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  1. Thrusts - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust Hero Image.JPG Thrusts Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP research thrusts THRUST 1: Electrocatalysis Thrust-01-FINAL-COMPOSITE.jpg Thrust-01-FINAL-COMPOSITE.jpg THRUST 2: Photoelectrocatalysis Thrust 3: integration

  2. Thrust 1 - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Electrocatalysis Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral

  3. Thrust 2 - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Photoelectrocatalysis Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS

  4. Thrust 3 - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Integration Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral

  5. Thrust 4 - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Prototyping Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral

  6. THRUST BEARING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  7. FA Technology Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FA Technology Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures Name: FA Technology Ventures Address: 677 Broadway Place: Albany, New York Zip: 12207 Region:...

  8. FA Technology Ventures (Boston) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ventures (Boston) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Name: FA Technology Ventures (Boston) Address: 100 High Street, Suite 1105 Place: Boston,...

  9. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  10. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  11. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  12. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian ...

  13. Physics Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust Areas Physics Thrust Areas Physics Division serves the nation through its broad portfolio of fundamental and applied research. Quality basic science research: critical component of maintaining our capabilities in national security research To further understand the physical world, generate new or improved technology in experimental physics, and establish a physics foundation for current and future Los Alamos programs, Physics Division leverages its expertise and experimental capabilities

  14. Thrusts in High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in HPC 1 Thrusts in High Performance Computing Science at Scale Petaflops to Exaflops Science through Volume Thousands to Millions of Simulations Science in Data Petabytes to ...

  15. Feng Fa Science and Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feng Fa Science and Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Feng Fa Science and Technology Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Sector: Wind energy Product: A VCPE...

  16. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  17. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  18. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  20. FA 4: Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Crosscutting Research Focus Area 4 - Lograsso, Schwegler CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for FA4 File: Read more about CMI org chart for FA4 CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials Institute

  1. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern

  2. MAN or FA from n-butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Cio, A.; Verde, L.

    1985-08-01

    Unsaturated polyester resins were first produced mostly from fumaric acid (FA) rather than from maleic anhydride (MAN). This is perfectly understandable if we consider that, using fumaric acid as raw material, polycondensates with a more homogeneous (less branched) structure are obtained, thus producing resins characterized by a more uniform and reproducible chemical and mechanical properties. Presently, for economical reasons, fumaric acid is used marginally as a MAN substitute in the production of polyester resins. These resins account for a major share (50%) of the overall MAN consumption in the U.S. and in Western Europe.

  3. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tadolini, Stephen C.; Dolinar, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  4. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  5. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Science Thrust Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Thrust Areas User research at the Lujan Center is focused in four science thrust areas. Each has a contact person who is available to discuss proposed experiments and to provide advice on the appropriate instrument and instrument scientist, available sample environments, and other details for planned experiments. Lujan Center instrument scientists welcome questions and discussions about new experiments and are happy to provide guidance for proposal development. New users are encouraged

  6. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc (453.3 KB) More Documents & Publications Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token

  7. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  8. Thrust bolting: Roof-bolt-support apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadolini, S.C.; Dolinar, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for installing a roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation and more specifically to tensioning the unit without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads. The bolt is capable of being placed into tension along the length and the levels of active support can be controlled by varying the length of the grouted portion and the level of thrust applied to the bolt during installation.

  9. Thrust bearing assembly for a downhole drill motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geczy, B. A.

    1985-12-24

    A bidirectional thrust bearing assembly is used between a downhole fluid motor and a rock bit for drilling oil wells. The bearing assembly has a stationary housing with radial journal bearing sleeves and a rotatable drive shaft also having radial bearing sleeves. A pair of oppositely facing thrust bearing rings are mounted in the housing. A second pair of thrust bearing rings are mounted on the shaft so as to have faces opposing the bearing faces on the first pair of rings. Belleville springs resiliently bias a pair of the thrust bearing rings apart and carry the thrust load between such rings. Each ring has a plurality of inserts of hard material, preferably polycrystalline diamond, at the bearing surface. Means are provided for circulating drilling fluid from the motor through the thrust bearing faces for forming hydrodynamic fluid bearing films in the bearing interfaces.

  10. Center for Inverse Design: Research Thrusts and Subtasks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Thrusts and Subtasks The Center for Inverse Design creates an unprecedented coupling of theory and experiment to realize the thesis that inverse design can revolutionize ...

  11. Tobias Hanrath > Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanrath Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries Assistant Professor Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Research Group Webpage th358@cornell.edu Research There is a...

  12. David Muller > Research Thrust Leader - Complex OxidesProfessor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Muller Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides Professor Applied and Engineering Physics Research Group Webpage dm24@cornell.edu He joined the Applied and Engineering Physics...

  13. Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Abstract Cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex, located in the Sevier belt hinterland, preserve a...

  14. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  15. Performance evaluation of a low-temperature solar Rankine cycle system utilizing R245fa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.D.; Zhao, L.; Wang, J.L.; Zhang, W.Z.; Zhao, X.Z.; Wu, W.

    2010-03-15

    A low-temperature solar Rankine system utilizing R245fa as the working fluid is proposed and an experimental system is designed, constructed and tested. Both the evacuated solar collectors and the flat plate solar collectors are used in the experimental system; meanwhile, a rolling-piston R245fa expander is also mounted in the system. The new designed R245fa expander works stably in the experiment, with an average expansion power output of 1.73 kW and an average isentropic efficiency of 45.2%. The overall power generation efficiency estimated is 4.2%, when the evacuated solar collector is utilized in the system, and with the condition of flat plate solar collector, it is about 3.2%. The experimental results show that using R245fa as working fluid in the low-temperature solar power Rankine cycle system is feasible and the performance is acceptable. (author)

  16. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R. Jr.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1995-04-01

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation.

  18. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  19. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  20. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  3. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  4. Joel Brock > Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Applied and Engineering Physics > Faculty Directory > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Joel Brock Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides Professor Applied and Engineering Physics Research Group Webpage jdb20@cornell.edu After receiving his doctoral degree, Brock spent two years as a postdoctoral research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and then joined the Cornell faculty in 1989. He served as Director of the School of Applied & Engineering

  5. Direct thrust measurement of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, K.; Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Alexander, P.; Boswell, R. W.; Perren, M.; Laine, R.; Pottinger, S.; Lappas, V.; Harle, T.; Lamprou, D.

    2011-04-04

    Direct thrust measurements of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster have been made using a pendulum thrust balance and a high sensitivity laser displacement sensor. At the low pressures used (0.08 Pa) an ion beam is detected downstream of the thruster exit, and a maximum thrust force of about 3 mN is measured for argon with an rf input power of about 700 W. The measured thrust is proportional to the upstream plasma density and is in good agreement with the theoretical thrust based on the maximum upstream electron pressure.

  6. Thrust Generation with Low-Power Continuous-Wave Laser and Aluminum Foil Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Sumida, Sota; Funaki, Ikkoh

    2010-05-06

    The micro-newton thrust generation was observed through low-power continuous-wave laser and aluminum foil interaction without any remarkable ablation of the target surface. To evaluate the thrust characteristics, a torsion-balance thrust stand capable for the measurement of the thrust level down to micro-Newton ranges was developed. In the case of an aluminum foil target with 12.5 micrometer thickness, the maximum thrust level was 15 micro-newtons when the laser power was 20 W, or about 0.75 N/MW. It was also found that the laser intensity, or laser power per unit area, irradiated on the target was significantly important on the control of the thrust even under the low-intensity level.

  7. Data:E8614377-f336-4354-9782-e7fa153c3873 | Open Energy Information

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  8. Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cumm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cummings, Vanderbilt University, Thrust Leader). This thrust integrate multiscale computational modeling and novel experimental probes of interfacial fluid properties at 'simple' interfaces, such as planar, cylindrical, and spherical surfaces, parallel slit and cylindrical pores, etc. which can be rigorously modeled with the minimum incorporation of simplifying approximations and assumptions. Such simple interfaces are

  9. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-30

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  10. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore » large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.« less

  11. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Chien -Chi; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. Conclusion: FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  12. SOURCE TERM TARGETED THRUST FY 2005 NEW START PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NA

    2005-10-05

    While a significant amount of work has been devoted to developing thermodynamic data. describing the sorption of radionuclides to iron oxides and other geomedia, little data exist to describe the interaction of key radionuclides found in high-level radioactive waste with the uranium surfaces expected in corroded spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages. Recent work indicates that actinide adsorption to the U(VI) solids expected in the engineered barrier system may play a key role in the reduction of dissolved concentrations of radionuclides such as Np(V). However, little is known about the mechanism(s) of adsorption, nor are the thermodynamic data available to represent the phenomenon in predictive modeling codes. Unfortunately, this situation makes it difficult to consider actinide adsorption to the U(VI) silicates in either geochemical or performance assessment (PA) predictions. The primary goal in the Source Term Targeted Thrust area is to ''study processes that control radionuclide release from the waste form''. Knowledge of adsorption of actinides to U(VI) silicate solids its and parameterization in geochemical models will be an important step towards this goal.

  13. Frank DiSalvo > Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank DiSalvo Research Thrust Leader - Fuel Cells and Batteries John A. Newman Professor of Physical Science Chemistry and Chemical Biology Research Group Webpage fjd3@cornell.edu...

  14. Method to Produce High Specific Impulse and Moderate Thrust from a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion-powered Rocket Engine: (ARE-Aneutronic Rocket Engine) --- Inventor(s) Samuel A. Cohen, Michael Paluszek, Yosef Razin, and Gary Pajer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Method to Produce High Specific Impulse and Moderate Thrust from a Fusion-powered Rocket Engine: (ARE-Aneutronic Rocket Engine) --- Inventor(s) Samuel A. Cohen, Michael Paluszek, Yosef Razin, and Gary Pajer This Invention describes a fusion-powered rocket engine that will produce high specific impulse, Isp, moderate thrust,

  15. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  16. Geology of oil and gas accumulations in the Papuan fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foo, W.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The high level of exploration interest in Papua New Guinea has developed in large part because of recent discoveries in the western Papuan fold and thrust belt and shows in the adjacent foreland region. Results from recent drilling in the Iagifu/Hedinia area by a Chevron-led joint venture have outlined several pools in culminations along a 50 km long structural axis. Oil and gas are sourced from a thick succession of Jurassic marine shales that were deposited along the rifted northern margin of the Australian plate. Generation and migration is interpreted to have peaked coincident with development of the fold and thrust belt during the Neogene. Trapping occurred as anticlines and thrust sheets developed sequentially from northeast to southwest. Several trends remain untested on lands held by various groups, primarily in the area west of the Juha gas condensate pool.

  17. Data:Ae3cd3b5-369c-4ef5-a089-9be6f92e16fa | Open Energy Information

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  18. Data:9203c91f-7d51-486f-a398-add8a8014cd6 | Open Energy Information

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  19. Exploration within the Sub-Andean Thrust Belt of Southern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, K.J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Sub-Andean thrust belt of Southern Bolivia is a proven hydrocarbon province. Chevron began a regional study of the area in 1988 and chose the Caipipendi block due to its high potential for significant new oil reserves. A regional work program designed to acquire and integrate seismic data, geologic field data, geochemistry, and gravity data was used to generated structural models, evaluate regional risk components and to detail leads. The structural style within the Caipipendi block is interpreted as being an in sequence, thin skinned thrust belt with eastward verging folds and thrust faults. Tight surface anticlines associated with a Middle Devonian detachment have been later folded by deeper fault bend folds associated with the Silurian detachment. While the tight surface folds are presently producing oil, the deeper broader structures associated with the Silurian detachement have not been tested. Seismic data, utilized for the first time in this part of the Sub-Andean thrust belt, integrated with balanced structural cross sections, is the key to evaluating this new play. Geochemical analysis, including oil biomarker work, indicate that the oils are sourced from the Silurian-Devonian sequence. A generative oil system model formulated by integrating the geochemical analysis with maturation modeling indicates that the Devonian Los Monos formation is the primary oil source. Anticipated reservoirs for the new play are Carboniferous and Devonian sandstones which are also productive elsewhere in the basin.

  20. Exploration for hydrocarbons under thrust belts - a challenging new frontier in the Carpathians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picha, F.J. )

    1993-09-01

    The Carpathian thrust belt has been explored with mixed results. Large reserves of oil and gas have been found in Romania and the western Ukraine, while exploration in other areas has been disappointing. Deep drilling and seismic profiling, as well as better understanding of structure, however, has contributed to the opening of promising new plays beneath the allochthonous belt. The thin-skinned Carpathian thrust belt is characterized by a long-range tectonic transport over the Neogene foredeep and the underlying European platform. The complex structure of the platform involves Caledonian and Variscan compressional deformation, Mesozoic extension, related to the development of the northern Tethyan margins, and Cenozoic normal faulting and wrenching associated with the Alpine Orogeny. Elements of the platform were also detached and incorporated into the thrust belt proper. In addition to numerous structural plays, significant morphologic features, such as large Paleogene and neogene buried valleys, have been found within the platform margins. Both the valley fill and the associated subsea fans and channels represent promising plays. Generation of hydrocarbons from various source rocks within the platform was greatly enhanced by emplacement of the wedge-shaped Carpathian thrust belt. The low heat flow, typical for the subthrust setting, enabled generation and preservation of hydrocarbons at great depths. Although several oil and gas fields have been found in shallower parts of the platform, the deeper structures (below 5 km) remain mostly unexplored. The complexity and diversity of subthrust geology offers a big challenge to exploration, but also provides an opportunity for finding significant oil and gas accumulations not only in the Carpathians, but elsewhere under thin-skinned thrust belts.

  1. Stem thrust prediction model for W-K-M double wedge parallel expanding gate valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldiwany, B.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wolfe, K.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model for determining the required valve stem thrust during opening and closing strokes of W-K-M parallel expanding gate valves was developed as part of the EPRI Motor-Operated Valve Performance Prediction Methodology (EPRI MOV PPM) Program. The model was validated against measured stem thrust data obtained from in-situ testing of three W-K-M valves. Model predictions show favorable, bounding agreement with the measured data for valves with Stellite 6 hardfacing on the disks and seat rings for water flow in the preferred flow direction (gate downstream). The maximum required thrust to open and to close the valve (excluding wedging and unwedging forces) occurs at a slightly open position and not at the fully closed position. In the nonpreferred flow direction, the model shows that premature wedging can occur during {Delta}P closure strokes even when the coefficients of friction at different sliding surfaces are within the typical range. This paper summarizes the model description and comparison against test data.

  2. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  3. The quest for better seismic imaging in the sub-Andean thrust belt of southern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.F.; Nelson, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Like many thrust belts around the world, the sub-Andean thrust belt of southern Bolivia is a difficult place to acquire good seismic data because of the challenges of complex geology, rugged topography, and remote access. This is further aggravated by the fact that we generally desire to image below the surface anticlines, where the conditions for acquiring good data are the worst. Near-surface, steeply-dipping beds also challenge some of the fundamental assumptions of seismic processing. Our approach has been to integrate detailed structural analysis of the surface and subsurface with the seismic interpretation. Seismic imaging of structural geometry is a fundamental risk element in thrust belt hydrocarbon exploration. Acquiring high-quality seismic data in mountainous terrain has been a difficult, time consuming, and costly task. We have exerted considerable effort into finding innovative ways to improve data quality. After an initial round of acquisition in Bolivia, we designed a seismic test program to optimize acquisition parameters. We found that standard parameters were acceptable in the valleys, but larger dynamite charges yielded better results in the mountainous areas where imaging had previously been poor. Additionally, a swath line layout (three parallel receiver lines 200 m apart) helped improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Better static solutions, detailed velocity analysis, and careful structural modeling and depth migrations all help to yield better data and a more reliable interpretation.

  4. The Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in northwestern Montana and northern Idaho from COCORP and industry seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoos, T.R.; Potter, C.J.; Thigpen, J.L.; Brown, L.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-06-01

    COCORP and petroleum industry seismic reflection profiles in northwestern Montana reveal the structure of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt. The Front Ranges consist of thick thrust sheets containing Precambrian Belt Supergroup and Paleozoic miogeoclinal shelf rocks above a thin remnant of Paleozoic rocks and gently westward-dipping North American basement. Interpretation of the seismic data and results from a recent petroleum exploration well suggest that 15-22 km of Precambrian Belt Supergroup sedimentary rocks are present in several thrust plates beneath the eastern Purcell anticlinorium. Previous hypotheses of a large mass of Paleozoic miogeoclinal sedimentary rocks or slices of crystalline basement located beneath the eastern Purcell anticlinorium do not appear to be supported by the data. The easternmost occurrence of allochthonous basement is interpreted to be in the western part of the anticlinorium near the Montana-Idaho border. Comparison of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in northwestern Montana and southern Canada suggest that a change in the deep structure of the Purcell anticlinorium occurs along strike. The anticlinorium in southern Canada has been interpreted as a hanging-wall anticline that was thrust over the western edge of thick Proterozoic North American basement, whereas in northwestern Montana the anticlinorium appears to consist of a complex series of thrust sheets above highly attenuated North American basement.

  5. Magnetostratigraphic constraints on the development of paired fold-thrust belts/foreland basins in the Argentine Andes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.H. ); Damanti, J.F. ); Jordan, T.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of a paired fold thrust-thrust belt/foreland basin is correlated to the flattening of the subducting Nazca plate between 28-33{degree}S. Magnetostratigraphic studies in neogene basin-filling continental strata determine local basin subsidence rates and provide relatively precise chronostratigraphic correlation between different depositional environments. The data demonstrate that most existing lithostratigraphic units are diachronous and require new tectonic interpretations. Increases in sediment accumulation rates closely correspond to changes in provenance and indicate that the Frontal Cordillera, on the Chile-Argentina border was a positive topographic province by 18 Ma. The Precordillera evolved from {approx}16 Ma to the present as thrusting migrated from west to east. Published ages from intercalated airfall tuffs constrain some sedimentary sections in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas where the earliest uplift occurred since 10 Ma. The youngest uplifts are on the west side close to continuing thrusting in the Precordillera. Not all fold-thrust belt/foreland basin pairs are associated with flat subduction, suggesting that tectonic controls exceeding the scale of individual plate segments may be important. The hydrocarbon-producing Subandean fold-thrust belt/foreland basin, located in the area of 'steep' subduction that underlies northern Argentina and Bolivia (18-24{degree}S), is also believed to have evolved since middle Miocene time. Recently initiated magnetostratigraphic studies in the Subandean foreland basin will attempt to temporally constrain the Neogene tectonic evolution for comparison with the southern region.

  6. Structural styles of subandean fold and thrust belt of Peru and Southern Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Along-strike variations in structural styles of the east-verging Subandean fold and thrust belt (SAFTB) in Peru and southern Ecuador are controlled by the presence or absence of thick Late Permian to Jurassic evaporite sequences rather than changes in subducting plate geometries as has been suggested previously for the Andes. Salt distribution and thickness have not only controlled the styles and segmentation along the SAFTB but also have been important factors in strike variations across the belt. The southern Ecuador SAFTB lacks significant evaporite units and is characterized by thick-skinned deformation that encompasses high-angle reverse faults, and broad, low-amplitude folds. The style changes to thin-skinned deformation near 2S lat. and it is well illustrated in the Santiago and Huallaga basins where thick evaporite units are present. This segment is characterized by a major decollement on the salt, grabens formed by salt withdrawal from reactivation of thrust faults as listric normal faults, salt piercement at or near synclinal axes, and periclines and asymmetric folds. The frontal thrust of this thin-skinned segment consists of box, overturned and upright folds above shallow salt domes, and by a major backthrust at the mountain front. This segment extends to 1030'S lat., near Oxapampa, Peru, where the thin-skinned SAFTB is narrow and changes across strike to a thick-skinned deformation as the evaporite units thin and disappear eastward. South of 1030'S lat., a new thick-skinned deformation segment is present in southern Peru and characterizes most of the deformation in the SAFTB of the Ucayali and Madre De Dios basins.

  7. Geometry and evolution of the frontal part of the Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt (Vicuna Area), Tierra del Fuego, southern Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; McClay, K.R. ); Harambour, S.; Rojas, L.; Skarmeta, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt is a thin-skinned foreland thrust and fold belt of Paleocene to Oligocene age that deforms Upper Jurassic through Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and siliciclastic strata of the Magallanes basin, southern Andean Cordillera, Chile. This paper is a detailed description and analysis of the geology and structural evolution of the thrust front (Vicuna area of southern Tierra del Fuego). Reflection seismic and well data, together with 1:50,000 scale geological mapping, have been used in the analysis. In the southern part of the Vicuna area, two different thrust systems have been found: an upper imbricate fan that deforms Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, and a younger, lower duplex composed of Cretaceous and probably Upper Jurassic rocks. The imbricate fan is characterized by fault-propagation folding in which listric thrust faults merge downward into a sole thrust that probably is located within the Upper Jurassic stratigraphy. The sole thrust of the upper imbricates forms the roof thrust of the underlying duplex. In the northern part of the Vicuna area, the syntectonic sedimentary wedge of the foredeep consists of Late Cretaceous through Tertiary siliciclastics that have been deformed and uplifted by passive back thrusting at the triangle zone. The structural style in the foreland region shows three main subhorizontal detachment levels located within the sedimentary wedge as a result of the progressive transfer of slip from the thrust belt to the foreland. Minor blind thrusts produce stacked [open quotes]pop up[close quotes] and triangle structures that result in complex geometries in the cores of anticlines. A forward-breaking sequence of thrusting is interpreted. During deformation, the active foredeep wedge migrated at least 10 km northward. Balanced geological cross sections indicate approximately 60% (-30 km) shortening for this part of the Magallanes thrust belt.

  8. Data:873baff3-174f-491f-a4c4-7c1d016cc484 | Open Energy Information

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  9. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorb FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.

  10. RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC are the master control elements of far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Chi; Gan, Fei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-11-25

    Terrestrial cyanobacteria often occur in niches tha tare strongly enriched in far-redlight (FRL; λ > 700nm). Some cyanobacteria exhibit a complex and extensive photoacclimation response, known as FRLphotoacclimation(FaRLiP).During the FaRLiP response, specialized paralogous proteins replace 17 core subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes: Photosystem (PS)I, PSII,and the phycobilisome. Additionally, the cells synthesize both chlorophyll (Chl) f and Chl d.Using biparental mating from Escherichia coli, we constructed null mutants of three genes, rfpA, rfpB,and rfpC, in the cyanobacteria Chlorogloeopsis fritschii PCC 9212 and Chroococcidiopsis thermalis PCC 7203.The resulting mutants were no longer able to modify their photosynthetic apparatus to absorbmore » FRL, were no longer able to synthesize Chl f, in appropriately synthesized Chl d in white light,and were unable to transcribe genes of the FaRLiP gene cluster. We conclude that RfpA, RfpB, and RfpC constitute a FRL-activated signal transduction cascade that is the master control switch for the FaRLiP response. FRL is proposed to activate (or inactivate) the histidine kinase activity of RfpA, which leads to formation of the active state of RfpB, the key response regulator and transcription activator. RfpC may act as a phosphate shuttle between RfpA and RfpB. Our results show that reverse genetics via conjugation will be a powerful approach in detailed studies of the FaRLiP response.« less

  11. Perspective and current status on fuel cycle system of fast reactor cycle Technology development (FaCT) project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funasaka, Hideyuki; Itoh, Masanori

    2007-07-01

    FaCT Project taking over from Feasibility Study on Commercialized FR cycle system (FS) has been launched in 2006 by Japanese joint team with the participation of all parties concerned in Japan. Combination system of (the sodium-cooled reactor,) the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) is evaluated as the most promising fuel cycle system concept so that it has potential conformity to the design requirements, as well as a high level of technical feasibility as the final report of Phase II in FS. Current status and R and D prospects for this combination system of the advanced aqueous reprocessing system and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication (MOX fuel) system until around 2015 have been studied. Then, it is anticipated that in FR reprocessing commercial facility will start to operate around same time that in LWR reprocessing subsequent plant will be required to replace Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (provided that life time 40 years) around 2050. From the view point of the smooth transition from LWRs to FRs in approximately the year 2050 and beyond in Japan, some issues on fuel cycle have been also discussed. (authors)

  12. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  13. Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) -- Thrust II Engine Projects, Sprays, and Emissions Control Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FT039 - Part 1 Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines Advanced Engine Development Team Paul Miles, 4 Magnus Sjöberg, 4 John Dec, 4 Steve Ciatti, 1 Chris Kolodziej, 1 Scott Curran, 3 Mark Musculus, 4 Charles Mueller 4 1. Argonne National Laboratory 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 4. Sandia National Laboratories Co-Optima DOE VTO Management Team: Kevin Stork, Gurpreet Singh, & Leo Breton Thrust II engine projects June 9 th , 2016 Overview: Thrust II

  14. Data:B831a092-b2f7-4f35-957e-d1fa374af3a8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. Thrust faults of southern Diamond Mountains, central Nevada: Implications for hydrocarbons in Diamond Valley and at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, D.E.

    1993-04-01

    Overmature Mississippian hydrocarbon source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains have been interpreted to be a klippe overlying less mature source rocks and represented as an analogy to similar conditions near Yucca Mountain (Chamberlain, 1991). Geologic evidence indicates an alternative interpretation. Paleogeologic mapping indicates the presence of a thrust fault, referred to here as the Moritz Nager Thrust Fault, with Devonian rocks emplaced over Permian to Mississippian strata folded into an upright to overturned syncline, and that the overmature rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in the footwall of this thrust. The upper plate has been eroded from most of the Diamond Mountains but remnants are present at the head of Moritz Nager Canyon and at Sentinel Mountain. Devonian rocks of the upper plate comprised the earliest landslide megabreccia. Later, megabreccias of Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks of the overturned syncline of the lower plate were deposited. By this interpretation the maturity of lower-plate source rocks in the southern Diamond Mountains, which have been increased by tectonic burial, is not indicative of conditions in Diamond Valley, adjacent to the west, where upper-plate source rocks might be present in generating conditions. The interpretation that overmature source rocks of the Diamond Mountains are in a lower plate rather than in a klippe means that this area is an inappropriate model for the Eleana Range near Yucca Mountain.

  16. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-20

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

  17. Anastomosing grabens, low-angle faults, and Tertiary thrust( ) faults, western Markagunt Plateau, southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, F.; Sable, E.G. )

    1993-04-01

    A structurally complex terrane composed of grabens and horsts, low-angle faults, Tertiary thrust( ) faults, gravity-slide blocks, and debris deposits has been mapped along the western Markagunt Plateau, east of Parowan and Summit, southwestern Utah. This terrane, structurally situated within the transition between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, contains Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The structures are mostly Miocene to Oligocene but some are Pleistocene. The oldest structure is the Red Hills low-angle shear zone, interpreted as a shallow structure that decoupled an upper plate composed of a Miocene-Oligocene volcanic ash-flow tuff and volcaniclastic succession from a lower plate of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The period of deformation on the shear zone is bracketed from field relationships between 22.5 and 20 Ma. The graben-horst system trends northeast and formed after about 20 Ma (and probably much later) based on displacement of dated dikes and a laccolith. The central part of the system contains many grabens that merge toward its southerly end to become a single graben. Within these grabens, (1) older structures are preserved, (2) debris eroded from horst walls forms lobe-shaped deposits, (3) Pleistocene basaltic cinder cones have localized along graben-bounding faults, and (4) rock units are locally folded suggesting some component of lateral translation along graben-bounding faults. Megabreccia deposits and landslide debris are common. Megabreccia deposits are interpreted as gravity-slide blocks of Miocene-Oligocene( ) age resulting from formation of the Red Hills shear zone, although some may be related to volcanism, and still others to later deformation. The debris deposits are landslides of Pleistocene-Pliocene( ) age possibly caused by continued uplift of the Markagunt Plateau.

  18. Laramide thrusting and Tertiary deformation Tierra Caliente, Michoacan and Guerrero States, southwestern Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.A.; Harrison, C.G.A. ); Lang, H. ); Barros, J.A.; Cabral-Cano, E.

    1990-05-01

    Field investigations and detailed interpretations of Landsat Thematic Mapper images are in progress to improve understanding of regional structure and tectonics of the southernmost extension of the North American cordillera. Two areas have been selected within the Ciudad Altamirano 1:250,000 topographical sheet for geologic mapping and structural interpretation at 1:50,000 scale. The authors results to date require modification of previous ideas concerning the style and timing of deformations, the role and timing of terrane accretion in the overall tectonic history of the region, and the importance of southern Mexico to investigations of the tectonic evolution of the plates in the region. The relative sequence of deformation in the area correlates well with variations in relative motion between North America and plates in the Pacific. Post-Campanian thrusts and generally eastward-verging folds deformed the Mesozoic sequence during the (Laramide equivalent) Hidalgoan orogeny, associated with high-velocity east-west convergence with the Farallon plate that began about 70 Ma. The resulting unconformity was covered by the Tertiary Balsas Formation, a thick sequence of mostly continental clastics. The Tertiary stratigraphy is regionally and sometimes locally variable, but it can be divided into two members. The lower member is relatively volcanic poor and more deformed, and it lies below a regionally significant mid-Tertiary unconformity, which may mark a change to northeast-directed convergence with the Farallon plate sometime prior to 40 Ma. Continued mid-Tertiary deformation in southern Mexico may be related to eastward movement of the Chortis block and the resulting truncation of the Pacific margin of Mexico. The authors also suggest a tentative correlation between the volcaniclastic member of the Lower Cretaceous San Lucas Formation and the protolith of the Roca Verde metamorphics to the east.

  19. Experience in the commercial operation of the pilot asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 at cogeneration plant-22 (TETs-22) of the Mosenergo Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinakov, V. E.; Chernyshev, E. V.; Kuzin, G. A.; Voronov, V. K.; Labunets, I. A.

    2006-01-15

    Results of commercial operation of a world pioneer asynchronized turbogenerator T3FA-110 with a capacity of 11 MW and full air cooling at a cogeneration plant are presented. The turbogenerator developed jointly by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Elektrosila Company differs from traditional synchronous generators by the presence on the rotor of two mutually orthogonal windings, a two-channel reverse thyristor excitation system, and a special control system. The special features of design and control allow such generators to operate in the modes of both production and high consumption of reactive power at normal static and dynamic stability. This widens the range of regulation of the voltage level in the connected electric network and makes it possible to bring parallel-connected synchronous generators to optimum operation conditions. The generator can work without excitation for a long time at 70% load. Commercial operation of the pilot T3FA-110 turbogenerator started in December 2003 at TETs-22 of the Mosenergo Company and has proved its full correspondence to the design engineering parameters. A program of wide use of such turbogenerators in the United Power System of Russia (RAO 'EES Rossii' Co.) has been developed.

  20. Development of transfer zones and location of oil and gas fields in frontal part of Bolivian Andean fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baby, P. ); Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Mendez, E. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    The frontal part of the Bolivian Andean thrust belt consists of a thick series of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks (5 to 8 km thick) which are folded and thrusted towards the east on a sole thrust at the base of paleozoic series. The front of this tectonic wedge is characterized by transfer zones of various scales and geometries. The main oil and gas fields are located in these transfer zones. A study realized from YPFB (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos) seismic data shows that in all the cases, the deformation is controlled by the geometry and thickness variations of the paleozoic basin. The most spectacular transfer zone appears at the bolivian orocline scale and corresponds to the famous bending of the andean thrust front close to Santa Cruz. More to the south (19 to 22[degrees] S) the southern foreland fold and thrust belt is characterized by a set of local right lateral offset transfer zones ([open quotes]en echellon[close quotes] folds). The difference of geometry and scale of the transfer zones seems to be related to the variation of the angle value between the shortening direction and the direction of the paleozoic basin borders. In order to test our interpretation, to constrain the boundary conditions and to study the thrust propagation sequence, we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  1. Stem thrust prediction model for Westinghouse wedge gate valves with linkage type stem-to-disk connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J.K.; Sharma, V.; Kalsi, M.S.

    1996-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted a comprehensive research program with the objective of providing nuclear utilities with analytical methods to predict motor operated valve (MOV) performance under design basis conditions. This paper describes the stem thrust calculation model developed for evaluating the performance of one such valve, the Westinghouse flexible wedge gate valve. These procedures account for the unique functional characteristics of this valve design. In addition, model results are compared to available flow loop and in situ test data as a basis for evaluating the performance of the valve model.

  2. Restoration of geological surface-UNFOLD method-a validation of complex structural mapping interpretation in the Andean Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillier, B. ); Oller, J.; Mendez, E.; Leconte, J.C.; Letouzey, J.; Specht, M.; Gratier, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    One of the most important problems in petroleum structural geology is dependable interpretation of structural maps obtained by seismic and sub-surface data. One method for validating the geometry of geological structures is the balancing cross-section technique which allows verification of cross-section geometry by a return to its initial horizontal state. However, this can not be used for of 3D halokinesis, shale tectonics, structures formed by polyphased noncoaxial tectonic events, or strike-slip and wrench faulting. An alternative approach is to test the restoration of folded and faulted surfaces to verify 3D structures by balancing geological surfaces represented by a structural map. This method tests the geometry of studied horizon and faults and is based upon the fact that, initially, actual folded/faulted structures were continuous at deposition. The balancing surface program, UNFOLD, restores the actual geological surface to its initial state. Misfits along faults implied poor structural map drawings or strong internal deformation of the geological level. By trial and error method, we returned to the initial data interpretation modifications. This method has been applied to 2D and 3D seismic structural interpretation in different structural styles, environments, rift zones, salt basins, wrench faulting, thrust belt,etc. Some applications to oil field structures in the Andean Thrust Belt have been done to check and validate the complex structural mapping interpretation.

  3. Data:Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fa413ec1-68e5-4f5e-a367-f60cd2d56c38 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  4. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F. ); Swift, C.M. Jr. )

    1996-01-01

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  5. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F.; Swift, C.M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  6. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  7. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  8. FA 1: Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Diversifying Supply Focus Area 1 - Moyer, Herbst CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) File: Read more about CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks

  9. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Developing Substitutes Focus Area 2 - Schwatrz, Sales U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 29, 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 29, 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 8, 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file August 8, 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file June 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S.

  10. Microsoft Word - best-fa.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leading to failure. Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 22-26, 2004 9 Solution and Implementation Many solutions were investigated and...

  11. LANSCE-NS thrust areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron and Nuclear Science (WNR) Facility at LANSCE Semiconductor irradiations (ICE House, ICE II) High resolution gamma-ray measurements following nuclear reactions (GEANIE) Detector development Neutron radiography (FP05) Fission and neutron capture cross sections (TPC, DANCE) Fission fragment measurements (SPIDER) Fission neutron output spectrum measurements (Chi-nu) Neutron-induced Charged Particle Detection (n,z

  12. 2014-04-23 Michigan FA CVT Posting.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  13. FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Area 3 - Peterson, Jones Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several ... Read more about Electronic Waste: DOD is Recovering Materials but Several Factors May ...

  14. An overview of the star thrust experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Kenneth; Slough, John; Hoffman, Alan

    1998-01-15

    The Field Reversed Configuration, FRC, is a closed field fusion confinement geometry with great potential to be used as a space propulsive device and power source. Present formation techniques are cumbersome and severely constrain the resultant FRC. An experiment is presently under construction to study the formation and sustainment of the FRC using a rotating magnetic field. If successful, this technique would vastly simplify and enable future FRC endeavors. An overview of the STX experiment is presented.

  15. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature Laboratory Freezers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Ultra-low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user acceptance and adoption of high-efficiency ULTs. One significant barrier is a relative lack of information on ULT efficiency to help purchasers make informed decisions with respect to efficient products.

  16. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Thrust Area | Local Structure, Magnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ingredients hypothesized to be important in the emergence of superconductivity. J. M. Caron, et al., Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011). DOI:10.1103PhysRevB.84.180409 Parametric Studies...

  17. Complex Oxides - Research Thrust Leader > Joel Brock > Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joel Brock jdb20@cornell.edu Dr. Brock is a Professor in the School of Applied and Engineering Physics and a member of the graduate fields of Applied Physics and of Materials...

  18. Batteries & Fuel Cells - Research Thrust Leader > Tobias Hanrath...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tobias Hanrath th358@cornell.edu Research There is a tremendous opportunity space for nanostructured materials to play a key role in next generation energy technologies. Our...

  19. Batteries & Fuel Cells - Research Thrust Leader > Frank DiSalvo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank DiSalvo fjd3@cornell.edu Research The DiSalvo Group's research focuses on the synthesis, characterization and potential applications of new solid state materials. Current...

  20. Complex Oxides - Research Thrust Leader > David Muller > Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Muller dm24@cornell.edu He joined the Applied and Engineering Physics faculty at Cornell University in July 2003, is a graduate of the University of Sydney and completed his...

  1. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  2. https://empcs.nv.doe.gov/emis2/fa/pg/FFACO.Obligations_Commitments...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The NDEP will provide comments regarding issues on the CAU 98 CAIP and on the Nye County drilling program. Ongoing: Comments on the CAIP were received in a letter dated April 2,...

  3. Microsoft Word - FFLF Wind Project EA 11 Feb 2010 rev4 FINAL FA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    37 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February 2010 DOE/EA-1737 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE'S PROPOSED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PENNSYLVANIA FOR FREY FARM LANDFILL WIND ENERGY PROJECT MANOR TOWNSHIP LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory February

  4. Jefferson Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research fa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, a forefront U.S. Department of Energy nuclear physics research facility, provides world- class, unique research capabilities and innovative technologies to serve an international scientific user community. Specifically, the laboratory's mission is to: * deliver discovery-caliber research by exploring the atomic nucleus and its fundamental constituents, including precise tests of their interactions; * apply advanced particle accelerator, detector and other technologies to develop new basic

  5. Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Workplace logon screen will prompt you only for your Windows User name and Password. ... see a prompt for your Windows User PASSWORD. There are various situations that cause ...

  6. http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=9182fa

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AUTOMOBILE AVERAGE FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS Section Contents 531.1 Scope. 531.2 Purpose. 531.3 Applicability. 531.4 Definitions. 531.5 Fuel economy standards. ...

  7. RETRAN-02 comparison of natural circulation flow rates at Babcock and Wilcox 177-FA plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, N.T.

    1985-07-01

    A very important aspect of nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) model development is the process of comparing the computer model results against actual plant responses. Good comparisons will qualify the computer model for specific engineering analyses. Flow rates and decay heat power levels were obtained from planned and unplanned natural circulation events that occurred at Arkansas Nuclear One, Crystal River, Davis-Besse, and Oconee nuclear power plants. A oneloop RETRAN model of the Oconee NSSS is used to attain a spectrum of steady-state equilibrium conditions at different power levels of 25, 50, 75, and 100 MW. The benchmark comparisons are respectable. The comparisons also illustrate the ability of the Babcock and Wilcox raised-loop plant to induce a greater natural circulation flow rate.

  8. Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - Citrix2FAAuthentication1232009.doc Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Microsoft Word - SMailSecureWeb-BasedEmailv3 ...

  9. Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    low temperature laboratory freezers (ULTs) are some of the most energy-intensive pieces of equipment in a scientific research laboratory, yet there are several barriers to user...

  10. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  11. Meet CMI Researcher Eric Schwegler | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schwegler Eric Schwegler, FA4 Deputy CMI researcher Eric Schwegler is the leader for Focus Area 4, Crosscutting Research, and the Thrust Lead for Enabling Science. Previously he served as Deputy Lead for Focus Area 4. Eric received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1998 from the University of Minnesota, following undergraduate degrees in computer science and chemistry from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. His thesis research was focused on the development of linear scaling

  12. Thrust at N{sup 3}LL with power corrections and a precision global...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACCURACY; B QUARKS; CENTER-OF-MASS SYSTEM; CORRECTIONS; ...

  13. Exploration in the Sub Andean thrust/fold belt of northwest Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, A.; Alarcon, M.; Aramayo, F.; Santiago, M.; Ashby, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    A significant portion of the 15,000 square kilometer Aguarague exploration permit is located with the Sub Andean zone of northwest Argentina bordering Bolivia. The Sub Andean sedimentary section is dominated by a succession of tectonostratigraphic cycles of Silurian to recent age. These cycles display a complex geological history prior to the onset of the Andean deformation of Upper Miocene age. As the structures are complex, several different exploration techniques were combined, including satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, geological mapping, geochemistry, microtectonic studies, magneto stratigraphy, seismic modeling and seismic with pre- and post-stack depth migration. The interpretation of these techniques produced three dimensional structural models, at regional and prospect scales, that demonstrated the deformation mechanism, sequence and timing of the structures; these were then linked to the timing of generation/expulsion of hydrocarbons. The physical properties of the sedimentary sequence produces three structural environs, each with distinct fold and fault mechanisms. 1. (Upper): A product of the cumulative deformation of the underlying environs; 2. (Middle): The presence of an incompetent shale, the principal source rock, within this unit produces {open_quotes}fold disharmony {close_quotes} (horizontally and vertically) between the overlying and underlying environs. 3. (Lower): Characterized by folds developed by Fault Bend Fold processes. Hydrocarbon fields and exploration prospects are present within all three environs. The work performed has permitted the successful evaluation of several structures within the Sub Andean of the UTE Aguarague.

  14. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Young's mod ant within the August 30, ble 1) require nal strength o m the ratio o fault plane (F ult from the nd generate of Rangely oi pore fluid ch dulus and Pois e model. ...

  15. Acquisition Letter AL 2011-05_FAL 2011-01 Congressional Notification of Pending Actions (Contract and FA) in excess of $1M

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AL 2011-05/FAL 2011-01 (AL/FAL) implements statutory and non-statutory Congressional notification of pending award of a contract action, announcement of selected applications for negotiation of financial assistance awards, or to award a financial assistance action in excess of $1 million. The AL/FAL implements Title I - General Provision Section 1101(a)(2) of Division B of Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 from the Department of Defense and Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 (Pub.L. 112-10). This statute is a continuation of Section 311 under the Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010. The amendment to Head of Contracting Activity delegation to designate signature authority for these notices will be sent out separately.

  16. Data:C2f657fb-1bf4-43a7-bab8-35adf4b59fa0 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  17. Data:8777236b-9eb8-4857-bc99-0e5a03782fa7 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  18. Data:07f78f8f-a33a-4414-add9-cd8d2c7ac364 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  19. Data:F4305257-a041-4f91-990d-7fa77582ebd6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  20. Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) -- Fuel Properties and Chemical Kinetics and Thrust I Engine Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information #$%&'"(")*+,"!" Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines Fuel Property Team -./0+,"12"345.+67489 ! "!"#$%&"'('#") * %+",%-./0"12) 3 %4",%5$/1) 6 %7$89%:"9;1) <% :$=%:>?;#9/) @ %5"99%7"2.) @ %+'#%A8;>B;) * %:$=%C$2>9"D) * %5($E%F"G9;() * %->'=%!'9E10'('8GH I % *J!

  1. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  2. Geothermal resources of the Green River Basin, Wyoming, including thermal data for the Wyoming portion of the Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, S.A.; Heasler, H.P.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Green River basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth is tabulated. It was concluded that large areas are underlain by water at temperatures greater than 120/sup 0/F. Although much of this water is too deep to be economically tapped solely for geothermal use, oil and gas wells presently provide access to this significant geothermal resource. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist. These areas - many revealed by hot springs - represent geothermal systems which might presently be developed economically. 34 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs. (ACR)

  3. Publications - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    056.JPG Publications Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS

  4. Research Highlights - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    100.JPG Research Highlights Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS

  5. XPS Spectral Database - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JCAP20130222-220.jpg XPS Spectral Database Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  6. Device Simulation Tool - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAZ0036_v2.jpg Device Simulation Tool Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation

  7. User Facilities Expert Team - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IMG_2298.JPG User Facilities Expert Team Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  8. Videos - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jcap-kjo080714_kjo0080.jpg Videos Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation

  9. Why Solar Fuels - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ©bobpaz.com0145.JPG Why Solar Fuels? Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation

  10. Innovations - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAZ0031.JPG Innovations Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS

  11. Benchmarking Database - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ©bobpaz.com0121.JPG Benchmarking Database Research Why Solar Fuels Goals & Objectives Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Publications Research Highlights Videos Innovations User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device

  12. Data:0e5fa6ee-2c95-482a-a78a-fd06c670a3a6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima)—Fuel Properties and Chemical Kinetics and Thrust I Engine Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Fuel & Lubricants

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima)-- Fuel Properties and Chemical Kinetics and Thrust I Engine Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Fuel...

  15. CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lo&&-, : i e r : gtdlm FILLS March 12, 1956 ~'RII~~~~~I~~D~.,A~ICAW~~TMDRLBS, CILJCU~ATI, QUO J. A. Qu~glw, M .D. c. E. aahwun ObJcrativr oi THpt On !iUesd8y, Fabmerg 28,19!36, th@ lILQMetallurgMalD@p~rtJmnt beipn bzdquotting green ult-ll( blend on e 350 ton hydmulla prau 8t the Ura &i&nnrlug DivUiou of Ameria8n Steel muUdPae8, c&alMatl, Ohio. Approll'tely a,ooo pound8 of greeu ult ub briqumtte4 bw13ry 8 -rioa of mvea day,. Par the pwpou ofwalutlngexpo88mmmafpemmm8 linrelvmd

  16. Section 27

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NF o N e ' f (N,$,Zb,h,8,u,<;) Session Papers 117 (1) (2) A Test of the Validity of Cumulus Cloud Parameterizations for Longwave Radiation Calculations D. Han and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Longwave radiative transfer under broken cloud conditions is often treated as a problem in cloud bulk geometry, especially for cumulus clouds, because individual clouds are nearly black. However, climate models ignore cloud geometry

  17. ORNUGWPO-019 Determination of Effective Porosity of Mudrocks...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... for the Kingston thrust sheet and the Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheets ... sheet (fig. la) and for the Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain Thrust sheets (fig. lb). ...

  18. Resources - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Resources Hero.jpg Resources Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP offers a number of databases and simulation tools for solar-fuel generator researchers and developers. User Facilities Expert Team solarfuels1.jpg

  19. Introduction - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hero Image ©bobpaz.com0082.JPG Research Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP seeks to discover new ways to produce hydrogen and carbon-based fuels using only sunlight, water and carbon dioxide as inputs Why Solar FuELs?

  20. Library - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Library Hero Image.JPG Library Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database JCAP library of Publications, research highlights and videos publications solarfuels1.jpg solarfuels1.jpg research highlights research videos

  1. A Solar Fuel Proto - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Videos JCAP-SOFI Presentation Benchmarkin A Solar Fuel Proto Heterogeneous Catalysis and Surface Science Scientists Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database a solar-fuel prototype in operation A fully integrated photoelectrochemical device performing unassisted solar water

  2. JCAP-SOFI Presentation - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Videos JCAP-SOFI Presentation Benchmarkin A Solar Fuel Proto Heterogeneous Catalysis and Surface Science Scientists Research Introduction Why Solar Fuels? Goals & Objectives Thrusts Thrust 1 Thrust 2 Thrust 3 Thrust 4 Library Publications Research Highlights Videos Resources User Facilities Expert Team Benchmarking Database Device Simulation Tool XPS Spectral Database Francesca Toma - Integration of lower band Gap oxides into water splitting devices Francesca Toma's presentationand interview

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DelMoro, A. (1) Gandhi, P. (1) Hailey, C.J. (1) Harrison, F.A. (1) Koss, M. (1) Lansbury, ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... DelMoro, A. (1) Gandhi, P. (1) Hailey, C.J. (1) Harrison, F.A. (1) Koss, M. (1) Lansbury, ... ; Comastri, A. ; Bologna Observ. ; Harrison, F.A. ; Caltech ; Alexander, D.M. ; ...

  5. Staff > Leadership Team > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnerships Paul Mutolo pfm2@cornell.edu List Image Complex Oxides - Research Thrust Leader Joel Brock jdb20@cornell.edu List Image Batteries & Fuel Cells - Research Thrust...

  6. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP 2001 Reserve Summary for Wyoming Thrust Belt Fields Wyoming Thrust Belt Oil & Gas Fields ...

  7. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2015-07-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. - Highlights: • Proteasome inhibition enhances cytotoxicity of low-dose FA in human lung cells. • Active proteasomes diminish replication-inhibiting effects of FA. • Proteasome activity prevents delayed G2 arrest in FA-treated cells. • Proteasome inhibition exacerbates replication stress by FA in

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Briefs Nuclear Weapons Lab-Directed R&D Solid-State Lighting Center Thrusts

  9. BLACKLEAF CANYON TWO MEDICINE CREEK POTSHOT PROSPECT GLACIER E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves Basin Outline WY UT ID CO MT WA OR NV CANADA INDEX MAP ID Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Montana Thrust Belt 1 1 0 1 Basin 2001 Reserve Summary for Montana Thrust Belt Fields CANADA USA Montana Thrust Belt Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  10. Visiting Faculty Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Visiting Faculty Program (VFP), formerly called Faculty and Student Teams (FaST), seeks to increase the research competitiveness of faculty members and their students at institutions...

  11. City of Clarksville, Tennessee (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    @CDELightband Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCDE-Lightband96953266253?refts Outage Hotline: 931-648-8151 Outage Map: www.outageentry.comCustomerFa References:...

  12. PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Don Bryant PARC Seminar Series featuring Don Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in...

  13. Microsoft Word - Bryant flyer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria" Dr. Donald Bryant Ernest C. Pollard Professor in...

  14. Sandia Energy Wind News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wake-Imaging System Successfully Deployed at Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility http:energy.sandia.govsandia-wake-imaging-system-successfully-deployed-at-scaled-wind-fa...

  15. Argent Energy UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motherwell, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: ML1 5FA Product: Motherwell-based waste-to-energy biodiesel producer that has an operational plant in Scotland. Coordinates:...

  16. Evaluation of the intrinsic and extrinsic fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, B.S.; Yao, Qizhou; Cooper, B.R.

    1996-08-01

    Comparative creep crack growth tests of FA-186 and FA-187 iron aluminides under either dry oxygen or air environment showed that both alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement. Test results also revealed that FA-187 is intrinsically a more brittle material than FA-186. Atomistic computational modeling is being undertaken to find the preferred geometries, structures and formation energies of iron vacancies and vacancy pairs (Fe-Fe) in FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al. An indication of vacancy clustering in Fe{sub 3}Al, with consequences for dislocation behavior, may be important for understanding the role of dislocation assisted diffusion in the hydrogen embrittlement mechanism.

  17. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 25

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... asbestos- containing transite panels from the walls and roof, exposing the ... Both CPP-601 and 602 once formed the center of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing fa- cilities at ...

  18. Waste Heat-to-Power Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Different working fluids - but, many ORC's use HFC-245fa Pressure ratiobuilt-in volume ratio mismatch - larger pressure ratio than practical scroll built-in volume ratio ...

  19. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept. of Chemical and Material Engineering; Hamad, F.A.; Abu-Arabi, M. University of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design and ...

  20. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  1. Prepared in response to formal guidance and a request by Sam...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Computational Chief Scientist to oversee and drive cross-cutting computer and computational science assets; and experienced FA Leads and Deputies with responsibility for the ...

  2. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  3. Low-Power Laser-Metal Interaction for Space Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Sumida, Sota; Funaki, Ikkoh

    2010-10-08

    The micro-Newton thrust generation was observed through low-power continuous-wave laser and aluminum foil interaction without any remarkable ablation of the target surface. To evaluate the thrust characteristics, a torsion-balance thrust stand capable for the measurement of the thrust level down to micro-Newton ranges was developed. In the case of an aluminum foil target with 12.5 micrometer thickness, the maximum thrust level was 15 micro-Newtons when the laser power was 20 W. It was also found that the laser intensity, or laser power per unit area, irradiated on the target was significantly important on the control of the thrust even under the low-intensity level.

  4. Recent results from the Spacecraft Fabrication and Test MODIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, T.T.

    1993-04-01

    The Spacecraft Fabrication and Test Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory (SF&T MODIL) is working with SDIO program offices and contractors to reduce schedule and budget risks for SDIO systems as they go into production. The concurrent engineering thrust has identified potential high payoff areas. A materials and structures demonstration project has been successfully completed in partial automated closing of matched metal molds for a continuous fiber composite. In addition to excellent accuracy, the parts demonstrated excellent predictability and repeatability of physical properties. The cryocooler thrust successfully demonstrated and inserted precision technologies into a generic cryocooler part. The precision technologies thrust outlined two potentially high payoff areas in precision alignment and miniature rocket thrust measurement. The Producible Technology Working Group (PTWG) efforts identified the need for a test and assembly thrust. Due to funding limitations, continuing efforts are limited to the cryocooler thrust.

  5. Quantification of the degree of reaction of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Haha, M.; De Weerdt, K.; Lothenbach, B.

    2010-11-15

    The quantification of the fly ash (FA) in FA blended cements is an important parameter to understand the effect of the fly ash on the hydration of OPC and on the microstructural development. The FA reaction in two different blended OPC-FA systems was studied using a selective dissolution technique based on EDTA/NaOH, diluted NaOH solution, the portlandite content and by backscattered electron image analysis. The amount of FA determined by selective dissolution using EDTA/NaOH is found to be associated with a significant possible error as different assumptions lead to large differences in the estimate of FA reacted. In addition, at longer hydration times, the reaction of the FA is underestimated by this method due to the presence of non-dissolved hydrates and MgO rich particles. The dissolution of FA in diluted NaOH solution agreed during the first days well with the dissolution as observed by image analysis. At 28 days and longer, the formation of hydrates in the diluted solutions leads to an underestimation. Image analysis appears to give consistent results and to be most reliable technique studied.

  6. Function allocation for humans and automation in the context of team dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Joe; John O'Hara; Jacques Hugo; Johanna Oxstrand

    2015-07-01

    Within Human Factors Engineering, a decision-making process called function allocation (FA) is used during the design life cycle of complex systems to distribute the system functions, often identified through a functional requirements analysis, to all human and automated machine agents (or teammates) involved in controlling the system. Most FA methods make allocation decisions primarily by comparing the capabilities of humans and automation, but then also by considering secondary factors such as cost, regulations, and the health and safety of workers. The primary analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of humans and machines, however, is almost always considered in terms of individual human or machine capabilities. Yet, FA is fundamentally about teamwork in that the goal of the FA decision-making process is to determine what are the optimal allocations of functions among agents. Given this framing of FA, and the increasing use of and sophistication of automation, there are two related social psychological issues that current FA methods need to address more thoroughly. First, many principles for effective human teamwork are not considered as central decision points or in the iterative hypothesis and testing phase in most FA methods, when it is clear that social factors have numerous positive and negative effects on individual and team capabilities. Second, social psychological factors affecting team performance and can be difficult to translate to automated agents, and most FA methods currently do not account for this effect. The implications for these issues are discussed.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: ppmteam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPM Team Members Corbett Battaile (Principal Investigator) ccbatta@sandia.gov Anton Sumali (Program Manager) hsumali@sandia.gov Nanoscale Physics (Task 1) Doug Medlin (Thrust Lead) dlmedli@sandia.gov Fadi Abdeljawad Stephen Foiles Khalid Hattar Mesoscale Materials Properties (Task 2) Hojun Lim (Thrust Lead) hnlim@sandia.gov Jay Carroll Dan Bufford Gustavo Castelluccio Continuum Mechanics (Task 3) John Emery (Thrust Lead) jmemery@sandia.gov Brad Boyce Rich Field Jay Foulk Mircea Grigoriu Kyle

  8. People | NEES - EFRC | University of Maryland Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center People Directors Director Gary Rubloff, UMD Website Deputy Director Sang Bok Lee, UMD Website Assoc Director for Sandia Sean Hearne, SNL-ALBQ Assoc Director for Programs Elizabeth Lathrop, UMD Primary Investigators Thrust 1 Phil Collins - UCI Bryan Eichhorn - UMD Kevin Leung - SNL-ALBQ Chuck Martin - UFL Zuzanna Siwy - UCI Thrust 2 Chunsheng Wang - UMD Sang Bok Lee - UMD Liangbing Hu - UMD Mark Reed - Yale YuHuang Wang - UMD Thrust 3 Reginald Penner - UCI John Cumings - UMD Katherine

  9. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engines (Co-Optima) -- Thrust II Engine Projects, Sprays, and Emissions Control Research | Department of Energy Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) -- Thrust II Engine Projects, Sprays, and Emissions Control Research Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima) -- Thrust II Engine Projects, Sprays, and Emissions Control Research Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) at the 2016 DOE

  11. BLACKLEAF CANYON TWO MEDICINE CREEK POTSHOT PROSPECT GLACIER E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 Reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE Basin Outline WY UT ID CO MT WA OR NV CANADA INDEX MAP ID Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Montana Thrust Belt 1 1 0 1 Basin 2001 Reserve Summary for Montana Thrust Belt Fields CANADA USA Montana Thrust Belt Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  12. BLACKLEAF CANYON TWO MEDICINE CREEK POTSHOT PROSPECT GLACIER E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl Basin Outline WY UT ID CO MT WA OR NV CANADA INDEX MAP ID Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Montana Thrust Belt 1 1 0 1 Basin 2001 Reserve Summary for Montana Thrust Belt Fields CANADA USA Montana Thrust Belt Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  13. Direct Fusion Drive for a Human Mars Orbital Mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluszek, Michael; Pajer, Gary; Razin, Yosef; Slonaker, James; Cohen, Samuel; Feder, Russ; Griffin, Kevin; Walsh, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    The Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) is a nuclear fusion engine that produces both thrust and electric power. It employs a field reversed configuration with an odd-parity rotating magnetic field heating system to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. The engine uses deuterium and helium-3 as fuel and additional deuterium that is heated in the scrape-off layer for thrust augmentation. In this way variable exhaust velocity and thrust is obtained.

  14. A=10C (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10C) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 10.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1968FA1B, 1969SA1A, 1969SO08, 1973SA30). Special reactions: (1967AU1B, 1969YI1A, 1971AR02). Pion reactions (See also reaction 3.): (1973AL1E, 1973CH20). Other topics: (1968FA02, 1968FA1B, 1969SO08, 1969SO1E, 1970FO1B, 1972AN05, 1972CA37). Ground-state properties: (1966KE16, 1968FA02, 1968FA1B, 1969GA1G, 1973SA30). 1. 10C(β+)10B Qm = 3.650 10C

  15. Presentations | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Viable Lithium-Sulfur Transportation Battery Kevin Zavadil, JCESR Thrust PI, Chemical Transformation Pathways to Non-aqueous Redox Flow (NRF) Batteries for Grid Storage Fikile ...

  16. Salishan 2010 final.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analytics NGC research thrust: Multilingual Text Analysis Sandia's improvements on LSA * LMSA - Latent Morpho-Semantic Analysis * Using morphemes, instead of terms * Two...

  17. Rotor Blade Sensors and Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EnergyWater Nexus EnergyWater History Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Decision ... rotor thrust loading-and detect any vibration that may be out of the ordinary; ...

  18. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    include high-temperature drive system materials, journal and thrust bearings, and corrosion and erosion-resistant lifting pump components. Finally, in Phase 3, the overall...

  19. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Cu 10 nm nanocrystalline sample being uni-axial compressed to strain of 20% and then stress released. Irradiation Extremes Thrust Traditional structural materials degrade and...

  20. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EvacuationWater Depression Controls *Completion - September 2014 *Wolf Creek Thrust Bearing Pressure Lift System - Units 1, 2, 3 & 5 *HDC is reviewing final plans and...

  1. Structural investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    During SevierLaramide orogeny, the Sierra Nevada Mountains were thrust eastward over Rose Valleylndian Wells Valley. Relatively thin graniticmetamorphic plates were folded to...

  2. File:EIA-MTB-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Montana Thrust Belt By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  3. File:EIA-WTB-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applicationpdf) Description Wyoming Thrust Belt By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F....

  4. cnc7233.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Hence, explosive selection depends strongly on the target. In this effort our primary thrust is fragment generation, although we are formulating some materials at each extreme. ...

  5. Affiliates | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enabling stakeholders to discuss opportunities and difficulties across the supply chain. Workshops may be thematically chosen to coincide with JCESR project thrusts and...

  6. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is...

  7. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion Chiravalle, Vincent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is...

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is...

  9. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these ...

  10. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  11. Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Bio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9, 2012 2 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Focus of 2007 Roadmap 2007 Roadmap "Thrust" Areas * Selective thermal processing * Syngas conversion * Utilization ...

  12. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CINT), Physical Synthesis Lab: J. Kevin Baldwin LANL Technologist Ion Beam Materials Lab: Yongqiang Wang LANL Scientist Irradiation Thrust Electron Microscopy Lab: Rob...

  13. Contact - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Prof. Peter Green, CSTEC Director Research Group Leader for Thrust 3 - Energy transport in organic and hybrid systems Materials Science & Engineering Dept. H H Dow ...

  14. Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural geology of the CP Hills, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; and regional implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, S.J.

    1991-08-01

    Detailed mapping and structural analysis of upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks in the CP Hills of the Nevada Test Site, together with analysis of published maps and cross sections and a reconnaissance of regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust of Barnes and Poole (1968) actually comprises two separate, oppositely verging Mesozoic thrust systems: (1) the west-vergent CP thrust which is well exposed in the CP Hills and at Mine Mountain, and (2) the east-vergent Belted Range thrust located northwest of Yucca Flat. West-vergence of the CP thrust is indicated by large scale west-vergent recumbent folds in both its hangingwall and footwall and by the fact that the CP thrust ramps up section through hangingwall strata toward the northwest. Regional structural relations indicate that the CP thrust forms part of a narrow sigmoidal belt of west-vergent folding and thrusting traceable for over 180 km along strike. The Belted Range thrust represents earlier Mesozoic deformation that was probably related to the Last Chance thrust system in southeastern California, as suggested by earlier workers. A pre-Tertiary reconstruction of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in the region between the NTS and the Las Vegas Range bears a close resemblance to other regions of the Cordillera and has important implications for the development of hinterland-vergent deformation as well as for the probable magnitude of Tertiary extension north of Las Vegas Valley. Subsequent to Mesozoic deformation, the CP Hills were disrupted by at least two episodes of Tertiary extensional deformation: (1) an earlier episode represented by pre-middle Miocene low-angle normal faults, and (2) a later, post-11 Ma episode of high-angle normal faulting. Both episodes of extension were related to regional deformation, the latter of which has resulted in the present basin and range topography of the NTS region.

  15. Cost savings deliverables and criteria for the OST technology decision process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCown, A.

    1997-04-01

    This document has been prepared to assist focus area (FA) technical and management teams in understanding the cost savings deliverables associated with a technology system during its research and development (R and D) phases. It discusses the usefulness of cost analysis in the decision-making process, and asserts that the level of confidence and data quality of a cost analysis is proportional to the maturity of the technology system`s development life cycle. Suggestions of specific investment criteria or cost savings metrics that a FA might levy on individual research projects are made but the final form of these elements should be stipulated by the FA management based on their rationale for a successful technology development project. Also, cost savings deliverables for a single FA will be more detailed than those for management of the Office of Science and Technology (OST). For example, OST management may want an analysis of the overall return on investment for each FA, while the FA program manager may want this analysis and the return on investment metrics for each technology research activity the FA supports.

  16. Effects of high temperature surface oxides on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing, heat treatment (750 {degrees}C in air, one hour) or simulated in-service-type oxidation (1000{degrees}C in air, 24 hours) on the room-temperature aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of iron aluminides. Materials evaluated included the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84, FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo, a FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385, and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy, FAPY. Tests were performed in a mild acid-chloride solution to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Cyclic-anodic-polarization tests were employed to evaluate resistances to localized aqueous corrosion. The high-temperature oxide surfaces consistently produced detrimental results relative to mechanically or chemically cleaned surfaces. Specifically, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the as-processed and 750{degrees} C surfaces, relative to the cleaned surfaces, for FA-84, FA-129, FAL-Mo, FA-385 and FAPY. Furthermore, the pitting corrosion resistances were much lower for the 1000{degrees}C surfaces, relative to cleaned surfaces, for FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo.

  17. Sandia National Labs: Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center (PCNSC):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departments Vision & Mission/Values Strengths & Capabilities Center Thrusts Resources Organization Chart Departments News Partnering Research Center 1100 Vision & Mission/Values Strengths & Capabilities Center Thrusts Resources Assistants Organization Chart Center 1100 Team Celebration 2011

  18. Documentation - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Systems Volume VIII System Shot Operations Manual S-AB-P-008 Shot Type 6-7 ESO Checklist (S-AB-P-173) Lithium Deuteride Targets Handling Procedure(Q-FA-P-121) OMEGA...

  19. NATIONAL .LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ((1 Radiation Dept. 3 Water Treatment Plant (Fa Water hsples Only) ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY SECTI ON >ATE RECEIVED: BY: - I IATE REPORTED: BY: 4-28-61 4ETHOD OF ANALYSIS: ...

  20. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of ... The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure ...

  1. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS; GAS TURBINE...

  2. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Results: Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly processmore large volumes of data, and...

  3. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects File DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx More Documents & Publications 1 1 Federal ...

  4. US Department of the Navy Driving Alternative Fuels Adoption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 5 years (anything beyond 1 year is challenging) - Offtakes before facility is producing fuel - Another major capital infusion FA-18E , Pacific Ocean USS Nimitz (CVN-68) THANK YOU

  5. Microsoft Word - MPW_Fact_Sheet_SAND2010-4820P_updated_format...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inte rvices integra afer resource circuits in low rogram prov production fa test and pac ened, 3.3 v, 0 ors, and diod tal and analo n Kit. managed and oper artment of Energy r...

  6. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.; Jones, L.L. (1994) 134 Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. (1999) 128 Ammonia usage in vapor compression for ...

  7. DOE/SC-ARM-0606

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Tobin,.DC,.H.Revercomb,.RO.Knuteson,.FA.Best,.WL.Smith,.NN.Ciganovich,.RG.Dedecker,.S.Dutc... .Minnis,.P,.L.Nguyen,.W.Smith,.R.Palikonda,.J.Ayers,.D.Doelling,.M.Norde...

  8. Section 81

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.A. Whitney, H.E. Revercomb, R.O. Knuteson, F.A. Best, and W.L. Smith University of ... 1989; Revercomb et al. 1995) and cloud (Smith et al. 1992; Collard et al. 1995) ...

  9. Light-induced electron transfer vs. energy transfer in molecular thin-film systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renschler, C. L.; Faulkner, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    Quenching of fluoranthene (FA) singlets by tetrabromo-o-benzoquinone (TBBQ) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was studied both in xylene solutions and in spin-cast polystyrene (PS) films. Emphasis was placed on time-resolved fluorescence transients resulting from pulsed excitation. Linear Stern-Volmer plots were obtained for quenching in solution and gave diffusion-controlled rate constants, of 1.45 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ and 1.53 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/ for TBBQ and TMPD, respectively. TBBQ was found to quench FA singlets in PS over the studied concentration range 12 mM < (TBBQ) < 48 mM, but in its presence FA singlets decayed nonexponentially. The results were interpreted quantitatively in terms of pure Foerster's transfer from FA to TBBQ without diffusion of excitons. The critical transfer radius R/sub 0/ was experimentally determined to be 24.3 A, which is in good agreement with the theoretical value of 23 A calculated from spectral data. Quenching of FA singlets in PS films was found to be independent of FA concentration over a 300 mM to 1200 mM FA concentration range for a constant TBBQ concentration of 24.0 mM. TMPD was only slightly effective as a quencher of FA singlets in PS because it apparently behaves strictly as a contact quencher based on reversible charge transfer. The implications of these results for the design of systems intended to exploit light-induced electron transfer are discussed.

  10. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... I c3tr9830.0cr JrL lm l m ROOM FLOOR TOP V I EI FAI-I FAI.2 F A2-2 FAI -3 F A2-3 FA I.4 FAI-5 FA2-5 FBI-3 FB2-3 FBI-4 FB I.5 FB2-5 FrcuRE 4-2 LocATtoNs oF POSr-REMEDIAL AcrloN ...

  11. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [{+-} SD] age = 12.1 {+-} 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 {+-} 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p}, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p} between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA{sub f/p} of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity.

  12. Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Your RSA token is used to esbablish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov . Using-TwoFactorRSA-Token w VPN.pdf (469 KB) More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

  13. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stablemore » and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.« less

  14. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garca-Mat, M.; De la Torre, A.G.; Len-Reina, L.; Aranda, M.A.G.; CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona ; Santacruz, I.

    2013-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 2 and 72 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  15. Highly robust hydrogen generation by bio-inspired Ir complexes for dehydrogenation of formic acid in water: Experimental and theoretical mechanistic investigations at different pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wan -Hui; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Xu, Shaoan; Onishi, Naoya; Manaka, Yuichi; Suna, Yuki; Kambayashi, Hide; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2015-07-30

    Hydrogen generation from formic acid (FA), one of the most promising hydrogen storage materials, has attracted much attention due to the demand for the development of renewable energy carriers. Catalytic dehydrogenation of FA in an efficient and green manner remains challenging. Here, we report a series of bio-inspired Ir complexes for highly robust and selective hydrogen production from FA in aqueous solutions without organic solvents or additives. One of these complexes bearing an imidazoline moiety (complex 6) achieved a turnover frequency (TOF) of 322,000 h⁻¹ at 100 °C, which is higher than ever reported. The novel catalysts are very stable and applicable in highly concentrated FA. For instance, complex 3 (1 μmol) affords an unprecedented turnover number (TON) of 2,050,000 at 60 °C. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing a “speciation” approach demonstrated a change in the rate-determining step with increasing solution pH. This study provides not only more insight into the mechanism of dehydrogenation of FA but also offers a new principle for the design of effective homogeneous organometallic catalysts for H₂ generation from FA.

  16. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steering Committee David J. Wesolowski FIRST Center Director, ORNL Ph: (865) 574-6903 Email: wesolowskid@ornl.gov Peter T. Cummings Thrust 1 Leader, Vanderbilt University Ph: (615) 322 8129 Email: peter.cummings@vanderbilt.edu Sheng Dai FIRST Center Deputy Director Thrust 2 Leader, ORNL Ph: (865) 576-7307 Email: dais@ornl.gov Steven H. Overbury Thrust 3 Leader, ORNL Ph: (865) 574-5040 Email: overburysh@ornl.gov Phillip F. Britt Chemical Sciences Division Director, ORNL Ph: (865) 574-4986 Email:

  17. Propellant feed system of a regeneratively cooled scramjet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanda, Takeshi; Masuya, Goro; Wakamatsu, Yoshio )

    1991-04-01

    An expander cycle for an airframe-integrated hydrogen-fueled scramjet is analyzed to study regenerative cooling characteristics and overall specific impulse. Below Mach 10, the specific impulse and thrust coincide with the reference values. At Mach numbers above 10, a reduction of the specific impulse occurs due to the coolant flow rate requirement, which is accompanied by an increase of thrust. It is shown that the thrust may be increased by injecting excess fuel into the combustor to compensate for the decrease of the specific impulse. 9 refs.

  18. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program: Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-09-01

    This quarterly report details activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program for the months of April, May, and June 1995. The 12 program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are provided.

  19. PISTON (Portable Data Parallel Visualization and Analysis)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a data-parallel way. By using nVidia's freely downloadable Thrust library and our own tools, we can generate executable codes for different acceleration hardware architectures...

  20. Piston

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-12-04

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  1. Piston

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-02-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  2. Piston

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2007-11-13

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  3. Piston

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2009-03-24

    A number of embodiments of a piston may have a shape that provides enhanced piston guidance. In such embodiments, the piston shape may include an axial profile that is configured to provide certain thrust load characteristics.

  4. Splineless coupling means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heitmann, Arnold M.; Lord, Jr., Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    In the first embodiment, the invention comprises an imperforate turbine wheel having a hub of polygonal cross-section engageable with a hollow shaft of polygonal conformation, and a thrust collar and bolt for fastening the shaft and wheel together.

  5. High-Resolution Computational Algorithms for Simulating Offshore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (UMN) is divided into three sections: turbine-scale modeling, wind-farm-scale modeling, ... Thrust curve for Sandia's 13.2 MW reference turbine design, developed as part of the large ...

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, FY 1994. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research include surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, etc. The laboratory directed R and D include director`s initiatives, individual projects, and transactinium science studies.

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Keynote presentation - Whitman.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... President Obama at Boise State, January 21, 2015 news.boisestate.edu So, where is the NNI today? Major R&D Thrusts in Nanotechnology Post-CMOS Electronics Photonics Energy ...

  8. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  9. Room Air Conditioners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Room Air Conditioners Room Air Conditioners A room air conditioner is one solution to cooling ... of a long room, then look for a fan control known as "Power Thrust" or "Super ...

  10. Final Report for High Latitude Climate Modeling: ARM Takes Us...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The main thrust of this project was to devise a method by which the majority of North ... found in the Arctic using the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) data. less ...

  11. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-09-19

    In this study, we investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body ss-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter kFa = 0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parametermore » kFa: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at kFa = α with α = 1.34 from the Bethe–Goldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for kFa > α and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at kFa = α. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86< kFa < 1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around kFa = α and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas.« less

  12. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross-Cutting Collaborations and Research The synergistic interactions between the three thrust areas have been responsible for the development of hybrid organic/inorganic materials for TE and PV devices. In addition, research in thrust areas 1 and 2 has led to the development of inorganic materials that serve a dual purpose, for both TE and PV applications. A number of these cross-cutting projects are highlighted below. Organic and Hybrid Systems for TE Improving Thermoelectric Efficiency via

  13. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the Inorganic PV thrust, we develop nanostructured materials architectures for solar energy conversion by engineering absorption and transport properties not available in the bulk. In particular, we aim to exploit unique quantum effects at the nanoscale which are promising for the realization of new paradigms in solar energy conversion such as intermediate band or hot carrier solar cells. Thrust Leaders: Prof. Rachel Goldman (MSE)&nbspand Prof. Jamie Phillips (EECS) Recent Publications -

  14. Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Four Research Thrusts organizational chart of four research thrusts (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses for leaders.) CMI has more than 30 projects focused in four areas. Project titles are available in a table, which can be sorted by project leader, location of project leader, project title or project number. CMI research is conducted at partner institutions, including national laboratories, universities and

  15. Petroleum systems of the Papuan Basin, Papua New Guinea, and their exploration potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, R.L.; Phelps, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The Papuan Basin of Papua New Guinea is a mature basin with a complex geologic history. The basin was initiated during Permo-Triassic rifting of the northern margin of Australia. Passive margin sedimentation occurred until the Oligocene to Recent when the basin was compressionally inverted, resulting in the formation of the present-day fold and thrust belt. Numerous hydrocarbon fields, some commercial, occur in traps along the front of the thrust belt. In mature complex basins such as this, it is critical to fully characterize existing petroleum systems as well as deliberately search for new systems. A recent systematic synthesis of the available geochemical data has defined three systems. Most important is the Jurassic system which is responsible for most of the oil and gas fields and all commercial production. Cretaceous and Tertiary systems, newly discovered in the basin, are based on detailed isotope and biomarker analysis of numerous oil seep. These additional petroleum systems open up new plays for exploration. To better define the pre-thrust basin geometry and help constrain the timing of hydrocarbon generation and migration, a series of palinspastically-stored cross-sections were constructed. Maturity modelling at different basin locations along these cross-sections evaluated the relative importance of two important species: (1) pre-thrust generation from local kitchens behind the present thrust belt, and (2) syn-thrust generation by loading of stacked thrust sheets within the fold belt. The relative importance of re-migration from pre-thrust traps vs direct charging into present day fold belt traps was evaluated using oil composition data.

  16. JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    Who We Are Overview Achievements Our People Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources News & Events JCAP News JCAP Events Media Coverage Connect With JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP JCAP Home Who We Are Overview Achievements Our People Research Introduction Thrusts Library Resources News & Events JCAP News JCAP Events Media Coverage Connect With JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP

  17. Hermatically sealed motor blower unit with stator inside hollow armature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donelian, Khatchik O.

    1976-01-20

    13. A hermetically sealed motor blower unit comprising, in combination, a sealed housing having a thrust plate mounted therein and having a re-entrant wall forming a central cavity in said housing, a rotor within said housing, said rotor comprising an impeller, a hollow shaft embracing said cavity and a thrust collar adapted to cooperate with said thrust plate to support the axial thrust of said shaft, one or more journal bearings within said housing for supporting the radial load of said shaft and electric motor means for rotating said rotor, said motor means comprising a motor-stator located within said cavity and adapted to cooperate through a portion of said re-entrant wall with a motor-rotor mounted within said hollow shaft, the portion of said re-entrant wall located between said motor-stator and said motor-rotor being made relatively thin to reduce electrical losses, the bearing surfaces of said thrust plate, thrust collar and journal bearings being in communication with the discharge of said impeller, whereby fluid pumped by said impeller can flow directly to said bearing surfaces to lubricate them.

  18. Franciscan-Knoxville Problem: Relationship between an accretionary prism and adjacent fore-arc basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korsch, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the Franciscan complex and Knoxville shales in the Californian Coast Ranges has been the subject of debate for a considerable period of time. Initially, gradational and unconformable relationships for the contact were proposed. This was followed by the recognition, at some localities, of a thrust fault contact. Plate tectonics has provided a framework for interpretation of the Franciscan complex as an accretionary prism related to subduction of oceanic crust and the Great Valley sequence, including the Knoxville shales, as fore-arc basin deposits. Thus, the contact between the two units was the initial site of the Benioff zone, which then migrated westward as the accretionary prism developed. In the Franciscan complex and Great Valley sequence many thrusts have been recognized recently. At different localities, the Franciscan complex can be observed juxtaposed against various units of the Great Valley sequence, suggesting a complicated thrusting history subsequent to initiation of the Benioff zone. Some of the thrusts had movement during development of the accretionary prism, but movement on others may be post-subduction in time. The term ''Coast Range thrust'' has been used to refer to the contact, but in recent years its meaning has become blurred by liberalization and excessive use. It is proposed that the term be used only as originally proposed, that is, as the thrust that juxtaposes the Franciscan complex and the ophiolitic base of the Great Valley sequence.

  19. (Bio)Chemical Tailoring of Biogenic 3-D Nanopatterned Templates with Energy-Relevant Functionalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhage, Kenneth H; Kroger, Nils

    2014-09-08

    The overall aim of this research has been to obtain fundamental understanding of (bio)chemical methodologies that will enable utilization of the unique 3-D nanopatterned architectures naturally produced by diatoms for the syntheses of advanced functional materials attractive for applications in energy harvesting/conversion and storage. This research has been conducted in three thrusts: Thrust 1 (In vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom biosilica) is directed towards elucidating the fundamental mechanism(s) underlying the cellular processes of in vivo immobilization of proteins in diatom silica. Thrust 2 (Shape-preserving reactive conversion of diatom biosilica into porous, high-surface area inorganic replicas) is aimed at understanding the fundamental mechanisms of shape preservation and nanostructural evolution associated with the reactive conversion and/or coating-based conversion of diatom biosilica templates into porous inorganic replicas. Thrust 3 (Immobilization of energy-relevant enzymes in diatom biosilica and onto diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas) involves use of the results from both Thrust 1 and 2 to develop strategies for in vivo and in vitro immobilization of enzymes in/on diatom biosilica and diatom biosilica-derived inorganic replicas, respectively. This Final Report describes progress achieved in all 3 of these thrusts.

  20. Assessment of a field-aligned ICRF antenna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Brunner, D.; Ennever, P.; Garrett, M. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Ochoukov, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2014-02-12

    Impurity contamination and localized heat loads associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna operation are among the most challenging issues for ICRF utilization.. Another challenge is maintaining maximum coupled power through plasma variations including edge localized modes (ELMs) and confinement transitions. Here, we report on an experimental assessment of a field aligned (FA) antenna with respect to impurity contamination, impurity sources, RF enhanced heat flux and load tolerance. In addition, we compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to and the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E? (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 2030% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. Further we observe that the fraction of RF energy deposited upon the antenna is less than 0.4 % of the total injected RF energy in dipole phasing. The total deposited energy increases significantly when the FA antenna is operated in monopole phasing. The FA antenna also exhibits an unexpected load tolerance for ELMs and confinement transitions compared to the TA antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing. In monopole phasing, the FA antenna has the highest plasma

  1. Weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Maziasz, P.J.; David, S.A.; McKamey, C.G.

    1992-08-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. Sigmajig tests of a commercial heat of FA-129 alloy indicate that hot-cracking may not be a problem for this alloy. Additionally, several new Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminides were evaluated for weldability. The preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that some of these alloys have comparable or better weldability than FA-129 based iron-aluminides. For the first time, successful welds, without hot or cold cracking, were made on 13 mm (0.5 in.) thick plates from a commercial heat of FA-129 using the proper choice of welding conditions and parameters.

  2. Weldability of Fe sub 3 Al based iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharia, T.; Maziasz, P.J.; David, S.A.; McKamey, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine the weldability of Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. Sigmajig tests of a commercial heat of FA-129 alloy indicate that hot-cracking may not be a problem for this alloy. Additionally, several new Fe{sub 3}Al based iron aluminides were evaluated for weldability. The preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that some of these alloys have comparable or better weldability than FA-129 based iron-aluminides. For the first time, successful welds, without hot or cold cracking, were made on 13 mm (0.5 in.) thick plates from a commercial heat of FA-129 using the proper choice of welding conditions and parameters.

  3. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  4. Species differences in methanol and formic acid pharmacokinetics in mice, rabbits and primates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeting, J. Nicole; Siu, Michelle; McCallum, Gordon P.; Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2010-08-15

    Methanol (MeOH) is metabolized primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase in humans, but by catalase in rodents, with species variations in the pharmacokinetics of its formic acid (FA) metabolite. The teratogenic potential of MeOH in humans is unknown, and its teratogenicity in rodents may not accurately reflect human developmental risk due to differential species metabolism, as for some other teratogens. To determine if human MeOH metabolism might be better reflected in rabbits than rodents, the plasma pharmacokinetics of MeOH and FA were compared in male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys over time (24, 48 and 6 h, respectively) following a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 or 2 g/kg MeOH or its saline vehicle. Following the high dose, MeOH exhibited saturated elimination kinetics in all 3 species, with similar peak concentrations and a 2.5-fold higher clearance in mice than rabbits. FA accumulation within 6 h in primates was 5-fold and 43-fold higher than in rabbits and mice respectively, with accumulation being 10-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Over 48 h, FA accumulation was nearly 5-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Low-dose MeOH in mice and rabbits resulted in similarly saturated MeOH elimination in both species, but with approximately 2-fold higher clearance rates in mice. FA accumulation was 3.8-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Rabbits more closely than mice reflected primates for in vivo MeOH metabolism, and particularly FA accumulation, suggesting that developmental studies in rabbits may be useful for assessing potential human teratological risk.

  5. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Sabin, Noah D.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Ogg, Robert J.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jane, John A.; Hua, Chiaho

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  6. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Collaboration: Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-15

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  7. Microsoft Word - Testimony of Gregory H Friedman, June 24, 2013 _FINAL_

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc Microsoft Word - SMail_Secure_Web-Based_Email_v3 _2_.doc Instructions for Using Secure Email via Outlook Web Access (455.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc

    BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE AND AGENCY ORGANIZATION FOR RELEASE ON

  8. Using regulations.gov to find dockets and documents

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Your RSA token is used to esbablish a connection to the Internet and connect to https://connect.doe.gov . Using-TwoFactorRSA-Token w VPN.pdf (469 KB) More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09 Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc of Energy

    Using Weather Data to Improve Capacity of Existing Power Lines Using Weather Data to Improve

  9. User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token User guide for remote access to VDI and Workplace using RSA token VDI_WP_RSA_Remote_Guide_Final.pdf (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications User Guide for Remote Access to VDI/Workplace Using PIV Microsoft Word - Citrix_2FA_Authentication_12_3_2009.doc Citrix_2FA_Authentication_09.09

  10. The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

    2004-07-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

  11. INEEL Institutional Plan - FY 2000-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enge, Ray Stevenson

    1999-11-01

    In this first Institutional Plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus it's efforts on three strategic thrusts; (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R&D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemical from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EM's environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex - the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NE's needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this Institutional Plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this Institutional Plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  12. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enge, R.S.

    1999-12-01

    In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  13. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected Thursdays; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) October 1 1 Dylan B ayerl ( Kioupakis g roup) 3:00---4:00pm November 1 Andy M artin ( Millunchick g roup) 2:00---3:00pm December 1 3 Brian R oberts ( Ku g roup) 2:00---3:00pm Thrust II --- s elected T hursdays, 3 :30---4:30pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) September 2 7 Hang C hi ( Uher g roup) October 1 8 Reddy g roup November 2 9 Gunho Kim (Pipe group) Thrust III --- s elected

  14. The overthrusted Zaza Terrane of middle Cretaceous over the North American continental carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age - relationships to oil generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echevarria Rodriguez, G.; Castro, J.A.; Amaro, S.V.

    1996-08-01

    The Zaza Terrane is part of the Caribbean plate thrust over the southern edge of the North American basinal and platform carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age. Zaza Terrane are volcanic and ophiolitic rocks of Cretaceous age. The ophiolites are mostly serpentines which behave as reservoirs and seals. All Cuban oil fields are either within Zaza Terrane or basinal carbonates underneath, or not far away to the north of the thrust contacts. It appears that the overthrusting of the Zaza Terrane caused the generation of oil in the basinal carbonate source rocks underneath, due to the increase of rock thickness which lowered the oil window to a deeper position and increased the geothermal gradient. Oil generation was after thrusting, during post-orogenic. API gravity of oil is light toward the south and heavy to very heavy to the north. Source rocks to the south are probably of terrigenous origin.

  15. A=17O (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diagram for 17O) GENERAL: See also Table 17.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Theory: (BA56E, KA56C, KI56B, LE56E, SC56H, VI56, AM57B, AM57C, FA57, FE57C, PE57B, RA57B,...

  16. Soft and Small Imaging Breakthrough | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... DE-AC02-05CH11231. Z.W. and D.G.S. acknowledge support under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant No. FA9550-10-1-0123, C.G.B. acknowledges an NSF Graduate Research ...

  17. A=17O (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO69B, NO69G, PA69D, PI69, SA69, SC69F, SC69O, BA70A, HA70L, MC70Q, SU70A). Ground state: -1.89371 0.00009 nm (SH67N); Q 26.5 3.0 mb (LI64H). See also (FA59E,...

  18. Dr. Donald Bryant | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Bryant September 29, 2014 Dr. Donald Bryant "Far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP) leads to extensive acclimative remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria." View Seminar Here Original Event info: September 22, 2014 - 11:00am Washington University, Brauer Hall Room 12

  19. BPA-2012-00330-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10512011 1004 Daniel C. APLC FA O8 998 8975 P.0011011 DANIEL C. MINUTILLO Professional Law Corporation rED BV BP 941 Blossom Hill Road, Suite 205 FOIL OtFCCE T 1 i i P.O. Box...

  20. Characterisation of magnesium potassium phosphate cements blended with fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Laura J.; Bernal, Susan A.; Walling, Samuel A.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Provis, John L.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2015-08-15

    Magnesium potassium phosphate cements (MKPCs), blended with 50 wt.% fly ash (FA) or ground granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) to reduce heat evolution, water demand and cost, were assessed using compressive strength, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on {sup 25}Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 29}Si, {sup 31}P and {sup 39}K nuclei. We present the first definitive evidence that dissolution of the glassy aluminosilicate phases of both FA and GBFS occurred under the pH conditions of MKPC. In addition to the main binder phase, struvite-K, an amorphous orthophosphate phase was detected in FA/MKPC and GBFS/MKPC systems. It was postulated that an aluminium phosphate phase was formed, however, no significant Al–O–P interactions were identified. High-field NMR analysis of the GBFS/MKPC system indicated the potential formation of a potassium-aluminosilicate phase. This study demonstrates the need for further research on these binders, as both FA and GBFS are generally regarded as inert fillers within MKPC.

  1. S_".

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 cf hc fomcf kestinghc.use EltCttlC COrpOFation faCilit?* t0 CletefmiM wpethef It contains f-e, iduol 1 oi ivacLlv I I) crdceaole CC acrivttles concL;cttc or bthdif 6f tpt? ...

  2. A=17F (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electromagnetic transitions: (BA59M, FA59E, RA60B, BA64AA, GR65E, KA65F, MA66BB, KA67J, ... The decay is to the ground state of 17O. The spectrum has the allowed shape down to 150 ...

  3. A=20Ne (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1986VA18, 1986VA23, 1986WE1C, 1987FA09, 1987KO15, 1987NI04, 1987RI03, 1987RO10). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1983RO1E, 1984EL1D, 1984GR03, 1985MI1D,...

  4. Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx (88.14 KB) More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2015-01 1 1

  5. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ...

  6. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    bl 7-L c"v. tP cq 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Plxmam-*twe,m%-h,itu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah...

  7. Two-Factor Authentication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) (also known as 2-Step Verification) is a system that employs two methods to identify an individual. More secure than reusable passwords, when a token's random number...

  8. Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2011-10-04

    An ORNL researcher developed a method for producing furfuryl alcohol (FA) through bioprocessing using a thermophilic microorganism. This organism has been shown to be highly resistant to the toxic effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and can propagate in the presence of over 48 g/L (500 mM) of furfural....

  9. Problems with interface change | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ex.php?titleData:1c1ac6b9-5085-41f4-b478-2927d2fa41e7tab3.Energy http:en.openei.orgservicesrestutilityrates?versionlatest&formatjsonplain&detailfull&getpageData:1c1a...

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation promotes long chain fatty acid oxidation in the immature swine heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-09-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supports infants and children with severe cardiopulmonary compromise. Nutritional support for these children includes provision of medium- and long-chain fatty acids (FAs). However, ECMO induces a stress response, which could limit the capacity for FA oxidation. Metabolic impairment could induce new or exacerbate existing myocardial dysfunction. Using a clinically relevant piglet model, we tested the hypothesis that ECMO maintains the myocardial capacity for FA oxidation and preserves myocardial energy state. Provision of 13-Carbon labeled medium-chain FA (octanoate), longchain free FAs (LCFAs), and lactate into systemic circulation showed that ECMO promoted relative increases in myocardial LCFA oxidation while inhibiting lactate oxidation. Loading of these labeled substrates at high dose into the left coronary artery demonstrated metabolic flexibility as the heart preferentially oxidized octanoate. ECMO preserved this octanoate metabolic response, but also promoted LCFA oxidation and inhibited lactate utilization. Rapid upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) protein appeared to participate in this metabolic shift during ECMO. ECMO also increased relative flux from lactate to alanine further supporting the role for pyruvate dehydrogenase inhibition by PDK4. High dose substrate loading during ECMO also elevated the myocardial energy state indexed by phosphocreatine to ATP ratio. ECMO promotes LCFA oxidation in immature hearts, while maintaining myocardial energy state. These data support the appropriateness of FA provision during ECMO support for the immature heart.

  11. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  12. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER RI I W Wi in nt te er r S Su ur rf fa ac ce e G Gr re ee en nh ho ou us se e F Fl lu ux xe es s Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm -1 ) GL Flux (Wm 2 ) AERI Flux (Wm 2 ) CFC-11...

  13. A new tectonic model for the development of the Eastern Cordillera, Altiplano, and Subandean zones, Bolivian Central Andes, 20[degrees]S latitude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gubbels, T.L.; Isacks, B.L. ); Koch, R.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Construction of a regional transect across the central Andes at 20[degrees]S sheds new light on the relationship between the Altiplano, Eastern Cordillera (EC), and Subandean zones and allows us to refine the two-stage model of Isacks (1988) for the growth of the Central Andes. This new model is based on examination of the regional geology and geophysics, coupled with field investigations, satellite image analysis, and new Ar-Ar geochronology. In this model, widespread Oligocene to mid-Miocene compressional deformation in the Altiplano and EC was followed in the late-Miocene and Pliocene by thrusting localized east of the EC within the Subandean fold-thrust belt. During the first stage of deformation, the Altiplano basin underwent important subsidence and internal deformation. The EC was both deformed internally and thrust westwards over the Altiplano basin, while the present Subandean zone was the site of an early, broad foreland basin which received material eroded from the EC. During the second stage, beginning at [approximately]10 ma, deformation terminated within the EC and became concentrated within the fold-thrust belt in response to large scale overthrusting of the EC above the Brazilian shield; this resulted in major thrusting along the Cabalgamiento Frontal Principal (CFP), which soles into the master Subandean decollement, and [approximately]100 km of telescoping within the early, broad foreland basin. In the EC, this second stage is marked by the elaboration of a regionally extensive erosion surface, ponding of gravels in shallow basins, and the emplacement of giant ignimbrite sheets. The Eastern Cordillera can thus be thought of as a crustal-scale wedge which has been extruded upward and outward on alternate sides during successive stages of late Cenozoic deformation. This motion has served to drive subsidence in both the Altiplano and Subandean foreland basins, as well as shortening in the fold-thrust belt.

  14. Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipids and Metabolites in Tissues by Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Thomas, Mathew; Cha, Jeeyeon; Dey, Sudhansu K.; yang, Pengxiang; Prieto, Mari; Laskin, Julia

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Three-dimensional (3D) imaging of tissue sections is a new frontier in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Here we report on fast 3D imaging of lipids and metabolites associated with mouse uterine decidual cells and embryo at the implantation site on day 6 of pregnancy. 2D imaging of 16-20 serial tissue sections deposited on the same glass slide was performed using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) an ambient ionization technique that enables sensitive localized analysis of analytes on surfaces without special sample pre-treatment. In this proof-of-principle study, nano-DESI was coupled to a high-resolution Q-Exactive instrument operated at high repetition rate of >5 Hz with moderate mass resolution of 35,000 (m/?m at m/z 200), which enabled acquisition of the entire 3D image with a spatial resolution of ~150 ?m in less than 4.5 hours. The results demonstrate localization of acetylcholine in the primary decidual zone (PDZ) of the implantation site throughout the depth of the tissue examined, indicating an important role of this signaling molecule in decidualization. Choline and phosphocholine metabolites associated with cell growth are enhanced in the PDZ and abundant in other cellular regions of the implantation site. Very different 3D distributions were obtained for fatty acids (FA), oleic acid and linoleic acid (FA 18:1 and FA 18:2), differing only by one double bond. Localization of FA 18:2 in the PDZ indicates its important role in decidualization while FA 18:1 is distributed more evenly throughout the tissue. In contrast, several lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC) observed in this study show donut-like distributions with localization around the PDZ. Complementary distributions with minimal overlap were observed for LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2 while the 3D image of the potential precursor phosphatidylcholine (PC 36:2) showed a significant overlap with both LPC 18:0 and FA 18:2.

  15. Finite range and upper branch effects on itinerant ferromagnetism in repulsive Fermi gases: BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-12-15

    We investigate the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases at zero temperature with upper branch and effective range effects. Based on a general effective Lagrangian that reproduces precisely the two-body s-wave scattering phase shift, we obtain a nonperturbative expression of the energy density as a function of the polarization by using the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation. For hard sphere potential, the predicted critical gas parameter k{sub F}a=0.816 and the spin susceptibility agree well with the results from fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. In general, positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter k{sub F}a: While a positive effective range reduces the critical gas parameter, a negative effective range increases it. For attractive potential or Feshbach resonance model, the many-body upper branch exhibits an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=? with ?=1.34 from the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation, which is qualitatively consistent with experimental results. The many-body T-matrix has a positive-energy pole for k{sub F}a>? and it becomes impossible to distinguish the bound state and the scattering state. These positive-energy bound states become occupied and therefore the upper branch reaches an energy maximum at k{sub F}a=?. In the zero range limit, there exists a narrow window (0.86F}a<1.56) for the ferromagnetic phase. At sufficiently large negative effective range, the ferromagnetic phase disappears. On the other hand, the appearance of positive-energy bound state resonantly enhances the two-body decay rate around k{sub F}a=? and may prevent the study of equilibrium phases and ferromagnetism of the upper branch Fermi gas. - Highlights: Nonperturbative interaction energy is obtained within the BetheGoldstone ladder resummation approach. Positive and negative effective ranges have opposite effects on the critical gas parameter. The upper branch Fermi gas exhibits an energy maximum

  16. Fall 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I ( IPV) Selected W ednesdays 1:30---2:30pm September 25 1100 Dow Matt Dejarld (Millunchick), Michael Kuo (Ku) October 16 MSE Conf. Simon Huang (Goldman), Brian Roberts (Ku) November 6 MSE Conf. Mike Abere (Yalisove), Jimmy Chen (Phillips) December 11 MSE Conf. Dylan Bayerl (Kioupakis), Larry Aagesen (Thornton) Thrust I I ( TE) Selected F ridays 1:30---2:30pm September 20 1100 Dow Vladimir Stoica (Clarke) October 18 1100 Dow Wei Liu (Uher) November 8

  17. Microinjector for blasocysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Remenyik, Carl J.; Woychik, Richard P.; Patek, David R.; Hawk, James A.; Turner, John C.

    1999-01-01

    An electromechanical device for driving the tip of a microinjection cannula, or needle, through the outer barrier of a blastocyst, cell, or cell nucleus for the injection of cells or other bioactive materials. Either a flexible frame or a ram moving within a base member is employed. Cannula motion is achieved by means of a piezoelectric stack and spring return system. The thrust motion over a predetermined microscopic distance is achieved without cannula setback prior to the thrust movement. Instead of specially prepared beveled and tipped needles, standard unimproved cannulas or needles can be used.

  18. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Ogden Quadrangle, Utah and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madson, M.E.; Reinhart, W.R.

    1982-03-01

    The Ogden 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to determine environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Geologic reconnaissance, geochemical sampling, airborne radiometric and hydrogeochemical data interpretation, detailed surface studies, and subsurface investigations were conducted. The Crawford Mountains, northern Fossil Basin and Darby Thrust zone areas were delineated as favorable. Within these areas, the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permean Phosphoria Formation contains an environment favorable for Phosphoria-type uranium deposits. All other environments in the quadrangle are unfavorable for uranium deposits. The Bannock and Absaroka Thrust zones are unevaluated because of inadequate subsurface geologic information.

  19. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  20. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, Luciano; Raimondi, ALbert A.

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  1. Microinjector for blasocysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Remenyik, C.J.; Woychik, R.P.; Patek, D.R.; Hawk, J.A.; Turner, J.C.

    1999-03-02

    An electromechanical device is disclosed for driving the tip of a microinjection cannula, or needle, through the outer barrier of a blastocyst, cell, or cell nucleus for the injection of cells or other bioactive materials. Either a flexible frame or a ram moving within a base member is employed. Cannula motion is achieved by means of a piezoelectric stack and spring return system. The thrust motion over a predetermined microscopic distance is achieved without cannula setback prior to the thrust movement. Instead of specially prepared beveled and tipped needles, standard unimproved cannulas or needles can be used. 6 figs.

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8 Greg Flach

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    org SRNL-MS-2014-00605 Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management ASCEM Software Capabilities and Performance Assessment Deployments Greg Flach ASCEM Site Applications Team Performance & Risk Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange Meeting December 11-12, 2014 Las Vegas NM ascemdoe.org SRNL-MS-2014-00605 1 ASCEM Points of Contact HPC Thrust David Moulton (moulton@lanl.gov; 505-665-4712) Platform Thrust Vicky Freedman (vicky.freedman@pnnl.gov; 509-372-4067) Site

  3. Electromagnetic Acceleration Characteristics of Laser-Electric Hybrid Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Koki; Takeda, Akihito; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-02

    A fundamental study on a laser-electric hybrid thruster was conducted, in which laser-induced plasmas were generated through laser beam irradiation on to a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration using only a laser beam. As two typical cases of the hybrid propulsion systems, a feasibility study on electrostatic acceleration mode and electromagnetic acceleration mode of the laser ablation plasma were conducted including thrust performance tests with a torsion-balance, ion current measurements, and ICCD camera observations. It was confirmed that the thrust performances could be improved with electric energy inputs.

  4. Design approaches and parameters for magnetically levitated transport systems. [Null flux suspension (Maglev)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danby, G.T.; Powell, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanically levitated transport system approaches are assessed with regard to thrust power needs, track cost, suspension stability, and safety. The null flux suspension appears as the favored approach, having the least thrust power requirements, highest stability, and lowest amount of track material. Various null flux configurations are described together with their operating parameters. The Linear Synchronous Motor (LSM) propulsion system is also described for propelling the suspended vehicles. Cryogenics and superconductivity aspects are discussed and the effect of high T/sub c/ superconductors evaluated. 13 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A.; Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M.; Saleem, M.A.; Topham, P.S.

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub ?FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub ?FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub ?FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  6. Acute airway effects of airborne formaldehyde in sensitized and non-sensitized mice housed in a dry or humid environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Søren Thor Wolkoff, Peder Hammer, Maria Kofoed-Sørensen, Vivi Clausen, Per Axel Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the role of air humidity and allergic sensitization on the acute airway response to inhaled formaldehyde (FA) vapor. Mice were sensitized to the immunogen ovalbumin (OVA) by three intraperitoneal injections followed by two aerosol challenges, giving rise to allergic airway inflammation. Control mice were sham sensitized by saline injections and challenged by saline aerosols. Once sensitized, the mice were housed at high (85–89%) or low (< 10%) relative humidity, respectively for 48 h prior to a 60-min exposure to either 0.4, 1.8 or about 5 ppm FA. Before, during and after exposure, breathing parameters were monitored. These included the specific markers of nose and lung irritations as well as the expiratory flow rate, the latter being a marker of airflow limitation. The sensory irritation response in the upper airways was not affected by allergic inflammation or changes in humidity. At high relative humidity, the OVA-sensitized mice had a decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to the saline control mice after exposure to approximately 5 ppm FA. This is in accordance with the observations that asthmatics are more sensitive than non-asthmatics to higher concentrations of airway irritants including FA. In the dry environment, the opposite trend was seen; here, the saline control mice had a significantly decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to OVA-sensitized mice when exposed to 1.8 and 4 ppm FA. We speculate that increased mucus production in the OVA-sensitized mice has increased the “scrubber effect” in the nose, consequently protecting the conducting and lower airways. - Highlights: ► Role of air humidity and allergy on sensitivity to an airway irritant was studied. ► In the humid environment, allergy amplified the effects of formaldehyde. ► In the dry environment, allergy reduced the effect of formaldehyde. ► Neither allergy nor humidity changed the formaldehyde-induced nasal irritation.

  7. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the

  8. Measurement of event shapes in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-06-20

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96  TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO)more » accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.« less

  9. Measurement of event shapes in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-06-20

    A study of event-shape observables in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96  TeV is presented. The data for this analysis were recorded by the CDF II Detector at the Tevatron Collider. The variables studied are the transverse thrust and thrust minor, both defined in the plane perpendicular to the beam direction. The observables are measured using energies from unclustered calorimeter cells. In addition to studies of the differential distributions, we present the dependence of event-shape mean values on the leading-jet transverse energy. Data are compared with pythia Tune A and to resummed parton-level predictions that were matched to fixed-order results at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy (NLO+NLL). Predictions from pythia Tune A agree fairly well with the data. However, the underlying event contributes significantly to these observables, making it difficult to make direct comparisons to the NLO+NLL predictions, which do not account for the underlying event. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a new observable, a weighted difference of the mean values of the thrust and thrust minor, which is less sensitive to the underlying event, allowing for a comparison with NLO+NLL. Both pythia Tune A and the NLO+NLL calculations agree well within the 20% theoretical uncertainty with the data for this observable, indicating that perturbative QCD successfully describes shapes of the hadronic final states.

  10. Preliminary Structural Design Conceptualization for Composite Rotor for Verdant Power Water Current: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-296

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2011-02-01

    The primary thrust of the CRADA will be to develop a new rotor design that will allow higher current flows (>4m/s), greater swept area (6-11m), and in the process, will maximize performance and energy capture.

  11. Thomas Jaramillo - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thomas jaramillo Principal Investigator and Research Thrust Coordinator Email: jaramillo@stanford.edu Dr. Jaramillo's research interests center around: energy and catalysis, engineering surface and bulk materials chemistry in relation to energy conversion reactions-production, utilization, and storage. General themes include nano-scale effects in heterogeneous catalysis and electro-catalysis. Topics include water electrolysis, fuel cell electrocatalysis (oxygen reduction, fuel oxidation,

  12. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian; Weaver, Craig; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2014-06-11

    Magnetic and gravity data, collected in south-central Washington near the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt (YFTB) are used to model upper crustal structure, the extent of the late Columbia River Basalt flow named the Ice Harbor member, the vertical conduits (dikes) that the Ice Harbor erupted from, and whether the dikes are offset or affected by faulting on the Wallula Fault zone.

  13. Engineering research, development and technology report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langland, R T

    1999-02-01

    Nineteen ninety-eight has been a transition year for Engineering, as we have moved from our traditional focus on thrust areas to a more focused approach with research centers. These five new centers of excellence collectively comprise Engineering's Science and Technology program. This publication summarizes our formative year under this new structure. Let me start by talking about the differences between a thrust area and a research center. The thrust area is more informal, combining an important technology with programmatic priorities. In contrast, a research center is directly linked to an Engineering core technology. It is the purer model, for it is more enduring yet has the scope to be able to adapt quickly to evolving programmatic priorities. To put it another way, the mission of a thrust area was often to grow the programs in conjunction with a technology, whereas the task of a research center is to vigorously grow our core technologies. By cultivating each core technology, we in turn enable long-term growth of new programs.

  14. Free trade and freer petchems drive Mexican restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.

    1992-11-25

    When Mexico first opened up its protected markets in 1987 by cutting import tariffs, it thrust the chemical industry into a phase of change. Now, with the advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA) and the liberalization of petrochemicals by state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), restructuring has moved up a gear.

  15. Optimization of perigee burns for manned interplanetary missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, W.W.; Olson, T.S.; Siahpush, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    In choosing an engine concept for the rocket vehicle to be used for the initial manned exploration of Mars, the two main factors in the decision should be what can be feasibly built and flight qualified within approximately the next 20 years, and what level of engine performance is required to safely perform these missions. In order to reduce the overall cost in developing this next generation space transportation system, it would be desirable to have a single engine design that could be used for a broad class of missions (for example, cargo and piloted lunar and Mars missions, orbit transfers around the Earth, and robotic missions to the planets). The engine thrust that is needed for manned Mars missions is addressed in this paper. We find that these missions are best served by a thrust level around 75,000 lbf to 100,000 lbf, and a thrust-to-engine weight ratio of about three. This thrust level might best be obtained by clustering five 15,000 lbf or 20,000 lbf engines. It may be better to throttle the engines back from full power between perigee burns, rather than shutting down. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Engine Cycle Analysis of Air Breathing Microwave Rocket with Reed Valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Komatsu, Reiji; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Katsurayama, Hiroshi

    2011-11-10

    The Microwave Rocket is a candidate for a low cost launcher system. Pulsed plasma generated by a high power millimeter wave beam drives a blast wave, and a vehicle acquires impulsive thrust by exhausting the blast wave. The thrust generation process of the Microwave Rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine. In order to enhance the performance of its air refreshment, the air-breathing mechanism using reed valves is under development. Ambient air is taken to the thruster through reed valves. Reed valves are closed while the inside pressure is high enough. After the time when the shock wave exhausts at the open end, an expansion wave is driven and propagates to the thrust-wall. The reed valve is opened by the negative gauge pressure induced by the expansion wave and its reflection wave. In these processes, the pressure oscillation is important parameter. In this paper, the pressure oscillation in the thruster was calculated by CFD combined with the flux through from reed valves, which is estimated analytically. As a result, the air-breathing performance is evaluated using Partial Filling Rate (PFR), the ratio of thruster length to diameter L/D, and ratio of opening area of reed valves to superficial area {alpha}. An engine cycle and predicted thrust was explained.

  17. Status report on solar-absorber-paint coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, S.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy has funded a number of programs that have investigated the stability and durability of solar absorber paint coatings. Some of the findings resulting from these programs are presented. Although the basic thrust of the programs has been to investigate changes in optical properties, other physical failures are described.

  18. Electrtostatic Beam-Plasma Thruster | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrtostatic Beam-Plasma Thruster Electrostatic beam-plasma thruster utilizes beam of energetic electrons to generate the plasma from which ions are extracted and accelerated to generate the thrust. The accelerated ions are neutralized by the electrons from the beam. No.: M-894 Inventor(s): Yevgeny Raitses

  19. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.2.4 - Thermal Conversion Sustainability Interface May 20, 2013 Technology Area Review: Analysis and Sustainability PI: Lesley Snowden-Swan Organization: PNNL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Goal Statements * Integration of BETO's Thermochemical Conversion and Sustainability Thrusts: - Incorporate sustainability considerations during design and development of emerging pathways

  20. Rotary pneumatic valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  1. Zongo-San Gaban zone: Eocene foreland boundary of the Central Andean orogen, northwest Bolivia and southeast Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, E.; Clark, A.H.; Kontak, D.J.; Archibald, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Discordant muscovite and biotite K-Ar dates of samples taken in six transects through the Cordillera Oriental of southeast Peru and northwest Bolivia, combined with /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra, reveal a northwest-trending, structurally cryptic, tectonothermal zone of late Eocene age (ca. 38 Ma) that overprints Triassic and older igneous and metamorphic rocks. The zone is at least 450 km long but is less than 25 km wide; temperatures along its northeast boundary are estimated to have reached 350/sup 0/C. No Paleogene magmatism has been recognized that could account for the thermal resetting of the K-Ar isotopic system. Uplift, erosion, and southwest-verging thrusting accompanied the development of this domain, which defined the foreland boundary of the orogen prior to inception of northeast-verging Andean thrusting in Miocene time. It is proposed that this tectonothermal zone, the Zongo-San Gaban zone (ZSGZ), which involves thrusting and basement shortening, is the southerly manifestation of the Incaic compressional deformation, which produced the thin-skinned Maranon thrust and fold belt (MTFB) north of the Abancay deflection of central Peru.

  2. Hydrocarbon potential of Altiplano and northern Subandean, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edman, J.D.; Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Lindsey, D.D.; Lowell, J.D.; Cirbian, M.; Lopez, M.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic, stratigraphic, structural, and geochemical data from the Altiplano, northern Subandean, and northern plains of Bolivia were interpreted in order to evaluate the exploration potential of each province. Identification of three possible source rock intervals, primarily the Devonian and secondarily the Permian and Cretaceous, was used as the basis for recognizing active hydrocarbon systems. For those areas containing source intervals, their analysis revealed that possible reservoir and seal units range in age from Paleozoic to Tertiary; the majority of structures, however, are Eocene or younger. With these general concepts in mind, traps were identified in all three sedimentary provinces. In the northern Altiplano, the most prospective area is along the eastern margin near a southwest and west-vergent thrust belt where hanging-wall anticlines and a warped Eocene-Oligocene(.) unconformity surface form the most likely potential traps. In the central and southern Altiplano, both thrust-related and wrench-related structures present possible exploration targets. In the northern Subandean and Beni plains north of the Isiboro-Chapare area, traps can be classified into two broad groups. First, there are a wide variety of structural traps within the northern Subandean thrust belt, the most attractive of which are footwall structures that have been shielded from surface flushing by hanging-wall strata. Second, in the plains just northeast of the thrust belt, hydrocarbons sourced from the remnant Paleozoic basin may have migrated onto the Isarsama and Madidi highs.

  3. The oil and gas potential of southern Bolivia: Contributions from a dual source rock system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartshorn, K.G.

    1996-08-01

    The southern Sub-Andean and Chaco basins of Bolivia produce oil, gas and condensate from reservoirs ranging from Devonian to Tertiary in age. Geochemical evidence points to contributions from two Paleozoic source rocks: the Devonian Los Monos Formation and the Silurian Kirusillas Formation. Rock-Eval pyrolysis, biomarker data, microscopic kerogen analysis, and burial history modeling are used to assess the quality, distribution, and maturity of both source rock systems. The geochemical results are then integrated with the structural model for the area in order to determine the most likely pathways for migration of oil and gas in the thrust belt and its foreland. Geochemical analysis and modeling show that the primary source rock, shales of the Devonian Los Monos Formation, entered the oil window during the initial phase of thrusting in the sub-Andean belt. This provides ideal timing for oil accumulation in younger reservoirs of the thrust belt. The secondary source rock, although richer, consumed most of its oil generating capacity prior to the development of the thrust related structures. Depending on burial depth and location, however, the Silurian source still contributes gas, and some oil, to traps in the region.

  4. shaleusa3_letter.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... AR MS OK MO TX TN LA KY R e e l f o o t R i f t Ouachita Thrust Front 0 4 8 Miles M i s s i s s i p p i a n E m b a y m e n t Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

  5. CX-005184: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic Energy MachinesCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 01/28/2011Location(s): Orem, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  6. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H.E.

    1997-02-01

    Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

  7. CX-005128: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy MachinesCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6Date: 01/25/2011Location(s): Orem, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  8. Splineless coupling means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heitmann, A.M.; Lord, R.E. Jr.

    1982-07-20

    In the first embodiment, the invention comprises an imperforate turbine wheel having a hub of polygonal cross-section engageable with a hollow shaft of polygonal conformation, and a thrust collar and bolt for fastening the shaft and wheel together. 4 figs.

  9. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  10. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  11. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one

  12. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and othermore » conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model

  13. Prediction of microalgae hydrothermal liquefaction products from feedstock biochemical composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leow, Shijie; Witter, John R.; Vardon, Derek R.; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2015-05-11

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) uses water under elevated temperatures and pressures (200–350 °C, 5–20 MPa) to convert biomass into liquid “biocrude” oil. Despite extensive reports on factors influencing microalgae cell composition during cultivation and separate reports on HTL products linked to cell composition, the field still lacks a quantitative model to predict HTL conversion product yield and qualities from feedstock biochemical composition; the tailoring of microalgae feedstock for downstream conversion is a unique and critical aspect of microalgae biofuels that must be leveraged upon for optimization of the whole process. This study developed predictive relationships for HTL biocrude yield and other conversion product characteristics based on HTL of Nannochloropsis oculata batches harvested with a wide range of compositions (23–59% dw lipids, 58–17% dw proteins, 12–22% dw carbohydrates) and a defatted batch (0% dw lipids, 75% dw proteins, 19% dw carbohydrates). HTL biocrude yield (33–68% dw) and carbon distribution (49–83%) increased in proportion to the fatty acid (FA) content. A component additivity model (predicting biocrude yield from lipid, protein, and carbohydrates) was more accurate predicting literature yields for diverse microalgae species than previous additivity models derived from model compounds. FA profiling of the biocrude product showed strong links to the initial feedstock FA profile of the lipid component, demonstrating that HTL acts as a water-based extraction process for FAs; the remainder non-FA structural components could be represented using the defatted batch. These findings were used to introduce a new FA-based model that predicts biocrude oil yields along with other critical parameters, and is capable of adjusting for the wide variations in HTL methodology and microalgae species through the defatted batch. Lastly, the FA model was linked to an upstream cultivation model (Phototrophic Process Model

  14. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  15. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori; Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano; Lemaux, Brian C.; Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja; Gladders, Mike; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Treu, Tommaso

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  16. A low-temperature processed environment-friendly full-organic carrier collection layer for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ai-Li; Li, Yan-Qing E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Jiang, Xiao-Chen; Ma, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Qian-Kun; Guo, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Dan-Dan E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin E-mail: zhangdd@suda.edu.cn

    2014-08-04

    We constructed a concept of the full-organic carrier collection layer (CCL) used for polymer solar cells. The CCL is composed of dipyrazino[2,3-f:2?,3?-h]quinoxaline-2,3,6,7,10,11-hexacarbonitrile as hole collection layer (HCL) and chlorine-free solvents (formic acid (FA)) processed 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) as electron collection layer, exhibiting good solubility, and environmental protection. The FA based device shows ideal power conversion efficiency (3.75%), which is higher than that of control device (3.6%). Besides, the HCL shows a different mechanism in hole extraction by functioning as a charge recombination zone for electrons injected from anode and holes extracted from the donor materials.

  17. A=15N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15N) GENERAL: See Table 15.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(HA57B, BR59M, FE59E, TA60L, BA61N, BU63D, KU63I, MA64HH, CO65I, FA65A, GR65E, GU65A, ZA65B, EL66B, SO66A, CO67M, EL67C, PA67K, EL68E, HO68, MA68DD, SH68D, WA68E, ZH68A, CH69, EL69B). General calculations and reviews:(EV64, BE65G, OL66B, WI66E, FA67A, LO67E, BI68C, ZH68, HA69M, IW69A). Electromagnetic transitions:(RO65O, HA66O, PO66F, RO66C, RO66M, WA66D, KU67J,

  18. Current status and perspective of advanced loop type fast reactor in fast reactor cycle technology development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Hajime; Aoto, Kazumi; Morishita, Masaki

    2007-07-01

    After selecting the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication as the most promising concept of FR cycle system, 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems' was finalized in 2006. Instead, a new project, Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development Project (FaCT Project) was launched in Japan focusing on development of the selected concepts. This paper describes the current status and perspective of the advanced loop type SFR system in the FaCT Project, especially on the design requirements, current design as well as the related innovative technologies together with the development road-map. Some considerations on advantages of the advanced loop type design are also described. (authors)

  19. CIPS Validation Data Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam Dinh

    2012-03-01

    This report documents analysis, findings and recommendations resulted from a task 'CIPS Validation Data Plan (VDP)' formulated as an POR4 activity in the CASL VUQ Focus Area (FA), to develop a Validation Data Plan (VDP) for Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) challenge problem, and provide guidance for the CIPS VDP implementation. The main reason and motivation for this task to be carried at this time in the VUQ FA is to bring together (i) knowledge of modern view and capability in VUQ, (ii) knowledge of physical processes that govern the CIPS, and (iii) knowledge of codes, models, and data available, used, potentially accessible, and/or being developed in CASL for CIPS prediction, to devise a practical VDP that effectively supports the CASL's mission in CIPS applications.

  20. Compact, flexible, frequency agile parametric wavelength converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Velsko, Stephan P.; Yang, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    This improved Frequency Agile Optical Parametric Oscillator provides near on-axis pumping of a single QPMC with a tilted periodically poled grating to overcome the necessity to find a particular crystal that will permit collinear birefringence in order to obtain a desired tuning range. A tilted grating design and the elongation of the transverse profile of the pump beam in the angle tuning plane of the FA-OPO reduces the rate of change of the overlap between the pumped volume in the crystal and the resonated and non-resonated wave mode volumes as the pump beam angle is changed. A folded mirror set relays the pivot point for beam steering from a beam deflector to the center of the FA-OPO crystal. This reduces the footprint of the device by as much as a factor of two over that obtained when using the refractive telescope design.

  1. A=7Be (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1967FA1A, 1968GO01, 1969TA1H, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1971NO02, 1972HI16, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L). Rotational and deformed models: (1965VO1A, 1966EL08). Special levels: (1966BA26, 1966EL08, 1967FA1A, 1969HA1G, 1969HA1F, 1971CO28, 1971NO02, 1972BB26, 1973AS02, 1973FE1J).

  2. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  3. Monthly Performance Report October 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Performance Report October 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report October 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 1 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments

  4. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  6. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Monthly Performance Report December 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report December 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 3 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report December 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 3 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key

  7. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Monthly Performance Report January 2010 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report January 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 4 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report January 2010 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 4 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key Accomplishments

  8. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monthly Performance Report November 2009 F.A. Figueroa President and General Manager U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-09RL14728 MSC Monthly Performance Report November 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 2 ii This page intentionally left blank. CONTENTS MSC Monthly Performance Report November 2009 DOE/RL-2009-113 REV 2 iii CONTENTS OVERVIEW 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Key

  9. Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Microbial Reduction of Furfurals to Furan Alcohols by a Microbial Species Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAn ORNL researcher developed a method for producing furfuryl alcohol (FA) through bioprocessing using a thermophilic microorganism. This organism has been shown to be highly resistant to the toxic effects of furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and can propagate in the presence of over 48 g/L (500

  10. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  11. Comparing mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of chicken manure: Microbial community dynamics and process resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Qigui; Takemura, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Kengo; Li, Yu-You

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Microbial community dynamics and process functional resilience were investigated. • The threshold of TAN in mesophilic reactor was higher than the thermophilic reactor. • The recoverable archaeal community dynamic sustained the process resilience. • Methanosarcina was more sensitive than Methanoculleus on ammonia inhibition. • TAN and FA effects the dynamic of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria obviously. - Abstract: While methane fermentation is considered as the most successful bioenergy treatment for chicken manure, the relationship between operational performance and the dynamic transition of archaeal and bacterial communities remains poorly understood. Two continuous stirred-tank reactors were investigated under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions feeding with 10%TS. The tolerance of thermophilic reactor on total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) was found to be 8000 mg/L with free ammonia (FA) 2000 mg/L compared to 16,000 mg/L (FA1500 mg/L) of mesophilic reactor. Biomethane production was 0.29 L/gV S{sub in} in the steady stage and decreased following TAN increase. After serious inhibition, the mesophilic reactor was recovered successfully by dilution and washing stratagem compared to the unrecoverable of thermophilic reactor. The relationship between the microbial community structure, the bioreactor performance and inhibitors such as TAN, FA, and volatile fatty acid was evaluated by canonical correspondence analysis. The performance of methanogenic activity and substrate removal efficiency were changed significantly correlating with the community evenness and phylogenetic structure. The resilient archaeal community was found even after serious inhibition in both reactors. Obvious dynamics of bacterial communities were observed in acidogenic and hydrolytic functional bacteria following TAN variation in the different stages.

  12. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Addthis 1 of 3 PPG Industries and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are partnering to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and façade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2 of 3 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group physicist Paul

  13. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; et al

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFamore » and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.« less

  14. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, J. )

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  15. Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles Dynamic model of organic Rankine cycle with R245fa working fluid and conservative component efficiencies predict power generation in excess of electrical accessory load demand under highway drive cycle deer11_hussain.pdf (688.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Fuel Economy Improvement through Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Automotive Thermoelectric Generator Design Issues

  16. Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Software BEopt 2.4 Now Available! With the release of BEopt Version 2.4 Beta, users can now perform modeling analysis on multifamily buildings! Other new options for input include: heat pump clothes dryers; electric/gas clothes dryers; condensing tank water heaters; door construction and area; window areas defined by façade-specific WWRs; and 2013 ASHRAE 62.2

  17. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences | OSTI, US Dept

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences Building a secondary containment system Broder, M.F. (1994) 144 Methods and opportunities in the recycling of rare earth based materials Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.; Jones, L.L. (1994) 134 Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. (1999) 128 Ammonia usage in vapor compression for refrigeration and air-conditioning in the United States

  18. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  19. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  20. A = 11B (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11B) GENERAL: See Table 11.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KU56, KU57A, BI60, TA60L, BA61D, BA61N, KO61L, KU61E, TR61, UM61, AM64, NE64C, CO65I, FA65A, FA65C, HA66F, MA66S, CO67M, FA67A, KU68A). Collective model:(BR59M, CL61D, CL62G, MA64HH, NE65E, EL66B, MI66J, RI67J, GO68). Ground state properties:(BE62L, BE63T, LI64H, LI64I, ST64, HU65C, RI66F, WI66E, BA67E, RH67A, SH67C, BA68B). Other:(SE63G, OL64A, TH64A, WI66F, BA67HH, PO67G).

  1. A Combined Experimental and Computational Study on the Stability of Nanofluids Containing Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annapureddy, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-01-23

    Computational studies on nanofluids composed of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) were performed using molecular modeling techniques. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to study adsorption behavior of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane (R-245fa) in a MIL-101 MOF at various temperatures. To understand the stability of the nanofluid composed of MIL-101 particles, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to compute potentials of mean force between hypothetical MIL-101 fragments terminated with two different kinds of modulators in R-245fa and water. Our computed potentials of mean force results indicate that the MOF particles tend to disperse better in water than in R-245fa. The reasons for this observation were analyzed and discussed. Our results agree with experimental results indicating that the employed potential models and modeling approaches provide good description of molecular interactions and the reliabilities. Work performed by LXD was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Work performed by HVRA, SKN, RKM, and PBM was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Geothermal Technologies Program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  2. Launch of fast reactor cycle technology development project in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2007-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA launched a new Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development f (FaCT) Project in cooperation with the Japanese electric utilities. The FaCT project is based on the conclusion of the previous project, namely the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (FS) which carried out in last seven years. In the FS, the combination of the sodium-cooled fast reactor with oxide fuel, the advanced aqueous reprocessing and the simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication was selected as the main concept which should be developed principally because it was the most promising concept for commercialization. A conceptual design study of the main concept and research and development of innovative technologies adopted in the main concept are implemented toward an important milestone at 2015. The development targets, which were set up at the beginning stage of FS, were revised for the FaCT project based on the results of FS and change in Japanese society environment and in the world situation. International collaboration is promoted to pursue fast reactor cycle technology which deserves the global standard and its efficient development. (author)

  3. Differences in Supratentorial Damage of White Matter in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors With and Without Adjuvant Treatment as Detected by Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Luedemann, Lutz; Henze, Guenter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Patients and Methods: Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Results: Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients.

  4. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  5. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases in ?-ferrite of Type 316FR weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, Eun Joon; Baba, Hayato; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2013-12-15

    The decomposition behavior and kinetics of ?-ferrite are examined using aging treatments between 873 and 1073 K for Type 316FR stainless steel weld metals with different solidification modes (316FR AF, 316FR FA). The dominant precipitates are sigma, chi, and secondary austenite nucleated at ?-ferrite/austenite interfaces or in the interior of the ferrite grains. These precipitates consume all the ferrite during isothermal aging in both 316FR AF and FA weld metals. Differences in the precipitation behavior (precipitation initiation time and precipitation speed) between weld metals can be explained by i) the degree of Cr and Mo microsegregation within ?-ferrite or austenite near ferrite and ii) the nucleation sites induced due to the solidification mode (AF or FA), such as the ferrite amount. For both weld materials, a JohnsonMehl-type equation can express the precipitation behavior of the sigma + chi phases and quantitatively predict the behavior at the service-exposure temperatures of a fast breed reactor. - Highlights: Precipitation of ? and ? phase in Type 316FR welds (two solidification modes) Different precipitation behaviors: precipitation initiation time and growth speed Johnson-Mehltype equation is the most applicable to the precipitation behaviors Precipitation behaviors are predicted under service conditions of FBRs.

  6. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  7. Creative problem solving at Rocky Reach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, B.M.; Garrison, D.H.

    1997-04-01

    Tainter gate inspection and thrust bearing cooling system problems at the 1287-MW Rocky Reach hydroelectric project on the Columbia River in Washington are described. Gate inspection was initiated in response to a failure of similar gates at Folsom Dam. The approach involved measuring the actual forces on the gates and comparing them to original model study parameters, rather than the traditional method of building a hydraulic model. Measurement and visual inspection was completed in one day and had no effect on migration flows. Two problems with the thrust bearing cooling system are described. First, whenever a generating unit was taken off line, cooling water continued circulating and lowered oil temperatures. The second problem involved silt buildup in flow measuring device tubes on the cooling water system. Modifications to correct cooling system problems and associated costs are outlined.

  8. Winter 2013 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 CSTEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected T hursdays, 1 :00---2:00pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) January 1 7 Jimmy Chen ( Phillips g roup) February 7 Michael K uo ( Ku g roup) February 2 8 Vladimir S toica (note: l ocation c hange t o 3 158 D ow) March 1 4 Simon H uang ( Goldman g roup) March 2 8 Sung J oo K im (Pan g roup)** * *Early s tart: 1 2:30pm** April 1 8 Larry A agesen ( Thornton g roup) May 2 Michael A berre ( Yalisove g roup) Thrust II --- s elected F

  9. Achieving uniform-high-tensions in mechanical-anchor bolts. Open file report, 15 January 1980-15 November 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahyera, A.; Jones, A.H.

    1982-11-01

    Towards the goal of achieving uniform high tensions in roofbolts to provide superior roof support for extended periods, mechanical anchor bolts were installed in a mine in eight different ways--under torque thrust control with and without hardened washers, belleville washers, and tension equalization; in a conventional manner with and without a hardened washer. The various bolt groups were analyzed in terms of tension uniformity and mean tension levels. Installing the bolts accurately with a hardened washer under the bolthead, and proper torque thrust control resulted in the most uniformly tensioned bolt--with a coefficient variation of only 14%, an improvement of three times over a conventional installation. Also, these bolts maintained a high tension level--80% of the installation tension compared with 50% achieved conventionally.

  10. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  11. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  12. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiravalle, Vincent P

    2012-07-23

    This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PRE-PROTOTYPE MACH 2 RAMGEN ENGINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramgen Power Systems

    2001-09-01

    The research and development effort of a new kind of combustion engine is presented. The engine is designed to convert the thrust from ramjet modules into shaft torque, which in turn can be used for electrical power generation or mechanical drive applications. An aggressive test program was undertaken that included evaluation of the existing engine, as well as incorporation of novel improvements to the thrust modules and supporting systems. Fuel mixing studies with Vortex Generators and bluff body flame holders illuminated the importance of increasing the shear-layer area and spreading angle to augment flame volume. Evaluation of flame-holding configurations (with variable fuel injection methods) concluded that the heat release zone, and therefore combustion efficiency, could be manipulated by judicious selection of bluff body geometry, and is less influenced by fuel injection distribution. Air film cooling studies demonstrated that acceptable combustor life could be achieved with optimized air film distribution patterns and thermal barrier coatings.

  14. Subterranean drilling and in situ treatment of wastes using a contamination control system and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jessmore, James J.; Loomis, Guy G.; Pettet, Mark C.; Flyckt, Melissa C.

    2004-09-28

    Systems and methods relating to subterranean drilling while maintaining containment of any contaminants released during the drilling. A thrust block installed over a zone of interest provides an overflow space for retaining any contaminants and excess sealant returns. Negative air pressure may be maintained in the overflow space by a ventilation system. Access ports in the thrust block seal the overflow space from the surrounding environment with a membrane seal. A flexible sack seal in the access port may be connected to a drill shroud prior to drilling, providing containment during drilling after the drill bit penetrates the membrane seal. The drill shroud may be adapted to any industry standard drilling rig and includes a connection conduit for connecting to the flexible sack seal and a flexible enclosure surrounding the drill shaft and of a length to accommodate full extension thereof. Upon withdrawal, the sack seal may be closed off and separated, maintaining containment of the overflow space and the drill shroud.

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor Science and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology Thrust The Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center's vision for Compound Semiconductors is to develop the science of compound semiconductors that will enable us to invent integrated nano-technologies for the microsystems of the future. We will achieve this by advancing the frontiers of semiconductor research in areas such as quantum phenomena, defect physics, materials and device modeling, heteroepitaxy, and by discovering new

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Optical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optical Sciences The focus of the Optical Sciences thrust is to understand and exploit the elegant interaction between light and matter. Our research portfolio encompasses the generation, transmission, manipulation, and detection of light and the development of optical materials with user defined characteristics. We emphasize innovative work in laser and optical materials development, nonlinear optics, spectroscopy, remote sensing, and photon-material interactions. In partnership with our DOE,

  17. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Research Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Briefs The annually published Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center Research Briefs highlights recent accomplishments supporting our missions. Our research focuses on five technical thrust areas: Science-based solutions for NNSA mission needs Collective hierarchical systems Compound semiconductors Nanosciences Optical sciences Issues 2009: View list of articles Download full issue (12.7MB PDF) 2008: View list of articles Download full issue (5.9MB PDF) 2007: View list of articles

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Science-based Solutions for NNSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mission Needs Science-Based Solutions for NNSA Mission Needs Sandia's existence stems from its engineering support of the Manhattan Project during the 1940's to develop Nuclear Weapons (NWs), and its first and foremost mission remains engineering support for the NW program. This mission represents a significant fraction of the total effort at Sandia, which is administered by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Not surprisingly, Center 1100 has had many core thrusts that have

  19. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995 (first quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S.

    1996-03-01

    This is the Site Operator Program quarterly report for USDOE electric and hybrid vehicle research. Its mission now includes the three major activity categories of advancement of electric vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 11 Site Operator Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of the site operators totals about 250 vehicles. The individual fleets are summarized.

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ZERO: OVERVIEW AND COMMERCIAL PATH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuteck, Michael D.; Jackson, Kevin L.; Santos, Richard A.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  1. FORGE Infographic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORGE Infographic FORGE Infographic The Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) constitutes the strategic thrust of the Geothermal Technologies Office, Department of Energy, over the next five years. Advances in EGS technologies could unlock up to 10% of the nation's energy supply from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), geothermal energy potential where there is little or no fluid or permeable rock. The FORGE infographic below shows the scope of this undertaking. Click

  2. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  3. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2016 Time: 11:00 am Speaker: Frank van Veggel, University of Victoria Title: On the Optical and Magnetic Properties of Ln3+ Based Nanoparticles for Bio-Imaging Location: 67-3111 Chemla Room Abstract: One of our main research thrusts in the field of colloidal nanomaterials and their applications is based on the trivalent lanthanide ions, which have unique optical and magnetic properties. We cover the range from synthesis and characterisation to (in vivo) applications, with a recent focus on

  4. Presentations - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentations To view notes or play video, please download. JCESR Presentations at the 228th Electrochemical Society Meeting, Phoenix, AZ (10-11-15) The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR): A New Paradigm for Energy Storage Research George Crabtree, JCESR Director Overcoming Key Challenges for a Viable Lithium-Sulfur Transportation Battery Kevin Zavadil, JCESR Thrust PI, Chemical Transformation Pathways to Non-aqueous Redox Flow (NRF) Batteries for Grid Storage Fikile Brushett,

  5. Research - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research To facilitate better and more rapid coordination among the CEFRC members, Center research activities are organized into three Disciplinary Working Groups (DWGs) Chemistry: Theory (Coordinated by William H. Green) Chemistry: Experiment and Mechanisms (Coordinated by Hai Wang) Chemistry and Transport (Coordinated by Yiguang Ju) Additionally, the CEFRC has enlarged its scope of investigation by extending our prior focus on butanol to three unifying, thrust targets that define the

  6. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Thermoelectric thrust of CSTEC focuses on fundamental transport processes that govern solid state energy conversion, i.e., how the charge and energy flow through the atomic lattice or an array of assembled molecules. The CSTEC team tackles the challenges of thermoelectricity comprehensively by studying transport phenomena from a multi-dimensional perspective that spans charge and energy transport in molecular junctions, conduction processes in two-dimensional films, and the role the

  7. Department of Energy (DOE) OpenNet documents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Smyth and Tolman Committee Reports The atomic bombing of Japan in early August 1945 suddenly thrust the Manhattan Project into the center of the public eye. What formerly had been privy to a select few now became the object of intense public curiosity and scrutiny. Manhattan Project officials, however, had no intent to release what they viewed as essential military secrets. To both allay inordinate inquisitiveness and satisfy the legitimate public need to know, officials in early 1944 began a

  8. Nuclear structure studies with INGA coupled to a fast DDAQ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palit, R.

    2014-08-14

    Studies of different types of nuclear excitation and isomers remain the main thrust area of the last experimental campaign using INGA at TIFR-BARC Pelletron Linac Facility at Mumbai. A digital data acquisition system has been coupled with the INGA which has improved the data throughput and better gain stability. About forty experiments that have been proposed in this experimental campaign. Selected results from these experiments will be discussed.

  9. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Project Description Chemistry used in measurement and detection science plays a crucial role in the Laboratory's Science of Signatures scientific thrust. Measurement and detection science areas that require chemistry include nuclear and radiological, materials, biological, energy, climate, and space. Los Alamos scientists integrate chemical-science capabilities to ensure that the Laboratory can

  10. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME TWO: INNOVATION & COST OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuteck, Michael D.; Jackson, Kevin L.; Santos, Richard A.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  11. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  12. About | Center for Gas Separations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Novel Adsorbent Synthesis A major thrust within the CGS is to design new adsorbents tuned to efficiently carry out a given gas separation. Research in the Center focuses heavily on metal-organic framework (MOF) adsorbents, which are a relatively new class of porous materials composed of metal ions connected by organic linkers in three dimensions. An essentially infinite library of possible metal and ligand combinations and their porous nature has rendered MOFs promising for specifically

  13. Optima Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optima Program Overview John Farrell Optima Stakeholder Listening Day June 16, 2015 2 BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE multi office multi lab multi year initiative what is Optima? approach: co-optimize fuels and engines accelerate, coordinate, and focus efficiency and displacement 30% per vehicle petroleum reduction via 4 source: EIA 2014 reference case efficiency 7-14% beyond BAU 16 billion gallons advanced biofuel Optima research thrust 1 Provide scientific basis to

  14. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFord, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust area fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.

  15. Center for Advanced Photophysics | Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Home About The Center Science Publications News & Press Releases Center Science The research of this Center focuses on (1) novel physical principles for solar energy conversion, (2) charge manipulation and exploratory photovoltaic device structures, and (3) novel nanomaterials. Research Thrusts Diagram of three overlapping circles. The upper left circle is labeled as Novel Physical Principles and

  16. Center for Inverse Design: About the Center for Inverse Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organization Partner Institutions Principal Investigators Research Thrusts & Subtasks Approach Publications SharePoint Collaboration Tool For research results, information, and discussion board Learn more about some recent research highlights from the Center for Inverse Design Meet some of our principal investigators in the Center for Inverse Design by viewing the short videos Download latest chart of efficiencies determined by certified agencies/labs of best research solar cells worldwide

  17. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Management Organizational Structure, Roles, and Responsibilities: The FIRST Center management structure, outlined in our organizational chart, has been designed to accomplish the scientific goals of the Center, while providing synergy between the thrusts, educational outreach, oversight, operational support, and integration with DOE's core science and technology programs. The Director (David J.Wesolowski) is responsible for the overall scientific direction and management of the Center,

  18. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics: Overview of Research Thrusts Victor Klimov Softmatter Nanotechnology and Advanced Spectroscopy, Chemistry Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545, USA Monday, February 8, 10am Chemistry Division Auditorium, TA-46, Bld. 535, Rm. 103 Abstract Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP) is part of the recent DOE initiative in Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) launched in August of 2009. The goal of CASP is to explore and

  19. Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F - Seismicity Relocation Analyses Hanford Sitewide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis 2014 F.1 Appendix F Seismicity Relocation Analyses Final Report: High-Resolution Seismicity Study of the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt Region, Washington Prepared by Clifford H. Thurber Department of Geoscience University of Wisconsin-Madison 1215 W. Dayton St. Madison, WI 53706 January 31, 2014 Final Report: Hanford Site-Wide Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA): High-Resolution Seismicity Analysis

  20. Ian D. Sharp - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ian d. sharp Principal Investigator and Research Thrust Coordinator Email: idsharp@lbl.gov Dr. Sharp's research is devoted to formation and characterization of functional semiconductor interfaces for applications in renewable energy, with a particular emphasis on solar energy conversion. Central to this work is the establishment of relationships among structural, chemical, and electrical properties at semiconductor-based solid/solid and solid/liquid interfaces. This work provides insight into

  1. Structure, Property, Processing Relationships in Metal Oxide Thin Films for Gas Sensing in Harsh Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergence of WBG Based Power Electronics and System Level Needs / Opportunities for Advances in Passives, Packaging, and Peripherals with Emphasis on HF Magnetics Electrochemical and Magnetic Materials Team Functional Materials Development Division NETL Office of Research and Development Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, Materials Scientist / Team Lead Nanocrystals Intergranular Phase 2 Overview of Presentation * Historic Thrust in Active Components for WBG-Based Power Electronics - Promise of WBG-Based

  2. Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction Effects: Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Collocated Structures

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emergence of WBG Based Power Electronics and System Level Needs / Opportunities for Advances in Passives, Packaging, and Peripherals with Emphasis on HF Magnetics Electrochemical and Magnetic Materials Team Functional Materials Development Division NETL Office of Research and Development Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, Materials Scientist / Team Lead Nanocrystals Intergranular Phase 2 Overview of Presentation * Historic Thrust in Active Components for WBG-Based Power Electronics - Promise of WBG-Based

  3. John Gregoire - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Greenwald About Us John Greenwald - Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory John Greenwald is the Science Editor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, one of the Energy Department's 17 National Labs. Most Recent Watch a Centrifuge Separate Nuclear Waste July 2

    gregoire Principal Investigator and Research Thrust Coordinator Email: gregoire@caltech.edu Dr. Gregoire's research interests include: high-throughput materials discovery, combinatorial materials synthesis, high-throughput

  4. Student Entrepreneurs Driving Loyola Biodiesel Program | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emergence of WBG Based Power Electronics and System Level Needs / Opportunities for Advances in Passives, Packaging, and Peripherals with Emphasis on HF Magnetics Electrochemical and Magnetic Materials Team Functional Materials Development Division NETL Office of Research and Development Dr. Paul Ohodnicki, Materials Scientist / Team Lead Nanocrystals Intergranular Phase 2 Overview of Presentation * Historic Thrust in Active Components for WBG-Based Power Electronics - Promise of WBG-Based

  5. Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimization of Fuels and Engines Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines presentation for SAE High Efficiency Internal Combustion Engine Symposium on April 10-11, 2016. farrell_co-optimization_sae_heice_ symposium_2016.pdf (14.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines (Co-Optima)-Fuel Properties and Chemical Kinetics and Thrust I Engine Projects Vehicle Technologies Office Merit

  6. Renewable energy project development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohi, J.

    1996-12-31

    The author presents this paper with three main thrusts. The first is to discuss the implementation of renewable energy options in China, the second is to identify the key project development steps necessary to implement such programs, and finally is to develop recommendations in the form of key issues which must be addressed in developing such a program, and key technical assistance needs which must be addressed to make such a program practical.

  7. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this

  8. The Macolumn - the Mac gets geophysical. [A review of geophysical software for the Apple Macintosh computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busbey, A.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Seismic Processing Workshop, a program by Parallel Geosciences of Austin, TX, is discussed in this column. The program is a high-speed, interactive seismic processing and computer analysis system for the Apple Macintosh II family of computers. Also reviewed in this column are three products from Wilkerson Associates of Champaign, IL. SubSide is an interactive program for basin subsidence analysis; MacFault and MacThrustRamp are programs for modeling faults.

  9. The National Nuclear Security Administration's B61 Spin Rocket Motor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project, IG-0740 | Department of Energy cf Energy's Sandia National Laboratories are refurbishing the Spin Rocket Motor, a 1:rime component of the B61 nuclear weapon system. Both the originai motor produced i2 i906 and the version last produced in 1991 are the subjects of the refurbishment. Rvth motors, which are essentially identical, produce thrust to arm thz weapon. In Deceinber 2001, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received Nuclear Weapons Council Standing and Safety

  10. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ONE: PRELIMINARY DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuteck, Michael D.; Jackson, Kevin L.; Santos, Richard A.; Chow, Ray; Nordenholz, Thomas R.; Wamble, John Lee

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  11. Adam Z. Weber - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adam z. weber Principal Investigator and Research Thrust Coordinator Email: azweber@lbl.gov Dr. Weber's research interests include: advanced diagnostics and mathematical modeling of various electrochemical devices, including solar-fuel generators, redox flow batteries, and polymer-electrolyte fuel cells; and a strong interest in multiscale and multiphase modeling of transport phenomena in these devices, including optimization of their operation for both performance and durability. In addition,

  12. Cognitive Foundations for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Noonan, Christine F.; Franklin, Lyndsey

    2011-02-25

    In this report, we provide an overview of scientific/technical literature on information visualization and VA. Topics discussed include an update and overview of the extensive literature search conducted for this study, the nature and purpose of the field, major research thrusts, and scientific foundations. We review methodologies for evaluating and measuring the impact of VA technologies as well as taxonomies that have been proposed for various purposes to support the VA community. A cognitive science perspective underlies each of these discussions.

  13. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME THREE: MARKET & TEAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuteck, Michael D.; Jackson, Kevin L.; Santos, Richard A.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  14. Hydromechanical drilling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, David A.

    1978-01-01

    A hydromechanical drilling tool which combines a high pressure water jet drill with a conventional roller cone type of drilling bit. The high pressure jet serves as a tap drill for cutting a relatively small diameter hole in advance of the conventional bit. Auxiliary laterally projecting jets also serve to partially cut rock and to remove debris from in front of the bit teeth thereby reducing significantly the thrust loading for driving the bit.

  15. Clear Skies T. J. Kulp and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T. J. Kulp and J. Shinn Geophysics and Environmental Research Program Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Introduction Completion of the Experimental Apparatus The experimental apparatus used to make our measurements consists of the multipass cell and its chamber, the FTIR spectrometer, the TDLAS system, and the necessary data collection apparatus. This equipment was assembled and the chamber was constructed during the first year of our project. The primary thrust of that

  16. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  17. Performance evaluation of half-wetted hydrodynamic bearings with DLC coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eryilmaz, O.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    In conventional liquid lubrication it is assumed that surfaces are fully wetted and no slip occurs between the fluid and the solid boundary. Under the 'no slip' condition the maximum shear gradient occurs at the fluid-surface interface. When one or both surfaces are non-wetted by the fluid, boundary slip can occur due to weak bonding between the fluid and the solid surface, which reduces shear stresses in the fluid adjacent to the non-wetted surface. A thrust bearing tribometer was used to compare the performance of 'no slip' hydrodynamic thrust bearings with bearings surfaces that were made to slip at the interface between the surface and fluid. Hydrophobic surfaces on both runner and bearing were achieved with the deposition of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (H-DLC) films, produced by plasma-enhanced CVD on titanium alloy surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces were created through the surface modification of DLC. A mixtures of water and glycerol was used as the lubricant. The tests were conducted using different constant bearing gaps. The normal load and the torque or traction force between the rotating runner and hydrodynamic thrust bearing were measured with load cells. The experimental results confirmed that load support is still possible when surfaces are partially-wetted or nonwetted.

  18. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E.; Schaps, S.; McGregor, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  19. Petroleum systems of Jianghan Basin, Hubel Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, A.E. ); Schaps, S.; McGregor, D. )

    1996-01-01

    The Jianghan Basin is a Cretaceous-Tertiary nonmarine rift basin superimposed on a late Precambrian to Jurassic passive margin and foreland basin succession deformed by mid-Mesozoic folding and thrusting. Hence the basin has potential for superimposed petroleum systems. Oil production is established in a Tertiary petroleum system developed in two major depocenters, the Jiangling (west) and Qianjiang (east) Depressions. Lacustrine source beds in the early Eocene Xingouzhui and late Eocene Qianjiang Formations generated hydrocarbons during local maximum basin fill in the Oligocene to present. Very early, low temperature generation of petroleum occurs where Type 1S Qianjiang Formation kerogen is present. Tertiary fluvial and deltaic sandstones form reservoirs that trap oil in highs or rollover structures formed by normal faulting and salt movement. The pre-rift section contains large folds and good source-beds, but has high exploration risk. Factors limiting effectiveness of older petroleum systems are: (1) Uplift and erosion of thrust structures; (2) Overmaturation of pre-Permian source rocks prior to folding and thrusting; (3) Limited extent of secondary maturation of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic source beds; and (4) Disruption of older traps and seals by widespread normal faulting. Production of hydrocarbons from Permian and Triassic rocks to the west of Hubei suggests that further seismic work and drilling are merited to evaluate pre-Tertiary potential in the Jianghan Basin.

  20. Controls of alluvial stratigraphy in the Upper Pennsylvania-Lower Permian Dunkard Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominic, D.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The Casselman, Pittsburgh, and Waynesburg formations exposed in northern West Virginia were deposited within a foreland basin adjacent to the Alleghenian fold and thrust belt. Sandstones were deposited in fluvial channels on an aggrading and prograding coastal plain. however, unlike mid-continental cyclothems, these channels were isolated from eustatic changes because previous delta progradation had blocked circulation between the local depositional basin and the larger mid-continental sea. Thus, eustatic changes had no direct or strong influence on Dunkard basin deposition, a conclusion supported by interbasinal correlation. Also, climate was largely stable during this interval. The evolution of channel properties, therefore, most likely reflects the influence of intrabasinal controls and possibly tectonism. Detailed correlation indicates that coeval channel belts were separated by about 50 km with an intervening area of slower subsidence and deposition. Quantitative reconstruction of bankfull hydraulics and geometry indicates that channels were of moderate sinuosity, were not braided, and were of two distinct sizes (average widths, 80 and 250 m, respectively). An overall decrease in discharge in the smaller channels throughout the studied interval may be attributed to a slowing of subsidence rates as the locus of sedimentation prograded beyond the northwestern margin of the Rome Trough or to thrustward migration of a forebulge following episodic thrusting. The increase in size and discharge of channels in the uppermost Waynesburg Formation is attributed to progradation of the upper fluvial-deltaic plain over the lower fluvial-deltaic plain, a progradation that may likewise have been promoted by thrusting.

  1. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08

  2. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh B.; Nica N.; Singh,B.; Nica,N.

    2012-05-01

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 77 (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y) have been evaluated and presented together with adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 77}Ga, {sup 77}Br and {sup 77}Kr. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 77}Ge, {sup 77}As, {sup 77}Se and {sup 77}Br from eight different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1997 NDS for A = 77 (1997Fa12) have been reported for {sup 77}Rb and {sup 77}Sr. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 77}Ni, {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y. Level schemes from the radioactive decays of {sup 77}Ni to {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y to {sup 77}Sr are unknown, while those for the decays of {sup 77}Cu to {sup 77}Zn and {sup 77}Ga to {sup 77}Ge are incomplete. Detailed gamma-ray data for {sup 77}Ge from thermal-neutron capture in {sup 76}Ge, together with extensive gamma-ray data from {sup 77}Ge decay to {sup 77}As have become available from 2012Me04. This work benefited from earlier evaluations (1997Fa12,1989Fa07,1980Si05,1973Ur02) of A = 77 nuclides, however, the data presented here supersede those in above evaluations.

  3. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  4. Tn-seq of Caulobacter crescentus under uranium stress reveals genes essential for detoxification and stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yung, Mimi C.; Park, Dan M.; Overton, K. Wesley; Blow, Matthew J.; Hoover, Cindi A.; Smit, John R.; Murray, Sean R.; Ricci, Dante P.; Christen, Beat; Bowman, Grant R.; Jiao, Yongqin

    2015-07-20

    Ubiquitous aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is highly resistant to uranium (U) and facilitates U biomineralization and thus holds promise as an agent of U bioremediation. In order to gain an understanding of how C. crescentus tolerates U, we employed transposon (Tn) mutagenesis paired with deep sequencing (Tn-seq) in a global screen for genomic elements required for U resistance. Of the 3,879 annotated genes in the C. crescentus genome, 37 were found to be specifically associated with fitness under U stress, 15 of which were subsequently tested through mutational analysis. Systematic deletion analysis revealed that mutants lacking outer membrane transporters (rsaFa and rsaFb), a stress-responsive transcription factor (cztR), or a ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase (spoT) exhibited a significantly lower survival rate under U stress. RsaFa and RsaFb, which are homologues of TolC in Escherichia coli, have previously been shown to mediate S-layer export. Transcriptional analysis revealed upregulation of rsaFa and rsaFb by 4- and 10-fold, respectively, in the presence of U. We additionally show that rsaFa mutants accumulated higher levels of U than the wild type, with no significant increase in oxidative stress levels. These results suggest a function for RsaFa and RsaFb in U efflux and/or maintenance of membrane integrity during U stress. In addition, we present data implicating CztR and SpoT in resistance to U stress. Together, our findings reveal novel gene targets that are key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of U resistance in C. crescentus.

  5. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  6. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C; Indelicato, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  7. Differences in Brainstem Fiber Tract Response to Radiation: A Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Feng, Tianshu; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J.; Hua, Chiaho

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced changes in white matter tracts are uniform across the brainstem. Methods and Materials: We analyzed serial diffusion tensor imaging data, acquired before radiation therapy and over 48 to 72 months of follow-up, from 42 pediatric patients (age 6-20 years) with medulloblastoma. FSL software (FMRIB, Oxford, UK) was used to calculate fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial, radial, and mean diffusivities. For a consistent identification of volumes of interest (VOIs), the parametric maps of each patient were transformed to a standard brain space (MNI152), on which we identified VOIs including corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus (ML), transverse pontine fiber (TPF), and middle cerebellar peduncle (MCP) at the level of pons. Temporal changes of DTI parameters in VOIs were compared using a linear mixed effect model. Results: Radiation-induced white matter injury was marked by a decline in FA after treatment. The decline was often accompanied by decreased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, or both. This implied axonal damage and demyelination. We observed that the magnitude of the changes was not always uniform across substructures of the brainstem. Specifically, the changes in DTI parameters for TPF were more pronounced than in other regions (P<.001 for FA) despite similarities in the distribution of dose. We did not find a significant difference among CST, ML, and MCP in these patients (P>.093 for all parameters). Conclusions: Changes in the structural integrity of white matter tracts, assessed by DTI, were not uniform across the brainstem after radiation therapy. These results support a role for tract-based assessment in radiation treatment planning and determination of brainstem tolerance.

  8. NRFE-07-28

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Proprietary Class 3 Page 1 of 10 FFT-13-34 ©2013 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC All Rights Reserved To: Jess Gehin - AMA FA Lead Rose Montgomery - AMA Deputy Lead cc: Z. Karoutas (W) From: J. Yan (W) Date: April 16, 2013 Tel: (803) 647-2047 Our Ref: PFT-13-34 Fax: (803) 695-3985 Subject: CASL Technical Note: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Keywords: Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation, LOCA, CFD Fibrous Debris Pilot Simulation Pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment buildings are

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station:

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington,

  11. TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --____ R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal/Storage a Research Organization a Government 0 Other Sponsored i F[fa' tty ------__------__ I Prime 5 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit p CgNTRACTING PERIOD: L.&G , PX& & cx LFkoL ~~~~~~~~~----------_ __ _______ OWNERSH; P: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT

  12. ORISE: Faculty Research Experiences - Dr. Miguel Castro

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miguel Castro Research opportunity puts chemistry professor on the FaST track Dr. Miguel Castro Miguel Castro, from the University of Puerto Rico, spent part of the summer conducting research on surface tension in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Faculty Student Team Research program. Click image to enlarge. Many people believe that to get to the heart of a matter one has to delve below the surface. For chemistry professor Miguel Castro, Ph.D., of the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez, the

  13. Argonne Lea Computing F A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lea Computing F A r g o n n e L e a d e r s h i p C o m p u t i n g FA c i l i t y 2 0 1 3 S c i e n c e H i g H l i g H t S Argonne leadership computing Facility C O N T E N T S About ALCF ...............................................................................................................................2 MirA...............................................................................................................................................3 SCienCe DireCtor'S MeSSAge

  14. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  15. Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Regulatory Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects DOE F 4600.2 FA RepReqChklst FINAL 10-2014.docx (88.14 KB) More Documents & Publications POLICY FLASH 2015-01 1 1 Department of Energy

    for RD&D Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects DOE F 4600.2, Financial Assistance Reporting Checklist for RD and D (154.3 KB) Attachment 1, Research Performance Progress Report (183.52 KB) More

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI Observations in the Arctic: Monthly-Average Radiance Spectra and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Walden, V.P., Revercomb, H.E., Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Ciganovich, N., Dedecker, R.G., Dirkx, T., Garcia, R.K., Herbsleb, R., Howell, H.B., McRae, D., Short, J., and Tobin, D., Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/Space Science and Engineering Center/University of Wisconsin Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Comparison of High Spectral Resolution Infrared Cloud Boundary Algorithms using S-HIS and AERI Measurements Holz, R.E.(a), Antonelli, P.(a), Ackerman, S.(a), McGill, M.J.(a), Nagel, F.(a), Feltz, W.F.(a), and Turner, D.D.(b), Univeristy of Wisconsin, Madison (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud top pressure is an important parameter in determining the radiative impact of clouds on climate. In addition,

  18. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  19. Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2011-05-17

    A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

  20. 12B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1948JE03: 12B; measured T1/2. 1956TA07, 1957CO59, 1958CO66, 1958KA31: 12B. 1957CO57: 12B; measured T1/2. 1958KR65: 12B; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12B; measured T1/2. 1961SC09: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962NE14: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963AL15: 12B; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12B; measured

  1. 12N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1949AL05: 12N; measured T1/2. 1958VE20: 12N; measured T1/2. 1959FA03: 12N; measured T1/2. 1962MA22: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1962PO02: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FI05: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963GL04: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963PE10: 12N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963WI05: 12N; measured not

  2. L3:THM.CFD.P3.03 Summary of THM Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary of THM Meeting with EDF Robert Lowrie Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2011 CASL-U-2011-0281-000 CASL-U-2011-0281-000 Summary of THM Meeting with EDF On August 24, 2011, Rob Lowrie (THM FA Lead) met with Olivier Marchand (EDF) at ORNL. Marchand leads R&D efforts at EDF. The focus of this meeting was to begin potential collaborations between CASL and EDF in the area of thermal hydraulics. Marchand went through two presentations on their Saturne [1] and Neptune [2] codes.

  3. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  4. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB _ TrB D TrC _ VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood _Water D Sandhill Scrub oak/Pine D Sandhill Pine/Scrub oak N Streams Roads _Water [2LJ Other Set-Asides DTES Plants (2) llilliJ Hydric Soils Road 8.11 560 Meters Figure 29-1. Plant cOllll1lunities and soils associated with the Scrub Oak Natural Area. 29-5 Set-Aside 29: Scrub Oak Natural Area

  5. Brain Tumor Therapy-Induced Changes in Normal-Appearing Brainstem Measured With Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hua Chiaho; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Broniscer, Alberto; Zhang, Yong; Li Yimei; Glenn, George R.; Kun, Larry E.; Ogg, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize therapy-induced changes in normal-appearing brainstems of childhood brain tumor patients by serial diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 109 DTI studies from 20 brain tumor patients, aged 4 to 23 years, with normal-appearing brainstems included in the treatment fields. Those with medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (n = 10) received postoperative craniospinal irradiation (23.4-39.6 Gy) and a cumulative dose of 55.8 Gy to the primary site, followed by four cycles of high-dose chemotherapy. Patients with high-grade gliomas (n = 10) received erlotinib during and after irradiation (54-59.4 Gy). Parametric maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were computed and spatially registered to three-dimensional radiation dose data. Volumes of interest included corticospinal tracts, medial lemnisci, and the pons. Serving as an age-related benchmark for comparison, 37 DTI studies from 20 healthy volunteers, aged 6 to 25 years, were included in the analysis. Results: The median DTI follow-up time was 3.5 years (range, 1.6-5.0 years). The median mean dose to the pons was 56 Gy (range, 7-59 Gy). Three patterns were seen in longitudinal FA and apparent diffusion coefficient changes: (1) a stable or normal developing time trend, (2) initial deviation from normal with subsequent recovery, and (3) progressive deviation without evidence of complete recovery. The maximal decline in FA often occurred 1.5 to 3.5 years after the start of radiation therapy. A full recovery time trend could be observed within 4 years. Patients with incomplete recovery often had a larger decline in FA within the first year. Radiation dose alone did not predict long-term recovery patterns. Conclusions: Variations existed among individual patients after therapy in longitudinal evolution of brainstem white matter injury and recovery. Early response in

  6. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  7. CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    kire 7900. 955 L*E,,fa,u PLUG S. W.. Washin@ on. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphme: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAIOlf Mr. Andrew Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 CT.05 FL .0-o/ lti.Ob id.Or Dear Mr. Wallo: In/. O-01 flA.05 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Mbj.o-03 I4 v.o+ The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.o= with your

  8. LL Pm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LL Pm ' F II c iJr Fa, i n m n ys m * t F t F c* F F -- ORAU 89/G-77 IL. 17- Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning U.S. Department of Energy RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 18 HENDERSON STREET JOLIET, ILLINOIS M. R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 . rlly mfhct Ez of the 8pmnmtng Institutiona of Oak Ridga Asaodatd ThsoplnlonBoxpmnsdhDrDlndonotnnasn IJnm

  9. CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMA.NRC.P5.01 CASL NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar Jess Gehin Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 22, 2012 CASL-U-2014-0076-000-a CASL-U-2012-0076-000-a 1 CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors A DOE Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Reactors NRC Commissioner Technical Seminar November 30, 2012 Doug Kothe (ORNL) CASL Director Doug Burns (INL) CASL Deputy Director Paul Turinsky (NCSU) CASL Chief Scientist Jess Gehin (ORNL) CASL AMA FA

  10. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 1\ ".~ -. , ;J Community _ Loblolly Pine _ Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood ~ Upland Hard'MJod Bottomland Hand'MJod Mixed Swamp Forest I!!!!I Carolina Bay Wetland _Water 8 Bottomland Hand'MJod/Pine DForb/Grassland _ Other* Disturbed Area &:i Scrub/Shrub %~~~sBoundary :tfW'Roads o Utimy ROW Streams NPDES outfalls o Monitoring Wells * Wastesites CJ TES Plants (2) ~ Other Set*Asides .-. SRS Bays Areas D Hydric Soiis o Soils Soil Series and Phase D AnB D BaB D BaC D Ch I::!:I Fa D LaB _

  11. Compartment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29 Road 8-3.1 a Community _Loblolly Pine I!!i!iILongleaf Pine DMixed Pine/Hardwood C]Carolina Bay Wetland _Water hW#IHydric Soils f I TES Plants (1) 1M. Roads /YI. Streams '1\1 Site Boundary 280 Soil Series and Phase D BaB oDoA LJ Fa o FuB o LaB o Rm .Wm o 280 Soils 560 Meters N A Figure 25-1. Plant cOllllllunities and soils associated with the Mona Bay and Woodward Bay Set- Aside Area. 25-5 Set-Aside 25: Mona Bay and Woodward

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

    2002-01-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and

  13. Microwave-excited microplasma thruster with helium and hydrogen propellants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Takao, Yoshinori; Ichida, Yugo; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2011-06-15

    Microplasma thruster of electrothermal type has been investigated with feed or propellant gases of He and H{sub 2}. The thruster consisted of an azimuthally symmetric microwave-excited microplasma source 1.5 mm in diameter and 10 mm long with a rod antenna on axis, and a converging-diverging micronozzle 1 mm long with a throat 0.2 mm in diameter. Surface wave-excited plasmas were established by 4.0-GHz microwaves at powers of {<=} 6 W, with the source pressure in the range 0.5-12 kPa at flow rates of 2-70 sccm. The microplasma generation, micronozzle flow, and thrust performance with He were numerically analyzed by using a two-dimensional fluid model, coupled with an electromagnetic model for microwaves interacting with plasmas in the source region. In experiments, the plasma electron density and gas temperature in the microplasma source were measured at around the top of the microwave antenna, or just upstream of the micronozzle inlet, by optical emission spectroscopy with a small amount of additive gases of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. In the case of He propellant, the Stark broadening of H Balmer-{beta} line and the vibronic spectrum of N{sub 2} 2nd positive (0, 2) band indicated that the electron density was in the range (2-5)x10{sup 19}m{sup -3} and the gas or rotational temperature was in the range 600-700 K. The thrust performance was also measured by using a target-type microthrust stand, giving a thrust in the range 0.04-0.51 mN, a specific impulse in the range 150-270 s, and a thrust efficiency in the range 2%-12%. These experimental results were consistent with those of numerical analysis, depending on microwave power and gas flow rate. Similar plasma characteristics and thrust performance were obtained with H{sub 2} propellant, where the specific impulse of {<=} 450 s was more than 1.5 times higher than that with He, owing to a difference in mass between He and H{sub 2}. A comparison with previous studies with Ar propellant [T. Takahashi et al., Phys. Plasmas

  14. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-08

    strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  15. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  16. Passive Two-Phase Cooling for Automotive Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated and tested using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245 fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator concept that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce its size was designed. Simulation results indicate the concept's thermal resistance can be 58% to 65% lower than automotive dual-side-cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers-plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  17. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  18. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  19. Future challenges for MEMS failure analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    MEMS processes and components are rapidly changing in device design, processing, and, most importantly, application. This paper will discuss the future challenges faced by the MEMS failure analysis as the field of MEMS (fabrication, component design, and applications) grows. Specific areas of concern for the failure analyst will also be discussed. MEMS components are extremely diverse in their application and function. Failure analysts will have to be equally diverse and/or multidisciplinary in their analysis of these devices. Many tools and techniques developed from the IC industry have been used for MEMS FA, but more MEMS-specific FA toolsets have to be developed for diagnosis of these failure mechanisms. Many of the devices discussed in this paper have global issues associated with failure analysis. Many non destructive techniques must be developed to assess the failure mechanisms. Tools and techniques that can perform these functions on a larger scale will also be required. To achieve this, industry will have to work with academia and government institutions to create the knowledge base required for tool and technique development for global and local defect localization.

  20. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  2. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  3. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  4. Evolution of Pre-Jurassic basement beneath northern Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Siclen, D.C.

    1990-09-01

    Data from the northern Gulf Coast region reveal a late Paleozoic wrench fault system along which North America (NA) moved southeast (present directions) alongside the northeastern edge of future South America (SA), to where collision with that continent converted a broad continental embankment off the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen into the Ouachita thrust belt. At the same time, Africa farther east, to which protruding SA was firmly joined, was continuing to advance the Appalachian thrusts on the opposite side of these faults. This relationship left no space between the American continents for the conventional remnant ocean or microcontinents. By Late Triassic time, however, extension south of the Ouachita Mountains was forming the series of Interior rift basins, at both ends of which new wrench faults transferred the extension southward to the DeSoto Canyon and South Texas rift basins. Genetically, the Ouachita thrusts are part of the subduction zone along the front of a former SA forearc basin, which continued to receive marine sediments into middle Permian. The Wiggins arch southeast of it is a sliver of that continent, left with NA when the Interior basin rifting jumped from that forearc basin southward across bordering outer basement highs to begin opening the deep Gulf of Mexico (GOM) basin. The Late Triassic crustal extension resulted from right-lateral translation of NA around the bulge of northwestern Africa. About 200 mi of this placed Cape Hatteras against Africa's Cap Blanc, in the configuration from which the magnetic data indicate spreading began in the Central North Atlantic Ocean. The reality of this translation is confirmed by widespread rifting at the same time in western North Africa and between all three northern Atlantic continents; this drew the tip of the Tethys sea southward to Cape Hatteras and led to deposition of voluminous Late Triassic red beds and evaporites along it.

  5. Tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Luna field area, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roveri, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The Luna gas field is located near Crotone (Calabria region, southern Italy) in a shallow-water/onshore area. It was discovered and put into production during the early 1970s. Up to now it has produced 19 {times} 10{sup 9} sm{sup 3} of gas; its productivity (50 {times} 10{sup 6} sm{sup 3}/y) has remained virtually unaltered since the beginning. The field is located on the axial culmination of a thrust-related anticline of the Apennine postcollisional thrust belt; it can be roughly subdivided into two areas characterized by different stratigraphic contexts. In the northern and central parts of the field is a structural trap. Reservoir rocks are Serravallian to Tortonian deep marine resedimented conglomerates and sandstones. These deposits represent part of the infill of a middle-upper Miocene foredeep. Reservoir rocks are now thrusted, eroded, and unconformably overlain by lower Pliocene shales, which are the most important seal in this part of the field. In the southern part of the field is a combination trap. Reservoir rocks are upper Tortonian shallow-water sandstones. They lap onto a Tortonian unconformity related to a tectonic phase which split the previous foredeep into minor piggyback basins. The upper Tortonian sandstones are overlain and sealed by Messinian shales and evaporites. Tectonosedimentary evolution of the area and, consequently, areal distribution and geometry of sedimentary bodies - both potential reservoirs and seals - have been reconstructed using a sequence stratigraphy approach. The sedimentary record has been informally subdivided into five main depositional sequences bounded by unconformities or their correlative conformities; classic facies analysis and petrophysical, seismic, and biostratigraphic data have been utilized to define the internal characteristics of each sequence.

  6. Geochemistry and habitat of the oils in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattavelli, L.; Novelli, L. )

    1990-10-01

    All varieties of liquid petroleum, ranging from condensates (> 50{degree}API) to immature sulfur-rich heavy oils (as low as 5{degree} API), have been found in Italy. However, nonbiodegraded heavy oils account for about 70% of the total original oil in place. Geochemical analyses indicate that 11 oil groups are present in the Italian basins and two main types of source rocks have been identified: Triassic carbonates and Tertiary shales. About 95% of the oils were originated from Middle and Upper Triassic carbonates containing type II kerogen (about 1% total organic carbon (TOC) and 500 mg hydrocarbon/g TOC). Only a relatively minor amount of oil was generated by Tertiary shales containing type III kerogen with TOC generally less than 1%. Timing of generation and migration and bulk properties of oils were controlled by geodynamic histories of the three main Italian geologic settings: (1) Apennine and Southern Alp thrust belts, (2) foredeep (depression bordering the thrust belts), and (3) foreland (nondeformed African continental margin). Within the Apennine thrust belts, deep burial during the Neogene resulted in the generation of substantially lighter oils, not only from deeply buried Triassic but sometimes also from Tertiary source rocks. In the late Neogene, foredeep depocenters located in the central Adriatic and southern Sicily, high subsidence (up to 1,000 m/m.y.), a low geothermal gradient (22C/km) and compressional tectonics caused the generation of immature heavy oils generally at depths below 5,000 m and temperatures greater than 100C. Rapid burial and higher geothermal gradients (32C/km), which occurred since the Jurassic, resulted in the generation of light oils from the Late Cretaceous to the Oligocene in the southern sector of Adriatic foreland.

  7. Mara Field, a unique giant in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, G.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The Mara field is located in Venzuela, 45 km northwest of Maracaibo, on the Mara-La Paz anticlinal trend. Discovered in 1945 by the Caribbean Petroleum Co. (Shell group), the field has produced 407 MMB as of 1991 and has remaining proven reserves of 60 MMB, and probable and possible reserves of 58 MMB, for an ultimate potential recovery of 525 MMB. In addition to being a giant field, Mara is also unique in that it produces from fractures igneous basement rocks as well as from fractured Cretaceous limestones, which are the source rocks of the region, and Paleocene/Eocene sandstone and carbonate reservoirs. The sedimentary stratigraphic section comprises beds ranging from early Cretaceous to middle Eocene, which suffered considerable erosion, and overlying Plio-Pleistocene sediments, all of which were involved in the latest strong deformation. The structure of the field is complex; a main thrust zone (consisting of numerous individual faults) borders the northwest flank of the elongated anticline and an opposing minor thrust zone cuts the southeast flank, forming a thrusted horst. Oblique transverse faults also cut the structure. By studying the patterns of cumulative production and lost circulation, it was possible to derive relationships between the accumulations of oil and the faulting and conceptual patterns of related fracturing in the different types of reservoir rocks. The study indicates that one can prognosticate the more prospective drilling locations on this or similar structures involving basement and limestone. It is felt that this information may be applicable to other plays in other regions.

  8. 2-D computer modeling of oil generation and migration in a Transect of the Eastern Venezuela Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallango, O. ); Parnaud, F. )

    1993-02-01

    The aim of the study was a two-dimensional computer simulation of the basin evolution based on available geological, geophysical, geochemical, geothermal, and hydrodynamic data with the main purpose of determining the hydrocarbon generation and migration history. The modeling was done in two geological sections (platform and pre-thrusting) located along the Chacopata-Uverito Transect in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin. In the platform section an hypothetic source rock equivalent to the Gyayuta Group was considered in order to simulate the migration of hydrocarbons. The thermal history reconstruction of hypothetic source rock confirms that this source rock does not reach the oil window before the middle Miocene and that the maturity in this sector is due to the sedimentation of the Freites, La Pica, and Mesa-Las Piedras formations. The oil expulsion and migration from this hypothetic source rock began after middle Miocene time. The expulsion of the hydrocarbons took place mainly along the Oligocene-Miocene reservoir and do not reach at the present time zones located beyond of the Oritupano field, which imply that the oil accumulated in south part of the basin was generated by a source rock located to the north, in the actual deformation zone. Since 17 m.y. ago water migration pattern from north to south was observed in this section. In the pre-thrusting section the hydrocarbon expulsion started during the early Tertiary and took place mainly toward the lower Cretaceous (El Cantil and Barranquim formations). At the end of the passive margin the main migration occur across the Merecure reservoir, through which the hydrocarbon migrated forward to the Onado sector before the thrusting.

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994 (First quarter of FY-95)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three ma or activity categories: (1) Advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, (2) Development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and (3) Increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified in Table ES-1. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized in Table ES-2.

  10. Studies of Nb3Sn Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High-Field Accelerator Magnets Nb3Sn

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E; Bossert, M; Gallo, G; Lombardo, V; Turrioni, D; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V

    2012-06-01

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  11. Torsional fatigue model for limitorque type SMB/SB/SBD actuators for motor-operated valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somogyi, D.; Alvarez, P.D.; Kalsi, M.S.

    1996-12-01

    Kalsi Engineering, Inc. has recently developed a computer program to predict the torsional fatigue life of Limitorque Type SMB/SB/SBD actuators for motor-operated valves under given loading levels, including those that exceed the ratings. The development effort was an outgrowth of the {open_quote}Thrust Rating Increase{close_quote} test program. The fatigue model computes all pertinent stress components and their variations as a function of the loading ramp. The cumulative damage and fatigue life due to stress cycling is computed by use of a modification of Miner`s rule. Model predictions were validated against actual cyclic loading test results.

  12. FC-PAD Organization and Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FC-PAD Organization and Activities FC-PAD Organization and Activities This document provides an in-depth description of the organization of the Fuel Cell Consortium for Performance and Durability (FC-PAD), including its scientific activities and six different thrust areas. FC-PAD Organization and Activities (4.08 MB) More Documents & Publications FCTO Consortia Overview (HyMARC and FC-PAD) Webinar FCTO Consortia Overview (HyMARC and FC-PAD) Webinar DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop -

  13. Staff > Faculty Directory > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faculty Directory List Image Héctor D. Abruña Director, Energy Materials Center at Cornell Emile M. Chamot Professor Chemistry and Chemical Biology hda1@cornell.edu List Image Lynden Archer James A. Friend Family Distinguished Professor Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering laa25@cornell.edu List Image Tomás Arias Professor Department of Physics taa2@cornell.edu List Image Joel Brock Research Thrust Leader - Complex Oxides Professor Applied and Engineering Physics jdb20@cornell.edu List Image

  14. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  15. K (transverse) jet algorithms in hadron colliders: The D0 experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Daniel Elvira

    2002-12-05

    D0 has implemented and studied a k{sub {perpendicular}} jet algorithm for the first time in a hadron collider. The authors have submitted two physics results for publication: the subjet multiplicity in quark and gluon jets and the central inclusive jet cross section measurements. A third result, a measurement of thrust distributions in jet events, is underway. A combination of measurements using several types of algorithms and samples taken at different center-of-mass energies is desirable to understand and distinguish with higher accuracy between instrumentation and physics effects.

  16. Conditional generation of arbitrary single-mode quantum states of light by repeated photon subtractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Garcia-Patron, Raul; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-09-15

    We propose a scheme for the conditional generation of arbitrary finite superpositions of Fock states in a single mode of a traveling optical field. The setup requires a source of squeezed vacuum states, beam splitters, strong coherent beams, photodetectors with single-photon sensitivity, and a final squeezer. If we want to generate a squeezed superposition of Fock states, which is sufficient in several applications, then the last squeezer is not even needed. The thrust of this method is that it achieves a high fidelity without requiring photodetectors with a high efficiency or a single-photon resolution. The possibility to improve its scaling by using a quantum memory is also discussed.

  17. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  18. From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo, Raul F.; Crooks, Richard M.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-08

    “Catalysis by design” has been a dream for decades. To specify the composition and structure of matter to effect a desired catalytic transformation with desired and predicted rate and selectivity remains a monumental challenge, especially in heterogeneous catalysis. Our research thrusts have been chosen not only for their practical and scientific relevance, e.g. for more efficient and sustainable chemicals and fuels production, but also because they provide a foundation for developing and exploring broadly applicable principles and strategies for catalyst design.

  19. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda ERSUG Agenda - January 12/13, 1995 Thursday, Jan 12 8:30 Welcoming Remarks - Jack Byers 8:45 Washington View - Tom Kitchens 9:00 Welcome from PNL - Rick Kendall NERSC Production Environment: Plans for 1995-1996 9:15 General Overview - Bill McCurdy 9:35 Proposed Computing Infrastructure - Michel McCoy 10:05 Unification of the Production Environment - Moe Jette (System Administration thrusts) 10:45 Break 11:00 Mass Storage -Steve Louis 11:20 User Services and Information Systems -

  20. Evolution of small-space plasma in a microthruster designed for small spacecraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farahat, A. M., E-mail: farahata@kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, College of Applied and Supporting Studies (Saudi Arabia); Ramadan, E. [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Department of Information and Computer Science (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-12-15

    Plasma and gas particle dynamics in atmospheric pressure helium-filled small volume are investigated using a two-dimensional model. The model includes the conservation equations for the plasma and the neutral gas. In this paper, results are presented from simulation of the interaction between gas and charged species, which in turn causes heating and thrust generation for this microengine. Gas heating and neutral depletion initiations are observed, highlighting the close interaction between gas and charged species in governing the evolution of the small-space plasma inside a microthruster designed for microsatellites.

  1. Collaborative Project. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.

  2. A Safer Liftoff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safe Liftoff National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit A Safer Liftoff An innovative rocket-fuel system uses a novel source of power and breakthrough engineering to deliver high-energy thrust with improved safety. March 22, 2016 A Safer Liftoff The next-generation rocket? Los Alamos scientists recently tested a powerful new rocket fuel and motor that is safer because the fuel is kept separate from its oxidizer. The new rocket motor and fuel outperformed

  3. Setup reduction approaches for machining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1997-04-01

    Rapid setup is a common improvement approach in press working operations such as blanking and shearing. It has paid major dividends in the sheet metal industry. It also has been a major improvement thrust for high-production machining operations. However, the literature does not well cover all the setup operations and constraints for job shop work. This review provides some insight into the issues involved. It highlights the floor problems and provides insights for further improvement. The report is designed to provide a quick understanding of the issues.

  4. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Entingh, Daniel J.

    1999-08-18

    The purpose of this workshop was to develop technical background facts necessary for planning continued research and development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). EGS are geothermal reservoirs that require improvement of their permeability or fluid contents in order to achieve economic energy production. The initial focus of this R&D program is devising and testing means to extract additional economic energy from marginal volumes of hydrothermal reservoirs that are already producing commercial energy. By mid-1999, the evolution of the EGS R&D Program, begun in FY 1988 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), reached the stage where considerable expertise had to be brought to bear on what technical goals should be pursued. The main purpose of this Workshop was to do that. The Workshop was sponsored by the Office of Geothermal Technologies of the Department of Energy. Its purpose and timing were endorsed by the EGS National Coordinating Committee, through which the EGS R&D Program receives guidance from members of the U.S. geothermal industry. Section 1.0 of this report documents the EGS R&D Program Review Session. There, managers and researchers described the goals and activities of the program. Recent experience with injection at The Geysers and analysis of downhole conditions at Dixie Valley highlighted this session. Section 2.0 contains a number of technical presentations that were invited or volunteered to illuminate important technical and economic facts and opportunities for research. The emphasis here was on fi.acture creation, detection, and analysis. Section 3.0 documents the initial general discussions of the participants. Important topics that emerged were: Specificity of defined projects, Optimizing cost effectiveness, Main technical areas to work on, Overlaps between EGS and Reservoir Technology R&D areas, Relationship of microseismic events to hydraulic fractures, and Defining criteria for prioritizing research thrusts. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 report

  5. Piedmont seismic reflection study: A program integrated with tectonics to probe the cause of eastern seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, L. III; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.; Bollinger, G.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-03-01

    A new tectonic model of the Appalachian orogen indicates that one, not two or more, terrane boundaries is present in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge of the central and southern Appalachians. This terrane boundary is the Taconic suture, it has been transported in the allochthonous Blue Ridge/Piedmont crystalline thrust nappe, and it is repeated at the surface by faulting and folding associated with later Paleozoic orogenies. The suture passes through the lower crust and lithosphere somewhere east of Richmond. It is spatially associated with seismicity in the central Virginia seismic zone, but is not conformable with earthquake focal planes and appears to have little causal relation to their localization.

  6. Nanoscopic Manipulation and Imaging of Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenblatt, Charles S.

    2014-02-04

    This is the final project report. The project’s goals centered on nanoscopic imaging and control of liquid crystals and surfaces. We developed and refined techniques to control liquid crystal orientation at surfaces with resolution as small as 25 nm, we developed an optical imaging technique that we call Optical Nanotomography that allows us to obtain images inside liquid crystal films with resolution of 60 x 60 x 1 nm, and we opened new thrust areas related to chirality and to liquid crystal/colloid composites.

  7. Future directions of C3 research at DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, D.G.; Dahmann, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Research into C3 related problems is a major effort of the Information Science and Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The major thrusts of projects is in the area of future, high-risk efforts, often resulting in the development of a conceptual model or prototype. Some of these prototypes are then further developed to provide an infrastructure for future research. The programs can be divided into two groups: base technology research programs and testbed programs. The testbeds provide a focus for the technology programs.

  8. High-Isp Mode Of Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator For Space Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kishida, Yoshiaki; Funaki, Ikkoh

    2010-10-08

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted. Laser-ablation plasma in the thruster was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thrusters was evaluated by measuring the mass shot and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulses up to 7,200 sec were obtained at the charge energies of 8.6 J. In addition, typical thrust efficiency varied between 11.8% and 21.3% depending on the charge energy.

  9. A Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator For Space Propulsion Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, Tadaki; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Baba, Msahumi; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2010-05-06

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted, in which laser-ablation plasma was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thruster was evaluated by measuring the mass per shot and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulse ranging from 5,000 approx6,000 sec were obtained at energies of 0.1 and 8.6 J, respectively. In addition, the typical thrust efficiency varied from 17% to 19% depending on the charge energy.

  10. Optima Stakeholder Listening Day Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda 16-17 June 2015 Maxwell Conference Room - Energy Systems Integration Facility National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado Day 1 Half-day: 11:00 - 17:30 11:00 Arrival, lunch (available for purchase, pre-order required), and networking 12:00 Introduction 12:20 Overview of the Optima initiative 13:00 Listening Day goals 13:45 Break 14:15 Working Session 1: Scoping new horizons for fuels and vehicles 15:45 Break 16:15 Working Session 2: Fuel and vehicle interactions - Thrust 1

  11. Nanoengineering for solid-state lighting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, E. Fred; Koleske, Daniel David; Wetzel, Christian; Lee, Stephen Roger; Missert, Nancy A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project performed in collaboration with researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Our collaborative effort was supported by Sandia's National Institute for Nanoengineering and focused on the study and application of nanoscience and nanoengineering concepts to improve the efficiency of semiconductor light-emitting diodes for solid-state lighting applications. The project explored LED efficiency advances with two primary thrusts: (1) the study of nanoscale InGaN materials properties, particularly nanoscale crystalline defects, and their impact on internal quantum efficiency, and (2) nanoscale engineering of dielectric and metal materials and integration with LED heterostructures for enhanced light extraction efficiency.

  12. JCAP News - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAZ0080_v2.jpg JCAP News News & Events JCAP News JCAP Events Media Coverage News & Events JCAP News JCAP Events Talks Meetings & Workshops Media Coverage JCAP News + 2016 JULY, 2016 JCAP scientists at LBNL have discovered ways to better predict a semiconductor's stability and degradation qualities. MORE JUNE 10, 2016 JCAP PI Francesca Toma receives the Alfredo di Braccio Award. MORE MAY 3, 2016 JCAP PI and Thrust 3 Coordinator Ian Sharp is the recipient of the Dept. of Energy's Early

  13. Segmented electrode hall thruster with reduced plume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2004-08-17

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with segmented electrodes along the channel, which make the acceleration region as localized as possible. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to minimize erosion and arcing. Also disclosed are methods of arranging the electrodes so as to produce a substantial reduction in plume divergence. The use of electrodes made of emissive material will reduce the radial potential drop within the channel, further decreasing the plume divergence. Also disclosed is a method of arranging and powering these electrodes so as to provide variable mode operation.

  14. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Safer Liftoff An innovative rocket-fuel system taps a novel source of power and breakthrough engineering to deliver high-energy thrust with improved safety. On a broad mesquite plain in central New Mexico, a small crew fits a metal cylinder into a rocket the size of a baseball bat, then slips the rocket onto guide rods on a platform. A "Los Alamos" logo on the fuselage certifies this launch as official science by the world-famous national laboratory, not a weekend outing with the

  15. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-12-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2001-2005 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; managaement procatices and standards; and communications and trust.

  16. R-MCJ10042201-1A_PADT_PhaseII-report-final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Mark Christian

    2010-04-22

    The thrust of this R&D effort was to develop technology that serves the SOFC industry and help developers in this industry to succeed. In particular this project focused on fluid handling equipment that supported the SOFC stack. Two devices were developed: the Hot Anode Recycle Blower (HARB) blower which will serve hot anode gas requirements in FutureGen demonstration units, and the small multi stage (SMS) blower which will serve warm anode and cathode gas requirements for SOFC and other fuel cell industries.

  17. The pulsed linear induction motor concept for high-speed trains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.; Marder, B.M.; Rohwein, G.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Kelley, J.B.; Cowan, M.; Zimmerman, R.M.

    1995-06-01

    The SERAPBIM (SEgmented RAil PHased Induction Motor) concept is a linear induction motor concept which uses rapidly-pulsed magnetic fields and a segmented reaction rail, as opposed to low-frequency fields and continuous reaction rails found in conventional linear induction motors. These improvements give a high-traction, compact, and efficient linear motor that has potential for advanced high speed rail propulsion. In the SERAPBIM concept, coils on the vehicle push against a segmented aluminum rail, which is mounted on the road bed. Current is pulsed as the coils cross an edge of the segmented rail, inducing surface currents which repel the coil. The coils must be pulsed in synchronization with the movement by reaction rail segments. This is provided by a sense-and-fire circuit that controls the pulsing of the power modulators. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the pulsed induction motor and to collect data that could be used for scaling calculations. A 14.4 kg aluminum plate was accelerated down a 4 m track to speeds of over 15 m/sec with peak thrust up to 18 kN per coilset. For a trainset capable of 200 mph speed, the SERAPHIM concept design is based on coils which are each capable of producing up to 3.5 kN thrust, and 30 coil pairs are mounted on each power car. Two power cars, one at each end of the train, provide 6 MW from two gas turbine prime power units. The thrust is about 210.000 N and is essentially constant up to 200 km/hr since wheel slippage does not limit thrust as with conventional wheeled propulsion. A key component of the SERAPHIM concept is the use of passive wheel-on-rah support for the high speed vehicle. Standard steel wheels are capable of handling over 200 mph. The SERAPHIM cost is comparable to that for steel-wheel high-speed rail, and about 10% to 25% of the projected costs for a comparable Maglev system.

  18. Propulsion and Power Generation Capabilities of a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Fusion System for Future Military Aerospace Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knecht, Sean D.; Mead, Franklin B.; Miley, George H.; Froning, David

    2006-01-20

    The objective of this study was to perform a parametric evaluation of the performance and interface characteristics of a dense plasma focus (DPF) fusion system in support of a USAF advanced military aerospace vehicle concept study. This vehicle is an aerospace plane that combines clean 'aneutronic' dense plasma focus (DPF) fusion power and propulsion technology, with advanced 'lifting body'-like airframe configurations utilizing air-breathing MHD propulsion and power technology within a reusable single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle. The applied approach was to evaluate the fusion system details (geometry, power, T/W, system mass, etc.) of a baseline p-11B DPF propulsion device with Q = 3.0 and thruster efficiency, {eta}prop = 90% for a range of thrust, Isp and capacitor specific energy values. The baseline details were then kept constant and the values of Q and {eta}prop were varied to evaluate excess power generation for communication systems, pulsed-train plasmoid weapons, ultrahigh-power lasers, and gravity devices. Thrust values were varied between 100 kN and 1,000 kN with Isp of 1,500 s and 2,000 s, while capacitor specific energy was varied from 1 - 15 kJ/kg. Q was varied from 3.0 to 6.0, resulting in gigawatts of excess power. Thruster efficiency was varied from 0.9 to 1.0, resulting in hundreds of megawatts of excess power. Resulting system masses were on the order of 10's to 100's of metric tons with thrust-to-weight ratios ranging from 2.1 to 44.1, depending on capacitor specific energy. Such a high thrust/high Isp system with a high power generation capability would allow military versatility in sub-orbital space, as early as 2025, and beyond as early as 2050. This paper presents the results that coincide with a total system mass between 15 and 20 metric tons.

  19. An alternative approach to achieving water quality-based limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, C.M.; Graeser, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    Since May 1982, members of the Iron and Steel Industry have been required to meet effluent limits based on Best Available Technology (BAT) for a process water discharge to receiving stream. US Steel Clairton Works has been successful in meeting these limits in the last three years; however, the current regulatory thrust is toward more stringent limits based on water quality. In cases of smaller streams such as the receiving stream for Clairton Works` process outfall, these limits can be very rigid. This paper will discuss the alternative approaches investigated to meet the new more stringent limits including the solution chosen.

  20. Control coil arrangement for a rotating machine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manoj R.; Lewandowsk, Chad R.

    2001-07-31

    A rotating machine (e.g., a turbine, motor or generator) is provided wherein a fixed solenoid or other coil configuration is disposed adjacent to one or both ends of the active portion of the machine rotor for producing an axially directed flux in the active portion so as to provide planar axial control at single or multiple locations for rotor balance, levitation, centering, torque and thrust action. Permanent magnets can be used to produce an axial bias magnetic field. The rotor can include magnetic disks disposed in opposed, facing relation to the coil configuration.

  1. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2002-10-08

    In this report, the thrust areas include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  2. Geothermal energy control system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1977-01-01

    A geothermal energy transfer and utilization system makes use of thermal energy stored in hot solute-bearing well water to generate super-heated steam from an injected flow of clean water; the super-heated steam is then used for operating a turbine-driven pump at the well bottom for pumping the hot solute-bearing water at high pressure and in liquid state to the earth's surface, where it is used by transfer of its heat to a closed-loop boiler-turbine-alternator combination for the generation of electrical or other power. Residual concentrated solute-bearing water is pumped back into the earth. The clean cooled water is regenerated at the surface-located system and is returned to the deep well pumping system also for lubrication of a novel bearing arrangement supporting the turbine-driven pump system. The bearing system employs liquid lubricated thrust and radial bearings with all bearing surfaces bathed in clean water serving as a lubricant and maintained under pressure to prevent entry into the bearings of contaminated geothermal fluid, an auxiliary thrust ball bearing arrangement comes into operation when starting or stopping the pumping system.

  3. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  4. Fossil Energy Materials Program conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy has recognized the need for materials research and development to assure the adequacy of materials of construction for advanced fossil energy systems. The principal responsibility for identifying needed materials research and for establishing a program to address these needs resides within the Office of Technical Coordination. That office has established the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Fossil Energy Materials Program to fulfill that responsibility. In addition to the AR and TD Materials Program, which is designed to address in a generic way the materials needs of fossil energy systems, specific materials support activities are also sponsored by the various line organizations such as the Office of Coal Gasification. A conference was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee on May 19-21, 1987, to present and discuss the results of program activities during the past year. The conference program was organized in accordance with the research thrust areas we have established. These research thrust areas include structural ceramics (particularly fiber-reinforced ceramic composites), corrosion and erosion, and alloy development and mechanical properties. Eighty-six people attended the conference. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  5. Collision propagation in Papua New Guinea and Solomon Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, E.A.; Abbott, L.; Kirchoff-Stein, K.; Reed, D.; Bernstein, B. )

    1990-06-01

    The collision of the Finisterre-New Britain terrane with the Australian continent is propagating eastward at a rate of approximately 125 km/m.y., based on plate motions and the collisional geometry, as well as on the geochemistry of the arc volcanics. A sequence of sedimentary facies is developed from east to west in the modern environment (pelagic sediments, turbidites, marine molasse, and fluvial molasse), and this sequence is accreted from north to south at the front of the terrane collision in the Markham valley. Based on the modern distribution, the authors suggest that the age of the initial marine molasse will predate the passage of the collision point, and that of the fluvial molasse will postdate its passage. Intense erosion in the Markham canyon, located along the suture between the collision point and the coast, appears to be responsible for stripping most of the accreted marine molasse and redepositing it in a basin just east of the collision point. Convergence along the suture zone deceases westward. At Lae, very young deformation is seen, but 80 km to the west undeformed terrace deposits cover the deformation front. Uplift appears active within the range, aided by out-of-sequence thrusting, but still farther west the rocks lack signs of young tectonism. In the region just west of Lae, the main locus of slip between the Australian and south Bismarck plates must transfer southward to the front of the Papuan fold-and-thrust belt.

  6. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  7. Measurement of event-shape observables in $$$Z \\rightarrow \\ell ^{+} \\ell ^{-}$$$ events in pp collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s}=7$$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-07-06

    Event-shape observables measured using charged particles in inclusive Z -boson events are presented, using the electron and muon decay modes of the Z bosons. The measurements are based on an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb-1 of proton–proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energymore » $$$\\sqrt{s}=7$$$ TeV . Charged-particle distributions, excluding the lepton–antilepton pair from the Z -boson decay, are measured in different ranges of transverse momentum of the Z boson. Distributions include multiplicity, scalar sum of transverse momenta, beam thrust, transverse thrust, spherocity, and F -parameter, which are in particular sensitive to properties of the underlying event at small values of the Z -boson transverse momentum. The measured observables are compared with predictions from Pythia 8, Sherpa , and Herwig 7. Furthermore, all three Monte Carlo generators provide predictions that are in better agreement with the data at high Z -boson transverse momenta than at low Z -boson transverse momenta, and for the observables that are less sensitive to the number of charged particles in the event.« less

  8. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy Clifford; Jones, Cecil Roy

    1998-01-01

    A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

  9. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-12-15

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

  10. Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Fold Belt, Cymric-McKittrick fields, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farley, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The Tulare fold belt is a series of asymmetric, generally northeast-verging anticlines and synclines in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Tulare Formation that trend northwestward through the Cymric-McKittrick fields. Anticlines within the deformed belt generally originated as fault propagation folds above decollements, the most important of which is the regional decollement on top of the Amnicola sand, the basal Tulare unit. The Amnicola decollement is the northeast subsurface extension of the McKittrick thrust, a low-angle fault that has displaced the Miocene Antelope shale over the Pliocene San Joaquin Formation and locally over the Tulare Formation. The Amnicola decollement is itself deformed by folding related to a younger, deeper decollement near the base of the San Joaquin Formation that merges westward with the Amnicola decollement and defines a zone of faulting associated with the McKittrick thrust Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Formation are currently undergoing active development by thermal recovery techniques. In general, the geometry of heavy oil reservoirs is determined by location within the Tulare fold belt combined with the position of a subhorizontal fluid level trap that forms the updip limit of fluid-saturated rock Reservoir geometry is complicated by complex local structure, discontinuous stratigraphy, and partial depletion of heavy oil reservoirs by fluid withdrawal due to gravity drainage. Proper resolution of fold geometry, fault geometry, and position of the fluid level trap is crucial to the design and monitoring of thermal recovery projects within the Tulare fold belt.

  11. Final Progress Report for Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Wesley

    2014-08-29

    The research objective of this proposal was to provide a detailed analysis of how solvent and anion structure govern the solvation state of Li+ cations in solvent-LiX mixtures and how this, in turn, dictates the electrolyte physicochemical and electrochemical properties which govern (in part) battery performance. Lithium battery electrolytes remain a poorly understood and hardly studied topic relative to the research devoted to battery electrodes. This is due to the fact that it is the electrodes which determine the energy (capacity) of the battery. The electrolyte, however, plays a crucial role in the practical energy density, power, low and/or high temperature performance, lifetime, safety, etc. which is achievable. The development within this project of a "looking glass" into the molecular interactions (i.e., solution structure) in bulk electrolytes through a synergistic experimental approach involving three research thrusts complements work by other researchers to optimize multi-solvent electrolytes and efforts to understand/control the electrode-electrolyte interfaces, thereby enabling the rational design of electrolytes for a wide variety of battery chemistries and applications (electrolytes-on-demand). The three research thrusts pursued include: (1) conduction of an in-depth analysis of the thermal phase behavior of diverse solvent-LiX mixtures, (2) exploration of the ionic association/solvate formation behavior of select LiX salts with a wide variety of solvents, and (3) linking structure to properties-determination of electrolyte physicochemical and electrochemical properties for comparison with the ionic association and phase behavior.

  12. Collaborative Research: Robust Climate Projections and Stochastic Stability of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghil, Michael; McWilliams, James; Neelin, J. David; Zaliapin, Ilya; Chekroun, Mickael; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Simonnet, Eric

    2011-10-13

    The project was completed along the lines of the original proposal, with additional elements arising as new results were obtained. The originally proposed three thrusts were expanded to include an additional, fourth one. (i) The e#11;ffects of stochastic perturbations on climate models have been examined at the fundamental level by using the theory of deterministic and random dynamical systems, in both #12;nite and in#12;nite dimensions. (ii) The theoretical results have been implemented #12;first on a delay-diff#11;erential equation (DDE) model of the El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. (iii) More detailed, physical aspects of model robustness have been considered, as proposed, within the stripped-down ICTP-AGCM (formerly SPEEDY) climate model. This aspect of the research has been complemented by both observational and intermediate-model aspects of mid-latitude and tropical climate. (iv) An additional thrust of the research relied on new and unexpected results of (i) and involved reduced-modeling strategies and associated prediction aspects have been tested within the team's empirical model reduction (EMR) framework. Finally, more detailed, physical aspects have been considered within the stripped-down SPEEDY climate model. The results of each of these four complementary e#11;fforts are presented in the next four sections, organized by topic and by the team members concentrating on the topic under discussion.

  13. Computational model of collisional-radiative nonequilibrium plasma in an air-driven type laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-05-06

    A thrust power of a gas-driven laser-propulsion system is obtained through interaction with a propellant gas heated by a laser energy. Therefore, understanding the nonequilibrium nature of laser-produced plasma is essential for increasing available thrust force and for improving energy conversion efficiency from a laser to a propellant gas. In this work, a time-dependent collisional-radiative model for air plasma has been developed to study the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes on population densities for an air-driven type laser propulsion. Many elementary processes are considered in the number density range of 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 3}<=N<=10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} and the temperature range of 300 K<=T<=40,000 K. We then compute the unsteady nature of pulsively heated air plasma. When the ionization relaxation time is the same order as the time scale of a heating pulse, the effects of unsteady ionization are important for estimating air plasma states. From parametric computations, we determine the appropriate conditions for the collisional-radiative steady state, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and corona equilibrium models in that density and temperature range.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Axial and Beam-Riding Propulsive Physics with TEA CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I.; Myrabo, L. N.; Notaro, S. N.; Bragulla, P. W.

    2010-10-08

    A twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO{sub 2} laser system (pulse duration of approximately 100 ns FWHM spike, with optional 1 {mu}s tail, depending upon laser gas mix) was employed to experimentally measure both axial thrust and beam-riding behavior of Type no. 200 lightcraft engines, using a ballistic pendulum and Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD, respectively. Beam-riding forces and moments were examined along with engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the vehicle axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse energy ({approx}12 to 40 joules); c) pulse duration (100 ns, and 1 {mu}s); and d) engine size (97.7 mm to 161.2 mm). Maximum lateral momentum coupling coefficients (C{sub M}) of 75 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser whereas previous PLVTS laser (420 J, 18 {mu}s duration) results reached only 15 N-s/MJ--an improvement of 5x. Maximum axial C{sub M} performance with the K922M reached 225 N-s/MJ, or about {approx}3x larger than the lateral C{sub M} values. These axial C{sub M} results are sharply higher than the 120 N/MW previously reported for long pulse (e.g., 10-18 {mu}s)CO{sub 2} electric discharge lasers.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Liquid-propellant Laser Propulsion with a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Bin; Li Long; Tang Zhiping; Cai Jian

    2010-05-06

    Thrust performance of Liquid-propellant laser propulsion (LLP) is seriously influenced by factors like laser parameters, choice of propellants and ablation materials. For the purpose of studying these influences, series of impulse measuring experiments for various propellants and ablation materials were conducted. The key device is a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever, which covers a C{sub m} measuring range from 10{sup 3} Ns/MJ to about 1.6x10{sup 4} Ns/MJ. A Nd:YAG laser was used as the laser source. From the result, it is found that laser energy density plays an important role on LLP efficiency, higher energy density leads to higher C{sub m} and I{sub sp}. Highest C{sub m} of about 10{sup 4} Ns/MJ with the I{sub sp} of 3.57s was achieved by focusing the laser to the average energy density of 8.83x10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. Besides of that, it is also found that when the energy density is certainly high, C{sub m} of LLP increases stably with the increase of the propellant thickness, which gives a potential way to further improve the thrust performance in LLP.

  16. Solar rocket plume-mirror interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S.T.; Chang, C.L.; Merkle, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    The extent to which the plume from a solar thermal rocket will impinge on the solar collector is studied by flow field analysis. Such interaction can adversely affect collector performance through fouling, excessive heat loading, or pressure loads that deform the delicate structures. The geometrical shape of the collector is such that only the flow from the nozzle boundary layer can reach it, but the thrust levels of interest lead to very viscous nozzle flows with thick boundary layers. Reasonable accuracy in solving these flows requires a fully coupled viscous-inviscid procedure. Results show that the fraction of the plume that hits the collector can be well estimated by continuum theory, but that transitional and rarefied phenomena will have some impact on how it is distributed over the surface. Initial results for one representative condition show that approx. 4 percent of the total flow in the jet makes its way to the collector. The pressures on the collector, however, remain quite low because of its distance from the engine. Additional work is needed to document the effect of thrust scaling and wall cooling on impingement.

  17. Structural Health and Prognostics Management for Offshore Wind Plants; Final Report of Sandia R&D Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd

    2015-04-01

    This final report is a compilation of resear ch efforts - funded by the US Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technolog ies Office over a four-year period from FY11 through FY14. The goals of this re search program were to develop and evaluate technical innovati ons with promise for maxi mizing revenues and reducing levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for offs hore wind plants - more specifically the goals of the Structural H ealth and Prognostics Management (SHPM) program were to reduce O&M costs and increase energy capture through use of SHPM-based technologies. A technology roadmap was deve loped at the start of the project to guide the research efforts. This roadmap identified and outlined six major research thrust areas each having five stages of ma turity. Research was conducted in each of these thrust areas, as documented throughout this report, although a major focus was on development of damage detection strategi es for the most frequent blade damage conditions and damage mitigation and life-exte nsion strategies via changes in turbine operations (smart loads management). Th e work summarized in this compilation report is the product of the work of many researchers. A summary of the major findings, status of the SHPM Technology Ro admap and recommendations for future work are also provided.

  18. Studies of the pattern and ages of post-metamorphic faults in the Piedmont of Virginia and North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, L. III; Costain, J.K.; Coruh, C.

    1988-04-01

    A geologic corridor from the Blue Ridge to the eastern Piedmont of Virginia is integrated into a tectonic model and extrapolated downward 10-15 km by means of seismic reflection and gravity studies. The Blue Ridge appears to be a hinge zone that faced a rift-generated Iapetus Ocean. An eastern continent with an Eocambrian and Cambrian magmatic arc and sediments of the same age, collided with the North American continental margin in the middle and late Ordovician. Subsequent Devono-Mississippian and Mississippian-Permian orogenesis continued to drive thin thrust nappes onto North America. Early Mesozoic rift basins record the beginning of the Atlantic basin and, from Middle Jurassic to Present, the margin of North America was covered by Coastal Plain sediments. Several constrained hypocenters of the central Virginia seismic zone, adjacent to a reflection profile, show an apparent relation to structure. We tentatively conclude that flat and ramp faults formed during Paleozoic nappe emplacement are currently being reactivated. The reactivation may be largely aseismic on the old thrust faults, but seismicity appears to be related to high angle transcurrent faults where new rock breakage may be occurring. 125 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  20. Quaternary structure of the southern Po Plain (Italy): Eustatic and tectonic implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farabegoli E.; Onorevoli, G. )

    1990-05-01

    The Quaternary telescoped growth pattern of the Southern Po Plain developed during the last 250,000 yr through the superimposition of six fining-upward continental sequences, which can be correlated with terraced deposits. The boundary surfaces of every cycle (base and top of gravels and/or sands), the overall thickness, the thickness of basal coarse sediments, and the related trends and deviations have been computer-gridded and contoured. Comparison between the maps of the whole Quaternary sequence and the structural map of Pliocene isobaths suggests that the sequence evolution has been controlled by the combined action of glacio-eustatic fluctuations and strong tectonics. Lowstands controlled the regional pattern of the basal surfaces, and highstands coincide with the time of accretions of the sequences. Tectonics influenced the local subsidence, and consequently, the paleogeographic setting, following a rather regular cyclic trend. Four tectonic events alternated with four pauses; each period was 20,000-50,000 years long. Thrust kinematics proceeded cyclically from the inner to outer thrust faults, giving rise to isolated grouped and joined and grouped but free tectonic elements.