile horses in race training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to further elucidate the requirements for Ca, P and Mg during exercise induced skeletal modeling and remodeling in juvenile racehorses. Nineteen long yearlings were fed rations containing differing amounts of Ca, P and Mg. Total collections of feces and urine were performed on days 0, 64 and 128 of the trial, and mineral absorption and retention were determined. The horses were maintained in a typical race training protocol to mimic the nutritional stresses placed on long yearlings during strenuous exercise. Calcium absorption and retention were lower (P < .05) at d 64 than d 0 and d 128. However, the efficiency of retaining absorbed Ca was higher at d 64 than d 128. Thus lower calcium retention at d 64 was due to reduced absorption. At d 64, Ca absorption and Ca retention were not maximized at Ca intake of 160 mg/kg/d. At d 128, calcium absorption was maximal at a daily intake of 124.2 mg/kg/d and retention was maximal at a daily intake of 122.7 mg/kg/d. These are 38% and 36% over current NRC (1989) recommendations respectively. Phosphorus absorption and retention were not maximized at the highest intakes fed (66 mg/kg/d) which is 32% over current NRC (1989) recommendations. Phosphorus absorption was reduced at d 64. Urinary excretion of P was least at d 128, but P retention values did not reach d 0 values by d 128. There was a trend for reduced Mg absorption at d 64, and Mg retention was significantly reduced at d 64. At d 64, Mg retention was maximized at a daily intake of 35.6 mg/kg/d which is 66% over NRC (1989) recommendations. The intake of Mg and the efficiency of Mg retention was increased from d 64 to 128, but Mg retention was not maximized even at the highest daily intake of Mg (44 mg/kg/d), over two times the current NRC (1989) recommendations. These data verify that early race training affects the dietary requirements for Ca, P and Mg. More research is needed to define these requirements exactly.

Stephens, Tonya Leigh

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Page 1 of 5 New Hampshire 4-H State Horse Advisory Council Meeting Minutes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Kentucky. Quiz Bowl: This Quiz Bowl proposal youth Quiz bowl this year is Jan 19 at Belmont Middle School. Rhiannon Beauregard, the new state Program Coordinator, 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science gave a brief Horseback Riding Instructor. National Roundup: New Hampshire was the 2012 Horse Bowl Champion Team NH Team

New Hampshire, University of

51

Molecular Studies in Horses with SRY-Positive XY Sex Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sex determination in mammals is regulated by the sex-determining region on the Y chromosome (SRY); the presence of SRY activates the male developmental pathway and suppresses the gene network necessary for female gonad development. Mutations in sex determination genes lead to various abnormal sexual phenotypes, including sex reversal syndrome in which the genetic and phenotypic sex do not match. Sex reversal syndrome has been reported in humans, mouse, and several domestic species. In horses, SRY-negative XY sex reversal syndrome has been well described and is caused by deletions on the Y chromosome. However, the molecular causes of the SRY-positive condition in horses and other mammals are not known. This research investigated five horses affected with SRY-positive XY sex reversal syndrome. Sequencing of the coding exon region of the SRY gene in the five cases showed 99-100% alignment with the sequences of normal males. Genotyping of two closely related individuals with 46 normal male controls on an equine SNP50 Beadchip identified two statistically significant SNPs in a ~16 Mb region on the long arm of horse chromosome 3 (ECA3q). The region was analyzed using Gene Ontology (GO) and Gene Relationships Across Implicated Loci (GRAIL) to select functionally relevant candidate genes for sequencing. Further analysis of the entire horse genome was done through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), which investigated possible structural rearrangements, such as copy number variants (CNVs). Deletions of olfactory receptor genes were detected on multiple chromosomes and confirmed through quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). A homozygous deletion on ECA29 in a region containing genes of the aldo-keto reductase gene family, known to play a role in interconverting sex hormones between active forms and inactive forms, was discovered in two sex reversed animals. The findings were confirmed through qPCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and experiments to define the specific breakpoints of the deletion through PCR have been initiated. This research represents the first systematic search in the horse genome for mutations and CNVs related to sex determination. The findings contribute to better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination in horses and other mammals, including humans.

Fang, Erica

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Calcium balance and bone density in immature horses fed a high protein diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies in other species indicate high protein diets increase urinary calcium (Ca) excretion and may lead to negative calcium balance and reduced bone density. As overfeeding of protein is commonplace in the horse industry, this study was undertaken to determine the effects of excess dietary protein on growth, physiologic response, mineral balance, bone density, and bone geometry in immature horses. Sixteen 10-month-old American Quarter Horses were blocked by age and sex into two dietary treatments. The control diet was formulated to provide the NRC (1989) recommended concentration of crude protein, while the high protein diet provided 130% of NRC (1989) recommendations. All other nutrients were formulated at or slightly above NRC (1989) recommendations. Blood samples, feces, and urine were collected during the 116-day study to determine any diet effect on pH and mineral balance. Radiographs were made of the left third metacarpal (MCIII) to determine bone density via radiographic bone aluminum equivalence (RBAE), and bone geometry was determined metrically from the radiographs. Urine pH decreased over time (p < 0.001), but there were no diet effects on blood pH or urine pH. Conversely, when normalized to day 0 values, fecal pH was reduced by feeding the high protein treatment (p < 0.02). Density of dorsal and palmar cortices increased over time (p < 0.001), but no differences were observed between diets. But, normalized total medial-lateral (ML) width of the MCIII was higher in the control diet (p < 0.05). Fecal Ca loss was greater in horses fed the high protein diet (p < 0.005), while Ca absorption and retention were lower for horses on the high protein treatment (p < 0.02). Phosphorus (P) balance was not different between diets, although feeding the high protein diet resulted in higher P intake overall (p < 0.001). While excess dietary protein may decrease fecal pH, increase fecal Ca excretion, and decrease Ca absorption and retention, there was no consistent effect of the high protein diet on bone density over the course of this study. Further research is necessary to determine if feeding high-protein diets is detrimental to bone quality in the growing horse.

Spooner, Holly Sue

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - CX-HorseRanchTap_FY13_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dustin Liebhaber Project Manager - TELP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Capacity Increase on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Horse Ranch Tap Line PP&A Project No.: 2,707 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Snohomish County, Washington Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new disconnect switch and associated modifications on the Horse Ranch Tap line in Snohomish County, Washington. BPA owns and maintains the line disconnect switch and the first 0.34 miles of the Tap line, while Puget Sound Energy (PSE) owns and operates the remaining 3.48 miles of the H-frame, wood

54

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Plasma concentration of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in horses following an oral dose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to study absorption of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and to measure any changes in blood concentration of these compounds following feeding them to horses in different amounts. Six mature mares were used in a replicated 3x3 Latin square designed experiment. The experiment consisted of three 15-day periods, which included 10 days of diet adaptation followed by a 5-day sampling period. Blood was drawn on one day during each sampling period. Horses were fed a control diet (40% hay, 60% concentrate) balanced to meet NRC (1989) requirements for maintenance of mature horses. In one experimental diet, 2.0 g chondroitin sulfate and 5.5 g glucosamine were added to the basal ration at each feeding. In the other experimental diet, 3.5 g chondroitin sulfate and 8.5 g glucosamine were added to the basal ration at each feeding. Following total collections, blood was centrifuged and plasma was harvested and data analyzed for the presence of each compound. Analyses for plasma glucosamine were performed in the Protein and Chemistry Lab at Texas A&M University using HPLC. Chondroitin sulfate in the plasma was analyzed using a color reagent, dimethylmethylene blue, followed by UV spectrophotometry. There were no significant differences (Pplasma when comparing the three different diets. This leads to a conclusion that these compounds were not absorbed through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream in the same form as they were fed. This poses a question as to whether or not oral forms of these compounds are absorbed and are able to migrate to joints through the blood to improve joint function. With the significant economic impact that products containing chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine are making in the animal nutrition industry, more research is needed to further elucidate actual efficacy of these compounds in diet supplements for horses.

Welch, Courtney Ann

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Page 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hitPage 1 of 16 2014 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl Date: Saturday January 25, 2014 Time: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM the day of the contest. The New Hampshire 4-H Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate

New Hampshire, University of

57

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Aquatic Modeling of the Selective Withdrawal System, Hungry Horse Dam, Montana, 1991-1993 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hungry Horse Dam presently releases frigid water from the bottom of the reservoir all year long. Cold water effects insect production and fish growth downstream. Rapid temperature changes of up to 8.3 C (14 F) have been measured in the Flathead River downstream of the South Fork confluence, controlled by dam discharges. Thermal effects from Hungry Horse Dam are detectable for over 64 Km downstream to Flathead Lake. The installation of a selective withdrawal structure on each of the dam`s discharge penstocks was determined to be the most cost-effective means to provide constant, permanent temperature control without impacting power production and flexibility in dam operation. The thermal model presented herein revealed that fish growth potential in the river would increase two to five times through selective withdrawal, temperature control. Temperature control is possible over the entire range of turbine discharge capacity, with very little effect on power production. Findings indicate that angling would improve through higher catch rates and larger fish. Temperature control will solve the most serious impact to river health. However, flow fluctuations will continue to effect insect production and usable fishery habitat in the Flathead River. A natural thermal regime combined with moderated flow fluctuation would further enhance riverine food production, trout growth and recreation potential.

Marotz, Brian L.; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Integrated high-resolution physical and comparative gene maps in horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution physically ordered gene maps for the horse (Equus caballus, ECA) are essential to the identification of genes associated with hereditary diseases and traits of interest like fertility, coat color, and disease resistance or susceptibility. Such maps also serve as foundations for genome comparisons across species and form the basis to study chromosome evolution. In this study seven equine chromosomes (ECA6, 7, 10, 15, 18, 21 and X) corresponding to human chromosomes (HSA) 2, 19 and X were selected for high-resolution mapping on the basis of their potential involvement in diseases and conditions of importance to horses. To accomplish this, gene- and sequence-specific markers were generated and genotyped on the TAMU 5000rad horse x hamster RH panel. Additionally, screening of a BAC library by overgoes and subsequent STS content mapping and fingerprinting approaches were used to assemble and verify a BAC contig along a ~5 Mb span on ECA21. Dense gene maps were generated for each of the seven equine chromosomes by adding 408 new markers (285 type I and 123 type II) to the current maps of these chromosomes, thereby greatly improving overall map resolution to one mapped marker every 960kb on average (range: 700 kb � 1.3 Mb). Moreover, the contig on ECA21 contained 47 markers (42 genes and 5 microsatellites) as well as 106 STS markers distributed along 207 BAC clones. Comparisons of these maps with other species revealed a remarkably high level of horse-human X chromosome conservation, as well as two evolutionary breakpoints unique to Perissodactyls or Equids for the equine homologues of HSA19 and HSA2, one of which has been more precisely localized by the ECA21 contig. Thus, high resolution maps developed for these chromosomes i) provide a basis to map traits of interest rapidly to specific chromosomal regions, ii) facilitate searches for candidate genes for these traits by fine comparisons of the equine regions with corresponding segments in other species, and iii) enable understanding the evolution of the chromosomes. Expansion of this work to the entire equine genome will be important for developing novel strategies for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of equine diseases.

Brinkmeyer Langford, Candice Lea

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft Word - Horse_Butte_G0374_Env_ Clearance_Doc.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amy Freel Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Cattle Creek Substation (formerly known as Horse Butte Substation) Budget Information: Work Order # 00283812 (TC AUO) and 00283765 (TC) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.11 "Construction or electric power substations (including switching stations and support facilities) with power delivery at 230-kilovolt (kV) or below, or modification (other than voltage increases) of existing substations and support facilities, ..." Location: Bonneville County, ID near Idaho Falls. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: In response to Utah Associated Municipal Power

63

Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1983 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This annual report covers the 1982-1983 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance, migration, spawning, egg incubation and fry emergence in the Flathead River system. This report also addresses the expected recovery of the mainstem kokanee population under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks in 1982.

Fraley, John J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of distortion of the intercluster motion in {sup 2}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 9}Be on Trojan horse applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deuteron induced quasifree scattering and reactions have been extensively investigated in the past few decades as well as {sup 6}Li, {sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, and {sup 9}Be induced reactions. This was done not only for the investigation of nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms but also for important astrophysical applications (Trojan horse method). In particular the widths of the spectator momentum distributions in several nuclei, which have been used as Trojan horses, have been obtained as a function of the transferred momentum. Applications of Trojan horse method will also be discussed because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the nucleus is a important input for this method. This gives hints on distortion effects at low energies important for nuclear astrophysics.

Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Blokhintsev, L. D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bertulani, C. A. [Physics Department, Texas A and M University, Commerce (United States); Irgaziev, B. F. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, District Swabi, N. W. F. P. (Pakistan)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Crystal Structures of the Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Complexes of Horse Heart Myoglobin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrite is an important species in the global nitrogen cycle, and the nitrite reductase enzymes convert nitrite to nitric oxide (NO). Recently, it has been shown that hemoglobin and myoglobin catalyze the reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions. We have determined the 1.20 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the nitrite adduct of ferric horse heart myoglobin (hh Mb). The ligand is bound to iron in the nitrito form, and the complex is formulated as Mb{sup III}(ONO{sup -}). The Fe-ONO bond length is 1.94 Angstroms, and the O-N-O angle is 113 degrees. In addition, the nitrite ligand is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with the distal His64 residue. We have also determined the 1.30 Angstroms resolution crystal structures of hh Mb{sup II}NO. When hh Mb{sup II}NO is prepared from the reaction of metMb{sup III} with nitrite/dithionite, the FeNO angle is 144 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 1.87 Angstroms. However, when prepared from the reaction of NO with reduced Mb{sup II}, the FeNO angle is 120 degrees with a Fe-NO bond length of 2.13 Angstroms. This difference in FeNO conformations as a function of preparative method is reproducible, and suggests a role of the distal pocket in hh Mb{sup II}NO in stabilizing local FeNO conformational minima.

Copeland,D.; Soares, A.; West, A.; Richter-Addo, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

%22Trojan Horse%22 strategy for deconstruction of biomass for biofuels production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of renewable biofuels to displace fossil fuels currently consumed in the transportation sector is a pressing multiagency national priority (DOE/USDA/EERE). Currently, nearly all fuel ethanol is produced from corn-derived starch. Dedicated 'energy crops' and agricultural waste are preferred long-term solutions for renewable, cheap, and globally available biofuels as they avoid some of the market pressures and secondary greenhouse gas emission challenges currently facing corn ethanol. These sources of lignocellulosic biomass are converted to fermentable sugars using a variety of chemical and thermochemical pretreatments, which disrupt cellulose and lignin cross-links, allowing exogenously added recombinant microbial enzymes to more efficiently hydrolyze the cellulose for 'deconstruction' into glucose. This process is plagued with inefficiencies, primarily due to the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, mass transfer issues during deconstruction, and low activity of recombinant deconstruction enzymes. Costs are also high due to the requirement for enzymes and reagents, and energy-intensive cumbersome pretreatment steps. One potential solution to these problems is found in synthetic biology-engineered plants that self-produce a suite of cellulase enzymes. Deconstruction can then be integrated into a one-step process, thereby increasing efficiency (cellulose-cellulase mass-transfer rates) and reducing costs. The unique aspects of our approach are the rationally engineered enzymes which become Trojan horses during pretreatment conditions. During this study we rationally engineered Cazy enzymes and then integrated them into plant cells by multiple transformation techniques. The regenerated plants were assayed for first expression of these messages and then for the resulting proteins. The plants were then subjected to consolidated bioprocessing and characterized in detail. Our results and possible implications of this work on developing dedicated energy crops and their advantage in a consolidated bioprocessing system.

Simmons, Blake Alexander; Sinclair, Michael B.; Yu, Eizadora; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Hadi, Masood Z.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, passed in 1980 by Congress, has provided a mechanism which integrates and provides for stable energy planning in the Pacific Northwest. The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council and charged the Council with developing a comprehensive fish and wildlife program to protect and enhance fish and wildlife impacted by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is one of the many agencies implementing the Council's program. The Hungry Horse Reservoir (HHR) study is part of the Council's program. This study proposes to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance principal gamefish species in Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific study objectives are: (1) Quantify the amount of reservoir habitat available at different water level elevations; (2) Estimate recruitment of westslope cutthroat trout juveniles from important spawning and nursery areas; (3) Determine the abundance, growth, distribution and use of available habitat by major game species in the reservoir; (4) Determine the abundance and availability of fish food organisms in the reservoir; (5) Quantify the seasonal use of available food items by major fish species; (6) Develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat use by fish and fish food organisms; and (7) Estimate the impact of reservoir operation on major gamefish species.

May, Bruce

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Determination of Fishery Losses in the Flathead System Resulting from the Construction of Hungry Horse Dam, 1986 Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's residential fish and wildlife plan, which is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River basin. The major goal of this study was to provide estimates of fishery losses to the Flathead system as a result of the completion of Hungry Horse Dam and to propose mitigation alternatives for enhancing the fishery. Construction of Hungry Horse Dam had the greatest adverse impacts on cutthroat and full trout from Flathead Lake and mitigative measures should be taken to offset these losses, if biologically and economically feasible. Also, other losses to fish and wildlife have been documented in the Flathead basin due to hydroelectric facilities and their operation. Some of these research projects will not be completed until 1989, when mitigation will be recommended using a basin-wide approach. Since HHR is at the headwaters of the Columbia system, mitigative measures may also affect downstream projects. Therefore, we presented an array of possible mitigation alternatives for consideration by decision-makers, with suggestions on the ones we feel are the most cost effective. Possible mitigation measures are included.

Zubik, Raymond J.; Fraley, John

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Coulomb suppression in the low-energy p-p elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here an important test of the main feature of the Trojan Horse Method (THM), namely the suppression of Coulomb effects in the entrance channel due to off-energy-shell effects. This is done by measuring the THM p-p elastic scattering via the p+d{yields}p+p+n reaction at 4.7 and 5 MeV, corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. In contrast to the on-energy-shell (OES) case, the extracted p-p cross section does not exhibit the Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude. This is confirmed by the half-off-energy shell (HOES) calculations and strengthened by the agreement with the calculated OES nuclear cross sections.

Tumino, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna 'Kore', Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l'Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Campajola, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche-Universita Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI-Debrecen (Hungary); Gialanella, L. [INFN-Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

70

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Influence of an Intra-articular Lipopolysaccharide Challenge on Markers of Inflammation and Cartilage Metabolism and the Ability of Oral Glucosamine to Mitigate these Alterations in Young Horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project established an in vivo method to identify and manipulate expression of markers of osteoarthritis (OA). Specifically, strategies that predictably induce joint inflammation to evaluate dietary methods of OA prevention in young horses have yet to be accomplished. Therefore, the 3 studies described herein were conducted to determine effectiveness of an intra-articular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge on markers of inflammation and cartilage metabolism in young horses and potential of dietary glucosamine hydrochloride (HCl) to mitigate these alterations. In the first study, horses were challenged with 0.25 ng or 0.50 ng of intra-articular LPS solution or lactated ringer’s solution (control). Injection of LPS increased inflammation based on synovial prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations. Carboxypeptide of type II collagen (CPII), a maker of type II collagen synthesis, also increased in a dose-dependent manner. However, clinical parameters of health were not influenced and remained within normal ranges. Carpal circumference increased in response to repeated arthrocentesis. Lameness scores increased with LPS injection when compared to controls. This model of joint inflammation (0.5 ng LPS) was used in the second study to evaluate potential chondroprotective effects of oral glucosamine HCl supplementation in yearling horses. Specifically, the oral absorption of glucosamine HCl versus saline was determined by nasogastric dosing and incorporation of dietary glucosamine HCl into plasma and synovial fluid over time. Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of glucosamine tended to increase over the 98-d period. In the third study, yearlings were challenged with intra-articular LPS to determine the potential of glucosamine HCl to mitigate inflammation when compared to contralateral joints. Injection of LPS increased synovial PGE2 and cartilage biomarkers CPII and collagenase cleavage neopeptide (C2C), a marker of type II collagen degradation. Oral glucosamine HCl decreased PGE2 and C2C concentrations, but increased levels of CPII. Results of these 3 studies provide a clearer understanding of joint inflammation and cartilage turnover in young horses and demonstrated a potential role of oral glucosamine to mitigate these effects and possibly prevent OA in horses.

Lucia, Jessica Lauren

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Channels and sources used to gather equine-related information by college-age horse owners and enthusiasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the equine-related topics that are important to Texas college-age horse owners and enthusiasts and the channels/sources they use to get equine-related information. Little research has focused on this group to determine their information needs. Therefore, two focus groups were conducted in 2008 in Texas with college-age horse owners and enthusiasts to conduct a needs assessment. Participants were separated into competitive and recreational groups depending on their level of participation in the industry. They were asked what topics they consider important and what channels/sources they use to gain desired information. Training was the most mentioned topic overall, and the most mentioned by recreational participants. Alternative medical treatments was the most mentioned topic by competitive participants. Competitive participants reported a smaller number of topics as important, indicating that they have specialized information needs. Recreational participants emphasized broader, less specialized topics. Participants showed an interest in relevant and controversial topics affecting the equine industry. Participants also used a combination of channels/sources and competitive and recreational participants often placed importance on different channels/sources. Face-to-face communication was important to both groups. Magazines were important to competitive participants, while the Internet was important to recreational participants. Competitive participants doubted the trustworthiness of sources available through the Internet, but wanted more reliable sources to be made available in the future. Participants preferred to get information from industry specialist sources, such as trainers, veterinarians, other owners and enthusiasts, breed associations, and equine magazines. Participants’ perceptions of trustworthiness were affected by the source’s ability to demonstrate equine-specific knowledge and the source’s reputation and success among equine industry members. The results suggests that the influence of the Internet has altered the traditional models of communication in which source selection determines channel use. In this study, the participants’ Internet channel selection often determined their source use. The results also suggests that communicators wanting to reach this audience should target specific topics to competitive and recreational audiences, use a multi-channel approach, establish trustworthiness, and explore the changing role of the Internet in agricultural communication.

Sullivan, Erin Alene

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews activities of the Hungry Horse Reservoir fisheries study from May 16-October 14, 1983. The first six months of the project were concerned with testing of equipment and developing methodologies for sampling physical-chemical limnology, fish food availability, fish food habits, seasonal distribution and abundance of fish, migration patterns of westslope cutthroat trout and habitat quality in tributary streams. Suitable methods have been developed for most aspects of the study, but problems remain with determining the vertical distribution of fish. Catch rates of fish in vertical nets were insufficient to determine depth distribution during the fall. If catches remain low during the spring and summer of 1984, experimental netting will be conducted using gang sets of standard gill nets. Purse seining techniques also need to be refined in the spring of 1984, Sample design should be completed in 1984. A major activity for the report period was preparation of a prospectus which reviewed: (1) environmental factors limiting gamefish production; (2) flexibility in reservoir operation; (3) effects of reservoir operation on fish populations and (4) model development. Production of westslope cutthroat trout may be limited by spawning and rearing habitat in tributary streams, reservoir habitat suitability, predation during the first year of reservoir residence and fish food availability. Reservoir operation affects fish production by altering fish habitat and food production through changes in reservoir morphometrics such as surface area, volume, littoral area and shoreline length. The instability in the fish habitat caused by reservoir operation may produce an environment which is suitable for fish which can utilize several habitat types and feed upon a wide variety of food organisms. Analysis of factors governing reservoir operation indicated that some flexibility exists in Hungry Horse operation. Changes in operation to benefit gamefish populations would have little impact on total power production, but would entail shifts in the generation schedule. We hope to develop, in cooperation with the USGS, a model which will predict the effects of reservoir operation on fish production. The model will have a food component based on energy flow through successive trophic levels to fish and a habitat component based on habitat availability and habitat preferences of species by life-stage.

May, Bruce

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Flathead Lake Angler Survey; Monitoring Activities for the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Plan, 1992-1993 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana from May 17, 1992 to May 19, 1993. The primary objective of the survey was to quantify the baseline fishery and exploitation rates existing prior to Hungry Horse Dam mitigation efforts. Anglers were counted on 308 occasions, comprising 5,618 fishing boats, 515 shore anglers, and 2,191 ice anglers. The party interviews represented 4,410 anglers, made up of 2,613 boat anglers, 787 shore anglers, and 1,010 ice anglers. A total of 47,883 angler days (190,108 angler hours) of pressure and a harvest of 42,979 fish (including lake trout, lake whitefish, yellow perch, bull trout, and westslope cutthroat trout) were estimated. Pressure was distributed between shore, boat, and ice anglers as 4%, 87%, and 9%, respectively. Seventynine percent of the total effort was directed at lake trout during the study period. Limited comparisons were made to previous creel surveys on Flathead Lake due to differences in methods and radical changes in the fishery. Potential sources of bias are explained in detail. Future creel surveys must employ methods consistent with this survey to obtain estimates that are statistically distinguishable.

Evarts, Les; Hansen, Barry; DosSantos, Joe (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1984 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assessed the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This report covers the 1983-84 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance and reproductive success in the upper Flathead River system. This report also addresses the projected recovery of the main stem kokanee run under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and implemented by the Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration in 1982. An estimated 58,775 kokanee reached spawning grounds in the Flathead River System in 1983. The 1983 spawning run was composed of 92% age III + fish, as compared to an average of 80% from 1972-1983. A total of 6883 kokanee redds were enumerated in the main stem Flathead River in 1983. A total of 2366 man-days of angling pressure was estimated during the 1983 kokanee lure fishery in the Flathead River system. Estimated numbers of fry emigrating from McDonald Creek, the Whitefish River and Brenneman's Slough were 13,100,000, 66,254 and 37,198, yielding egg to fry survival rates of 76%, 10.4% and 19.2%.

Fraley, John J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Astrophysical S(E) factor of the (15)N(p, alpha)(12)C reaction at sub-Coulomb energies via the Trojan horse method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low-energy bare-nucleus cross section for (15)N(p, alpha)(12)C is extracted by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the (2)H((15)N,alpha(12)C)n reaction at E(beam) = 60 MeV. For the first time we applied the modified half-off-energy-shell resonant R-matrix method that takes into account off-energy-shell effects and initial- and final-state interactions. In particular it has been shown that inclusion of Coulomb (15)N-d scattering and off-shell effects do not affect the determination of the astrophysical factor. Also the simple plane-wave approximation used in previous analyses is justified. The results extracted via the Trojan horse method are compared to direct data in the same energy region and show very good agreement in the energy interval 70-312 keV. These results confirm the extrapolations of the S factor reported in literature.

La Cognata, M.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Fu, Changbo; Goldberg, V. Z.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Schmidt, D.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Irgaziev, B. F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

Clancy, Patrick

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source ............................. 30 Figure 2: Gasoline and CNG Prices by Gasoline Gallon Equivalent ................................................ 64 Figure 3: Diesel and CNG Prices by Diesel Gallon Equivalent ..................................................................... 102 Figure 5: Historical E85 Stations and E85 Sales Volume

80

Quantification of Hungry Horse Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries; Methods and Data, 1983-1987 Summary Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hungry Horse Reservoir study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife plan. The plan is responsible for mitigating damages to the fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The major goal of our study is to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery. This study began in May, 1983, and the initial phase will be completed July, 1988. This report summarizes limnological, fish abundance, fish distribution and fish food habits data collected from 1983 to 1988. The effect of reservoir operation upon fish habitat, fish food organisms and fish growth is discussed. 71 refs., 36 figs., 46 tabs.

May, Bruce; Michael, Gary; Wachsmuth, John (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

AN UPDATED {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD  

SciTech Connect

The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. {sup 6}Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low {sup 6}Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of {sup 6}Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U{sub e} . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U{sub e} value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the {sup 2}H({sup 6}Li, {alpha} {sup 3}He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T{sub 9} and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of kokanee reproductive success in the Flathead system from 1981 to 1987 have assessed the losses in fish production attributable to hydroelectric operations. We estimated that the Flathead Lake shoreline spawning stock has lost at least 50,000 fish annually, since Kerr Dam was completed in 1938. The Flathead River spawning stock has lost 95,000 spawners annually because of the operations of Hungry Horse Dam. Lakeshore spawning has been adversely affected because Flathead Lake has been drafted to minimum pool during the winter when kokanee eggs are incubating in shallow shoreline redds. Egg mortality from exposure and desiccation of kokanee redds has increased since the mid 1970's. When the lake was drafted more quickly and held longer at minimum pool. Escapement surveys in the early 1950's, and a creel survey in the early 1960's have provided a baseline to which the present escapement levels can be compared, and loss estimated. Main stem Flathead River spawning has also declined since the mid 1970's when fluctuating discharge from Hungry Horse Dam during the spawning and incubation season exposed redds at the river margin and increased mortality. This decline followed an increase in main stem spawning in the late 1950's through the mid 1960's attributable to higher winter water temperature and relatively stable discharge from Hungry Horse Dam. Spawning escapement in the main stem exceeded 300,000 kokanee in the early 1970's as a result. Spawning in spring-influenced sites has comprised 35 percent of the main stem escapement from 1979 to 1986. We took that proportion of the early 1970's escapement (105,000) as the baseline against which to measure historic loss. Agricultural and suburban development has contributed less significantly to degradation of kokanee spawning habitat in the river system and on the Flathead Lake shoreline. Their influence on groundwater quality and substrate composition has limited reproductive success in few sites. Studies of the effects of hydroelectric operations on the reproductive success of kokanee in the Flathead system have been ongoing since 1980. Results of these studies have been published in a series of annual progress reports which are detailed in Appendix G. The reports summarize spawning site inventories and spawning escapement, egg and alevin mortality rates and the mechanisms by which water level fluctuations influence mortality, creel surveys, and investigation of the population dynamics of Flathead kokanee. The Region 1 offices of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks distribute this material to the scientific community and the general public. Until recently, it was considered feasible to recover losses to the Flathead kokanee fishery by enhancing and diversifying natural reproduction. But the establishment of opossum shrimp (M. relicta) in Flathead Lake has reduced the availability of zooplankton forage in the spring and summer, and may reduce the viability of juvenile kokanee. In 1986, research was redirected to quantify this competitive interaction and to investigate artificial means of enhancing the kokanee fishery. The average density of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake has increased to 108/m{sup 2} in 1987, and at some locations density exceeds 500/m2. Mysid grazing pressure has delayed the pulse of zooplankton production in the spring and reduced zooplankton standing crop in the summer. Cladocerans such as Daphnia thorata, the preferred food of kokanee of all ages, are the most markedly affected species. The peak density of D. thorata in the summer has declined from 4.8/liter in 1983 to O.9/liter in 1987. Growth rates of underyearling and yearling kokanee have declined, apparently as a result of the reduction in their food supply. Spawning escapement has also declined, falling from 150,000 in 1985. to 25,000 in 1986, to 600 in 1987. Fry-to-adult survival has declined from 2.5 percent to near zero. The causes of high mortality, and which age-classes are most susceptible, are not completely understood, but the observed decline in juvenile growth rate impl

Beattie, Will; Zubik, Raymond; Clancey, Patrick

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Plumpton College Horse riding displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& sales · Metalsmithing · Gun dogs Ditchling Road, Plumpton, Nr Lewes, East Sussex BN7 3AE Email & refreshments · Dog grooming · Falconry · Sheep shearing · Wine tasting & wine sales · Fun dog show · Plant sales · Clay pigeon shooting · Terrier racing · Climbing wall · Sport/outdoor activities · Floristry

Bontcheva, Kalina

87

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Crazy Horse Landfill Site in Salinas, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Crazy Horse Landfill site in Salinas, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, operation and maintenance requirements, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Integrated Ferroelectrics, 71: 221232, 2005 Copyright Taylor & Francis Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is higher than for the Thunder pieces, rendering the samples prone to depoling. The displacement loop

Mossi, Karla

89

Sandia National Laboratories Trojan Horse Project: Biorefinery ...  

bio-processing system Laura Santos | 925.294.1214 | lesanto@sandia.gov BENEFITS Significant reduction in the cost and complexity of the processes to ...

90

Trojan Horse Project - Energy Innovation Portal  

Significant reduction in the cost and complexity of the processes to deconstruct biomass for biofuels processing;

91

New Hampshire "4-H Horse of the Year" Peter Stone Model Horse Contest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard Rhiannon.Beauregard@unh.edu Moiles House 180 Main Street Durham, NH 03824-2536 Questions? Call

New Hampshire, University of

92

Microsoft Word - G0374 Horse Butte CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clearence Memorandum Clearence Memorandum Cherilyn C. Randall - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Birch Creek Radio Tower Budget Information: Work Order #257258 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021: B4.6 "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the presviously developed facility area including... replacement of poles..." Location: Bonneville County, ID - Section 2, Township 2 South, Range 41 East of the Heise SE Quadrangle Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to install a new 50-ft radio tower within the existing Birch Creek Radio Station property in order to communicate with Utah Associated Municipal

93

4-H Horse Advisory Committee 23 February 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Please join/friend for this information (Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal Science Group). Funding

New Hampshire, University of

94

NEW HAMPSHIRE 4-H HORSE PROGRAM Cover Design Contest 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promotion. State 4-H Office Address: Rhiannon Beauregard, Program Coordinator UNH Cooperative Extension

New Hampshire, University of

95

Page 1 of 4 2013 NH HORSE AD BOOKLET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or Rhiannon Beauregard, New Hampshire 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator at (603) 862-2188 or Rhiannon.Beauregard@unh.edu. 1. Promote the ad campaign within your county - Work with your Extension. Send all materials to Rhiannon Beauregard (see below) by May 17, 2013. You will need to include a copy

New Hampshire, University of

96

TROJAN HORSE PROJE T: IOREFINERY IN A PLANT  

Synthetic biology not conducted on food-source plants Enzyme will not be expressed in the grain, only in stalks and leaves

97

Automated extraction and classification of thunderstorm and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... found that thunder- storms dominated the wind climate in West Texas. ... may be unrealistically long, suggest- ing that intermediate beginning and ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Comes the Thunder: Precursors to Local Rainfall in the West African Monsoon Download a printable PDF Submitter: Roeder, L. R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of...

99

Europe's Horse Meat Scandal Casts Light on Food Taboo1 Horse meat is taboo in some cultures, standard in others.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, chicken, and cow a part of your diet, there's a feeling10 that there's just something wrong about eating's healthy qualities: it's low fat, low cholesterol, and high in iron. Los Angeles-born food historian32

South Bohemia, University of

100

DON'T LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH? PROBLEMATIC DONATIONS TO THE SMITHSONIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a gift in return--a must in Muslim society--Jackson stated he could not accept gifts as the U.S as jewelry, 1955 #12;2 had presented a magnificent lion and lioness to the U.S. Consulate for President Van to the U.S. from the Imaum of Muscat. In April of 1840, the ship Sultanee, or Al-Sultana, arrived in New

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Horses and Barn Doors: Evolution of Corporate Guidelines for Internet Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intel's Internet usage policy evolved from paractically non-existant to explicitly defined - all in reaction to changing conditions and security threats. This paper covers the evolution of Intel Internet access policy, a continual struggle to close the ...

Sally Hambridge; Jeffrey C. Sedayao

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system. And at Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada,...

103

The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Adkins, B.S. (WVU Inst. of Tech.). Mine foreman training, Surface and underground apprentice training

Mohaghegh, Shahab

104

Page 1 of 16 2013 NH 4-H Horse Quiz Bowl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Location: Belmont Middle School, 38 School Street, Belmont NH 03220 Deadline Quiz Bowl is an event where youth demonstrate their knowledge of equine science in a contest similar to high school quiz bowls. Teams of four race to hit their buzzers and answer equine-related questions

New Hampshire, University of

105

Page 1 of 7 2013 NH 4-H HORSE QUIZ BOWL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at http://extension.unh.edu/4H/NH4-HHorseProject.htm or by sending an Excel document to Rhiannon.Beauregard

New Hampshire, University of

106

The cart before the horse? National noise policy for hybrid and electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the federal government proceeds to define noise policy for hybrid and electric vehicles questions are being raised about the adequacy of information and science behind that policy. This paper identifies information required to produce effective noise policy for hybrid and electric vehicles and examines federal policy with respect to those requirements. What do we need to know? What do we know? And most importantly

Dennis Weidemann; Leslie D. Blomberg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Taming Wild Horses: The Need for Virtual Time-based Scheduling of VMs in Network Simulations  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of scalable network simulators employ virtual machines (VMs) to act as high-fidelity models of traffic producer/consumer nodes in simulated networks. However, network simulations could be inaccurate if VMs are not scheduled according to virtual time, especially when many VMs are hosted per simulator core in a multi-core simulator environment. Since VMs are by default free-running, on the outset, it is not clear if, and to what extent, their untamed execution affects the results in simulated scenarios. Here, we provide the first quantitative basis for establishing the need for generalized virtual time scheduling of VMs in network simulators, based on an actual prototyped implementations. To exercise breadth, our system is tested with multiple disparate applications: (a) a set of message passing parallel programs, (b) a computer worm propagation phenomenon, and (c) a mobile ad-hoc wireless network simulation. We define and use error metrics and benchmarks in scaled tests to empirically report the poor match of traditional, fairness-based VM scheduling to VM-based network simulation, and also clearly show the better performance of our simulation-specific scheduler, with up to 64 VMs hosted on a 12-core simulator node.

Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL; Henz, Brian J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety Lightning: What You Need to Know * NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area * If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough...

109

Ruffed Grouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

like distant thunder, and ends as a rapid whir. Every few minutes, for hours at a time, a cock performs day after day, and often spring after spring, on his favorite drumming spot...

110

A Study of Tornadic Thunderstorm Interactions with Thermal Boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been frequently observed that thunderstorms which interact with a warm front, or an old thunder-storm outflow boundary, are likely to increase in severity and become tornadic. The physical mechanisms responsible for this observed ...

Robert A. Maddox; L. Ray Hoxit; Charles F. Chappell

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Lake-Effect Snowstorms in Northern Utah and Western New York with and without Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lake-effect snowstorms in northern Utah and western New York with and without lightning/thunder are examined. Lake-effect snowstorms with lightning have significantly higher temperatures and dewpoints in the lower troposphere and significantly ...

David M. Schultz

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Thunderstorm Interactive Forecast System: Turning Automated Thunderstorm Tracks into Severe Weather Warnings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has developed a new tool called the Thunderstorm Interactive Forecast System (TIFS; formerly known as ThunderBox) for interactively producing finished severe weather warnings and other forecasts from ...

John Bally

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NextPrevious | Home Logon Register Forums IT Talk Shop Chat Blogs Vendors Jobs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a very Future space robots may think for themselves amitsayal -7/7/2008 Add Comment Future space robots may think for themselves A spaceship descends with a thunderous roar and deposits a futuristic probe

Arizona, University of

114

Wyoming produces almost as much coal as the next seven states ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Black Thunder Mine led production with a total of 116.2 million short tons, followed by the North Antelope Rochelle Mine, with production of 105.8 million short tons.

115

Relations of Thunderstorms and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal and spatial relationships between thunderstorms (events) and flashes were investigated using data for 1983–85 for 25 first-order stations (10 in the West and 15 along the East Coast). Thunder events were compared with flashes within ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Importance of Cloud Top Lifetime in the Description of Natural Cloud Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical and dynamical characteristics of 156 natural summer cumulus clouds have been documented for three locations in North America: Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Thunder Bay, Ontario; and Miles City, Montana. The measurements (...

Robert S. Schemenauer; G. A. Isaac

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Bankruptcy Treatment of Intellectual Property Assets: An Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Wing v. Comm'r of Internal Revenue, 278 F.2d 656, 661 (Fawick v. Comm'r of Internal Revenue, 436 F.2d 655, 662 (6thunder Article 9. The Internal Revenue Service later executed

Menell, Peter S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Glossary Term - Thor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalus Previous Term (Tantalus) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Titans) Titans Thor In Norse mythology, Thor is the god of thunder and the son of Odin and Earth. Thor possesses a...

120

People's Physics Book Ch 11-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the towers are equally spaced, and that the central support is equidistant from both middle towers. The best's say on a cool night (air temperature 10° Celsius) you see lightning flash and then hear the thunder

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tobacco Control Policy Making in Montana 1979-2005: Falling Off the Horse at the Finish Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rep. Jesse Laslovich (D-Anaconda) questioned whether thea deal with B utte and Anaconda legislators to help the mRep. Jesse Lasolovich, (D-Anaconda) admitted that he was

Torrijos, Randy JD; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

2013 New Hampshire 4-H Horse Judging Contest DATE: April 20, 2013 TIME: 8:30 AM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-18). Please contact Rhiannon.Beauregard@unh.edu. REASONS DIVISION: Senior Division: Youth ages 14 -18 Rhiannon.Beauregard@unh.edu. NON-REASONS DIVISION: Youth ages 12-18 years of age on January 1. College-18). Please contact Rhiannon.Beauregard@unh.edu. #12;2 of 13 Youth with special needs (physical, learning, etc

New Hampshire, University of

123

Tobacco Control Policy Making in Montana 1979-2005: Falling Off the Horse at the Finish Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Record 19 Sep 2000. 145. Mclaughlin K. Smoking HotlineRecord 30 Dec 168. Mclaughlin K. Gov Rips Tobacco Opponents.1 February 2001. 174. Mclaughlin K. Panel Nixes Tobacco

Torrijos, Randy JD; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Hungry Horse Dam. Description: Hungry Horse Dam, on Montana's Flathead River, helped to pave the way for using fly ash in concrete. ...

125

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE - Lightning Safety Lightning: What You Need to Know * NO PLACE outside is safe when thunderstorms are in the area!! * If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. * When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter: a substantial building with electricity or plumbing or an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle with windows up. * Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last sound of thunder. Indoor Lightning Safety * Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity. * Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. * Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. * Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls.

126

EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to increase testing and training activities and expansion of operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico More Documents & Publications EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment Federal Register Notice: National Nuclear Security Administration Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

127

EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico Under the Proposed Action, the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range expansion would include approximately 1,680 acres of US Air Force-owned land located in the southwest corner of the Coyote Test Field, adjacent to TA-III. DOE/EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment for the Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (April 2008) More Documents & Publications EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0281: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact

128

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

129

Revised 12/2012 JULIA M. WONDOLLECK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1987; updated 2002 and 2012. "Designing a Collaborative Process: The Proposed Thunder Bay National. Contributor, NEPA Pilot Projects Initiative, US Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution and the Udall Assessment Group: A Case Study of a Large-Scale Data Negotiation." 2000. Sumrall, Kristin. "Confronting

Edwards, Paul N.

130

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 2, appendices. Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefaction experiments were undertaken using subbituminous Black Thunder mine coal to observe the effects of aqueous SO{sub 2} coal beneficiation and the introduction of various coal swelling solvents and catalyst precursors. Aqueous SO{sub 2} beneficiation of Black Thunder coal removed alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, increased the sulfur content and increased the catalytic liquefaction conversion to THF solubles compared to untreated Black Thunder coal. The liquefaction solvent had varying effects on coal conversion, depending upon the type of solvent added. The hydrogen donor solvent, dihydroanthracene, was most effective, while a coal-derived Wilsonville solvent promoted more coal conversion than did relatively inert 1-methylnaphthalene. Swelling of coal with hydrogen bonding solvents tetrahydrofuran (THF), isopropanol, and methanol, prior to reaction resulted in increased noncatalytic conversion of both untreated and SO{sub 2} treated Black Thunder coals, while dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which was absorbed more into the coal than any other swelling solvent, was detrimental to coal conversion. Swelling of SO{sub 2} treated coal before liquefaction resulted in the highest coal conversions; however, the untreated coal showed the most improvements in catalytic reactions when swelled in either THF, isopropanol, or methanol prior to liquefaction. The aprotic solvent DMSO was detrimental to coal conversion.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

PRB rail loadings shatter record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rail transport of coal in the Powder River Basin has expanded, with a record 2,197 trains loaded in a month. Arch Coal's Thunder basin mining complex has expanded by literally bridging the joint line railway. The dry fork mine has also celebrated its safety achievements. 4 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Assessment of the Quality of Thunderstorm Data at First-Order Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological assessments of past fluctuations in thunderstorms and other weather extremes require high-quality records. Data on thunder-day occurrences exist at U.S. first-order stations (FOS) since 1894 and represent the only long-term data ...

Stanley A. Changnon

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Pingin' in the rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential Internet connections are susceptible to weather-caused outages: Lightning and wind cause local power failures, direct lightning strikes destroy equipment, and water in the atmosphere degrades satellite links. Outages caused by severe events ... Keywords: ThunderPing, outage, ping, weather

Aaron Schulman; Neil Spring

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

RESERVOIR INFLOW FORECASTING USING NEURAL NETWORKS CHANDRASHEKAR SUBRAMANIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or over predicting electricity demand due to poor weather forecasts is several hundred million dollars outages that many in the area experienced. Deep Thunder can also improve generation-side load forecasting by providing high-resolution weather forecast data for use in electricity demand forecast models. Integrating

Manry, Michael

135

Entertainment Tech & science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Space Gadgets Internet Wireless Security Games Innovation Travel Weather Local news Browse Video Meet the Press MSNBC TV NBC Sports search site web Future space robots may think for themselves:13 a.m. PT, Sat., July. 5, 2008 A spaceship descends with a thunderous roar and deposits a futuristic

Arizona, University of

136

FOCUSFOCUSCollege of Engineering and Physical Sciences February 2004, VOL. 24, NO. 2 SUPPORT THE KINGSBURY RENOVATION PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of modern, usable space. The state legislature provided $44.6 million for the project two years ago and UNH in nearby Parsons, and Dean Arthur Greenberg jokingly likened the thunderous roar to the opening salvos and the library storage space on Leavitt Lane, but everything that was available before the move is still

Pohl, Karsten

137

Remember Me No account?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spaceship descends with a thunderous roar and deposits a futuristic probe before taking off again, ... Pasadena (California, United States) Artificial Intelligence & Robotics, Astronomy & Space Science, Physics hours ago - AeroMorning] Entities: Payload, The Boeing Company, Means of Transport, Space Tourism First

Arizona, University of

138

Relationships between Thunderstorms and Cloud-to-Ground Lightning in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from networks of lightning sensors operated during 1986?89 were employed to perform climatic assessments of cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes, and of the relationship between CG flashes and thunder events, as reported at 62 first-order stations. ...

Stanley A. Changnon

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Design and development of an automated acoustic based jet engine performance evaluator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft jet engines produce loud thundering sound that is caused due to high rate of fuel-air combustion. However due to improper combustion caused by non proportional air-fuel ratios, malfunction of fuel feed or any other loose gauging, certain abnormal ...

Atif Bin Mansoor; Hammad Ahmed; Z. Mahmood

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Winter Mesocyclone over the Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diagonostic analysis is made of a midwinter mesoscale vortex that developed over the Mississippi Valley and produced moderate to heavy snow with gale force winds (>18 m s?1), lightning, and thunder along a narrow track approximately 1500 km in ...

Boniface J. Mils; John E. Walsh

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PUTTING THE CART BEFORE THE HORSE : E-Money and Regulation in the EU: Lessons from Japan. What Does the Future Hold for E-Money in Europe?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??While regulation is not the only factor responsible for the development of the e-money market, it is generally believed that the original E-Money Directive in… (more)

Boiadjiev, Stanislav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproduction Success of Kokanee in the Flathead River System, 1986 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1985 kokanee spawning run in the Flathead system was the strongest in five years. Escapement to the Flathead River system was 147,000 fish, including 123,000 in McDonald Creek and an estimated 20,000 in the main stem. Enumeration of spawners and redds in the Flathead River was hindered by high fall flows and early freezing in November. The upstream spawning migration from Flathead Lake began in late August. Schools of kokanee were seen six miles above the lake on September 4. We counted 1,156 redds in Flathead Lake, distributed primarily along the southeastern shore. An unusually high proportion (90 percent) of lakeshore spawning occurred in the zone above minimum pool, where egg mortality is very high because of exposure from drawdown. Escapement to the Swan River was 1,350 fish. Four year old (III+) fish comprised 95 percent of the spawning run in the Flathead system. This continues a five-year trend toward dominance of the III+ year class. The age composition of spawners has varied considerably for the past 15 years. The average size of spawning fish was 365 mm, which is identical to the average size of the parent year class in 1981. One of the goals of managing Flathead kokanee is to produce mature fish 300-330 mm in length. In the main stem Flathead River, pre-emergent survival was 80 percent. Survival in McDonald Creek, unaffected by hydroelectric operations, was 83 percent. Sampling showed few hatched alevins, probably due to unusually cold winter temperatures. Egg survival at Blue Bay, a spawning area on Flathead Lake where redds are concentrated below minimum pool, varied in relation to depth and dissolved oxygen concentration in the substrate. Eggs survived 78 days at 2,880 feet where dissolved oxygen was 5.7 mg/l. Eggs survived 35 days at 2,870 feet where dissolved oxygen concentration averaged 2.9 mg/l. Low dissolved oxygen contributed to poor survival to emergence at all elevations in Blue Ray. Experiments in Skidoo Bay confirmed that survival of eggs above minimum pool depends on redds being wetted by groundwater seeps. After 40 days exposure by drawdown, eggs in groundwater seeps showed 86 percent survival, whereas outside of the groundwater seeps eggs survived less than six days. These results confirm that exposure by drawdown is the primary factor that limits kokanee reproductive success in redds above minimum pool. We surveyed the west and south shoreline of Flathead Lake to locate potential kokanee spawning habitat. We found conditions which could support incubating eggs at two sites in South Ray and two sites on the west shore of the lake. Seven other sites on the west shore were not suitable due to low groundwater discharge or low dissolved oxygen. In all these areas suitable substrate existed only within the drawdown zone. The lake should be drafted earlier in the fall, and filled earlier in the spring to improve recruitment from lakeshore spawning. We conducted creel surveys during 1985, and estimated that anglers caught 192,000 kokanee. Anglers harvested 49,200 fish during the ice fishery in Skidoo Bay, 129,000 fish during the summer fishery on the lake, and 13,800 during the fall river fishery. Estimated fishing pressure for the year exceeded 188,000 angler hours. The abundance of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake, measured at six index stations, increased to 130/mIf in 1986. My&Is increased tenfold from 1984 to 1985, and about threefold from 1985 to 1986. Monitoring of mysid shrimp and zooplankton populations in Flathead Lake is supplementing an investigation of the growth and survival of juvenile kokanee. Kokanee and mysid shrimp feed primarily on planktonic crustaceans. This work was designed to detect a potential decline in kokanee recruitment or growth brought about by competitive interaction with mysid shrimp. Fluctuation in adult kokanee year class strength is in part attributable to the negative effects of hydroelectric dam operation on reproductive success in the main stem Flathead River and in Flathead Lake. Our results show that egg survival in the river has improved in response to sta

Beattie, Will; Clancey, Patrick

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

You can lead a horse to water... Are clinical students getting the message about the library and information skills support that is available?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subscription resources via Google Scholar which would have not otherwise been available. There was a mixed reaction to the use of multiple "gateways" to online resources (e.g. library catalogue versus list of databases versus links from department website... to contact the librarian as a source of support – they didn’t have time to “waste”. This was in direct comparison with the very few undergraduate students who identified librarians as a source of either recommendations, or of help in searching...

Kuhn, Isla; Edwards-Waller, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Measurement of the 20 and 90 keV Resonances in the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N Reaction via the Trojan Horse Method  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of primary importance in several astrophysical scenarios, including fluorine nucleosynthesis inside asymptotic giant branch stars as well as oxygen and nitrogen isotopic ratios in meteorite grains. Thus the indirect measurement of the low energy region of the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction has been performed to reduce the nuclear uncertainty on theoretical predictions. In particular the strength of the 20 and 90 keV resonances has been deduced and the change in the reaction rate evaluated.

La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and DMFCI Universita di Catania, 95123 Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, 77843 Texas (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi (23640), NWFP Pakistan (Pakistan); Coc, A. [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France)] (and others)

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Imagining Chivalry: Charles V's Suits of Steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Museum of Art, _____. The Armored Horse in Europe 1480-1620.9. bard, as well as the armored reins and stirrups are alllight horse armor, and armored caparison protecting the

Machado, Erin Jeannine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microsoft Word - Document1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feed Contaminants and Additives Potentially Toxic to Horses Don Kapper, Senior Vice President, Buckeye Nutrition Feed additives and contaminants that can have toxic or undesirable effects in a horse's diet should be of interest to the fee

147

Citrus Offers Year-Round Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to foliar nutrient sprays (compost, manure teas, guanos, andmanure/ year • 1–2 barrows compost/year • 1–2 barrows horse0.50–0.75% N content for compost and horse manure, 1.5–2.0%

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Cambridge 800th Anniversary Campaign Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd The Horse Trust Mary V Insall Dr Sidney Kenderdine Richard King Eashwar Viswanathan

Travis, Adrian

149

The Cambridge 800th Anniversary Campaign Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stella Ho F Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd The Horse Trust Mary V Insall Johnson Matthey plc Dr Sidney Kenderdine

Keeler, James

150

Frostbite Theater - Static Electricity Experiments - Opposites Attract and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Behind the Scenes Behind the Scenes Previous Video (Behind the Scenes) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Thunder and Lightning) Thunder and Lightning Opposites Attract and Likes Repel An electroscope can be used to show that opposite electric charges attract and like electric charges repel. [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: I'm sure you all know that opposite charges attract and like charges repel, but have you ever seen it? If not, we can show you with these things! Steve: These devices are called electroscopes. They're made from a little clippy thing and two pieces of plastic. If Joanna and I take our fingers and scrape them against the plastic

151

Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1992--December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactivity of the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid component of Wilsonville recycle oil (WRO) during liquefaction of Black Thunder coal in tetralin was determined at 415{degrees}C and 60 minutes. The liquefaction runs were made by combining this material with Black Thunder coal at the same ratio used in the WRO coal runs. THF conversion and product distribution from liquefaction in tetralin in the presence of the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid were similar to results from liquefaction in WRO. THF conversion was greater than loot with an oil yield that was somewhat higher than in WRO. Differences in HC gas yield and H{sub 2} consumption were slight, while conversion and product distribution from liquefaction of Black Thunder coal in tetralin or in the WRO distillate were quite different. In both these solvents the 85--86% THF conversions were less than for runs in which the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid was present. This establishes that the THF insoluble fraction of the ashy resid is the reactive fraction of the WRO.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Attitude Adjustment: Trojans and Malware on the Internet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 13. 1999. Both back-doors and do-it-yourself Trojan horse "kits" are likely to increase as threats for some time. Active ...

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

153

Microevolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have been created by man since he began manipulating his environment. Consider domestic cats, dogs, cows, pigs, horses, wheat, rice, and corn. New species of bacteria are created...

154

Full Size Image - Energy Innovation Portal  

Trojan Horse Project Biorefinery in a Plant. Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of ...

155

Solar Power in the Desert: Are the current large-scale solar developments really improving California’s environment?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jenerette. 2010. Box 11: Two paths towards solar energy:Photovoltaic vs Solar Thermal. In: Planetary Stewardship.government betting on the wrong solar horse. Natural Gas &

Allen, Michael F.; McHughen, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Available Technologies - lbl.gov  

Joints, brain, prostate, heart, lungs (may be used with hyperpolarized noble gas) Mobile MRI scanners; Large objects (e.g., racing horses or other ...

157

DFKI and University of Kaiserslautern Participation at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... animal dog cat horse birds - Asian People aisan -hot -sexy -bikini People&Blog & Entertainment Bicycling riding bicycle fahrrad Sports Boat Ship ...

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Anaerobic digestion of equine waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goals of this project were to determine the methane production potential of horse manure during anaerobic digestion; to examine the effect of softwood chip… (more)

Wartell, Brian A., 1984-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Manhattan Project: CP-1 Drawing  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Drawing of CP-1 Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > Picking Horses, November 1942 Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > Production Reactor (Pile) Design, Met Lab,...

160

CX-010736: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010736: Categorical Exclusion Determination Capacity Increase on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Horse Ranch Tap Line CX(s)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SwA Overview Briefing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 8. Automation is one piece ... Network Device ... distributed attack tools increase in wide-scale Trojan horse distribution Windows-based remote ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Investigations into the biology and genetics of Cylicocyclus nassatus as relating to the mechanism of action and selection for resistance to avermectin-milbemycin anthelmintics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this dissertation were to study the feasibility of using Drenchrite® bioassay for the diagnosis of anthelmintic resistance in horse parasitic nematodes, determine… (more)

TANDON, RITESH

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

USDOE/EPRI BIOMASS COFIRING COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period of April 1, 2000 through June 30, 2000, alternatives for relocating the Seward Generating Station cofiring project were investigated. A test was conducted at Bailly Generating Station of Northern Indiana Public Service Co., firing a blend of Black Thunder (Powder River Basin) coal and Illinois basin coal, in cyclone boiler designed for Illinois basin coal. This test at Bailly was designed to determine the technical feasibility of cofiring at that station using PRB coals. This report summarizes the activities during the second calendar quarter in 2000 of the USDOE/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. It focuses upon reporting the results of construction and testing activities at these generating stations.

E. Hughes; D. Tillman

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This is the first Annual Technical Report of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. Activities from the first three quarters of the fiscal 1998 year were reported previously as Quarterly Technical Progress Reports (DOE/PC93054-57, DOE/PC93054-61, and DOE/PC93054-66). Activities for the period July 1 through September 30, 1998, are reported here. This report describes CONSOL's characterization of process-derived samples obtained from HTI Run PB-08. These samples were derived from operations with Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal, simulated mixed waste plastics, and pyrolysis oils derived from waste plastics and waste tires. Comparison of characteristics among the PB-08 samples was made to ascertain the effects of feed composition changes. A comparison also was made to samples from a previous test (Run PB-06) made in the same processing unit, with Black Thunder Mine coal, and in one run condition with co-fed mixed plastics.

G.A. Robbins; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Make Checks Payable to the 4-H Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4-H State Horse Show Website  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beauregard at Rhiannon.Beauergard@unh.edu or (603) 862-2188. All of this information can be found at the NH 4 Foundation of New Hampshire. For more information contact Rhiannon Beauregard at Rhiannon Exposition. Please notify Rhiannon Beauregard, NH 4-H Animal and Agricultural Science Education Coordinator

New Hampshire, University of

166

Secretary Chu's powerpoint for a speech commemorating the 50th Anniversary of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How technology can change the How technology can change the world Panofsky Auditorium SLAC, Stanford University 24 August, 2012 Bill Hansen Sigurd Varian John Woodyard David Webster Russell Varian The Klystron 3 Steven Chu and Arun Majumdar Nature 488, pp. 294 - 303 (2012) August 16 issue. 4 The Industrial Revolution and the transition from horse power to horsepower transformed the world J.M.W. Turner (1839) The H.M.S. Temeraire, distinguished in Battle of Trafalgar, being towed to her last berth to be broken up for scrap. 5 The gasoline-powered internal combustion engine rapidly replace horse powered vehicles. New York, 5 th Avenue, ~1890s Detroit, circa 1920 The ~160,000 horses in New York and Brooklyn in 1880 were producing 3 - 4 millions pounds of horse manure and 40,000 gallons urine a day.*

167

GUIDANCE FOR THE AND DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Planting Compost (3) Pulp Construction Redwood deck Crafts (2) Remodeling Custom Wood Homes Sawdust horse Cellulosic ethanol Mulch (8) Charitable donation (9) Pellets (5) Christmas tree Personal use (8) Compost

Florida, University of

168

Intramolecular Oxyferryl Heme Reduction in Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACS Publications Abstract: The kinetics of oxyferryl (FeIVO) heme reduction in horse heart myoglobin (Mb) by a4LRuII (a NH3; L NH3, pyridine, isonicotinamide) bound at the...

169

Substituted Tetraammine Ruthenium Cytochrome c Derivatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myung-ok P. Cho, and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 34, 3301-3309 (1995) Abstract: Horse-heart (hh) cytochrome c, modified at His-33, and Candida krusei (Ck) cytochrome c, modified...

170

High Pressure Pulse Radiolysis-Reduction Cyt c by Ru(II) Complexes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The DV values for intramolecular electron transfer in (NH3)5RuII-His33 horse heart ferricytochrome c and (NH3)5RuII-His39 Candida krusei ferricytochrome c are -17.7 ...

171

The Burdock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and clings to clothing and to the hair or fur of animals. A dog's coat, sheep' s wool, and the tails of horses and cattle frequently become matted with these burs. Thus the...

172

Freshwater Sponges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three have much commercial value -- the bath sponge, the horse sponge and the sheep's wool sponge. Divers or dredges tear these from the rocky floors of warm shallow seas such as...

173

The Zebra's Stripes: A New Theory of Animal Vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Why do dogs wag their tails when they're happy, but horses do it in anger? What visual trick do snakes perpetrate when moving in an S shape? ...

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Pectol Shields and the Shield-Bearing Warrior Rock Art Motif  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-16. Ewers, John C. 1945 Blackfeet Crafts. USDI Bureau ofNo. 9. 1955 The Horse in Blackfoot Indian Culture. Bureau ofof paint. painting them. The Blackfoot, for example, made a

Loendorf, Lawerence L.; Conner, Stuart W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

University of Florida | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

grant to research pine-based biofuels New gene chip may help detect, treat West Nile virus in horses and humans UF teamed with USF, FSU and UCF to build the DOE Solar Decathlon...

176

Unschooling media : participatory practices among progressive homeschoolers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction: Rehoboth, the name of my hometown in southern Massachusetts, comes from the Hebrew work for "crossroads." Indeed there's not much in this rural town besides Route 44 and Route 118, with smatterings of horse ...

Bertozzi, Vanessa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Congestion Evil: Perceptions of Traffic Congestion in Boston in the 1890's and 1920's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pace. 39 Given that electric cars could travel eight or tencars, in horse cars or electric cars through the heart ofpeople also perceived the electric cars as more of a safety

Weinstein, Asha E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Plants Poisonous to Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with large coarse fronds is found in open woods and abandoned fields, especially upon sandy and gravelly soils. It is poisonous to cattle and horses that browse it when pastures...

180

Electricity Diffusion and Trend Acceleration in Inter-War Manufacturing Productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

counting both the horse power capacity of a steam turbine attached to an electric generator within the plant, and the horse power capacity of all the electric motors that use the electricity so generated to run production machinery in the factory. Clearly... economies typical of a volume production process such as electricity generation, the consequent drastic reduction in power generation capital at the factory level was much faster than the corresponding increase in the generation capital of electric utilities...

Ristuccia, Cristiano A; Solomou, Solomos

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 17 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Sikkim were silver, tobacco, brass and copper, Indian cotton piecegoods. European cotton twist and yarn, vegetable and mineral oils, horses, ponies and mules. For the first time since 1890-91, horses, ponies and mules were exported to Sikkim during... of the Institute and Sarbang (Procession of monks carrying banners, incense and musical instruments) received H is Holiness with melody of gyaling (monastic clarionet) and ragdhung (monastic brass trumpet). The Hon'ble Chief Minister of Sikkim. the State Cabinet...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

182

Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Day  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs » Programs » Laboratory Directed Research & Development » Laboratory Directed R&D Day Laboratory Directed Research and Development Day National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Contact Andrea Maestas LDRD Program (505) 667-1230 Email LDRD Day 2012 Learn how LDRD innovations benefit our nation Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted its fourth annual Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Day on October 23, 2012, at Buffalo Thunder in Pojoaque, New Mexico. More than 30 scientists and engineers from the Lab presented posters about their LDRD projects, answering questions and

183

ET Industries, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ET Industries, Inc. ET Industries, Inc. (showerheads) Issued: May 24, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-SE-2902 AMENDED NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION 1 Manufacturers (including importers) are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal water conservation standards. See 10 C.F.R. §§ 429.5, 429.102; 42 U.S.C. §§ 6291(10), 6302. On April 3, 2012, DOE tested one unit of the "ThunderHead" showerhead basic model ("basic model TH-1 " 2 ), which ET Industries, Inc. ("ET") imported into the United States. On April 24, 2012, DOE completed testing of three additional units of basic model TH-1, also imported into

184

Dinosaur behavior  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinosaur behavior Dinosaur behavior Name: kevv Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Did the movie Jurassic Park accurately reflect the known behavior of dinosaurs? Replies: Well, since we do not have an accurate record of that time period (Man showed up about ten million years after T-rex thundered across the plains of Antarctica *grin*) so we cannot say for certain WHAT the dinosaurs did. However, since they were wild animals, we can extrapolate from their modern contemporaries and from our knowledge of their individual anatomies what kind of behaviors they exhibited. A predator with large claws probably hunts by slashing and by piercing and holding on to prey. An herbivore with large spikes growing on its tail probably used them to fend off attackers like a spiked club -- I do not think it was much of a fashion statement

185

Patterson: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SW-2911) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patterson: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SW-2911) Patterson: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SW-2911) Patterson: Noncompliance Determination (2011-SW-2911) July 12, 2013 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Dan Patterson finding that the "ThunderHead" showerhead basic model manufactured by ET Industries, Inc. and imported by Dan Patterson does not comport with the water conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing. Patterson must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom Patterson distributed the noncompliant products that the product does not meet Federal standards. In addition, Patterson must provide to DOE documents and records showing the number of units Patterson distributed and to whom. The manufacturer and/or private labeler of the

186

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ET Industries, Inc. ET Industries, Inc. ( showerheads) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-SE-2902 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENAL TY Date issued: May 24, 2013 Number of alleged violations: 974 Maximum possible assessment: $194,800 Proposed civil penalty: $194,800 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") Office of the General Counsel, Office of Enforcement, alleges that ET Industries Inc. ("ET") has violated cettain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. Patts 429 and 430. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. Since March 1, 2010, ET has distributed in commerce in the United States 97 4 units of the "ThunderHead" showerhead ("basic model TH-1 " 1 ). 2. Basic model TH-1 is a "covered product" as defined in 42 U.S.C. § 6292(a)(l5) and

187

Microsoft Word - TEC - STG Minutes - 9-14-06.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION (TEC) WORKING GROUP TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION (TEC) WORKING GROUP SECURITY TOPIC GROUP MEETING MINUTES SEPTEMBER 14, 2006 INTRODUCTION The Security Topic Group (STG) of the Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group met in the afternoon of September 14, 2006 in Thunder Bay, Wisconsin. On behalf of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), the Chairman of the STG, Mr. Alexander Thrower of the Office of Logistics Management (RW-10), presided over the meeting. At the outset, Mr. Thrower introduced himself and the STG members participating. The STG agreed that the meeting agenda would include confirmation of conference notes from August 17, 2006 and discussion of the STG Work Plan. AUGUST 17, 2006 CONFERENCE CALL

188

Beam transport and monitoring for laser plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The controlled transport and imaging of relativistic electron beams from laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) are critical for their diagnostics and applications. Here we present the design and progress in the implementation of the transport and monitoring system for an undulator based electron beam diagnostic. Miniature permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are employed to realize controlled transport of the LPA electron beams, and cavity based electron beam position monitors for non-invasive beam position detection. Also presented is PMQ calibration by using LPA electron beams with broadband energy spectrum. The results show promising performance for both transporting and monitoring. With the proper transport system, XUV-photon spectra from THUNDER will provide the momentum distribution of the electron beam with the resolution above what can be achieved by the magnetic spectrometer currently used in the LOASIS facility.

Nakamura, K.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shaw, B.; Shiraishi, S.; Mittal, R.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of work conducted under the DOE Proof-of-Concept Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey, from February 1994 through April 1995. The work includes modifications to HRI`s existing 3 ton per day Process Development Unit (PDU) and completion of the second PDU run (POC Run 2) under the Program. The 45-day POC Run 2 demonstrated scale up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL Process) for a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal to produce distillate liquid products at a rate of up to 4 barrels per ton of moisture-ash-free coal. The combined processing of organic hydrocarbon wastes, such as waste plastics and used tire rubber, with coal was also successfully demonstrated during the last nine days of operations of Run POC-02. Prior to the first PDU run (POC-01) in this program, a major effort was made to modify the PDU to improve reliability and to provide the flexibility to operate in several alternative modes. The Kerr McGee Rose-SR{sup SM} unit from Wilsonville, Alabama, was redesigned and installed next to the U.S. Filter installation to allow a comparison of the two solids removal systems. The 45-day CTSL Wyoming Black Thunder Mine coal demonstration run achieved several milestones in the effort to further reduce the cost of liquid fuels from coal. The primary objective of PDU Run POC-02 was to scale-up the CTSL extinction recycle process for subbituminous coal to produce a total distillate product using an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Of major concern was whether calcium-carbon deposits would occur in the system as has happened in other low rank coal conversion processes. An additional objective of major importance was to study the co-liquefaction of plastics with coal and waste tire rubber with coal.

Comolli, A.G.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards October 19, 2011 - 12:27pm Addthis Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards Richard Kauffman Richard Kauffman Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy How can I participate? Join our LIVE video chat tomorrow! Email newmedia@hq.doe.gov; Tweeting your question to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leaving a question for Kauffman at Facebook.com/energygov. Ed. note: This was cross-posted on Huffington Post. Energy.gov will be hosting a live video chat with Richard Kauffman this Thursday at 2 PM ET. China has become the world's largest producer of solar modules. But did

193

Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards October 19, 2011 - 12:27pm Addthis Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards Richard Kauffman Richard Kauffman Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy How can I participate? Join our LIVE video chat tomorrow! Email newmedia@hq.doe.gov; Tweeting your question to @energy with the hashtag #energymatters; or leaving a question for Kauffman at Facebook.com/energygov. Ed. note: This was cross-posted on Huffington Post. Energy.gov will be hosting a live video chat with Richard Kauffman this Thursday at 2 PM ET. China has become the world's largest producer of solar modules. But did

194

CX-005418: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18: Categorical Exclusion Determination 18: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005418: Categorical Exclusion Determination Birch Creek Radio Tower CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 03/07/2011 Location(s): Bonneville County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to install a new 50-foot radio tower within the existing Birch Creek Radio Station property in order to communicate with Utah Associated Municipal Power System?s (UAMPS) new 100-megawatt Horse Butte Wind Power Generating Facility. BPA would also install telemetry and communication equipment within UAMPS?s Horse Butte control house. Electrical generation produced from the Horse Butte Wind project would interconnect into BPA?s transmission system via a tap between towers 31/6 and 31/7 of BPA?s Palisades-Goshen 115-kilovolt transmission

195

EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with MFWP, BPA is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a portion of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program. The purpose of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program is to mitigate for the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam through restoring habitat, improving fish passage, protecting and recovering native fish populations, and

196

A Beggar’s Ride: Tales From Within the Herd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This story suite is a work of autobiographical fiction, a coming of age tale which uses a young girl’s relationship to horses—along with various people and places connected to the horse world—as its narrative theme. The collection is comprised of twelve chapters, including an Introduction and Prologue and much later, an Interlude and Conclusion. While the first person narrative voice is maintained through most of the chapters herein, the Interlude uses second-person perspective. Additionally, NOW DEPARTING is written in the present narrative tense. Poems are interspersed throughout the work, between chapters, as transitional bridges for the reader.

Jensen, Katie Laurie

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Interview of Owen Gingerich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the bomb to Tinian to put it together before it was flown to Hiroshima; as a result he became one of the leading proponents to ban nuclear weapons; he had been to both Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the bombing; we were once in a Japanese restaurant... as supervisor; there were thirty-two of us; I got a merchant marine card as a cattleman although I had not had any farm experience; we went to Poland with some eight hundred horses in 1946, on a reconditioned liberty ship with the horses in stalls on the upper...

Gingerich, Owen

2008-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gyalse Tenzin Rabgye and the Founding of Taktsang Lhakhang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tower, and from a highly decorated throne30 he bestowed long life initiation upon all the villagers, along with the initiation and recitation for Chenrezig and other teachings. The Dzongpon Ngag-dbang sByin-pa and his people served him with faultless... courtesy and bestowed upon him a tall pile of such gifts as gold, silver, horses, oxen, tea, clothing, silk, loads of butter, salt, and cotton cloth. To all of the bTsan- gdong patrons he gave horses and silver bowls, admonishing them of the need...

Ardussi, John A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

University of Missouri-Columbia The College of Arts and Science Winter 2005 a student's unique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the fungus -- they take wing, using up scant energy reserves when they should be holed up until warmer rarely bite humans, though vampire bats feed on the blood of cattle, horses, deer and other wild mammals derived from vampire-bat saliva is used to treat human heart-disease patients and stroke victims. Bats

Glaser, Rainer

200

The mode structure of microcrystal and microdroplet lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Planck Institute for Physics of Complex Systems, 1996-1997 The work horse of optics is the ray picture ­ i. The feedback required for lasing is provided by long-lived modes whose emission properties are found to depend are not. The latter exhibit highly anisotropic emission directionality, characteristic spectral line

Nöckelm, Jens

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Texas Originals Introduction: We are not the first people to Walk Across Texas. Many of the nomadic tribes of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Originals Introduction: We are not the first people to Walk Across Texas. Many of the nomadic tribes of Texas were doing this long before we got here. Before Europeans introduced horses to the Native Level and Subject: Seventh Grade Texas History TEKS: TH 2a, 9b, 9c, 10a, 11a, 20a, 21a, 22a, 22b, 22c

Wilkins, Neal

202

News: Humans + porn = solved Captcha  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber criminals have finally merged the idea of crowdsourcing and Captcha solving. Troj/CAPTCHA-A is a trojan horse posing as an adult game, in which a stripper called Melissa sheds clothing every time the user solves a Captcha puzzle. A Captcha is a ...

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

OVERVIEW OF THE FOURTH MESSAGE UNDERSTANDING EVALUATION AND CONFERENC E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This time a task was specified: a template was defined and fill rules for the slots supplied. Answer keys, i at horse­races.) 7 #12; when it should not be), or non­committal (no fill when the answer key also contains Street Journal, Lexus/Nexus, and PROMT. Roughly 2300 training texts were provided and answer keys were

204

Network Worms Thomas M. Chen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network Worms Thomas M. Chen* Dept. of Electrical Engineering Southern Methodist University PO Box is the possible rate of infection. Since worms are automated programs, they can spread without any human action. Historical examples of worms have included: · Trojan horses: software with a hidden malicious function, e

Chen, Thomas M.

205

Volume 22, Part2-October 1975 FieldGwideandRoadLogto theWestern b k Cliffs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and following Coal Canyon Log. Kaiser No. 3 Mine tipple, Sunnyside. Go southwest to- ward East Carbon City. 105 Mine road ahead. Continue straight ahead into Horse Canyon. Thick coal on cliff at 2 o location of some subsidence fractures through the Castlegate Sandstone from mine workings in Sunnyside Coal

Seamons, Kent E.

206

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, oil shale and nahcolite mining, ORV use, overgrazing, trampling by wild horses · Land ownership · Occurrences: 6 · Individuals: 4000-6000 · Primary threats: oil and gas development, oil shale development, ORV use, overgrazing, oil shale mining · Land ownership/management: BLM, private, USFS #12;Phacelia

207

Characterization of Polymers,Composites and Natural Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

March 3, 2011 .... Rheological and Dynamic Strain Rate Studies of Wax-Coated Granular ... make up the surface of synthetic Thoroughbred horse racetracks used in North America. ... the first crystalline solid to liquid nominal transition temperature. .... Delay time (30 minutes after mixing), microwave power (390 watt ) and ...

208

Table of ConTenTs University Calendar ......................................4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winters* Hippity Hoppity Happy Handlers Jenna Sweetman Sophie Winter Hoof Beats Elizabeth Bergen Michele Pellicone* Jennifer Versfelt* Kayla Versfelt Pocket Pet Rescue Chelsea Obermeier* People Pick Handlers Club, Hoof Beats 4-H Horse Club, Just Kidding Goat Club, K-9 Leaders, Mad Scientists Prep Club

Ronquist, Fredrik

209

Dpon ru Paean 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description (to be used in archive entry) The lyrics state, "Sheep wool is smooth in the fourth lunar month, the time when adults are happy. Female yaks are full of milk in the fifth lunar month, the time when singers are happy. Horses are in good shape...

Gcod pa don 'grub

210

mental management, urban planning, waste disposal, and related fields in government and industry may choose from a variety of course offerings. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Castillo, Steven P.

211

Making Redescription Mining Well Posed A bias on the form of descriptor expressions helps violate the dichotomy law and ensure well posedness of redescription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Ramakrishnan, Naren

212

28 / AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 2006-2007 AGRICULTURAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Castillo, Steven P.

213

A simple simulation method for designing fibrous insulation materials R. Arambakam a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Courses BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life...................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging..........................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organis- mal Biology

Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi

214

Upcoming Events Dr bike sessions: Free 30 minute health check for your bike, carried  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation, or both ANSC 265 and ANSC 355, Horse Judging...............................................................................................3 BIOL 111G/111L, Natural History of Life or BIOL 211G/211L, Cell and Organismal Biology ...........................................................................................................3 ANSC 414, Sheep and Wool Production

Evans, Paul

215

MINOR: Livestock Production A minor in Livestock Production consists of at least 19 credits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................3 ANSC 303, Livestock, Meat, and Wool Evaluation....................................... 4 ANSC 304 and Wool Production; ANSC 415, Horse Production; ANSC 416, Beef Production; ANSC 417, Dairy Production BIOL 111G, Natural History of Life, and BIOL 211G, Cellular and Organismal Biology

Castillo, Steven P.

216

A New Approach to Gaudapadakarika  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and being kept on it becomes explanded Likewise is the yogin's mind (ch. 156). The tamed horse also may be compared here (Ibid). The Y ogasutra refers to about nine factors of distraction and their s<'tellites about five in all (I, 30-32). In order...

Sastri, N. Aiyaswami

1971-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

D A R G A N M . W . F R I E R S O N D E P A R T M E N T O F A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arabia of wind ¡ Could provide 9 times US electricity usage just in lower 48 �� Oldddddd technology of the electricity anywhere ¡ Denmark deals with this by selling excess power to Norway Having a grid reached at 30 mph" Produce electricity ¾ of the time at Wild Horse" " " " " Turbines - 351 feet tall from

Frierson, Dargan

218

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 24, 2013 July 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral Learn how Energy Department researchers are harnessing power from an unlikely source -- viruses. July 24, 2013 If you've ever heard the thunderous sound of a sonic boom, you've experienced the shock waves in the air created by an object traveling faster than the speed of sound. But what happens when an object travels faster than the speed of light? At Jefferson Laboratory, construction is underway to upgrade the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the CEABF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) at Hall B. During the experiments, the accelerator will shoot electrons at speeds faster than the speed at which light travels in the same medium, creating shock waves that emit a blue light, known as Cherenkov light -- this light is equivalent to the sonic boom. By recording data from Cherenkov light, scientists will be able to map a nucleon's three-dimensional spin.

219

ARM facility captures rare tornado data [EVS News]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM facility captures rare tornado data ARM facility captures rare tornado data June 13, 2013 Every spring, tornadoes thunder across five states, from Kansas to Texas, and alerts are common. However, by Monday, May 20, it was clear that this time the alert had a different urgency to it. The turn of events leading up to the EF-5 tornado that wreaked havoc in Moore, Oklahoma, provided a unique opportunity for scientists to sample the environment preceding a severe weather event. Read more about how EVS scientist, Donna Holdridge, supported the ARM program in the full article. Raw data from the additional radiosonde launches preceding the severe weather events of May 20 in Oklahoma. The blue line identifies the temperature, which decreases with increasing altitude. The red line is the dew point, the temperature at which the air is 100% saturated with its water vapor content. Where the dew point approaches the actual temperature, the air is nearing 100% relative humidity near the ground-ideal conditions for tornado events.

220

Photo of the Week: Faster than the Speed of Light | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Faster than the Speed of Light Photo of the Week: Faster than the Speed of Light Photo of the Week: Faster than the Speed of Light July 24, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis If you've ever heard the thunderous sound of a sonic boom, you've experienced the shock waves in the air created by an object traveling faster than the speed of sound. But what happens when an object travels faster than the speed of light? At Jefferson Laboratory, construction is underway to upgrade the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the CEABF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) at Hall B. During the experiments, the accelerator will shoot electrons at speeds faster than the speed at which light travels in the same medium, creating shock waves that emit a blue light, known as Cherenkov light -- this light is equivalent to the sonic boom. By recording data from Cherenkov light, scientists will be able to map a nucleon's three-dimensional spin.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sound Pitch and Distance Travelled Sound Pitch and Distance Travelled Name: Chris Status: educator Grade: 4-5 Location: MI Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Do high pitched sounds travel farther than low pitched sounds? Replies: Sorry Chris, it is the other way around. If you are near lightening you hear a crack or bang which is a high frequency sound. But far away from the lightening you hear thunder as a low pitch, rolling, boom. The high frequency sound from the crack you hear close up does not made it very far from the lightening (which is the cause of the noise). Hope this helps. R. W. "Mr. A." Avakian Quite the opposite. Low pitched sounds attenuate more slowly with distance. Fog-horns are an evolutionary example of the point. Of course, they are meant to operate in elevated humidity, which adds another loss factor. I will try to tell you more later. On the other hand, it is quite possible for high-pitched sounds to be _more_noticeable_ to a given being in a given noise background.

222

Recent News from the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2013 24, 2013 By applying pressure to the generator, one is able to generate about six nanoamperes of current and 400 millivolts of potential -- roughly a quarter of the voltage of a AAA battery and enough to flash a number on the small LCD screen. | Photo courtesy of Seung-Wuk Lee's lab at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. R&D 100: Battery Technology Goes Viral Learn how Energy Department researchers are harnessing power from an unlikely source -- viruses. July 24, 2013 If you've ever heard the thunderous sound of a sonic boom, you've experienced the shock waves in the air created by an object traveling faster than the speed of sound. But what happens when an object travels faster than the speed of light? At Jefferson Laboratory, construction is underway to upgrade the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the CEABF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) at Hall B. During the experiments, the accelerator will shoot electrons at speeds faster than the speed at which light travels in the same medium, creating shock waves that emit a blue light, known as Cherenkov light -- this light is equivalent to the sonic boom. By recording data from Cherenkov light, scientists will be able to map a nucleon's three-dimensional spin.

223

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Facility Captures Rare Tornado Data ARM Facility Captures Rare Tornado Data Bookmark and Share Every spring, tornadoes thunder across five states, from Kansas to Texas, and alerts are common. However, by Monday, May 20, it was clear that this time the alert had a different urgency to it. The turn of events leading up to the EF-5 tornado that wreaked havoc in Moore, Oklahoma, provided a unique opportunity for scientists to sample the environment preceding a severe weather event. Raw data from the additional radiosonde launches preceding the severe weather events of May 20 in Oklahoma. The blue line identifies the temperature, which decreases with increasing altitude (decreasing pressure). The red line is the dew point; dew point-also expressed as a temperature-is the temperature at which the air is 100% saturated with its water vapor content (low values of the dew point represent low relative humidity). Where the dew point approaches the actual temperature, the air is nearing 100% relative humidity, or saturation, near the ground-ideal conditions for tornado events.

224

A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. During this reporting period, CONSOL completed analyses of 81 feed and process stream samples from HTI bench Run CMSL-9. HTI liquefaction bench unit Run CMSL-9 (227-87) was operated with all-dispersed catalyst and Black Thunder Mine (Wyodak and Anderson seam) coal, with and without mixed plastics or high density polyethylene (HDPE) as coprocessing feedstocks. The dispersed catalysts used were Molyvan A and HTI`s iron catalyst, a sulfated iron hydroxide. Results are discussed in this report.

Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. [Canadian Energy Development, Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Production of low-cost hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed effort is to verify at the laboratory scale, the ability of the MTCI indirectly heated fluid-bed gasifier to economically produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from liquefaction by-product streams and from char produced in mild gasification processes. Specifically, the proposed effort is aimed at developing an experimental technology data base by defining the process characteristics that would be required for process integration into an overall liquefaction system. This would result in substantial decreases in the cost of hydrogen for the production of competitively priced coal-derived liquid fuels. During this quarter, shakedown tests of the reactor were completed. Subbituminous coals from Black Thunder mine and Eagle Butte mine were obtained for use in mild gasification to produce char. During the initial shakedown tests, it was determined that a new pulse combustor was needed. A pulse combustor with a large aerovalve was fabricated and tested. Three shakedown tests with limestone as the fluid-bed medium were carried out at temperature from 1450{degree}F to 1550{degree}F.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1993--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. In addition, a synergistic effect has been demonstrated, in which solvent blends are more effective for coal swelling than the pure solvents alone. Therefore, it will be necessary to use only low levels of swelling agents and yet promote the impregnation of catalyst precursors. The rate of the impregnation of catalyst precursors into swollen coal increases greatly as the effectiveness of the solvent to swell the coal increases. This effect is also demonstrated by improved catalyst precursor impregnation with increased contact temperature. Laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Gutterman, C.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: The preliminary evaluation of the kinetics of coal liquefaction distillation resid conversion  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the use of a novel laboratory-scale batch reactor, designed by the University of Delaware, to study the kinetics of coal liquefaction resid reactivity. The short time batch reactor (STBR) is capable of conducting reactions at temperatures up to 450{degrees}C and pressures up to 2500 psi at well-defined reaction times from a few seconds to 30 min or longer. Sixty experiments were conducted with the STBR in this project. The products of the resid/tetralin/hydrogen reaction were separated by solubility, and several analytical procedures were used to evaluate the reaction products, including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Changes were monitored in the boiling ranges of the products, as a function of process conditions (time, temperature, and tetralin donor solvent-to-resid ratio), with and without catalysts. Two distillation resid samples were studied; Sample 1 is the resid of the second stage product stream from Wilsonville Run 259 which used Pittsburgh seam coal (Ireland mine) bituminous coal, and Sample 2 is the resid of the same streak from Wilsonville Run 260 which used Wyodak and Anderson (Black Thunder Mine) subbituminous coal. It was determined that the resid reactivity was different for the two samples studied. The results demonstrate that further development of this experimental method is warranted to empirically assess resid reactivity and to provide data for use in the construction of an empirical model of coal conversion in the direct liquefaction process.

Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF COAL LIQUEFACTION PROCESS STREAMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Technical Progress Report for the fifteenth quarter of activities under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC93054. It covers the period January 1 through March 31, 1998. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) CONSOL characterized 41 process stream samples obtained from HTI Run PB-01 (227-90), in which Black Thunder Mine coal, Hondo VTB resid, municipal solid waste (MSW) plastics, and virgin plastics were co-liquefaction feedstocks with all-dispersed Fe and Mo catalysts. (2) A request was made for samples from the Nippon Coal Oil NEDOL pilot plant in Kashima, Japan. (3) Phenols were extracted from two samples of separator overhead oil from HTI Run PB-03 Periods 10A and 10B. The phenols were converted to ethylphenyl ethers, and the ethers were distilled to produce a sample within the diesel fuel boiling range. The ethers were mixed with diesel fuel to make 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% solutions. The four mixtures and a control sample (0% ether) were tested for diesel fuel properties by Intertek Testing Services, Caleb Brett. (4) Computational studies related to the University of Delaware's resid conversion model were continued on the Hewlett Packard Apollo HP-735 RISC workstation at CONSOL R and D. The Structure Optimization Program and the Structure Once-Through Program were used to generate physicochemical properties and structure models for the 15 coal resid samples which have been under study.

G.A. Robbins; S.D. Brandes; D.J. Pazuchanics; D.G. Nichols; R.A. Winschel

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A model for equine breed identification using microsatellites and posterior probability testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifteen new horse Microsatellite loci were identified by screening a size-fractionated plasrnid library with a (GT) 15 probe. Positive clones were sequenced and oligonucleotide primer pairs complementary to flanking region DNA were synthesized. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were performed on DNA from three breed groups of unrelated horses (E. caballus) and from an Arabian half-sib family. PCR amplification was also attempted for homologous loci in Grant's zebra, E. burchelli granti. PCR products were analyzed by polyacrylantide gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography. Segregation analysis of the 19 n-microsatellite loci did not indicate linkage (Z > 3.0) between any of the loci. Microsatellite allele distributions in the unrelated breed groups of E. caballus were compared for calculation of population differentiation and genetic distance using three different distance estimates, Ds, Dps and Ddm. The draft-origin breed group showed the greatest allelic diversity with an average of 4.8947 alleles per locus and an average heterozygosity of 0.5642. An average of 4.0526 and 3.4737 alleles per locus and an average heterozygosity of 0.5426 and 0.5295 were observed in Arabians and Thoroughbreds, respectively. Genetic differentiation among the breeds of horses tested ranged from 0.0029 to 0.4171 with an average Fst 0. 1 126 over all loci. Although each genetic distance measure reflected similar cladistic relationships, the magnitude of divergence varied considerably with the distance measure that was used. Ds estimates were most conservative (0. 130 to 0.268), Dps estimates were intermediate (0.334 to 0.476) and Ddm estimates were greatest (0.480 to 2.050). Genetic distance measures were also applied to pairwise comparisons between the individual breed groups of E caballus and E burchelli granti. Each distance measure showed greater horse-zebra distances than any intra-specific comparison under the same measure. A model for horse breed classification was designed based on the microsatellite allele distributions observed in Arabians and Thoroughbreds. The model utilized a posterior probability algorithm across a multi-locus genotype to generate the relative likelihood that an individual was either pure Arabian (ARAB), a pure Thoroughbred (THOR) or a first generation ARAB-THOR hybrid. Thirty-four test horse genotypes were analyzed and of these, 76.47% were correctly classified, 20.59% were indistinguishable and 2.94% were incorrectly classified.

Chastain, Pepper Alise

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

CX-007359: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

359: Categorical Exclusion Determination 359: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007359: Categorical Exclusion Determination McNary-Horse Heaven 230-kilovolt Transmission Line Raise (Structures 15/2 to 16/3) CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/01/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to add six wooden prop structures to the McNary-Horse Heaven No. 1 230-kilovolt transmission line between structures 15/2-16/3. The prop structures are needed to raise the existing line so that the conductor meets the necessary Minimum Approach Distance from the orchard below. An augur truck would use existing BPA roads to access the site and install wooden poles. More Documents & Publications CX-006582: Categorical Exclusion Determination

232

EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-SA-71: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-71: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285-SA-71, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002)

233

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0028-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C010-2012-0028-DNA C010-2012-0028-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0028-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Flow Test, Injectivity Test Comments Sundry Notice: Flow Test Well 85-11 and simultaneously Inject Test Well 68-1 and 24A-6 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

234

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(8-89) memorandum DATE: 7/19/02 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-70) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist TO: Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). Location: The ROWs are located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions.

235

CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

600: Categorical Exclusion Determination 600: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the United States Army Corps of Engineers' Bonneville 115-kilovolt (kV) Switchyard, and the United States Bureau of Reclamation's Grand Coulee 115-kV, 230-kV, and 500-kV Switchyards and Hungry Horse 230-kV Switchyards. The SCADA upgrade at each switchyard will provide BPA the system monitoring and control necessary to

236

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0007-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

07-DNA 07-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0007-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Observation Wells Comments Geothermal Drilling Permit Well 38-12 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

237

Hair Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hair Snakes Hair Snakes Nature Bulletin No. 101 February 1, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation HAIR SNAKES Farm boys have more fun than city boys. Every farm boy has watched the "hair snakes" sometimes found wriggling in drinking troughs for horses and cattle, or in puddles on a country road. They and their fathers will argue obstinately that these are hairs, from a horse's mane or tail, that turned into snakes. Phooie. Hair snakes are not snakes at all. They are roundworms. There are four common groups of worms here: annelids, which include earthworms and sewage-sludge worms; tapeworms; flatworms; and roundworms. The last three are called the "Lower Worms" and many of them are parasitic in other animals.

238

Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) January 26, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICEIWG January 26, 2012 GILA RIVER INDIAN COMMUNITY Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino 5040 Wild Horse Pass Boulevard Chandler, AZ 85226 (520) 796-7272 Action Items DRAFT PURCHASING POLICY GUIDANCE  The draft policy guidance was distributed to ICEIWG at the Portland meeting in October 2011. IE is accepting comments from ICEIWG as they arise.  The goal is to get final comments and to work through the internal review process. Once that is finalized, it will go through the formal leadership review process so that it can be published as draft policy guidance. This will kick-off formal consultations with tribes. IE would like to get the draft out to Indian country for comment and consultation by the end of February.  IE will send out a "Dear Tribal Leader" letter in regards to the consultations to all tribes and will

239

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0050-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EA EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0050-EA EA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field, Geothermal/Power Plant Wild Rose Geothermal Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Consultant EMPSi Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field, Geothermal/Power Plant Techniques Development Drilling, Drilling Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 245 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

240

EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-SA-70: Supplement Analysis 5-SA-70: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002) More Documents & Publications

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Supplement Analysis 1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-71: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington Vegetation Management on sections of the McNary-Ross, McNary-Horse Heaven, Horse Heaven-Harvarlum, Harvarlum-Big Eddy, and Hanford-John Day Transmission lines. The treatment areas are identified in Step 1 of the Planning Steps shown below. The work will involve the control of noxious weeds in the subject rights-of-ways (ROWs). DOE/EIS-0285-SA-71, Bonneville Power Administration, Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, located in Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon and Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, all being in the Walla Walla and Redmond Regions. (July 2002)

242

Microsoft Word - SCADA CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: Claire Bingaman KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: SCADA Upgrades at BPA's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations Budget Information: Hungry Horse: WO# 00246171, Task 01 Bonneville: WO# 00246173, Task 01 Grand Coulee: WO# 00246244, Task 01 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area.... Location: Grant County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the

243

Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO LEVERAGING TRIBAL RENEWABLE RESOURCES TO SUPPORT MILITARY ENERGY GOALS May 30-31, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL AND CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, Arizona The seventh in a series of planned U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development forums, this Tribal Leader Forum is designed to provide information for western U.S. tribal leaders and military leaders on the renewable energy resource development potential on tribal lands, and the opportunities for partnerships between tribes and military installations to promote energy development on tribal lands to achieve military energy security goals. Tribal leaders will also have the opportunity to directly converse with each other and key military leadership by participating in a roundtable discussion to

244

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0023-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-0023-DNA 3-0023-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Observation Wells Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates Application Document Type GPD Decision Document Date 1/31/2013 Relevant Numbers Lead Agency Doc Number DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2013-0023-DNA Serial Number NVN-083929 Lease Numbers

245

Property:Reference material | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference material Reference material Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Reference material Property Type Page Description The reference material used or cited in the work, activity or concept which is the subject of the page. Pages using the property "Reference material" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada + 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada + 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) + GTP ARRA Spreadsheet +

246

Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICEIWG ICEIWG May 29, 2013 WILD HORSE PASS HOTEL & CASINO 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler, AZ AGENDA CONFERENCE ROOM: ACACIA CD WEDNESDAY, MAY 29, 2013 8:00-9:00am REGISTRATION & BREAKFAST ** Continental breakfast will be provided on-site. ** 9:00-11:00am WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS Opening Prayer by ICEIWG Tribal Representative Tracey A. LeBeau, Director, U.S. DOE Office of Indian Energy (IE) & DOE ICEIWG Co-Chair Jim Manion, Warm Springs Delegate & Tribal ICEIWG Co-Chair Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director, DOE-IE ICEIWG Members - Current & New Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon: Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power General Manager Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians: William Micklin, CEO Gila River Indian Community: Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community

247

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2012-0035-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Production Wells Comments Geothermal Drilling Permits 12-A-12, 54A-11, 62-11, and Sundry Notice Well 65-11 Time Frame (days) Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided

248

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-0517-DNA DNA at Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration {{{NEPA_Name}}} General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type DNA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Drilling Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 26 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City Managing Field Office Stillwater Funding Agencies none provided Surface Manager BLM Mineral Manager BLM Selected Dates

249

A Comparison of Trojan Virus Behavior in Linux and Windows Operating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trojan virus attacks pose one of the most serious threats to computer security. A Trojan horse is typically separated into two parts - a server and a client. It is the client that is cleverly disguised as significant software and positioned in peer-to-peer file sharing networks, or unauthorized download websites. The most common means of infection is through email attachments. The developer of the virus usually uses various spamming techniques in order to distribute the virus to unsuspecting users. Malware developers use chat software as another method to spread their Trojan horse viruses such as Yahoo Messenger and Skype. The objective of this paper is to explore the network packet information and detect the behavior of Trojan attacks to monitoring operating systems such as Windows and Linux. This is accomplished by detecting and analyzing the Trojan infected packet from a network segment -which passes through email attachment- before attacking a host computer. The results that have been obtained to detect i...

Al-Saadoon, Ghossoon M W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cooling Tower Considerations for Energy Optimizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation strategies and production economies involve more than examining the cooling tower fan consumption of horse power. Colder water provides vast potentials for savings. Ask yourself, "What is the dollar and energy utilization value if I can obtain 1°F colder water off my cooling tower than I am now getting?" Therefore, let us first examine the elements of the cooling tower to determine the areas of greatest potential improvement to generate that colder water. The air flow generated by the fan should first be looked at In both counterflow or crossflow towers to determine that maximum flow is available through pitching fans up to within the motor plate amperage limitations and fan stall point calculations. If applicable, new fiberglass state of the art fans can be installed and additional motor horse power added. However, the most dramatic improvement that can be obtained in producing colder water is to retrofit modern film fill to replace the old fashioned wood splash bar slats.

Burger, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ya ri a bsod Collection 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

last updated by World Oral Literature Project staff on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Ya ri a bsod Collection/Sha bo don ’grub rdo rje and Skal dbang skyid ???????... of title Unknown Description (to be used in archive entry) At one time, Ya ri a bsod went to steal horses in Rta bo and was shot and injured. As he lay dying he sang this song to describe his situation. ???????????????????????????? ?????????...

Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

252

The Low Pay Commission After Eight Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

familiarity with interview and case study techniques to explore changing power relationships. Studies were carried out on selected affected sectors (clothing, hospitality, charities, retail, hairdressing, and horse racing, for example) and on selected... there were derisory penalties in the very rare event of prosecutions.6 In 1974, contrary to prevailing trade union opinion, dissatisfaction with this position developed in the public service union NUPE, with the publication of a carefully argued case for what...

Brown, William

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Lead levels in whole blood of New Zealand domestic animals  

SciTech Connect

A survey of whole-blood lead in domestic animals of New Zealand was conducted. 1142 animals were examined (252 cattle, 113 cats, 271 dogs, 258 horses, and 248 sheep). Data was analyzed as to age, sex, breed and animals known to be poisoned. Variations in lead concentration with different environments were noted with special reference to elevated lead in animals near automobile service stations, which could indicate potential danger to humans working in such areas.

Ward, N.I.; Brooks, R.R.; Roberts, E.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Agriculture - Noise and shocking investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents an investigation of noise and shocking from the telephone line at a horse farm. The investigation revealed that the noise was caused by an arching connection and vegetation along the fence. Also the charger's grounding system was not installed properly. Recommendations were made to the customer to reinstall the charger's ground system to manufacturer's specification and use an AM radio to find the loose connection along the fence.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Two Nineteenth Century Trade Routes in the Eastern Himalayas: the Bhutanese trade with Tibet and Bengal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that found vent from this place were borax, drugs, ponies, brass utensils and incense sticks. Apart from these domestic goods, a variety of foreign goods were available in Lhasa because of her excellent linkages with two major countries in Asia, viz... character. China provided it with tea, silk, carpet and porcelain articles, and Mongolia supplied it leather, saddlery, sheep and horses. Rice, sugar, musk and tobacco came from Bhutan and Sikkim, and broadcloth, indigo, brass-works, coral, pearls, sugar...

Sarkar, Ratna; Ray, Indrajit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ancient Trade Partners: Bhutan, Cooch Bihar and Assam (17th - 19th centuries)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

route to Tibet and Lhasa. However, Bhutan resisted but continued trading in North Bengal and Assam, selling horses, wool products, and musk, while importing cotton cloth, broadcloth, tools, spices and tobacco. Through this trade with Cooch Bihar... merchant and traveller Ralph Fitch in 1583, who noted that musk, wool, agate, silk and pepper were purchased." After the 16th century, the Narayani tanka, called rupee by the British, which was probably first struck around 1583 and took its name after...

Pommaret, Françoise

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating Turing machines have attracted much attention in the last decade or so. They have been described as "the work-horse of hypercomputation" (Potgieter and Rosinger 2010: 853). But do they really compute beyond the "Turing limit"--e.g., compute ... Keywords: ATM paradox, Accelerating Turing machine, Epistemic embedding, External and internal computation, Halting problem, Hypercomputation, Ontology of computing, Supertask, Thompson lamp paradox, Turing-machine purism, Turing-machine realism

B. Jack Copeland; Oron Shagrir

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The evolution of the Baie Verte Lineament, Burlington Peninsula, Newfoundland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disappear under the Atlantic ocean, and little is known about the local offshore continuation. Fleur de Lys Supergroup metasediments reappear briefly on the Horse Islands, 20 km offshore (Fig. 1.3). The available aeromagnetic maps show that the expression... accumulations, mainly of Cambrian and Ordovician age, that comprise the cover of the western and eastern platforms of the Newfoundland Appalachians. These two platforms are adjoined by regionally metamorphosed clastic wedges marginal to the central mobile...

Kidd, William

1974-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

259

Farmers enter compost business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One sixth of Massachusett's six million tons of solid waste can be composted economically. The Department of Food and Agriculture intends to survey and identify the existing and potential markets for compost and their demand characteristics and to promote the use of compost as an environmentally sound alternative to existing uses of synthetic fertilizers and conditioners. Various pilot projects have been set up composting poultry manures, horse manures, fish wastes, shredded newspaper, cheese whey, wood ash, etc.

Goldstein, N.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin Craig Fenwick, Stephen Marmor, K. Govindaraju, Ann M. English, James F. Wishart and Ji Sun J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 3169-3170 (1994) Abstract: The observed rate constant (kobs), as determined by pulse radiolysis, for intramolecular electron transfer (ET) from a5RuII bound at His48 to the ferric heme of horse heart myoglobin was 0.059 ± 0.003 s-1 at 25 °C, pH 7.0. This value is essentially identical to that previously reported in the literature for sperm whale myoglobin. Following oxidation by H2O2 of the ferric heme to oxyferryl heme (FeIV=O), kobs for intramolecular ET from a5RuII(His48) to heme increased to 0.19 ± 0.02 s-1 at a driving force of 0.96 eV. However, at the same driving force, a rate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Nature Bulletin No. 305 May 5, 1984 Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRAIRIE BIRDS OF THE CORNBELT The Ideal way to get acquainted with the birds of the open fields and prairies is to take a team of horses and raise a crop of corn. Birds are not afraid of horses and a farmer or his boy can watch them, close up, day after day. Unlike tractors, horses guide themselves most of the time and the driver has plenty of chances to look and listen -- especially while plowing. The small animal life uncovered by a freshly turned furrow offers a free lunch for birds. Several sorts of typical ground-nesting birds are loined by blackbirds, cowbirds, robins, and even the wary crows, from nearby hedgerows, farmsteads and woodlands to form a flying, running, hopping parade behind the plow. They and the prairie birds rush to grab earthworms. cutworms, white grubs, beetles and ants.

262

Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Azimuthal variation of radiation of seismic energy from cast blasts  

SciTech Connect

As part of a series of seismic experiments designed to improve the understanding of the impact of mining blasts on verifying a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, a sixteen station network of three-component seismic sensors were deployed around a large cast shot in the Black Thunder Mine. The seismic stations were placed, where possible, at a range of 2.5 kilometers with a constant inter-station spacing of 22.5 degrees. All of the data were recorded with the seismometers oriented such that the radial component pointed to the middle point of the approximately 2 kilometer long shot. High quality data were recorded at each station. Data were scaled to a range of 2.5 kilometers and the sum of the absolute value of the vertical, radial, and transverse channels computed. These observations were used to construct radiation patterns of the seismic energy propagating from the cast shot. It is obvious that cast shots do not radiate seismic energy isotropically. Most of the vertical motion occurs behind the highwall while radial and transverse components of motion are enhanced in directions parallel to the highwall. These findings have implications for local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and possibly for regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic observations of cast blasting. Locally, it could be argued that peak particle velocities could be scaled not only by range but also by azimuthal direction from the shot. This result implies that long term planning of pit orientation relative to sensitive structures could mitigate problems with vibration levels from future blasting operations. Regionally, the local radiation pattern may be important in determining the magnitude of large scale cast blasts. Improving the transparency of mining operations to international seismic monitoring systems may be possible with similar considerations.

Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Martin, R.L. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields  

SciTech Connect

Changes in coal structure that may occur during coal drying will be measured in order to determine the effects of coal drying on its reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semisolid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The objectives for this quarter were to begin coal drying experiments using thermal, microwave, and chemical methods, and to begin coal liquefaction experiments on the dried coals. Three additional coal samples have been acquired. These are a Black Thunder Mine coal acquired from Arco Coal Co, and a Texas subC and Illinois No. 6 hvC acquired from the DOE coal sample bank at Penn State. The samples are listed as DECS-1 and DECS-2, respectively in the PSU sample bank. The ultimate and proximate analyses for all the samples are given in Table 1. Work on each of the subtasks is described in separate paragraphs.

Miknis, F.P.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

"1. Colstrip","Coal","PPL Montana LLC",2094 "2. Noxon Rapids","Hydroelectric","Avista Corp",568  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "1. Colstrip","Coal","PPL Montana LLC",2094 "2. Noxon Rapids","Hydroelectric","Avista Corp",568 "3. Libby","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",525 "4. Hungry Horse","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",428 "5. Yellowtail","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",287 "6. Kerr","Hydroelectric","PPL Montana LLC",206 "7. Fort Peck","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",200 "8. J E Corette Plant","Coal","PPL Montana LLC",154 "9. Judith Gap Wind Energy Center","Other Renewables","Invenergy Services LLC",135

267

DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0006-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-EA -EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2010-0006-EA EA at Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration Gabbs Valley and Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Exploration Projects General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Ormat Technologies Inc Consultant Environmental Management Associates Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Project Location Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration Techniques Downhole Techniques, Drilling Techniques, Exploration Drilling, Well Testing Techniques Time Frame (days) Application Time 363 NEPA Process Time 363 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided Managing District Office Carson City

268

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG May 29, 2013 Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino Chandler, Arizona MEETING OVERVIEW The U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Indian Energy (IE) hosted an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting on Wednesday, May 29, 2013 in Chandler, Arizona. IE welcomed reappointed and new members to ICEIWG. The ICEIWG meeting was held prior to the seventh Tribal Leader Forum on "Leveraging Tribal Renewable Resources to Support Military Energy Goals." Arizona tribal leaders and intertribal organization representatives were encouraged to attend this meeting.

269

EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: Final Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program In cooperation with Montana, Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to implement a conservation program to preserve the genetic purity of the westslope cutthroat trout populations in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage. The South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program constitutes a portion of the Hungry Horse Mitigation Program. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0353 (July 2005) More Documents & Publications EIS-0353: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

270

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Military Applications Leveraging Tribal Renewable Energy Resources to Support Military Energy Goals May 31-31, 2013 Wild Horse Pass Chandler, AZ Sacred Power Corporation Sacred Power Products 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation Sacred Power Corporation? ï‚— Longevity Oldest Native American Solar Company ï‚— Diversity Manufacturing & Installation ï‚— Experience Over 100 years combined ï‚— Products 3 Patented Products ï‚— Ethnicity Native American Owned ï‚— Reputation Established Government Contractor ï‚— Awards Top 100 Companies in US ï‚— Flexibility Open to New Ideas 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation About Sacred Power ï‚— Design / Manufacturer ï‚— 8A Contractor ï‚— Distribution ï‚— Training 6/24/2013 Sacred Power Corporation

271

Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

Hanzel, Delano

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 6 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-che) , the embodiment of energy, courage and loyalty. The fifth was the Ideal Elehpant (hasti, Tib. gLang-po-che), the embo­ diment of strength, stability and prosperity. The sixth one ,ns the Ideal Horse (asva, Tib. rTa-mchog), the embo­ diment of speed... of the general reader with an in­ terest in Trans-Himabyan art or Mahayana. A glossary in Sanskrit-Tibetan, a key to place names and a note on source material are appended. mu~trated with five colour plates and thirteen monochromes. April, 1962. Notes...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

273

European Bulletin of Himalayan Research (EBHR) Number 20 - 21, 2001 Double issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tree. It’s huge! There you have to offer the rice grains. “O Horse, don’t kick, don’t use the whip. I am going to the shops to buy ????, to buy ???? for the ?????????????????.” 10 [Then Sitane arrives at the place of the watchmen (N... to himself, but also mirrors the experience of a particular time and social- 1 The article is based on field research in Garhwal conducted between 1993-98. I thank Sundar Singh Rawat and Dhan Singh Rana for their cooperation and support. I am also indebted...

South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Germany; (CNRS) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; (SOAS) School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

What happened on the way to the laundry?  

SciTech Connect

In Santa Fe, New Mexico, there is an Interstate Nuclear Services (INS) laundry that washes protective clothing worn by workers at nuclear facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)-clothing that can be contaminated with radioactive material. Some of the radioactivity goes into the sewer system, thereby going to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and then coming out in the water effluent or the digested sludge. Some of the water effluent is used to water playing fields, a golf course, and the infield of the horse-racing track, and the sludge is interred into a field. This study investigates contamination from a waste water treatment plant.

Beck, R.; Schwanfelder, K.; Sze, T.; Shelton, J. [Santa Fe Preparatory School, NM (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Downhole mud properties complicate drilling hydraulics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explains that wellsite parameters such as penetration rate, hole cleaning, hole erosion and overall wellbore stability are directly related to the hydraulic conditions occurring while drilling. Drilling hydraulics, in turn, are largely a function of the drilling mud's properties, primarily viscosity and density. Accurate pressure loss calculations are necessary to maximize bit horse-power and penetration rates. Also, annular pressure loss measurements are important to record equivalent circulating densities, particularly when drilling near balanced formation pressures or when approaching formation fracture pressures. Determination of the laminar, transitional or turbulent flow regimes will help ensure the mud will remove drill cuttings from the wellbore and minimize hole erosion.

Leyendecker, E.A.; Bruton, J.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

On Directed Information and Gambling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of gambling in horse races with causal side information and show that Massey's directed information characterizes the increment in the maximum achievable capital growth rate due to the availability of side information. This result gives a natural interpretation of directed information $I(Y^n \\to X^n)$ as the amount of information that $Y^n$ \\emph{causally} provides about $X^n$. Extensions to stock market portfolio strategies and data compression with causal side information are also discussed.

Permuter, Haim H; Weissman, Tsachy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Socioeconomic Profile of the Poters in the Central Mid-Hills of Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their economiC limitation they have to survive with maize. 4. Maize serves a duel purpose: human food and livestock feed. Maize is mainly consumed In the fonn of grit. During the process of grit making (milllng3) the flour comes out as a by­ product which is fed... 8: Food co~n~s~umlFu~·ln~.~f~th~e§~"~e~"'la~(..!th~e~h=.~u~se~h~.~'d~,evef'lRamechhap SindbuU Rank- Rank- 2 3 1 2 Malze Rice Pulses (Horse gram and masyang) Millets (Flnger mille and buck wheat 7 8 7 22 ~eat 2 7 -Rank: I Most frequently used: 2...

Upadhyay, Kiran Dutta

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Regions of XY homology in the pig X chromosome and the boundary of the pseudoautosomal region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than the PARs of horse (1.8 Mb [24]), human PAR1 (2.7Mb [25]) chimp (2.7 Mb [26-28]) or mouse (700 kb [29]). Although the sizes and gene content of PARs change over time as sex-specificSome pig satellite DNAs are already known to be present on X... -affinit ENSG00000185291 interleukin 3 receptor, alpha (low affinity) ENSG00000169100 solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine member 6 ENSG00000169093 acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase-like ENSG00000182162 purinergic receptor P2Y, G...

Skinner, Benjamin M; Lachani, Kim; Sargent, Carole A; Affara, Nabeel A

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF perturbations. We also present evidence for an acoustically-induced magnetic signal at both magnetic observatories, indicating that magnetometers act as highly sensitive detectors of acoustically-induced ground motion. Further experimental and theoretical work are required to improve confidence in these conclusions.

Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

280

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE0004124 EE0004124 Prime: City of Norco EE DE-EE0004124 Power & Vehicles Technologies 2011 Alan Blosser 10/1/2010 - 9/31/2011 Norco, CA City of Norco Waste to Energy Facility (CA) Perform a feasibility study to dispose of the community's horse manure by converting it to energy. Norco is zoned for and has a significant recreational horse population. 12 06 2010 Alan L. Blosser Digitally signed by Alan L. Blosser DN: cn=Alan L. Blosser, o=Power and Vehicle Technologies Division, ou=NETL-DOE, email=alan.blosser@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I am the author of this document Date: 2010.12.06 16:49:35 -05'00' 12 8 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2010.12.08 11:38:33 -05'00' Subcontractor: Chevron Energy Solutions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Stratigraphic controls on lateral variations in the structural style of northeastern Brooks Range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural style of the range-front region of the northeastern Brooks Range in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is strongly controlled by (1) the existence of detachment horizons in both pre-Mississippian rocks and the unconformably overlying Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous cover sequence, and (2) lithology and structural competency of the pre-Mississippian rocks. These variables strongly influence lateral changes in structural style. The Brooks Range of northwestern ANWR is dominated by a series of narrow linear anticlinoria, whereas in northeastern ANWR the Brooks Range is characterized by only two broad and strongly arcuate anticlinoria. In both areas, the anticlinoria are controlled by the geometry of a duplex bounded by a floor thrust in pre-Mississippian rocks and a roof thrust in the Kayak Shale, near the base of the cover sequence. In the west, where the pre-Mississippian partially consists of structurally competent carbonates, each anticlinorium marks a single horse in the duplex. However, in the east, pre-Mississippian rocks are relatively incompetent and each anticlinorium is cored by multiple horses. In the west, shortening above the roof thrust is by detachment folding, except where the shale detachment horizon is depositionally absent. In contrast, in eastern ANWR shortening above the roof thrust is by major thrust duplication of the entire cover sequence, perhaps due to lithology and thickness changes within the detachment horizon.

Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Determination of H{sub 2} Diffusion Rates through Various Closures on TRU Waste Bag-Out Bags  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The amount of H{sub 2} diffusion through twist and tape (horse-tail), wire tie, plastic tie, and heat sealed closures on transuranic (TRU) waste bag-out bags has been determined. H{sub 2} diffusion through wire and plastic tie closures on TRU waste bag-out bags has not been previously characterized and, as such, TRU waste drums containing bags with these closures cannot be certified and/or shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since wire ties have been used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1980 to 1991 and the plastic ties from 1991 to the present, there are currently thousands of waste drums that cannot be shipped to the WIPP site. Repackaging the waste would be prohibitively expensive. Diffusion experiments performed on the above mentioned closures show that the diffusion rates of plastic tie and horse-tail closures are greater than the accepted value presented in the TRU-PACT 11 Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Diffusion rates for wire tie closures are not statistically different from the SAR value. Thus, drums containing bags with these closures can now potentially be certified which would allow for their consequent shipment to WIPP.

Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; E. Larry Callis; Kirsten M. Norman

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Stereoselective Binding of Ruthenium Complexes to Cytochrome c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Dependent Stereoselective Binding of Ruthenium Aquobipyridine Site-Dependent Stereoselective Binding of Ruthenium Aquobipyridine Complexes to Histidine Side Chains in Horse Heart Cytochrome c Jian Luo, James F. Wishart, and Stephan S. Isied J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 12970-12971 (1998) [Find paper at ACS Publications] Abstract: Stereoselective covalent binding of the ruthenium complexes cis-[Ru(bpy)2(H2O)2]2+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and cis-[Ru(dmbpy)2(H2O)2]2+ (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) to the surface His 33 residue and the more buried His 26 residues of Horse heart cytochrome c (Hh cyt c) to form large enantiomeric excess of D-[Ru(dmbpy)2(H2O)]-His 26-cyt c (38%), but little or no excess of D-[Ru(bpy)2(H2O)]-His 26-cyt c (6%). At the surface exposed His 33 site, equal entiomeric excess of L-[Ru(dmbpy)2(H2O)]-His 33-cyt c and L-[Ru(bpy)2(H2O)]-His 33-cyt c (34%)

284

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

285

DOE Solar Decathlon: University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Virginia's house on the National Mall at Solar Decathlon 2002. Enlarge image The Trojan Goat incorporates recycled materials, including copper cladding reclaimed from a roof, wood panels reclaimed from shipping pallets, and paving stones reclaimed from the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. (Credit: Chris Gunn/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: University of Virginia What: Trojan Goat Where: Private residence Crozet, VA 22932 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2002 University of Virginia: Bearing Solar Gifts Like the Trojan horse that launched the Greeks to victory, the Trojan Goat earned the University of Virginia second place in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2002. Since then, the house has gone on to inspire

286

CX-006815: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006815: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cattle Creek Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 09/27/2011 Location(s): Bonneville County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration In response to Utah Associated Municipal Power System?s (UAMPS) interconnection request, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is planning to integrate UAMPS?s 100-megawatt (MW) Horse Butte Wind Power Generating Facility into its balancing authority. The proposed point of interconnection is at the Palisades-Goshen 115-kilovolt transmission line adjacent to tower 31/6. Document(s) Available for Download CX-006815.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008877: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010590: Categorical Exclusion Determination

287

Data:48eb2536-a73c-4bae-99d6-06810b2c2463 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eb2536-a73c-4bae-99d6-06810b2c2463 eb2536-a73c-4bae-99d6-06810b2c2463 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Pioneer Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2012/03/27 End date if known: Rate name: SCHEDULE I-12 IRRIGATION SERVICE(UNCONTROLLED) Sector: Commercial Description: Available to Members of the Cooperative located adjacent to its three-phase line for irrigation purposes, for loads of not less than 30 horsepower. This rate applies to accounting schedule 441 Irrigation. Energy sales under this schedule are subject to the Energy Cost Adjustment. The reported Demand Charge is derived from THE Annual Horse power charge of $24.0 per connected horsepower.

288

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Norco City of Norco EE CDP tracking no. 49.10 Power & Vehichles Technologies 2011 Alan Blosser 10/1/2010 - 9/30/2011 City of Norco, Riverside County, CA City of Norco Waste to Energy Project This equestrian community needs to find an alternative to the landfill disposal of the horse manure generated within the community. Phase 1 will research and recommend options for implementation. 07 29 2010 Alan L. Blosser Digitally signed by Alan L. Blosser DN: cn=Alan L. Blosser, o=Power and Vehicle Technologies Division, ou=NETL-DOE, email=alan.blosser@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I am the author of this document Date: 2010.07.29 16:51:27 -04'00' 8 17 2010 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

289

EIS-0353: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0353: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement South Fork Flathead Watershed/Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program This notice announces BPA's intention to prepare an EIS on removal of all fish from selected lakes in the South Fork of the Flathead River drainage that harbor non-native species that threaten to genetically contaminate native fish in streams leading from those lakes, down into the South Fork Flathead River and Hungry Horse Reservoir. The specific lakes proposed for treatment are located in the Montana Counties of Flathead, Missoula, and Powell. This proposed action would take place within floodplains and waters located directly adjacent to and below the high water marks of these lakes.

290

Fault block kinematics at a releasing stepover of the Eastern California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

block kinematics at a releasing stepover of the Eastern California block kinematics at a releasing stepover of the Eastern California shear zone: Partitioning of rotation style in and around the Coso geothermal area and nascent metamorphic core complex Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fault block kinematics at a releasing stepover of the Eastern California shear zone: Partitioning of rotation style in and around the Coso geothermal area and nascent metamorphic core complex Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Pliocene lavas and sediments of Wild Horse Mesa in the Coso Range, CA exhibit clockwise vertical-axis rotation of fault-bounded blocks. This indicates localization of one strand of the Eastern California shear zone/Walker Lane Belt within a large-scale, transtensional, dextral,

291

Category:Exploration Activities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities Activities Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category:Exploration Activities Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Exploration Activities page? For detailed information on Exploration Activities, click here. Contents: Top - 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pages in category "Exploration Activities" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 1,574 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) 2-M Probe At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)

292

Up-Hill ET in (NH3)5Ru(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Up-Hill Electron Transfer in Pentaammineruthenium(III)-Modified Ferrocytochrome c: Rates, Thermodynamics, and the Mediating Role of the Ruthenium Moiety Ji Sun, James F. Wishart, and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 34, 3998-4000 (1995) Abstract: At moderate to high ionic strengths (>0.1 M), Co(oxalate)33- oxidizes native cytochrome c very slowly, however it undergoes a rapid reaction with pendant ruthenium complexes covalently attached to the surface of the protein. Under these conditions, the rate of the thermodynamically unfavorable (up-hill) FeII-to-RuIII electron transfer process in pentaammineruthenium-modified horse-heart cytochrome c can be revealed using sufficiently high Co(oxalate) 33- concentrations. Rate measurements performed over a wide range of CoIII concentrations confirm the proposed

293

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1981 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use geoscience data to develop a conceptual model of the reservoir. Notes The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic

294

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Casper to NPR-3: Casper to NPR-3: Take I-25 North approx. 22 miles to Exit 210 (Horse Ranch Creek Road), this turns into WY Hwy 259 Directions to NPR-3: Take WY Hwy 259 toward Midwest approx. 11.5 miles from Exit 210 Directions to NPR-3: Look for "Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center" signs, then turn right onto gravel road Follow main field road approx. 4 miles from turnoff to RMOTC Field Office RMOTC Field Office RMOTC Casper Office 907 N. Poplar Street, Suite 150 Directions from I-25 North or South: Take Poplar Street Exit 188B, turn north on Poplar Street, go approx. 1 block past stop lights, and turn right into parking lot of the Cottonwood Building at 907 North Poplar

295

Energy Economy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 19, 2011 October 19, 2011 Clean Energy Markets: We've Got the Innovation and Deployment Cart and Horse Backwards China has become the world's largest producer of solar modules. But did you know that these Chinese manufacturers are using technology breakthroughs developed in the United States? What's the disconnect in the US's ability to deploy it? October 17, 2011 An illustration of the 2011 Chevy Volt, whose lithium-ion battery is based on technology developed at Argonne National Laboratory. | Image courtesy of General Motors. From the Lab to the Showroom: How the Electric Car Came to Life In the U.S., businesses tend to invest in research that will pay off in the short term. National laboratories are filling a gap by conducting the essential research that will change the game 10 to 20 years down the road.

296

Animal Care Enforcement Actions | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animal Care Enforcement Actions Animal Care Enforcement Actions Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Animal Care Enforcement Actions Dataset Summary Description Contains monthly reports on 7060s and stipulations related to enforcement of the Animal Welfare and Horse Protection Acts. Form 7060 - Official warning of an alleged violation of statue or regulation and notice to the subject that APHIS may seek civil or criminal penalties for alleged violation in the future if the subject again violates. Stipulation - a pre-litigation monetary settlement between APHIS and the subject. The stipulation provides the subject with notice of alleged violation, affords the subject an opportunity for an administrative hearing, and offers the subject an opportunity to waive the hearing and pay a monetary penalty calculated within Civil Penalty guidelines.

297

Microsoft Word - Updated Proposed Action 2004 SA.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 27, 2004 December 27, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan EIS (DOE/EIS-0312/SA-01) Sarah McNary Senior Policy Advisor Proposed Action: Updated Proposed Action (UPA) for the FCRPS Biological Opinion Remand Location: The action area of the UPA, including areas where the UPA directly or indirectly affects listed salmonids consists of the following areas: * The mainstem Columbia River, including and downstream of Libby and Hungry Horse dams and reservoirs; the Snake River below the confluence with the Salmon River; and the Clearwater River below Dworshak reservoir and dam, down to and including the Columbia River estuary and plume. * The estuary and plume, which includes the area immediately off the mouth of the Columbia

298

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002155: Categorical Exclusion Determination Anaerobic Biotechnology for Renewable Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002155-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000600-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

299

2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Alum Geothermal Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=2-M_Probe_At_Alum_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=402957"

300

The Entire Botany Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Botany Archives Botany Archives Botany Archives, Since May 2000 Table of Contents: Ginseng Caterpillars and Pin Oaks Seaweed and Nutrition Blue Leaves Walnut Problems Italian Trees Purple Plants Poplar Up-date European Tree Design Planting Magnolia Trees Schoolyard Plants Poplar Droppings Fungi Spores Woodland Adaptations Growing Lichen Apple Tree Maturity Horse Poison Plants Honeysuckle Poison Old Trees Leaking Popular Cottonwood Infestation Tulip Tree Seeds Bald Cypress Ecology Maple Recovery Leaf Minors Catalpa Problem Berm Enhancement Organic Gardening Ailing Burr Oak Damaged Cypress Tree Reed Ridding Berm Enhancement Tulip Tree Flowering Lichens Weed Seeds Plants at Night Kombu Seaweed Plants at Night Crab Grass Phloem Physiology Elm Disease Bark Thickness Poison Sumac Growing Fields Killing Pine Trees

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bows and Arrows -- Part Two: Arrows and Archers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two: Arrows and Archers Two: Arrows and Archers Nature Bulletin No. 593 February 27, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor Richard Becker, Naturalist BOWS AND ARROWS - PART TWO: ARROWS AND ARCHERS Archery, and hunting with a bow, are sports increasingly popular in this country. Bows and arrows are still used by primitive tribes, such as the pigmies in Africa and the aborigines in South American jungles, who frequently tip their arrows with deadly poisons. The warlike Indians of the Great Plains used bows and arrows long after the introduction of firearms. Loading an old-fashioned musket took too much time and was difficult for a brave on a running horse. After repeating rifles appeared, they and cartridges for them were greatly prized but hard to get.

302

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

303

Fault Block Kinematics at a Releasing Stepover of the Eastern California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fault Block Kinematics at a Releasing Stepover of the Eastern California Fault Block Kinematics at a Releasing Stepover of the Eastern California Shear Zone: Partitioning of Rotation Style in and Around the Coso Geothermal Area and Nascent Metamorphic Core Complex Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Fault Block Kinematics at a Releasing Stepover of the Eastern California Shear Zone: Partitioning of Rotation Style in and Around the Coso Geothermal Area and Nascent Metamorphic Core Complex Abstract Pliocene lavas and sediments of Wild Horse Mesa in the Coso Range, CA exhibit clockwise vertical-axis rotation of fault-bounded blocks. This indicates localization of one strand of the Eastern California shear zone/Walker Lane Belt within a large-scale, transtensional, dextral, releasing stepover. We measured rotations paleomagnetically relative to two

304

Property:NEPAanalysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NEPAanalysis NEPAanalysis Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPAanalysis Property Type Text Description National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessment and analysis compliance. Pages using the property "NEPAanalysis" Showing 9 pages using this property. 2 2-M Probe Survey + This exploration technique may be approved on federally managed lands by conducting a categorical exclusion (CX) analysis. Off road travel can be accomplished using existing roads and ways using ATV's and off road transportation. Access can be accomplished by using horses or by foot in areas closed to off road vehicles. An EA may be required in project areas that contain resources with a potential for impacts. A Acoustic Logs + Well logging is a standard operation associated with the drilling permit approval and is included in the downhole analysis of the drilling program.

305

CX-004798: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

798: Categorical Exclusion Determination 798: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004798: Categorical Exclusion Determination Maryland Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant- Leonardtown Subgrant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 12/22/2010 Location(s): Leonardtown, Maryland Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The Town of Leonardtown proposes to use Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant federal funding from the Department of Energy to replace existing motors from the towns waste water treatment plant with new energy efficient motors. The motors range from 1.0 to 50.0 horse power and are used throughout the water purification process. The treatment plant is a current operating and permitted facility authorized by the State of Maryland. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

306

Ancient Warriors and the Origin of Chinese Purple  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Warriors and the Origin of Ancient Warriors and the Origin of Chinese Purple Figure 1: (a) Warrior # T18G21-08, a kneeling archer. The pigment samples in this study have been taken from this terracotta warrior. (b) Close-up picture of the purple paint on the terracotta warrior. (c) Images of the purple paint samples used in this study. In March 1974 during the sinking of wells for farmland irrigation near Xi'an, China, nine farmers made one of the world's most remarkable archaeological finds: the discovery of an army consisting of more than 8000 life-size terra cotta figures of warriors and horses of the First Emperor of Qin. One of the most intriguing puzzles is the purple synthetic pigments ("Chinese Purple" or "Han Purple" [1]) found on the terra cotta soldiers

307

CX-006293: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006293: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for Purchase of the Pistol Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/26/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 20 acre Pistol Creek property by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT). The property is being acquired as partial mitigation for the construction and operation of the Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River, and because of its riparian and natural resource values. The property includes approximately one-quarter mile of Pistol Creek, which is largely important for providing habitat to westslope cutthroat trout and

308

CX-006793: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006793: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for Purchase of Squeque Lane Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09/13/2011 Location(s): Section Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 10 acre Squeque Lane property by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired as partial mitigation for the construction and operation of the Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River, and because of its riparian and natural resource values. The property is largely

309

2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At Columbus Salt Marsh, Nevada, additional 2m measurements better defined the shape of a blind, shallow thermal anomaly; also at this location deeper temperature measurements were used to develop a near-surface temperature gradient. References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army Depot, Terraced Hills, And Other Areas In Nevada

310

Manhattan Project: Enter the Army, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY Army parade, Los Alamos ENTER THE ARMY (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The decision to proceed with planning for the production of enriched uranium and of plutonium led directly to the involvement of the Army, specifically the Corps of Engineers. President Roosevelt had approved Army involvement on October 9, 1941, and Vannevar Bush had arranged for Army participation at S-1 meetings beginning in March 1942. The need for security suggested placing the S-1 program within one of the armed forces, and the construction expertise of the Corps of Engineers made it the logical choice to build the production facilities envisioned in the Conant report of May 23.

311

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

312

Property:ExplorationOutcome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ExplorationOutcome ExplorationOutcome Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ExplorationOutcome Property Type String Description The outcome of an Exploration Activity. Allows Values could be useful with more improvements;useful;not indicated;not useful;useful regional reconnaissance Pages using the property "ExplorationOutcome" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) + not indicated + 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) + useful + 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) + useful +

313

Raft River geoscience case study | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study study Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River geoscience case study Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically

314

CX-006315: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15: Categorical Exclusion Determination 15: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006315: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes for Purchase of the Thorne Creek Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/15/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 60-acre Thorne Creek property by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired as partial mitigation for the construction and operation of the Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River, and because of its riparian and natural resource values.

315

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/28/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 28, 2002 June 28, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-27) Ron Morinaka, KEWU-4 Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Abbot Creek Fish Barrier Project (Hungry Horse Mitigation / Habitat Improvements) Project No: 1991-19-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals Location: Kalispell, Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund a fishery enhancement project where a fish passage barrier will be installed in Abbot Creek to remove introduced rainbow trout

316

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

317

CX-006789: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89: Categorical Exclusion Determination 89: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006789: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for Purchase of Lake County Properties CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 09/09/2011 Location(s): Lake County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of seven properties, totaling 172 acres, by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the properties as a condition of funding the acquisitions. The properties are being acquired as partial mitigation for the construction and operation of the Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River, and because of their riparian and natural resource values.

318

2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Astor Pass Geothermal Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 100 new 2m measurements at Astor Pass, Nevada resolved additional details of near-surface thermal outflow in this blind geothermal system References Christopher Kratt, Chris Sladek, Mark Coolbaugh (2010) Boom And Bust With The Latest 2M Temperature Surveys- Dead Horse Wells, Hawthorne Army

319

County-level Estimates of Carbon Dioxide Release from Livestock, 2000-2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livestock, 2000-2008 Livestock, 2000-2008 Tristram O. West Joint Global Change Research Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Craig C. Brandt Oak Ridge National Laboratory These data represent carbon dioxide release by livestock in the United States. Emissions are based on livestock population data from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service and the Census of Agriculture. Livestock in this analysis include dairy cows, non-dairy cows, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, and horses. Additional details on datasets and methods used in this analysis can be found in the following publication: West, T.O., V. Bandaru, C.C. Brandt, A.E. Schuh, and S.M. Ogle. 2011. Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States. Biogeosciences 8: 2037-2046. DOI: 10.5194/bgd-8-2037-2011.

320

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thunder horse mc778" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Intramolecular ET Rates in Modified Ferrocytochromes c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intramolecular Electron-Transfer Rates on Driving Force, pH, Intramolecular Electron-Transfer Rates on Driving Force, pH, and Temperature in Ammineruthenium-Modified Ferrocytochromes c James F. Wishart, Ji Sun, Myung Cho, Chang Su, and Stephan S. Isied J. Phys. Chem. B 101, 687-693 (1997) [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Several ruthenium ammine complexes were used to modify horse-heart cytochrome c at histidine-33, creating a series of (NH3)4(L)Ru-Cyt c derivatives (L = H2O/OH-, ammonia, 4-ethylpyridine, 3,5-lutidine, pyridine, isonicotinamide, N-methylpyrazinium) with a wide range of driving forces for Fe-to-Ru electron transfer (-DG° = -0.125 to +0.46 eV). Electron-transfer rates and activation parameters were measured by pulse radiolysis using azide or carbonate radicals. The driving-force dependence

322

Outdoor Manners  

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Outdoor Manners Outdoor Manners Nature Bulletin No. 683-A June 10, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OUTDOOR MANNERS I AM AN OLD TIME COUNTRY LANE -- just a plain dirt road with a lot of ups and downs, built by the pioneers who settled this region. I was abandoned, thank goodness, after those tin Lizzies began to honk and rattle through the country. They didn't like me and I didn't like them. For more than a century, people went this way on foot, on horseback, and in vehicles drawn by horses or mules. I became well acquainted with many of them and some of their great-grandchildren. They became acquainted with my trees, my wildflowers, the birds and all of my wild creatures. In those days most folks were friendly, neighborly people. They had time to stop, visit, look and listen.

323

High Pressure Pulse Radiolysis-Reduction Cyt c by Ru(II) Complexes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for a for a Reversible Intermolecular Electron-Transfer Reaction involving Isonicotinamide(pentaammine)ruthenium and Cytochrome c Beate Bänsch, Martin Meier, Pablo Martinez, Rudi van Eldik, Chang Su, Ji Sun, Stephan S. Isied and James F. Wishart Inorg. Chem. 33, 4744-4749 (1994) Abstract: The reversible intermolecular electron-transfer reaction between pentaammineisonicotinamideruthenium(II/III) and horse-heart cytochrome c iron(III/II) was subjected to a detailed kinetic and thermodynamic study as a function of temperature and pressure. Theoretical calculations based on the Marcus-Hush theory were employed to predict all rate and equilibrium constants as well as activation parameters. There is an excellent agreement between the kinetically and thermodynamically determined equilibrium

324

Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The realistic animation of animal behavior by autonomous animate agents requires that the agents able to perceive their virtual worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrodynamically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit a rudimentary model of fish perception. Complex individual and group behaviors, including target tracking, obstacle avoidance, feeding, preying, schooling, and mating, result from the interplay between the internal cognitive state of the artificial fish and its perception of the external world. 1 Introduction Considerable research has focused on the computer animation of animals, such as insects, reptiles, birds, horses, and humans. 1 Unlike their natural counterparts, the earliest graphics models of animals had no autonomy and their motions had to be laboriously keyframed like animated cartoons. Subsequently, researchers developed kinematic and then dynamic...

Xiaoyuan Tu; Demetri Terzopoulos

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Modelling complex draft-tube flows using near-wall turbulence closures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a finite-volume method for simulating flows through complex hydroturbine draft-tube configurations using near-wall turbulence closures. The method employs the artificial-compressibility pressure-velocity coupling approach in conjunction with multigrid acceleration for fast convergence on very fine grids. Calculations are carried out for a draft tube with two downstream piers on a computational mesh consisting of 1.2x10{sup 6} nodes. Comparisons of the computed results with measurements demonstrate the ability of the method to capture most experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. Calculated three-dimensional particle traces reveal very complex flow features in the vicinity of the piers, including horse-shoe longitudinal vortices and and regions of flow reversal.

Ventikos, Y.; Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Patel, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)  

SciTech Connect

Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

Clark, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Albert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jorgenson, H. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mares, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oades, Kevin [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Kemshall, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Thomas, Philip [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Young, Trevor [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Pederson, Neal [VI Control Systems

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

330

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intraseasonal Variation Observed from Multi-Infrared Channel Intraseasonal Variation Observed from Multi-Infrared Channel Inoue, T., Meteorological Research Institute Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Intraseasonal variations (MJO) of convective cloud, sea surface temperature (SST) and water vapor information are studied using three infrared channels (6.7, 11, 12 um). Split window(11 and 12 um) can classify optically thin ice cloud and optically thick cloud. Further SST and water vapor information can be retrieved from the split window over the cloud free region. We can estimate upper level relative humidity from the 6.7 um data. Composite analysis of cloud type associated with the intraseasonal variation during May 1998 showed the horse shoe shape deep convective cloud area near the center of the MJO, cirrus type cloud area to the west of the

331

Manhattan Project: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SITE MAP SITE MAP Resources > Site Map THE MANHATTAN PROJECT Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries A Miniature Solar System, 1890s-1919 Exploring the Atom, 1919-1932 Atomic Bombardment, 1932-1938 The Discovery of Fission, 1938-1939 Fission Comes to America, 1939 1939-1942: Early Government Support Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 1942: Difficult Choices More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 1942-1944: The Uranium Path to the Bomb Y-12: Design, 1942-1943 Y-12: Construction, 1943

332

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2001 - 12010 of 26,764 results. 2001 - 12010 of 26,764 results. Download CX-010726: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Eddy-Redmond No.1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/14/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010726-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010736: Categorical Exclusion Determination Capacity Increase on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Horse Ranch Tap Line CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/17/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010736-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010737: Categorical Exclusion Determination Insulator Replacement on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) North

333

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Intramolecular ET in Ru-Modified MnCyt c  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tetraammine(L)ruthenium(III)-Modified Tetraammine(L)ruthenium(III)-Modified Manganocytochromes c Ji Sun and James F. Wishart Inorg. Chem. 37, 1124-1126 (1998) [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Manganese-substituted horse heart cytochrome c was prepared by replacing the iron in the heme group according to established methods. The resulting manganicytochrome c was subsequently modified at histidine-33 with three ruthenium complexes trans-(NH3)4(L)Ru-His33, where L = NH3, pyridine or isonicotinamide. Proof of correct derivatization was obtained by atomic absorption analysis of manganese and ruthenium, differential pulse voltammetry and electrospray mass spectroscopy. Manganese(II)-to-ruthenium(III) intramolecular electron transfer rates were measured as a function of temperature by pulse radiolysis, using oxidation

335

Lyntegar Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lyntegar Electric Coop, Inc Lyntegar Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Lyntegar Electric Coop, Inc Place Texas Utility Id 11364 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC ERCOT Yes NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cotton Gin Service "CG" Commercial General service single-phase Residential General service three-phase Residential Irrigation Single-Phase Service Industrial Irrigation Three-Phase Service Industrial Large Power Service "LP" Industrial Muncipal Pumping Service - 100kW or less - Horse Power Commercial

336

Assignment of the sup 1 H and sup 15 N NMR spectra of Rhodobacter capsulatus ferrocytochrome c sub 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The peptide resonances of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of ferrocytochrome c{sub 2} from Rhodobacter capsulatus are sequentially assigned by a combination of 2D {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectroscopy, the latter performed on {sup 15}N-enriched protein. Short-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data show {alpha}-helices from residues 3-17, 55-65, 69-88, and 103-115. Within the latter two {alpha}-helices, there are three single 3{sub 10} turns, 70-72, 76-78, and 107-109. In addition {alpha}H-NH{sub i+1} and {alpha}H-NH{sub i+2} NOEs indicate that the N-terminal helix (3-17) is distorted. Compared to horse or tuna cytochrome c and cytochrome c{sub 2} of Rhodospirillium rubrum, there is a 6-residue insertion at residues 23-29 in R. capsulatus cytochrome c{sub 2}. The NOE data show that this insertion forms a loop, probably an {Omega} loop. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation experiments are used to follow NH exchange over a period of 40 h. As the 2D spectra are acquired in short time periods (30 min), rates for intermediate exchanging protons can be measured. Comparison of the NH exchange data for the N-terminal helix of cytochrome c{sub 2} of R. capsulatus with the highly homologous horse heart cytochrome c shows that this helix is less stable in cytochrome c{sub 2}.

Gooley, P.R.; Caffrey, M.S.; Cusanovich, M.A.; MacKenzie, N.E. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transition-metal chromophore as a new, sensitive spectroscopic tag for proteins. Selective covalent labeling of histidine residues in cytochromes c with chloro(2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)platinum(II) chloride  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity and selectivity of Pt(trpy)Cl/sup +/ toward proteins are studied with cytochromes c from horse and tuna as examples. The new transition-metal reagent is specific for histidine residues at pH 5. The reaction, facile one-step displacement of the Cl/sup -/ ligand by imidazole, produces good yield. The binding sites, His 26 and His 33 in the horse protein and His 26 in the tuna protein, are identified by UV-vis spectrophotometry and by peptide-mapping experiments. Model complexes with imidazole, histidine, histidine derivatives, and histidine-containing peptides are prepared and characterized. The covalently attached Pt(trpy)/sup 2 +/ labels allow easy separation of the protein derivatives by cation-exchange chromatography. The labels do not perturb the conformation and reduction potential of cytochrome c, as shown by UV-vis spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, differential-pulse voltammetry, EPR spectroscopy, and /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. The selectivity of Pt(trpy)Cl/sup +/ is entirely opposite from that of PtCl/sub 4//sup 2 -/ although both of them are platinum(II)-chloro complexes. Owing to an interplay between the steric and electronic effects of the terpyridyl ligand, the new reagent is unreactive toward methionine (a thio ether) and cystine (a disulfide), which are otherwise highly nucleophilic ligands, but very reactive toward imidazole, which is otherwise a relatively weak ligand. Unusual and useful selectivity of preformed transition-metal complexes toward proteins evidently can be achieved by a judicious choice of ancillary ligands.

Ratilla, E.M.A.; Brothers, H.M. II; Kostic, N.M.

1987-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stratigraphic controls on lateral variations in the structural style of northeastern Brooks range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural style of the range-front region of the northeastern Brooks Range in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is strongly controlled by (1) the existence of detachment horizons in both pre-Mississippian rocks and the unconformably overlying Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous cover sequence, and (2) lithology and structural competency of the pre-Mississippian rocks. These variables strongly influence lateral changes in structural style. The Brooks Range of northwestern ANWR is dominated by a series of narrow linear anticlinoria, whereas in northeastern ANWR the Brooks Range is characterized by only two broad and strongly arcuate anticlinoria. In both areas, the anticlinoria are controlled by the geometry of a duplex bounded by a floor thrust in pre-Mississippian rocks and a roof thrust in the Kayak Shale, near the base of the cover sequence. In the west, where the pre-Mississippian partially consists of structurally competent carbonates, each anticlinorium marks a single horse in the duplex. However, in the east, pre-Mississippian rocks are relatively incompetent and each anticlinorium is cored by multiple horses. In the west, shortening above the roof thrust is by detachment folding, except where the shale detachment horizon is depositionally absent. In contrast, in eastern ANWR shortening above the roof thrust is by major thrust duplication of the entire cover sequence, perhaps due to lithology and thickness changes within the detachment horizon. A Devonian batholith marks the boundary between the eastern and western structural provinces. The thrust-controlled range front of eastern ANWR extends north of the batholith, suggesting that the batholith itself may be underlain by a thrust fault.

Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

2012 SARA Students Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Service Academy Research Associates (SARA) program provides an opportunity for Midshipmen and Cadets from US Service Academies to participate in research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratory for several weeks during the summer as part of their summer training assignments. During the summer of 2012, three Midshipmen were assigned to work with the XCP Division at LANL for approximately 5-6 weeks. As one of the nation's top national security science laboratories, LANL stretches across 36 square miles, has over 2,100 facilities, and employs over 9,000 individuals including a significant number of students and postdocs. LANL's mission is to 'apply science and technology to: ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent, reduce global threats, and solve other emerging national security challenges.' While LANL officially operates under the US Department of Energy (DoE), fulfilling this mission requires mutual cooperation with the US Department of Defense (DoD) as well. LANL's high concentration of knowledge and experience provides interns a chance to perform research in many disciplines, and its connection with the DoD in both operation and personnel gives SARA students insight to career possibilities both during and after military service. SARA students have plenty of opportunity to enjoy hiking, camping, the Los Alamos YMCA, and many other outdoor activities in New Mexico while staying at the Buffalo Thunder Resort, located 20 miles east of the lab. XCP Division is the Computational Physics division of LANL's Weapons Department. Working with XCP Division requires individuals to be Q cleared by the DoE. This means it is significantly more convenient for SARA students to be assigned to XCP Division than their civilian counterparts as the DoD CNWDI clearance held by SARA students is easily transferred to the lab prior to the students arriving at the start of the summer. SARA students working with XCP Division were given a comprehensive introduction into nuclear engineering and physics, nuclear weapons, and radiation transport and detection via texts and lectures at various classification levels. Students also attended tours of several prominent facilities at LANL including TA-41 Ice House, TA-55 PF-4 plutonium facility, the Nicholas C. Metropolis Center for Modeling and Simulation, also known as the Secure Computing Center (SCC), and the Dual-Axis Radiological Hydro Test (DARHT) facility; in addition, SARA students accompanied by LANL staff traveled to Minot AFB in North Dakota for tours of the 5th Bomb Wing and 91st Missile Wing facilities. Students participated in a week long class on the Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code to supplement their understanding of radiation transport simulations. SARA students were then tasked with using this knowledge to model radiation detectors and use MCNP to compare their models to experimental data and previously accepted models.

Briccetti, Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorei, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yonkings, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lorio, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goorley, John T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sood, Avneet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Global lightning and severe storm monitoring from GPS orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, there has been a growing interest to develop and deploy an automated and continuously operating satellite-based global lightning mapper [e.g. Christian et al., 1989; Weber et al., 1998; Suszcynsky et al., 2000]. Lightning is a direct consequence of the electrification and breakdown processes that take place during the convective stages of thunderstorm development. Satellite-based lightning mappers are designed to exploit this relationship by using lightning detection as a proxy for remotely identifying, locating and characterizing strong convective activity on a global basis. Global lightning and convection mapping promises to provide users with (1) an enhanced global severe weather monitoring and early warning capability [e.g. Weber et al., 1998] (2) improved ability to optimize aviation flight paths around convective cells, particularly over oceanic and remote regions that are not sufficiently serviced by existing weather radar [e.g. Weber et al., 1998], and (3) access to regional and global proxy data sets that can be used for scientific studies and as input into meteorological forecast and global climatology models. The physical foundation for satellite-based remote sensing of convection by way of lightning detection is provided by the basic interplay between the electrical and convective states of a thundercloud. It is widely believed that convection is a driving mechanism behind the hydrometeor charging and transport that produces charge separation and lightning discharges within thunderclouds [e.g. see chapter 3 in MacGorman and Rust, 1998]. Although cloud electrification and discharge processes are a complex function of the convective dynamics and microphysics of the cloud, the fundamental relationship between convection and electrification is easy to observe. For example, studies have shown that the strength of the convective process within a thundercell can be loosely parameterized (with large variance) by the intensity of the electrical activity within that cell as measured by the lightning flash rate. Williams [2001] has provided a review of experimental work that shows correlations between the total lightning flash rate and the fifth power of the radar cloud-top height (i.e. convective strength) of individual thunder cells. More recently, Ushio et al., [2001] used a large statistical sampling of optical data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) in conjunction with data provided by the Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission (TRMM) satellite to conclude that the total lightning flash rate increases exponentially with storm height. Lightning activity levels have also been correlated to cloud ice content, a basic product of the convective process. For example, Blyth et al. [2001] used the Thermal Microwave Imager (TMI) aboard the TRMM satellite to observe a decrease in the 37 and 85 GHz brightness temperatures of upwelling terrestrial radiation during increased lightning activity. This reduction in brightness temperature is believed to be the result of increased ice scattering in the mixed phase region of the cloud. Toracinta and Zipser [2001] have found similar relationships using the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) satellite instrument and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) aboard the DMSP satellites.

Suszcynsky, D. M. (David M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Linford, J (Justin); Pongratz, M. B. (Morris B.); Light, T. (Tracy E.); Shao, X. (Xuan-Min)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Babesia microti cysteine protease-1 as a target for vaccine development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Babesia species have a worldwide distribution, affecting a wide range of mammalian hosts. The major route of transmission is inoculation by an infected Ixodid tick. Babesia species of major economic concern are those that cause bovine and equine babesiosis. Historically, bovine Babesia species, Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina caused significant economic losses in the United States in the 1860�s, as thousands of cattle died. Also, outbreaks of equine babesiosis, caused by Babesia equi or Babesia caballi, have occurred in the United States resulting in the death of some horses and millions of dollars in losses. A constant risk of reinfection with bovine and equine Babesia species exists, as stray and smuggled animals from Mexico, where bovine babesiosis is endemic, may carry infected ticks as they cross the border, and, thousands of horses from B. equiand B. caballi-endemic regions are imported through Florida every year. Vaccines have been developed for a number of Babesia species, none of which result in sterile immunity. The live attenuated vaccine is the most commonly used vaccine against Babesia species. However, the basis for the vaccine is to maintain a carrier state in order to prevent disease. Other vaccine designs have been developed to invoke protection without a carrier state but have been unsuccessful. It has been shown that the cysteine protease is important in the life cycle of a number of parasitic organisms, making it a good target for vaccine development. The vaccine design for this study incorporated the cysteine protease of Babesia microti. Babesia microti naturally infects Peromyscus leucopus (white-footed mouse) and is the major cause of human babesiosis in the United States. Using B. microti in the vaccine design allowed for the use of a mouse model to determine whether the cysteine protease of other economically important Babesia species may make a good vaccine target. The vaccine design incorporated a prime-boost strategy, priming with DNA encoding the cysteine protease and boosting two times with either DNA encoding the cysteine protease or cysteine protease peptide, followed by parasite challenge. Analysis of daily percent parasitemias, packed cell volume, and seroconversion of all groups revealed that a protective immune response against B. microti was not elicited by this vaccine strategy.

James, Allison Melissa

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

347

Analysis of Protein-RNA and Protein-Peptide Interactions in Equine Infectious Anemia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Macromolecular interactions are essential for virtually all cellular functions including signal transduction processes, metabolic processes, regulation of gene expression and immune responses. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of two important macromolecular interactions involved in the relationship between Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) and its host cell in horse: (1) the interaction between the EIAV Rev protein and its binding site, the Rev-responsive element (RRE) and (2) interactions between equine MHC class I molecules and epitope peptides derived from EIAV proteins. EIAV, one of the most divergent members of the lentivirus family, has a single-stranded RNA genome and carries several regulatory and structural proteins within its viral particle. Rev is an essential EIAV regulatory encoded protein that interacts with the viral RRE, a specific binding site in the viral mRNA. Using a combination of experimental and computational methods, the interactions between EIAV Rev and RRE were characterized in detail. EIAV Rev was shown to have a bipartite RNA binding domain contain two arginine rich motifs (ARMs). The RRE secondary structure was determined and specific structural motifs that act as cis-regulatory elements for EIAV Rev-RRE interaction were identified. Interestingly, a structural motif located in the high affinity Rev binding site is well conserved in several diverse lentiviral genoes, including HIV-1. Macromolecular interactions involved in the immune response of the horse to EIAV infection were investigated by analyzing complexes between MHC class I proteins and epitope peptides derived from EIAV Rev, Env and Gag proteins. Computational modeling results provided a mechanistic explanation for the experimental finding that a single amino acid change in the peptide binding domain of the quine MHC class I molecule differentially affectes the recognitino of specific epitopes by EIAV-specific CTL. Together, the findings in this dissertation provide novel insights into the strategy used by EIAV to replicate itself, and provide new details about how the host cell responds to and defends against EIAV upon the infection. Moreover, they have contributed to the understanding of the macromolecular recognition events that regulate these processes.

Jae-Hyung Lee

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Education Program for Improved Water Quality in Copano Bay Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Copano Bay watershed covers approximately 1.4 million acres encompassing portions of Karnes, Bee, Goliad, Refugio, San Patricio and Aransas counties. Copano Bay and its main tributaries, the Mission and Aransas rivers, were placed on the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) 303(d) list in 1998 due to levels of bacteria that exceed water quality standards established to protect oyster waters use. A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program was initiated in September 2003 to identify and assess sources of these bacteria. The Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas at Austin (UT CRWR) was funded by TCEQ to conduct computer-based modeling to determine the bacterial loading and reductions necessary to attain water quality standards. Subsequently Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (TAMU-CC) conducted bacterial source tracking (BST) with funding from Texas General Land Office (TGLO) and the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program (CBBEP) to determine actual sources of bacteria. Due to the findings of the initial efforts of the TMDL and concerns voiced by stakeholders in the watershed, Texas AgriLife Extension Service was awarded a Clean Water Act § 319(h) Nonpoint Source Grant from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The overall goal of this project was to improve water quality in Copano Bay and its tributaries by increasing awareness of water quality issues throughout the watershed. This increased awareness was to be accomplished by providing education and demonstrations for land and livestock owners in the watershed on best management practices (BMPs) to decrease or prevent bacteria from entering waterways. Through creation of a project website, 52 educational programs, and nine one-on-one consultations over the span of the project, we have reached 5,408 residents in and around the Copano Bay watershed. Additionally, through this project all data collected for the initial TMDL efforts was re-evaluated and findings were presented in the “Task 2 Report.” Project members developed a curriculum for horse owners, “A Guide to Good Horsekeeping” that addressed BMPs specific to horse operations. Land and livestock owners who had already implemented BMPs or were interested in implementing BMPs were given a participation certificate.

Berthold, A.; Moench, E.; Wagner, K.; Paschal, J.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

VIEW FROM THE PENNINES: SYSTEMS BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of trees were planted in the eld at the back of our garden about ten years ago. Some are relatively fast growing (silver birch, larch, some rs) and others less so (oak, horse chestnut). The planting was quite well thought out, and in the next few years the faster growing species will need to be thinned, creating space for the slowly maturing giants. This process has been something of a learning experience for me. I have been able to name most of the trees for years, but only now am I beginning to see how the trees grow (or do not grow) as a function of their variety and their position. It may already be too late for one young horse chestnut, which is having to compete for light and other resources with two well grown larches and a silver birch, but I am beginning to understand what needs to be done to encourage the more slowly growing varieties. The understanding and manipulation of the trees ' development requires the trees to be considered as a group, although information about individual trees (their growth rates for example) is important, and the e ect of thinning creates perturbations which take years to stabilize, so the whole process is slow and complicated. Choosing what to cut down is further in uenced by the steady state we may wish to create eventually, and the aesthetics of the interim states. The choices I am making in the eld are crude and uninformed, but the ecological system seems su ciently robust that my actions have not destroyed the overall feel of the eld. Much more subtle calculations are being made in biology, where, at least amongst some researchers, there is an awareness that considering anything in isolation, sequencing the human genome for example, does not necessarily help understand the actions or functions of the components. An approach to biology which brings together experimentation at the molecular level (chemistry), modelling (computer science and mathematics) and the investigation of how functionality is achieved (biology) has taken o in the last ve years. This approach is usually referred to as systems biology,

Paul Glendinning; Paul Glendinning

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Chicken Pox  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicken Pox Chicken Pox Name: Mike Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is the virus entitled Chicken Pox when it is contracted by humans? How did Chicken Pox get its name? If cows can contract a virus entitled cow pox, why is Chicken Pox Chicken Pox? Replies: Hi! The reason is exactly that: because there is a chicken disease called "chicken pox"...even "our " chicken pox isn't caused by the same virus... see, pox diseases are a complex of viral diseases in domestic animals and men, marked mainly by eruptions of the skin and mucous membranes. So there is for example: smallpox (men), sheep pox, rabbit pox, horse pox, fowl pox, cow pox, mouse pox, and so on... Pox virus are the group of viruses responsible for small pox in humans and a wide range of pox diseases in animals. Chicken pox in humans is also called varicella and is caused by a herpes virus.

351

Manhattan Project: More Piles and Plutonium, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. MORE PILES AND PLUTONIUM (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 At the University of Chicago, meanwhile, Arthur Compton had consolidated most fission research at his new Metallurgical Laboratory(Met Lab). Compton decided to combine all pile research by stages. He continued to fund Enrico Fermi's pile research at Columbia University, while Fermi began preparations to move his work to Chicago. Funding continued as well for the theoretical work of Eugene Wigner at Princeton and of J. Robert Oppenheimer at the University of California, Berkeley. Compton also appointed Leo Szilard head of materials acquisition and arranged for Glenn T. Seaborg to move his plutonium work from Berkeley to Chicago in April 1942.

352

Manhattan Project: More Uranium Research, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH Cubes of uranium metal, Los Alamos, 1945 MORE URANIUM RESEARCH (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 During the first half of 1942, several routes to a bomb via uranium continued to be explored. At Columbia University, Harold Urey worked on the gaseous diffusion and centrifuge systems for isotope separation in the codenamed SAM (Substitute or Special Alloy Metals) Laboratory. At Berkeley, Ernest Lawrence continued his investigations on electromagnetic separation using the "calutron" he had converted from his thirty-seven-inch cyclotron. Phillip Abelson, who had moved from the Carnegie Institution and the National Bureau of Standards to the Naval Research Laboratory, continued his work on liquid thermal diffusion but with few positive results, and he had lost all contact with the S-1 Section of the Office of Scientific Research and Development. Meanwhile Eger Murphree's group hurriedly studied ways to move from laboratory experiments to production facilities.

353

Property:NEPA Resource Comment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comment Comment Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Resource Comment Property Type Text Description Comment on the analysis of a potential impact to a NEPA resource Subproperties This property has the following 4 subproperties: D DOI-BLM-NV-063-EA08-091#NEPAImpact_with_Wild_Horse_and_Burro_Management DOI-BLM-NV-063-EA08-091#NEPAImpact_with_Recreation DOI-BLM-NV-063-EA08-091 DOI-BLM-NV-063-EA08-091#NEPAImpact_with_Paleontological_Resources Pages using the property "NEPA Resource Comment" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Prime_or_Unique_Farmlands + The proposed project is not located in or near any prime or unique farmlands (BLM WFO 2002). BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01#NEPAImpact_with_Wilderness + The proposed project is not in or adjacent to any wilderness area (BLM WFO 2002).

354

Tree Flowers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flowers Flowers Nature Bulletin No. 524-A April 6, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation TREE FLOWERS Many people do not realize that all of our common trees have flowers. Otherwise they could not produce seeds. We are apt to think of flowering trees as being those with showy blossoms -- most of them beautiful and some very fragrant -- such as the redbud, dogwood, buckeye, horse chestnut, black locust, tulip tree or yellow poplar, magnolia, and the fruit trees. However, all of our forest and shade trees have flowers -- of some kind -- which are just as interesting when examined with a strong reading glass. Some are grotesque, some exquisitely designed, some extremely colorful. They offer a new world to be explored and photographed. Some kinds, such as the elms, bloom profusely but the flowers are so small and delicately tinted that they are seldom noticed. Others, such as the poplars, oaks and walnuts, have peculiar flowers in the form of catkins that, without petals or sepals, do not look like flowers at all. The sycamore's tiny flowers are packed, in countless numbers, into a tight round ball that dangles back and forth on a long flexible stem.

355

Data:98933602-cec3-46f2-8d04-08754b32d43f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

602-cec3-46f2-8d04-08754b32d43f 602-cec3-46f2-8d04-08754b32d43f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: PUD No 1 of Benton County Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Agricultural Irrigation without Annual Facilities Charge Sector: Commercial Description: To agricultural irrigation power in excess of 300 horsepower served by one meter, or as covered by special power sales contract and not subject to the District's Annual Facilities Charge. Time of Use rate defined Monday through Saturday. The minimum annual bill shall be $5.75 per horse-power. Source or reference: http://www.bentonpud.org/images/site/flipbooks/BentonPUDPolicyRates%20%282%29/#/20/

356

Remote Access to Brookhaven, Information Services Division (ISD),  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISD Homepage ISD Homepage Site Details ISD Staff Remote Access Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Remote Access to Brookhaven External BNL users who need internet access to the internal ISD website which includes the Research Library, Records Management, Publications and Technical Editing must have a Virtual Private Network (VPN) account to connect to the BNL Internal Campus Network. This account can be setup by the Accounts Management Office. Available Options Remote Access Policy Broad-Band Connection: must use VPN with a CryptoCard Token Anti-Virus Procedures All Windows PCs should be running one of Brookhaven's official anti-virus software packages when connecting remotely to the BNL Internal Campus Network. Anti-Virus procedures are an important component of BNL's host-based security architecture. Anti-Virus software is the component of this architecture that provides a protection mechanism against malicious code. Malicious codes are programs, such as Trojan horses or viruses, that run on a host system without the authorization of the system user. These codes typically come from e-mail attachments, or can be downloaded along with programs from the Internet, or through an infected floppy disk. Properly installed anti-virus software can minimize these vulnerabilities.

357

Manhattan Project: Difficult Choices, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES (1942) Events More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 By early 1942, as the United States suffered a series of military defeats in the Pacific, top officials in Washington tentatively had decided to proceed with the construction of an atomic bomb. Two paths seemed possible. A uranium bomb could be achieved if sufficient uranium-235 could be produced by one or more of the three isotope separation methods under consideration: gaseous diffusion, centrifuge, and electromagnetic. A plutonium bomb might provide a quicker route, but it required demonstration that plutonium could be produced in a uranium pile and then be separated in usable quantities. To this end, Arthur Compton consolidated most plutonium research at the new Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) at the University of Chicago.

358

Data:0896dce6-d4cf-4c36-8d2b-7bf78a7d3832 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dce6-d4cf-4c36-8d2b-7bf78a7d3832 dce6-d4cf-4c36-8d2b-7bf78a7d3832 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Kaw Valley Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/02/01 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation Service (40) Sector: Commercial Description: There is a Horse Power Charge of $2 The Flat rate Adjustments fluctuates with the Cooperative's Wholesale Power Cost. Source or reference: http://www.kve.coop/elecRates.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

359

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Computer Viruses and Other Hazards Name: Paul Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: IL Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What is a Computer Virus? What do viruses do? How do viruses Spread? How do I prevent a virus? What are Trojan Horse programs? Malware? Phishing? Replies: Paul From National Institute of Science and Technology Which is the US government office in charge of this problem and should be your reference for this subject At this URL: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-61-rev1/SP800-61rev1.pdf Please find the following definitions from paragraph 5: 5.1.1 Virus: A virus is designed to self-replicate-make copies of itself-and distribute the copies to other files, programs, or computers. Viruses insert themselves into host programs and propagate when the infected program is executed, generally by user interaction (e.g., opening a file, running a program, clicking on a file attachment). Viruses have many purposes-some are designed to play annoying tricks, whereas others have destructive intent. Some viruses present themselves as jokes while performing secret destructive functions. There two major types of viruses are compiled viruses, which are executed by the operating system, and interpreted viruses, which are executed by an application.

360

Solar photovoltaic technology: The thin film option  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaics (PV) the direct conversion of sunlight to electricity was first discovered by scientists at the Bell Labs in 1954. In the late 1960's and 1970's most of the solar cell technology has been used for space applications to power satellites. The main work horse for the PV technology has been crystalline silicon (Si) solar cells. Over the past 15 years this has led to cost reduction from $35/kWh to about $0.30/kWh at the present time. Demonstrated reliability of 20 years or more has resulted in acceptance by several utilities. However, cost reductions in crystalline Si solar cells have been limited by the cost of wafering of ingots and the attendant loss of material. A number of Si sheet solar cells are also being investigated. In the past decade the emphasis of the research and development effort has been focused on thin film solar cells, which have the potential for generating power at much lower cost of $1-2/Wp. Thin film solar cells that are presently being investigated and are generating global attention are: amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium diselenide (CuInSe/sub 2,/ or CIS). In the past few years, considerable progress has been; made by all three of these thin film solar cells. This paper reviews the current status and future potential of these exiting thin film solar cell technologies.

Ullal, H.S.; Zweibel, K.; Sabisky, E.S.; Surek, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Energy-efficient alcohol-fuel production. Technical final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed utilization schedule for the alcohol fuel plant and methane generator is to produce 180 proof ethanol during the spring, summer, and fall (April to October). The ethanol will be used in the farm tractors and trucks during the planting, growing, and harvesting seasons. Some alcohol can be stored for use during the winter. The still will not be operated during the winter (November to March) when the methane from the digester will be used to replace fuel oil for heating a swine farrowing building. There are tentative plans to develop a larger methane generator, which will utilize all of the manure (dairy, beef, horses, and swine) produced on the ISU farm. If this project is completed, there will be enough methane to produce all of the alcohol fuel needed to operate all of the farm equipment, heat the buildings, and possibly generate electricity for the farm. The methane generating system developed is working so well that there is a great deal of interest in expanding the project to where it could utilize all of the livestock waste on the farm for methane production.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Treatment of bovine cancer-eye (and other animal tumors) with heat  

SciTech Connect

Hyperthermia appears to be an excellent technique for the treatment of a variety of animal tumors. While this report has emphasized the application of hyperthermia to bovine cancer-eye, there cannot be serious doubt about the potential for wider applications of the technique. We have collaborated with the Animal Resource Facility at the University of New Mexico in the successful treatment of a variety of tumors in small animals which would not be a particular interest to stockmen, but the program included the successful treatment of a number of sarcoids in horses. This investigation involving heat effects on sarcoids will continue, but early results appear to be promising. Other veterinarians are using the commercial hyperthermia instruments to treat a variety of small-animal tumors; these practitioners are enthusiastic about the results but no data have been published to date. We have treated an equine lid tumor with good results, and others are pursuing investigations in this area. Use of commercial hyperthermia instruments for treatment of any condition other than bovine cancer-eye or similar small tumors on animals cannot be justified. Like other therapeutic techniques, hyperthermia must be applied to appropriate cases and retreatment will be necessary in some instances. (ERB)

Doss, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

High accuracy {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate in the 8{center_dot}10{sup 6}-5{center_dot}10{sup 9} K temperature range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction is of great importance in several astrophysical scenarios, as it influences the production of key isotopes such as {sup 19}F, {sup 18}O and {sup 15}N. In this work, a high accuracy {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}){sup 15}N reaction rate is proposed, based on the simultaneous fit of direct measurements and of the results of a new Trojan Horse experiment. In particular, we have focused on the study of the broad 660 keV 1/2{sup +} resonance. Since {Gamma}{approx}100-300 keV, it strongly influences the nearly-zero-energy region of the cross section by means of the low-energy tail of the resonant contribution and dominates the cross section at higher energies. Here we provide a factor of 2 larger reaction rate above T{approx}0.5 10{sup 9} K based over our new improved determination of its resonance parameters.

La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and DMFCI - Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E. [Cyclotron Institute - Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Coc, A. [CSNSM CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay France (France); Irgaziev, B. [GIK - Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi District (Pakistan)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

Plasma Measurements: An Overview of Requirements and Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces this special issue on plasma diagnostics for magnetic fusion devices. Its primary purpose is to relate the measurements of plasma parameters to the physics challenges to be faced on operating and planned devices, and also to identify the diagnostic techniques that are used to make these measurements. The specific physics involved in the application of the techniques will be addressed in subsequent chapters. This chapter is biased toward measurements for tokamaks because of their proximity to the burning plasma frontier, and to set the scene for the development work associated with ITER. Hence, there is some emphasis on measurements for alpha-physics studies and the needs for plasma measurements as input to actuators to control the plasma, both for optimizing the device performance and for protection of the surrounding material. The very different approach to the engineering of diagnostics for a burning plasma is considered, emphasizing the needs for new calibration ideas, reliability and hardness against, and compatibility with, radiation. New ideas take a long time to be converted into "work-horse" sophisticated diagnostics so that investment in new developments is essential for ITER, particularly for the measurement of alpha-particles.

Kenneth M. Young

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Land-Grant Mission and The Cowboy Church: Diffusing University-Community Engagement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The land-grant university and the cowboy church are two social institutions designed to engage communities. Research is abundant on the former and limited on the latter. The purpose of this study was to provide a descriptive report on cowboy churches, while identifying the potential for university-cowboy church collaborations and examining the direct implications to Cooperative Extension. Rogers' Diffusions of Innovations conceptualized this study and was employed to evaluate the acceptability of university-cowboy church collaborations. This basic qualitative study utilized a purposive snowball technique to identify key informants of the American Fellowship of Cowboy Churches (AFCC). Ten subjects participated in semi-structured, face-to-face and phone interviews. Data were analyzed for common themes and patterns within the context of each of this study's objectives. Findings described cowboy churches affiliated with the AFCC, the interpersonal and mass media communication channels used by these churches, and subject awareness of Cooperative Extension. Conclusions and implications suggest university-cowboy church collaborations are an acceptable innovation, especially in the context of Extension collaborations. There are relative advantages for such collaborations, shared compatibility through each institution's mission, and ample opportunities for trialibility. County agents should initiate contact with cowboy church pastors and collaborations should be initiated regarding in information exchange, horses, livestock shows, and youth.

Williams, Katy

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

Casey, Daniel

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Written for presentation at the 2007 ASABE Annual International Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Anaerobic digestion on the farm has been promoted for decades as an effective method to reduce pollution and produce fuel. However, because of the cost and the problems associated with anaerobic digestion of animal manures and the lack of return on the investment, there are relatively few digesters being installed in the United States. Most of the biogas produced by anaerobic digestion is used to generate electricity. Grid interconnect agreements require lengthy negotiations and are difficult to finalize. Usually the electrical rates received are below the cost of production because equipment for electrical generation is expensive to install and expensive to maintain. By showing that biogas can easily be used as a fuel in trucks and/or tractors, anaerobic digestion would be more attractive especially on smaller facilities. High fuel prices are starting to have a significant impact on the economic viability of farms. If farmers could produce there own fuel in the form of biogas the pay back time on an anaerobic digester system could be reduced significantly. This would also encourage the installation of more pollution preventing anaerobic digester systems. With the help from a Rural Development (USDA), grant, Utah State University has been operating a 1996 Chevy ton truck on biogas produced by their Induced Blanket Reactor (IBR) anaerobic digester. This presentation will report on the trucks performance over the past 8 months comparing the use of biogas with gasoline and natural gas. Data includes horse power tests, oil sampling, and emissions tests.

Carl S. Hansen Phd; Conly Hansen Phd; Greg Sullivan; Sponsored Asabe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Direct measurements of intramolecular electron transfer rates between cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase: effects of exothermicity and primary sequence on rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid mixing of ferrocytochrome c peroxidase (cyt c peroxidase(II)) and ferricytochrome c (cyt c(III)) results in the reduction of cyt c(III) by cyt c peroxidase(II). In 10 mM phosphate, pH 7.0, the rate of decay of cyt c peroxidase(II) and the rate of accumulation of cyt c(II) give equal first-order rate constants. Equivalent results are obtained by pulse radiolysis using isopropanol radical as the reducing agent. This rate is independent of the initial cyt c(III):cyt c peroxidase(II) ratios. These results are consistent with unimolecular electron transfer occurring within a cyt c(III)-cyt c peroxidase(II) complex. When cyt c is replaced by porphyrin cyt c (iron-free cyt c), a complex still forms with cyt c peroxidase. On radiolysis intracomplex electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin cyt c anion radical to cyt c peroxidase(III). This large rate increase suggest that the barrier for intracomplex electron transfer is large. Finally, the authors have briefly investigated how the cyt c peroxidase(II) ..-->.. cyt c(III) rate depends on the primary structure of cyt c(III). They find the reactivity order to be as follows: yeast > horse > tuna.

Cheung, E.; Taylor, K.; Kornblatt, J.A.; English, A.M.; McLendon, G.; Miller, J.R.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effects of ancillary ligands on selectivity of protein labeling with platinum(II) chloro complexes  

SciTech Connect

Potassium (2,6-pyridinedicarboxylato)chloroplatinate(II) was synthesized. The molecular structure of the complex in (n-Bu){sub 4}N(Pt(dipic)Cl){center dot}0.5H{sub 2}O was determined by x-ray crystallography. The (Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} is essentially planar and contains a Pt(II) atom, a tridentate dipicolinate dianion ligand, and a unidentate Cl{sup {minus}} ligand. The bis(bidentate) complex trans-(Pt(dipic){sub 2}){sup 2{minus}} was also observed by {sup 1}H NMR. A red gel-like substance was observed when the yellow aqueous solution of K(Pt(dipic)Cl) was cooled or concentrated. The K(Pt(dipic)Cl) molecules form stacks in the solid state and gel-like substance but remain monomeric over a wide range of concentrations and temperatures. The reactivity and selectivity of(Pt(dipic)Cl){sup {minus}} toward cytochromes c from horse and tuna were studied. The new transition-metal reagent is specific for methionine residues. Di(2-pyridyl-{beta}-ethyl)sulfidochloroplatinum(II) chloride dihydrate was also synthesized. This complex labels histidine and methionine residues in cytochrome c. The ancillary ligands in these platinum(II) complexes clearly determine the selectivity of protein labeling. 106 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

Zhou, Xia-Ying.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lyme Disease Lyme Borreliosis,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lyme disease is a tickborne illness that results from infection with members of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. These organisms are maintained in wild animals, but they can affect humans and some species of domesticated animals. Lyme disease was first recognized in the 1970s, when a cluster of juvenile arthritis cases was investigated in the U.S., but its symptoms can be found in European historical records as far back as the early 20th century. This disease has also been detected in Australia, parts of Asia, the province of Ontario, Canada, and recently, the Amazon region of Brazil. Lyme disease in people is readily cured with antibiotics during the initial stage of the illness, when an unusual rash often aids disease recognition. However, people whose infections remain untreated sometimes develop chronic arthritis, neurological signs and other syndromes. Lyme disease in domesticated animals is still poorly understood, and no distinctive rash seems to occur. The illness is best characterized in the dog, where arthritis and nephropathy appear to be the most common sequelae. Clinical signs attributed to Lyme disease have also been reported in other species including horses and cattle.

Lyme Arthritis; Erythema Migrans

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.  

SciTech Connect

Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat transfer in a two-pass internally ribbed turbine blade coolant channel with cylindrical vortex generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of vortex generators on the mass (heat) transfer from the ribbed passage of a two pass turbine blade coolant channel is investigated with the intent of optimizing the vortex generator geometry so that significant enhancements in mass/heat transfer can be achieved. In the experimental configuration considered, ribs are mounted on two opposite walls; all four walls along each pass are active and have mass transfer from their surfaces but the ribs are non-participating. Mass transfer measurements, in the form of Sherwood number ratios, are made along the centerline and in selected inter-rib modules. Results are presented for Reynolds number in the range of 5,000 to 40,000, pitch to rib height ratios of 10.5 and 21, and vortex generator-rib spacing to rib height ratios of 0.55, and 1.5. Centerline and spanwise averaged Sherwood number ratios are presented along with contours of the Sherwood number ratios. Results indicate that the vortex generators induce substantial increases in the local mass transfer rates, particularly along the side walls, and modest increases in the average mass transfer rates. The vortex generators have the effect of making the inter-rib profiles along the ribbed walls more uniform. Along the side walls, horse-shoe vortices that characterize the vortex generator wake are associated with significant mass transfer enhancements. The wake effects and the levels of enhancement decrease somewhat with increasing Reynolds number and decreasing pitch.

Hibbs, R.; Acharya, S.; Chen, Y. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Low cost Image Transmission System  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, sites protect themselves with intrusion detection systems. Some of these systems have sensors in remote areas. These sensors frequently alarm -- not because they have detected a terrorist skulking around the area, but because they have detected a horse, or a dog, or a bush moving in the breeze. Even though the local security force is 99% sure there is no real threat, they must assess each of these nuisance or false alarms. Generally, the procedure consists of dispatching an inspector to drive to the area and make an assessment. This is expensive in terms of manpower and the assessment is not timely. Often, by the time the inspector arrives, the cause of the alarm has vanished. A television camera placed to view the area protected by the sensor could be used to help in this assessment, but this requires the installation of high-quality cable, optical fiber, or a microwave link. Further, to be of use at the present time, the site must have had the foresight to have installed these facilities in the past and have them ready for use now. What is needed is a device to place between the television camera and a modem connecting to a low-bandwidth channel such as radio or a telephone line. This paper discusses the development of such a device: an Image Transmission System, or ITS.

Skogmo, D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hydraulic Cooling Tower Driver- The Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the weaknesses of present day cooling tower drives are fan wrecks caused by shaft couplings breaking, gear box malfunctions due to inadequate lubrication, gear tooth wear, and inaccessibility for inspection and routine maintenance. The hydro-drive eliminates these items from the drive train and puts the same electric motor HP at ground level close coupled to a hydraulic pump, filters, and oil reservoir. Hydraulic lines bring oil pressure to the hydraulic motor, which is more than 75% less weight than comparable gear boxes and presents a smooth practically trouble free performance. In this three cell installation, the original 75 horsepower motors and 18’ diameter fans were cooling a total of 14,000 GPM which were CTI tested and 74.7% of capability. The upgrading and retrofit consisted of installing at ground level 100 horse power motors, 22’ diameter fans, 14’ high velocity recovery fan cylinders, “V” PVC splash bars, and high efficiency cellular drift eliminators. Testing after completion indicated a 92% tower now circulating 21,000 GPM instead of the original 14,000.

Dickerson, J. A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Absorbed dose measurements during routine equine radiographic procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to determine absorbed doses from scattered radiation to personnel during routine equine radiographic procedures and to determine if the protective apparel adequately reduced exposure from scattered radiation. Absorbed doses were measured for one month at the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital using Li:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). All personnel present in the x-ray examination room during eqine radiography were monitored using TLDs placed at: (1) the finger level; (2) the waist level; (3) the eye level; and (4) the forearm level. Absorbed doses ranged from 0.693 ligy to 31.3 tigy per study. The greatest doses were associated with the individual handling the cassette holder, although the individual making the exposures received similar doses due to improper techniques. The individual holding the horse's halter consistently received the lowest dose. Although all doses observed were within acceptable limits for occupational workers, results demonstrated the need for protective apparel to effectively reduce exposures.

Salinas, Leticia Lamar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) regulates myogenesis and {beta}1 integrin expression in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Myogenesis in vitro involves myoblast cell cycle arrest, migration, and fusion to form multinucleated myotubes. Extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity during these processes is maintained by the opposing actions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) proteases and their inhibitors, the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Here, we report that TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP are differentially expressed during mouse myoblast differentiation in vitro. A specific role for TIMP-2 in myogenesis is demonstrated by altered TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotube formation. When differentiated in horse serum-containing medium, TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotubes are larger than wild-type myotubes. In contrast, when serum-free medium is used, TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotubes are smaller than wild-type myotubes. Regardless of culture condition, myotube size is directly correlated with MMP activity and inversely correlated with {beta}1 integrin expression. Treatment with recombinant TIMP-2 rescues reduced TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotube size and induces increased MMP-9 activation and decreased {beta}1 integrin expression. Treatment with either MMP-2 or MMP-9 similarly rescues reduced myotube size, but has no effect on {beta}1 integrin expression. These data suggest a specific regulatory relationship between TIMP-2 and {beta}1 integrin during myogenesis. Elucidating the role of TIMP-2 in myogenesis in vitro may lead to new therapeutic options for the use of TIMP-2 in myopathies and muscular dystrophies in vivo.

Lluri, Gentian; Langlois, Garret D. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 149 Beaumont Ave., HSRF 418, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Soloway, Paul D. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Jaworski, Diane M. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 149 Beaumont Ave., HSRF 418, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)], E-mail: diane.jaworski@uvm.edu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water-mill, though known in the Roman Empire from the second century BCE, did not come to enjoy any widespread use until the 4 th or 5 th centuries CE, and then chiefly in the West, which was then experiencing not only a rapid decline in the supply of slaves, but also widespread depopulation, and thus a severe scarcity of labour. For the West-- those regions that came to form Europe-- the water-mill then became by far the predominant ‘prime mover’: i.e., an apparatus that converts natural energy into mechanical power. The classic study, as a monograph in technological and engineering history, is Terry S. Reynolds, Stronger than a Hundred Men: A History of the Vertical Water Wheel (Baltimore and London, 1983). Indeed he has calculated that even the early medieval watermills provided about 2 hp, enough to liberate from 30 to 60 persons from the wearisome task of grinding grain into flour, the mill’s virtually sole use during the first millennium. He, and others, have neglected to note, however, that, apart from providing such economies in labour, water-mills also conserved on the capital and land resources (fodder crops) that would have been required to produce a comparable amount of power with animal-powered mills (horses, mules). The aim of this study is to analyse in greater depth the economic implications and consequences of

Copyright John Munro; John Munro

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Digestion of fat in the equine small and large intestine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Six pony geldings were fitted with ideal cannulas and used in a 6 x 6 Latin square experiment. Diets consisting of 65% concentrate and 35% bermudagrass hay were fed at 12 h intervals. The concentrate contained 0, 5,10,15, 20 or 25% rendered animal fat. The ponies were fed at a constant intake throughout the experiment. The ponies were fed each diet for 1 0 d of adjustment followed by 4 d of collection during each period. Feces and ileal fluid were collected over the 4-d collection period. The collections from the ileum were taken 3X daily to represent each 2 h interval following feeding. The ileal fluids were composited on an equal volume basis into one sample per horse per treatment. Fifteen percent of the total feces within each collection period were saved for analyses. Feed and hay samples were also collected. The feed, hay and fecal samples were analyzed for dry matter, energy, crude protein, neutral detergent fiber and ether extract. The ileal samples were analyzed for dry matter and ether extract content. Upper and lower intestinal digestibilities were calculated from the change in ratio of nutrient to indigestible indicator. The fat added to the diet had no effect on the apparent digestibility of energy or crude protein. Apparent digestibilities of neutral detergent fiber

Swinney, Dara Lynn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Slaughter of the Bison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slaughter of the Bison Slaughter of the Bison Nature Bulletin No 324-A December 7, 1968 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE SLAUGHTER OF THE BISON The extermination of the bison was inevitable. The plains and prairies that supported those roaming herds of huge beasts are now dotted with cities and towns, crossed by a network of railroads and highways, plowed to produce vast acreages of wheat, corn, cotton and other crops, or fenced and grazed by millions of cattle and sheep. We should be ashamed of the cruel senseless waste when they were slaughtered and left to rot but the cold fact is that the buffalo were doomed by civilization. Until we came, the Indian was still living in the Stone Age. His weapons were primitive, his needs were simple, and until horses appeared -- wild descendants of those left behind by the early Spanish explorers -- his only domestic animal and beast of burden was the dog. At least nine tribes of Plains Indians, such as the Sioux-and Comanche, were nomads who depended almost entirely upon the buffalo, but they killed no more than what they could use -- usually less. To several other tribes, like the Pawnee and Kansas, who lived in villages and grew corn, tobacco and other crops, the buffalo was less essential. That was even more true of the eastern "woodland" Indians.

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381

Old Sauk Trail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sauk Trail Sauk Trail Nature Bulletin No. 436-A December 4, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OLD SAUK TRAIL Sauk Trail Road crosses the extreme southern part of Cook County. From Richton Park it runs due west on a section line to Harlem Ave. and then, in Will County, angles slightly northwest to Frankfort. From Richton Park easterly to Dyer, Indiana, where it joins the Lincoln Highway (U.S. 30), it is different from most roads in this region. This appears to be a narrow winding survivor from the horse-and-buggy days. Actually, it is a remnant of the famous Great Sauk Trail. Originally, the Sauk Trail ran easterly across Illinois from Rock Island to the Illinois River at about where Peru is now, paralleled the north bank of that river to Joliet, and thence easterly to Valparaiso, Indiana. From there it angled northeasterly to LaPorte and on across southern Michigan -- passing through or near Niles, Three Rivers, Jonesville, Clinton and Ypsilanti -- to Detroit.

382

Exotic Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exotic Animals Exotic Animals Nature Bulletin No. 440-A January 15, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation EXOTIC ANIMALS When people settle in a new land they always bring to it plants and animals that are strangers there. The early colonists in North America brought the seeds of grains, grasses, clovers, garden crops and flowers they grew in Europe. They brought horses, cattle, sheep, goats, swine, poultry, cats and dogs. They brought honeybees because there were none here. Unfortunately, mixed with their seeds or in forage for their animals, they brought the seeds of many pesky weeds. As stowaways, they brought rats, mice and injurious insects. The colonists found a continent teeming with a great abundance and variety of wildlife, including billions of wild pigeons, ducks, geese and turkeys, but they brought their own domesticated kinds, including turkeys which had been introduced into Europe from Mexico by the Spaniards. It is a curious fact that our only domestic animal native to North America is this noble bird.

383

Manhattan Project: Groves and the MED, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The summer of 1942 proved to be a troublesome one for the fledgling bomb project. Colonel James C. Marshall (right) received the assignment of directing the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Metals, or DSM, the military's initial cover name for the project. Marshall immediately moved from Syracuse, where he served in the Corps's Syracuse Engineer District, to New York City. Concerned that the name DSM would attract too much attention, the military set up the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), established by general order on August 13. Marshall, like most other Army officers, knew nothing of nuclear physics. Furthermore, Marshall and his Army superiors were disposed to move cautiously. In one case, for instance, Marshall delayed purchase of an excellent production site in Tennessee pending further study, while the scientists who had been involved in the project from the start were pressing for immediate purchase. Although Vannevar Bush had carefully managed the transition to Army control, there was not yet a mechanism to arbitrate disagreements between the S-1 Committee and the military. The resulting lack of coordination complicated attempts to gain a higher priority for scarce materials and boded ill for the future of the entire bomb project.

384

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Manhattan Project: Final Approval to Build the Bomb, Washington, D.C.,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB President Roosevelt signs declaration of war with Japan, December 8, 1941. FINAL APPROVAL TO BUILD THE BOMB (Washington, D.C., December 1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 Anxious as he was to get moving, Leslie Groves decided to make one final quality control check. On November 18, 1942, Groves appointed Warren K. Lewis of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to head a final review committee, comprised of himself and three DuPont representatives. During the final two weeks of November, the committee traveled from New York to Chicago to Berkeley and back again through Chicago. It endorsed the work on gaseous diffusion at Columbia, though it made some organizational recommendations; in fact, the Lewis committee advocated elevating gaseous diffusion to first priority and expressed reservations about the electromagnetic program despite an impassioned presentation by Ernest Lawrence in Berkeley. Upon returning to Chicago, Crawford H. Greenewalt, a member of the Lewis committee, was present at Stagg Field when CP-1 (Chicago Pile #1) first went critical. (For more on CP-1, skip ahead to "Early Pile Design, 1942.") Significant as this moment was in the history of physics, it came after the Lewis committee endorsed moving piles to the pilot stage and one day after Groves instructed DuPont to move into pile design and construction.

387

GIS INTERNET MAP SERVICE FOR DISPLAYING SELENIUM CONTAMINATION DATA IN THE SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO PHOSPHATE MINING RESOURCE AREA  

SciTech Connect

Selenium is present in waste rock/overburden that is removed during phosphate mining in southeastern Idaho. Waste rock piles or rock used during reclamation can be a source of selenium (and other metals) to streams and vegetation. Some instances (in 1996) of selenium toxicity in grazing sheep and horses caused public health and environmental concerns, leading to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) involvement. The Selenium Information System Project is a collaboration among the DEQ, the United States Forest Service (USFS), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Idaho Mining Association (IMA), Idaho State University (ISU), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL)2. The Selenium Information System is a centralized data repository for southeastern Idaho selenium data. The data repository combines information that was previously in numerous agency, mining company, and consultants’ databases and web sites. These data include selenium concentrations in soil, water, sediment, vegetation and other environmental media, as well as comprehensive mine information. The Idaho DEQ spearheaded a selenium area-wide investigation through voluntary agreements with the mining companies and interagency participants. The Selenium Information System contains the results of that area-wide investigation, and many other background documents. As studies are conducted and remedial action decisions are made the resulting data and documentation will be stored within the information system. Potential users of the information system are agency officials, students, lawmakers, mining company personnel, teachers, researchers, and the general public. The system, available from a central website, consists of a database that contains the area-wide sampling information and an ESRI ArcIMS map server. The user can easily acquire information pertaining to the area-wide study as well as the final area-wide report. Future work on this project includes creating custom tools to increase the simplicity of the website and increasing the amount of information available from site-specific studies at 15 mines.

Roger Mayes; Sera White; Randy Lee

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Binuclear transition-metal complexes as new reagents for selective cross-linking of proteins. Coordination of cytochrome c to dirhodium(II). mu. -tetraacetate  

SciTech Connect

This study introduces binuclear transition-metal complexes as reagents for selective covalent cross-linking of proteins. Incubation of horse cytochrome c (designated cyt) with Rh{sub 2}(OAc){sub 4} under mild conditions yields the diprotein complex, Rh{sub 2}(OAc){sub 4}(cyt){sub 2}, whose composition is established by size-exclusion chromatography, uv-vis spectroscopy, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The protein molecules are coordinated to the Rh atoms via the imidazole (Im) rings of their His 33 residues, as shown by uv difference and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, by the pH effect on the complex formation, and by the control experiments with tuna cytochrome c. The diprotein complex is stable under ordinary conditions, and yet it can be cleaved, and the native protein recovered, by treatment with a suitable strong nucleophile. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements show that the structural and redox properties of cytochrome c are not perturbed significantly by cross-linking. Comparison between Rh{sub 2}(OAc){sub 4}(Im){sub 2} and Rh{sub 2}(OAc){sub 4}(cyt){sub 2} shows that the complex containing small ligands is not an entirely realistic model of the complex containing proteins. In particular, the enhanced stability of the latter toward hydrolysis may be due to steric bulk of the protein ligands and to hydrogen bonds that amino acid side chains may form with the inorganic link. Some of the findings of this study may pertain to the mechanism of antitumor action of the Rh{sub 2}(RCOO){sub 4} complexes. 86 refs., 2 tabs.

Chen, J.; Kostic, N.M. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (USA))

1988-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentration Experiment. Final report for Phase-I system design, 6 June 1978-28 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentrating Experiment is the design of a 200 kWe peak photovoltaic concentrating system applied to deep well irrigation in the Trans-Pecos region of Texas. The site selected is typical of deep well irrigation in arid regions of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. The existing well utilizes a 200 horse power, three phase, 480 volt induction motor to lift water 540 feet to irrigate 380 acres. The Trans-Pecos Photovoltaic Concentration (PVC) system employs a two axis (azimuth-elevation) tracking parabolic concentrator module that focuses sunlight at 38X concentration on two strings of actively cooled silicon solar cells. The direct current from a field of 102 collector modules is converted by a maximum power point electric power conditioning system to three phase alternating current. The power from the power conditioning system is connected through appropriate switchgear in parallel with the utility grid to the well's induction motor. The operational philosophy of the experiment is to displace daytime utility power with solar generated electric power. The solar system is sized to provide approximately 50 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor. This requires an energy exchange with the utility since peak solar power (200 kWe) generated exceeds the peak motor demand (149.2 kWe). The annual energy production is projected to be 511 Mwh using El Paso, Texas solar TMY data. System electrical power production efficiency is projected to be 7.4 percent at the design point, and 7.0 percent on an annual electrical energy production basis. The system is projected to provide 37.8 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor at the design point of March 10, excluding energy delivered to the grid in excess of motor demand. The total energy produced is projected to be 39.0 percent of the 24 hour energy demand of the motor at the design point of March 10.

Marcy, W.M.; Dudek, R.A.

1979-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Argonne's Laboratory Computing Resource Center 2009 annual report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now in its seventh year of operation, the Laboratory Computing Resource Center (LCRC) continues to be an integral component of science and engineering research at Argonne, supporting a diverse portfolio of projects for the U.S. Department of Energy and other sponsors. The LCRC's ongoing mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting high-performance computing application use and development. This report describes scientific activities carried out with LCRC resources in 2009 and the broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. The LCRC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz. Committee members are appointed by the Associate Laboratory Directors and span a range of computational disciplines. The 350-node LCRC cluster, Jazz, began production service in April 2003 and has been a research work horse ever since. Hosting a wealth of software tools and applications and achieving high availability year after year, researchers can count on Jazz to achieve project milestones and enable breakthroughs. Over the years, many projects have achieved results that would have been unobtainable without such a computing resource. In fiscal year 2009, there were 49 active projects representing a wide cross-section of Laboratory research and almost all research divisions.

Bair, R. B. (CLS-CI)

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Is degradation of the herbicide atrazine enhanced in turfgrass pond sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To further understand the fate of atrazine, a herbicide of public concern in the environment, this study was undertaken to determine if atrazine degradation potential is increased in turfgrass ponds having a history of repeated exposure to agrichemicals. Two sets of mesocosms (20 L) were established: one containing sediments from a pond at the Turfgrass Research Center on the Texas A&M campus, which had repeated exposure to agrichemicals, the other containing sediments from a pond on a local horse-farm that had no contact with agrichemicals in recent years. These mesocosms were fortified with atrazine (100 [u]g L?¹) and incubated under aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and the concentrations of atrazine in the water and sediment were monitored. In addition, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and ammonium levels, and bacterial populations were monitored in the mesocosms. To determine the role of microbes in the degradation of atrazine, sterile controls were developed in a manner similar to the mesocosms. By monitoring the twelve mesocosms, it was possible to determine that the appropriate environments were maintained, and that the water chemistry was consistent with either an aerobic or hypoxic environment, as appropriate. The rates of atrazine degradation in both pond systems were very similar. Atrazine concentrations declined by about 65% in 160 days. Degradation was more rapid under aerobic conditions, but the difference was not statistically significant. Effects of prior exposure to agrichemicals on the rate of atrazine degradation were not detected. The most likely cause is that there was insufficient exposure to atrazine in the turfgrass pond to develop a population of rapid atrazine degraders.

Shourds, Shalyn Wayne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids’ property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are discussed in Chapter V, followed by summary and conclusions in Chapter VI.

Pendelton, Alice Mae

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Micrometeorite Impacts in Beringian Mammoth Tusks and a Bison Skull  

SciTech Connect

We have discovered what appear to be micrometeorites imbedded in seven late Pleistocene Alaskan mammoth tusks and a Siberian bison skull. The micrometeorites apparently shattered on impact leaving 2 to 5 mm hemispherical debris patterns surrounded by carbonized rings. Multiple impacts are observed on only one side of the tusks and skull consistent with the micrometeorites having come from a single direction. The impact sites are strongly magnetic indicating significant iron content. We analyzed several imbedded micrometeorite fragments from both tusks and skull with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). These analyses confirm the high iron content and indicate compositions highly enriched in nickel and depleted in titanium, unlike any natural terrestrial sources. In addition, electron microprobe (EMP) analyses of a Fe-Ni sulfide grain (tusk 2) show it contains between 3 and 20 weight percent Ni. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) of a particle extracted from the bison skull indicates ~;;0.4 mg of iron, in agreement with a micrometeorite ~;;1 mm in diameter. In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and XRF analyses of the skull show possible entry channels containing Fe-rich material. The majority of tusks (5/7) have a calibrated weighted mean 14C age of 32.9 +- 1.8 ka BP, which coincides with the onset of significant declines<36 ka ago in Beringian bison, horse, brown bear, and mammoth populations, as well as in mammoth genetic diversity. It appears likely that the impacts and population declines are related events, although their precise nature remains to be determined.

Hagstrum, Jonathon T.; Firestone, Richard B; West, Allen; Stefanka, Zsolt; Revay, Zsolt

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese left the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

Mackey, Dennis L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

{sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions at sub-coulomb energies  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p{sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n{sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes have been measured in quasi free kinematics to investigate for the first time the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions by means of the Trojan Horse Method. The {sup 3}He+d experiment was performed at 18 MeV, corresponding the a d-d energy range from 1.5 MeV down to 2 keV. This range overlaps with the relevant region for Standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as with the thermal energies of future fusion reactors and deuterium burning in the Pre Main Sequence phase of stellar evolution. This is the first pioneering experiment in quasi free regime where the charged spectator is detected. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been extracted for the first time. They deviate by more than 15% from available direct data with new S(0) values of 57.4{+-}1.8 MeVb for {sup 3}H+p and 60.1{+-}1.9 MeVb for {sup 3}He+n. None of the existing fitting curves is able to provide the correct slope of the new data in the full range, thus calling for a revision of the theoretical description. This has consequences in the calculation of the reaction rates with more than a 25% increase at the temperatures of future fusion reactors.

Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Sparta, R.; Aliotta, M.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Mrazek, J.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Universita degli Studi di Enna Kore, and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cyclotron Institute Texas A and M University - College Station, Texas (United States); Excellence Cluster Universe - Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching, Germany and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH - Theorie Darmstadt (Germany); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); School of Physics and Astronomy - University of Edinburgh, SUPA (United Kingdom); Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR - Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR - Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Combination Anthelmintics to Control Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Foals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two common nematodes that affect young horses are cyathostomes (small strongyles) and Parascaris equorum (ascarids). It has been recently found that populations of these nematodes are resistant to common anthelmintics used to control them. Small strongyles have been found to be resistant to pyrantel and fenbendazole, while ascarids have been found to be resistant to ivermectin. This represents a unique dilemma in controlling the gastrointestinal nematode population in the foal. It has been shown in other host species that combination anthelmintics can be used to successfully treat resistant nematodes. The current study utilized 28 foals and was conducted from April to November 2007. The foals were allocated into age cohorts and randomly assigned a treatment regimen. Group I was administered ivermectin at 0.2 mg/kg BW. Group II was administered ivermectin at 0.2-mg/kg BW and pyrantel pamoate at 6.6 mg/kg BW. Group III was administered ivermectin at 0.2-mg/kg BW and fenbendazole at 10 mg/kg BW. Group IV was administered pyrantel pamoate at 6.6 mg/kg BW and fenbendazole at 10 mg/kg BW. Fecal samples were collected at time of treatment and two wk post treatment to determine effectiveness in removing egg producing adult nematodes. Each age cohort was then treated 30 d later with a different anthelmintic or combination. That is, foals in group I were treated as those in group II, group II to treatment III, group III to treatment IV, and group IV to treatment I. Over a period of 4 mo, each foal received at least one treatment in consecutive order. The difference of egg counts (pre-treatment minus post-treatment) for small strongyles treated with ivermectin (IVM) was 29.39 eggs per g (EPG), 5.44 EPG for ivermectin with pyrantel (PRT), 3.85 EPG for ivermectin with fenbendazole (FBZ), and -8.32 EPG for pyrantel with fenbendazole. There was a significant difference when comparing IVM to IVM PRT (P = 0.0018), IVM vs. IVM FBZ (P = 0.0010), and IVM vs. PRT FBZ (P 0.1184).

Volker, Ashley

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Los Alamos National Laboratory new generation standard nuclear material storage container - the SAVY4000 design  

SciTech Connect

Incidents involving release of nuclear materials stored in containers of convenience such as food pack cans, slip lid taped cans, paint cans, etc. has resulted in defense board concerns over the lack of prescriptive performance requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has shared in these incidents and in response proactively moved into developing a performance based standard involving storage of nuclear material (RD003). This RD003 requirements document has sense been updated to reflect requirements as identified with recently issued DOE M 441.1-1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual'. The new packaging manual was issued at the encouragement of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board with a clear directive for protecting the worker from exposure due to loss of containment of stored materials. The Manual specifies a detailed and all inclusive approach to achieve a high level of protection; from package design & performance requirements, design life determinations of limited life components, authorized contents evaluations, and surveillance/maintenance to ensure in use package integrity over time. Materials in scope involve those stored outside an approved engineered-contamination barrier that would result in a worker exposure of in excess of 5 rem Committed Effective Does Equivalent (CEDE). Key aspects of meeting the challenge as developed around the SAVY-3000 vented storage container design will be discussed. Design performance and acceptance criteria against the manual, bounding conditions as established that the user must ensure are met to authorize contents in the package (based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide), interface as a safety class system within the facility under the LANL plutonium facility DSA, design life determinations for limited life components, and a sense of design specific surveillance program implementation as LANL moves forward into production and use of the SAVY-3000 will all be addressed. The SAVY-3000 is intended as a work horse package for the DOE complex as a vented storage container primarily for plutonium in solid form.

Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection  

SciTech Connect

The central theme of this dissertation is represented by the versatility of mesoporous silica nanomaterials in various applications such as catalysis and bio-applications, with main focus on biological applications of Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres (MSN). The metamorphosis that we impose to these materials from catalysis to sensing and to drug and gene delivery is detailed in this dissertation. First, we developed a synthetic method that can fine tune the amount of chemically accessible organic functional groups on the pores surface of MSN by exploiting electrostatic and size matching between the cationic alkylammonium head group of the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant and various anionic organoalkoxysilane precursors at the micelle-water interface in a base-catalyzed condensation reaction of silicate. Aiming nature imitation, we demonstrated the catalytic abilities of the MSNs, We utilized an ethylenediamine functional group for chelating Cu{sup 2+} as a catalytic functional group anchored inside the mesopores. Thus, a polyalkynylene-based conducting polymer (molecular wire) was synthesized within the Cu-functionalized MSNs silica catalyst. For sensing applications, we have synthesized a poly(lactic acid) coated mesoporous silica nanosphere (PLA-MSN) material that serves as a fluorescence sensor system for detection of amino-containing neurotransmitters in neutral aqueous buffer. We exploited the mesoporosity of MSNs for encapsulating pharmaceutical drugs. We examined bio-friendly capping molecules such as polyamidoamine dendrimers of generations G2 to G4, to prevent the drug leaching. Next, the drug delivery system employed MSNs loaded with Doxorubicin, an anticancer drug. The results demonstrated that these nano-Trojan horses have ability to deliver Doxorubicin to cancer cells and induce their death. Finally, to demonstrate the potential of MSN as an universal cellular transmembrane nanovehicle, we anchored positively charged dendrimers on the surface of MSN and utilize them to complex cationic DNA. The p-EGFP-CI gene-coated MSN nanocomposite was able to transfect cancer cell lines, such as human HeLa and CHO cancer cell lines. The gene carrier ability of MSNs was further proved by transfecting primary cells and cotransfecting of two different genes in cancer cell lines. In sum, MSN are versatile partners in several types of applications.

Daniela Rodica Radu

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Interactive Roles of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and RF-Amide Related Peptide 3 in Adenohypophyseal Physiology and Reporduction in the Mare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The seasonal termination of ovarian cycles in mares initiated near the time of the autumnal equinox is a significant managerial issue for horse breeders world-wide. Studies presented herein had two over-arching aims. In Aim I, objectives were to develop the principals needed to apply gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) therapeutics for routinely establishing pregnancies in the winter anovulatory mare. We first tested the hypothesis that continuous administration of native GnRH, beginning in either early February or March, would induce ovulation without reversion to an anovulatory state following treatment withdrawal. Continuous 28-d treatments elevated circulating luteinizing hormone (LH) and stimulated spontaneous ovulation much earlier than controls. However, mares treated only in February ceased ovarian cycles at termination of treatment. In contrast, mares administered GnRH in March continued to exhibit estrous cycles. Thus, we concluded that GnRH treatment must continue through March to ensure continued escape from winter anovulation. We then tested the hypothesis that the Julian day of conception could be accelerated in winter anovulatory mares treated continuously with native GnRH for 56 d beginning on February 1. Indeed, GnRH treatment caused a marked increase in the frequency of pregnancy compared to controls. Data illustrated that continuous administration of native GnRH is a practical and highly efficient option for managing seasonal anovulation. In Aim II, we examined hypothalamic distribution, adenohyphyseal receptor gene expression, and ligand functionality of RFRP3 in the mare during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Hypothalamic RFRP3 mRNA was detected in the mare; however, neither hypothalamic expression of RFRP3 nor its anterior pituitary receptor differed between reproductive states. We then used equine adenohypophyseal cell culture to test the hypothesis that RFRP3 reduces the responsiveness of the equine gonadotrope to GnRH. Addition of RFRP3 to cell culture failed to counter the effects of GnRH. Finally, the effects of a RFRP3 receptor-signaling antagonist (RF9) were examined in winter anovulatory mares. A robust increase in circulating concentrations of LH relative to controls was observed in response to RF9 treatments, but treatments had no effect on adenohypophyseal responsiveness to GnRH. Data provide indirect evidence that antagonism of the RFRP3 system by RF9 may be at the GnRH neuronal level.

Thorson, Jennifer Frances

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cloning and expression of equine NF-kB2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic retrovirus that causes persistent disease in horses and ponies. In addition to its structural proteins, EIAV encodes four regulatory/accessory genes, tat, rev, ttm, and S2. It has been documented EIAV S2 gene expression is essential for disease expression of EIAV. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, it was shown that S2 protein interacts with human NF-KB2. NF-KB2 plays a key role in the alternative or non-canonical NF-KB pathway. In order to determine if the interaction of S2 with NF-KB2 might be relevant to equine disease, a cDNA representing full length equine NF-KB2 was generated in our laboratory using PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. To our knowledge this is the first time that equine NF-KB2 cDNAs have been recovered and characterized. The sequence of equine NF-KB2 was 95% homologous to human overall, however a major difference was found in the ankyrin repeat region where protein-protein interactions occur. Two splice variants of equine NF-KB2 were found that correspond to splice variants of human NF- KB2. We tested the interaction of EIAV S2 and equine NF-KB2 using the yeast two hybrid system (Y2H) and co-immunoprecipitation. Unfortunately we were not able to detect an interaction between EIAV S2 and equine NF-KB2 in either system. Despite this result, NF-KB2 is an important component in the immune response so we examined its expression in equine macrophages. Moreover we were interested to know if EIAV might affect expression levels of equine NF-KB2, as NF-KB2 is a target of other viruses. Hence, the expression level of equine NF-KB2 was measured in uninfected and infected primary equine monocyte- derived macrophage (eMDM). Using quantitative PCR we determined that equine NF-KB2 gene expression is decreased in eMDM after 3 days post plating, about the time that monocytes start to differentiate into mature macrophages. However EIAV infection of eMDM upregulated the expression level of NF-KB2.

Mirhosseini, Negin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies  

SciTech Connect

Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Many firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories' involvement in one of the disruptive technology areas, namely micro-electromechanical systems (sometimes referred to as Microsystems or MEMS) and will survey a number of companies that have investigated Sandia's technological discoveries for potential use in an industrial capacity. The survey will focus on the movement of the research findings from the laboratory into the marketplace and all of the problem areas that disruptive technologies face in this arena. The paper will then state several hypotheses that will be tested. The data will be described with results and conclusions reported.

KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K.; WALSH, STEVE; MCWHORTER,PAUL J.; CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C.; WILLIAMS,W. DAVID; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Functional profiling of microRNAs in stallions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in eukaryotic genomes and are thought to be critically involved in many biological processes. While the functions of sperm miRNAs in equine biology are yet to be determined, studies in mouse and humans suggest that sperm miRNAs regulate gene expression in the zygote and can indicate the status of male fertility. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of selected sperm miRNA in equine tissues and compare their expression levels in the sperm and testes of fertile/sexually mature and subfertile/sexually immature stallions. From sperm RNA-seq data, we selected 6 highly expressed miRNAs: miR-34b, -34c, -191, -223, -1248 and -1905c. Total RNA enriched with miRNAs was extracted from 10 adult tissues, sperm of 3 fertile and 3 subfertile stallions, and testes of five 1-year old and five 3-year old stallions. The RNA was polyadenylated, reverse transcribed into srcDNA, and examined through RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. Reverse transcriptase PCR on a panel of adult male tissues revealed ubiquitous expression of the 6 miRNAs, whereas transcription of miR-34c, -223, and -1905c was elevated in testes and sperm. Additionally, we showed that stallion sperm and testes contain transcripts of mature sperm-enriched tRNA-derived 2 small RNAs (mse-tsRNAs), which is a novel finding for the horse. A pilot study was conducted to quantify the expression of miR-34c and miR-1905c in the sperm of fertile and subfertile stallions. While the expression levels varied between individuals and the two fertility phenotypes, a significantly (p=0.04) elevated expression of miR-34c was observed in the subfertile group. Finally, due to the overall high expression of miR-1905c in sperm, its expression was qualified and quantified in the testes of 1-year old and 3-year old stallions. miR-1905c was expressed in all testes samples and no significant differences in expression level were observed between immature and maturing testes. Because the number of stallions was limited, the current results remain preliminary and further experimentation will be required. Nevertheless, the discovery of miRNAs in stallion sperm might lead to a new direction in the search of biomarkers for stallion fertility.

Wang, Aaron Stephen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Effects of Maternal Nutrition Manipulation on Mares and Their Foals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous research documented the fetus is sensitive to nutrition of the dam, but this has not been thoroughly investigated in horses. Objectives of the current studies were to determine effect of manipulation of maternal nutrition during the last third of pregnancy on mare performance, intake, hormones, foaling parameters, colostrum, and foal passive transfer of immunity and growth, and effects of supplemental arginine. Plane of nutrition influenced mare performance, and DMI was influenced by time with the first trial finding all mares consumed less in the 10th month of pregnancy compared to the 11th month, and the second trial finding all mares consumed less during the 11th month. Additionally, the second study determined arginine supplementation has no detrimental effects on DMI. Both studies indicated the dual marker system was sufficient at estimating DMI. Neither trial found an influence of treatment on foaling parameters or physical measurements obtained following parturition, and the second study determined arginine supplementation also did not affect foaling or measurements. The first study determined maternal nutrition did not affect foal growth or ADG. When colostrum quality was evaluated, the first study determined mares consuming only hay had increased specific gravity and Brix% indicating higher quality. This was confirmed by IgG analysis finding a tendency for increased IgG concentration. However, colostrum volume was not affected by nutrition, nor was total g IgG. The second study found contrasting results with greater specific gravity in mares on a high plane of nutrition, and a tendency for moderate plane of nutrition mares to have greater volume. Additionally, the second study determined that arginine supplementation does not influence colostrum volume or quality (measured by specific gravity or Brix %). In the first trial, maternal diets affected glucose and insulin AUC in mares, which altered insulin dynamics in the resulting foals. Foal insulin AUC and peak insulin concentration were greater in foals from mares supplemented with concentrate compared to foals from mares fed hay alone. These studies have provided a wealth of information to help elucidate the impact of maternal nutrition in late gestation on mares and their foals.

Winsco, Kelly N

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gene Expression in the Stallion Testes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the genes that regulate spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in the testis is critical for enhancement of stallion fertility. Stallion testicular samples were used to identify candidate genes by cDNA microarrays that simultaneously assessed expression levels of 9132 genes. First, gene expression was compared between light (spermatogenically active) and dark (spermatogenically inactive) testis tissue of 1.5-year-old horses (n = 3). Ninety-three genes were differentially expressed (35 light specific, 58 dark specific) in matched paired samples. Second, gene expression was compared between testicular tissue of two mature stallions, one with normal quality semen (fertile) and one with poor quality semen (subfertile). A total of 233 genes were differentially expressed (122 in fertile tissue, 111 in subfertile tissue). Of these, phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B), steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, and outer dense fiber of sperm tails 2 (ODF2) mRNAs, were localized and quantified by in situ hybridization (ISH) in mature stallions and/or in unilateral cryptorchids. ISH revealed differences (P < 0.05) among mature stallions (n = 10) for PDE3B (localized to seminiferous tubules) and StAR protein (localized to interstitial spaces) mRNAs. A positive correlation coefficient (r = .556, p = .025) was found between StAR protein mRNA and plasma concentration of testosterone. Additionally, both gene products were evaluated in 1-year-old (n = 3) and 3-year-old (n = 3) unilateral cryptorchid stallions. Expression of both PDE3B and StAR protein gene was significantly higher in mature, descended testes compared to mature, retained testes and the descended and retained testes of immature, cryptorchid stallions. StAR protein gene demonstrated significantly higher expression in immature retained testes compared to immature descended testes. A precision-cut tissue slice (PCTS) in vitro culture system was evaluated as a potential tool to study equine testes function. Testes from immature stallions (n = 3) were cut into slices (mean slice weight = 13.85 +/- 0.20 mg; mean slice thickness = 515.00 +/- 2.33 ?m) and exposed to medium containing ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH) at concentrations of 0, 5, 50 and 500 ng/ml for 6 h at 32 degrees C. Medium content of testosterone and estradiol was increased 500% and 120%, respectively, by addition of oLH versus that observed for the testis tissue slices treated with 0 ng oLH (control). An oLH concentration-dependent increase in StAR protein mRNA in tissue slices was detected by in situ hybridization; whereas, differences for PDE3B and ODF2 mRNAs were not observed. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the stallion is an excellent model for studying male fertility due to the initiation of spermatogenesis, frequency of cryptorchidism, and routine castration providing useful tissue to use for studying gene expression.

Laughlin, Andy M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases  

SciTech Connect

Accidental or terrorist releases of hazardous materials into the atmosphere can impact large populations and cause significant loss of life or property damage. Plume predictions have been shown to be extremely valuable in guiding an effective and timely response. The two greatest sources of uncertainty in the prediction of the consequences of hazardous atmospheric releases result from poorly characterized source terms and lack of knowledge about the state of the atmosphere as reflected in the available meteorological data. We have developed a new event reconstruction methodology that provides probabilistic source term estimates from field measurement data for both accidental and clandestine releases. Accurate plume dispersion prediction requires the following questions to be answered: What was released? When was it released? How much material was released? Where was it released? We have developed a dynamic-data-driven event reconstruction capability that couples data and predictive methods through Bayesian inference to obtain a solution to this inverse problem. The solution consists of a probability distribution of unknown source term parameters. For consequence assessment, we then use this probability distribution to construct a 'composite' forward plume prediction that accounts for the uncertainties in the source term. Since in most cases of practical significance it is impossible to find a closed form solution, Bayesian inference is accomplished by utilizing stochastic sampling methods. This approach takes into consideration both measurement and forward model errors and thus incorporates all the sources of uncertainty in the solution to the inverse problem. Stochastic sampling methods have the additional advantage of being suitable for problems characterized by a non-Gaussian distribution of source term parameters and for cases in which the underlying dynamical system is nonlinear. We initially developed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic methodology and demonstrated its effectiveness by reconstructing a wide range of release scenarios, using synthetic as well as real-world data. Data for evaluation of our event reconstruction capability were drawn from the short-range Prairie Grass, Copenhagen, and Joint Urban 2003 field experiments and a continental-scale real-world accidental release in Algeciras, Spain. The method was tested using a variety of forward models, including a Gaussian puff dispersion model INPUFF, the regional-to-continental scale Lagrangian dispersion model LODI (the work-horse real-time operational dispersion model used by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center), the empirical urban model UDM, and the building-scale computational fluid dynamics code FEM3MP. The robustness of the Bayesian methodology was demonstrated via the use of subsets of the available concentration data and by introducing error into some of the measurements (Fig. 1). These tests showed that the Bayesian approach is capable of providing reliable estimates of source characteristics even in cases of limited or significantly corrupted data. An example of an urban release scenario is shown in Fig. 2. For more effective treatment of strongly time-dependent problems, we developed a Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) approach. To achieve the best performance under a wide range of conditions we combined SMC and MCMC sampling into a hybrid methodology. We compared the effectiveness and advantages of this approach relative to MCMC using a set of synthetic data examples. We created a modular, scalable computational framework to accommodate the full set of stochastic methodologies (e.g., MCMC, SMC, hybrid stochastic algorithms, 'Green's function', 'reciprocal' methods), as well as a selection of key classes of dispersion models. This design provides a clear separation of stochastic algorithms from predictive models and supports parallelization at both the stochastic algorithm and individual model level. In other words, it supports a parallel stochastic algorithm (e.g., SMC) that invokes parallel forward models. The framework is

Mirin, A A; Kosovic, B

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases  

SciTech Connect

Accidental or terrorist releases of hazardous materials into the atmosphere can impact large populations and cause significant loss of life or property damage. Plume predictions have been shown to be extremely valuable in guiding an effective and timely response. The two greatest sources of uncertainty in the prediction of the consequences of hazardous atmospheric releases result from poorly characterized source terms and lack of knowledge about the state of the atmosphere as reflected in the available meteorological data. In this report, we discuss the development of a new event reconstruction methodology that provides probabilistic source term estimates from field measurement data for both accidental and clandestine releases. Accurate plume dispersion prediction requires the following questions to be answered: What was released? When was it released? How much material was released? Where was it released? We have developed a dynamic data-driven event reconstruction capability which couples data and predictive models through Bayesian inference to obtain a solution to this inverse problem. The solution consists of a probability distribution of unknown source term parameters. For consequence assessment, we then use this probability distribution to construct a ''''composite'' forward plume prediction which accounts for the uncertainties in the source term. Since in most cases of practical significance it is impossible to find a closed form solution, Bayesian inference is accomplished by utilizing stochastic sampling methods. This approach takes into consideration both measurement and forward model errors and thus incorporates all the sources of uncertainty in the solution to the inverse problem. Stochastic sampling methods have the additional advantage of being suitable for problems characterized by a non-Gaussian distribution of source term parameters and for cases in which the underlying dynamical system is non-linear. We initially developed a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic methodology and demonstrated its effectiveness by reconstructing a wide range of release scenarios, using synthetic as well as real-world data. Data for evaluation of our event reconstruction capability were drawn from the short-range Prairie Grass, Copenhagen, and Joint Urban 2003 field experiments and a continental-scale real-world accidental release in Algeciras, Spain. The method was tested using a variety of forward models, including a Gaussian puff dispersion model INPUFF, the regional-to-continental scale Lagrangian dispersion model LODI (the work-horse real-time operational dispersion model used by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center), the empirical urban model UDM, and the building-scale computational computational fluid dynamics code FEM3MP. The robustness of the Bayesian methodology was demonstrated via the use of subsets of the available concentration data and by introducing error into some of the measurements. These tests showed that the Bayesian approach is capable of providing reliable estimates of source characteristics even in cases of limited or significantly corrupted data. For more effective treatment of strongly time-dependent problems, we developed a Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) approach. To achieve the best performance under a wide range of conditions we combined SMC and MCMC sampling into a hybrid methodology. We compared the effectiveness and advantages of this approach relative to MCMC using a set of synthetic data examples. Our dynamic data-driven event reconstruction capability seamlessly integrates observational data streams with predictive models, in order to provide the best possible estimates of unknown source term parameters, as well as optimal and timely situation analyses consistent with both models and data.

Kosovic, B; Belles, R; Chow, F K; Monache, L D; Dyer, K; Glascoe, L; Hanley, W; Johannesson, G; Larsen, S; Loosmore, G; Lundquist, J K; Mirin, A; Neuman, S; Nitao, J; Serban, R; Sugiyama, G; Aines, R

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Recent Developments in SHERPA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some recent QCD-related developments in the SHERPA event generator are presented. In the past decades, event generators such as PYTHIA [1, 2] and HERWIG [3, 4] have been central for nearly all physics analyses at particle physics experiments at the high-energy frontier. This will also hold true at the LHC, where a large number of interesting signals for new particles or new phenomena (the Higgs boson or any other manifestation of the mechanism behind electro-weak symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, extra dimensions etc.) is hampered by a plethora of severe, sometimes overwhelming backgrounds. Nearly all of them are largely influenced by QCD. Therefore it seems fair to say that the success of the LHC in finding new physics may very well depend on a deep and detailed understanding of old physics, like QCD. Examples for this include, among others, the central-jet veto for the vector boson fusion channel for Higgs production or topologies, where gauge bosons emerge in association with many jets, a background for many search channels. In a reflection on increased needs by the experimental community, aiming at higher precision, incorporation of new physics models and so on, the work horses of old have undergone serious renovation efforts, resulting in new, improved versions of the respective codes, namely PYTHIA8 [5] and HERWIG++ [6]. In addition a completely new code, SHERPA [7], has been constructed and is in the process of maturing. The status of this code is the topic of this contribution. SHERPA's hallmark property is the inclusion of higher-order tree-level QCD contributions, leading to an improved modelling of jet production. They are introduced through a full-fledged matrix element generator, AMEGIC++ [8], which is capable of generating matrix elements and corresponding phase space mappings for processes with multi-particle final states in various models, including the Standard Model, anomalous gauge triple and quadruple couplings according to [9, 10], the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Feynman rules from [11], the ADD-model of extra dimensions [12, 13], and a model with an extra U(1) singlet coupling to the Higgs boson only [14]. The code has been thoroughly tested and validated [15]. This code, however, is limited, especially in the treatment of many ({ge} 6) external QCD particles. Therefore, in the near future, SHERPA will incorporate another, new matrix element generator, COMIX, which is based on Berends-Giele recursion relations [16] and color-dressing [17] rather than color-ordering. In Tabs. 1 and 2 some example cross sections for gg {yields} ng at fixed energies and pp {yields} b{bar b} + n jets obtained with this program are exhibited and compared to those from other programs. In addition, concerning the calculation of higher-order matrix elements and cross sections, there have been first steps towards an automation of such calculations at truly next-to leading order accuracy. They manifest themselves in the implementation of a procedure [19] to fully automatically construct and evaluate Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction terms [20] for the real part of such NLO calculations. The results from the matrix element calculations are merged with the subsequent parton shower through the formalism of [21, 22]. The results of its implementation in SHERPA [23] has recently been compared with other algorithms [24]. Although there remains some dispute about the theoretical equivalence of the different approaches, the overall results show satisfying agreement with each other, such that they can be used with confidence for data analysis.

Archibald, Jennifer; /Durham U., IPPP; Gleisberg, Tanju; /SLAC; Hoeche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.; Schumann, Steffen; /Edinburgh U.; Siegert, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Winter, Jan; /Fermilab

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to a mean of 20-30 percent. Survival in individual spawning areas exposed by lake drawdown varied from 0 to 65 percent. Groundwater reaction to lake stage explained some of the variation in individual spawning area survival. Three types of groundwater reaction to lake stage were identified. Increased survival in exposed redds resulted from two of the three types. A significant statistical relationship was determined between embryo survival and the number of days exposed by lake drawdown. The operation of Kerr Dam in 1983-84 was characterized by an early decline in lake stage, a longer period near minimum pool and a later and more rapid filling compared to the operation seen in 1981-82 and 1982-83. Based on the survival relationship observed in natural redds exposed by drawdown in 1983-84, complete mortality from exposure would have occurred to all redds constructed above 2884.7 ftor 90 percent of all redds constructed above minimum pool. Emergence traps placed over redds below minimum pool in Gravel, Blue, and Yellow bays captured fry in Gravel and Blue bays only. Duration of fry emergence in1984 was three weeks longer than in 1982 or 1983, but was not related to the date of initial redd construction. Survival to fry emergence in Gravel Bay was calculated to be 28.9 percent of egg deposition or 57,484 fry. Survival to fry emergence above and below the zone of greatest redd density was 33.6 and 245 percent, respectively, indicating a relationship between survival and spawner site selection. After analysis of the historic operation of Kerr Dam, it is believed that the dam has, and is continuing to have, a significant impact on successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake. Based on the evidence that prolonged exposure of salmonid embryo by dewatering causes significant mortality, the number of days the lake was held below various foot increments (2884 ft to 2888 ft) during the incubation period was investigated. The annual change in the number of days the lake was held below 2885 ft was further investigated because 80-90 percent of the redds cons

Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z