Sample records for throughput hydrothermal pretreatment

  1. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    straw pretreated for bioethanol production. Biotechnologyof woody biomass for bioethanol production. Bioresources

  2. High Throughput Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Biomass: Screening Recalcitrance in Large Sample Populations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, S. R.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on the execution of the first high-throughput thermochemical pretreatment/enzyme digestion pipeline for screening biomass for recalcitrance.

  3. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pretreatment of sweet sorghum bagasse for enhancement ofhydrolysis of sugar cane bagasse. J. Food Eng. 2002; 55:hydrolysates of sugarcane bagasse pretreated by steam

  4. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acid pretreatment process using ASPEN-Plus®. Appl. Biochem.of autohydrolysis aspen (P. tremuloides) lignins. Part 3.Simulated autohydrolysis of aspen milled wood lignin in the

  5. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the use of a fixed bed flowthrough pretreatment reactor.removal calculations. A fixed bed flowthrough reactor offersat,outlet,(mol/cm 3 ) Fixed*bed*of*xylose*spheres C xi =,

  6. Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid compared to hydrothermal pretreatment of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    A novel mechanism and kinetic model to explain enhanced xylose yields from dilute sulfuric acid stover Dilute sulfuric acid Hydrothermal pretreatment Kinetic model Xylose a b s t r a c t Pretreatment of corn stover in 0.5% sulfuric acid at 160 °C for 40 min realized a maximum monomeric plus oligomeric

  8. RESEARCH Open Access The fate of lignin during hydrothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    , heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, compositional analysis, and gas chromatography­mass spectrometry of aromatic monomers point strongly to depolymerization and condensation being primary mechanisms for lignin during pretreatment. Keywords: Condensation, Depolymerization, Flowthrough pretreatment, Hydrothermal

  9. Biomass pretreatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  10. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by a dioxane water extraction, while Trajano et al.water, limited condensation reactions for both substrates, as evidenced by greater lignin extraction

  11. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of autohydrolysis aspen (P. tremuloides) lignins. Part 3.role for delignification of aspen wood by steam explosion.H: Characterization of aspen exploded wood lignin. Can J

  12. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    adapter (EW-91100-85, Cole Parmer, Vernon Hills, IL). Tableadapter (EW-91100-85, Cole Parmer, Vernon Hills, IL). The

  13. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature treatment of aspen. Wood Sci Technol 40:371-391size- reduction of Poplar and Aspen wood. Biotechnology andHydrothermal Pretreatment of Aspen Wood Chips 5.1. Abstract

  14. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.6. Proposed HTP systems and evaluation…………………………. ………………82Comparison of results of HTP system evaluations…………..……………86score and cost of proposed HTP systems……………86 Chapter 4. A

  15. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.3. Effects of low pH on biomass solids……………………………. ………………of effects of low pH on biomass……………………………. ….25 2.4. Low pHof low pH biomass reactions………………………. ……………..46

  16. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    editors. Handbook on bioethanol: production and utilization.Salix for the production of bioethanol. Bioresource Technol.editor. Handbook on bioethanol: production and utilization.

  17. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5.13c. (9) Wyman C. Ethanol Fuel in Encyclopedia of Energy;10): 1865-1871. (6) Wyman C. Ethanol Fuel in Encyclopedia ofscenario for cellulosic ethanol fuel production, and speaks

  18. RESEARCH Open Access Composition and hydrothermal pretreatment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    of the article DeMartini and Wyman Biotechnology for Biofuels 2011, 4:52 http://www.biotechnologyfo that are * Correspondence: charles.wyman@ucr.edu 1 Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University

  19. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conductivity and heat capacity of saturated liquid water inHeat capacity Material (k, W/m /K) (C p , kJ/kg/K) Sand Air, P atm , 180 o C Water, saturated liquid,

  20. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EW-91100-85, Cole Parmer, Vernon Hills, IL). 4.4.1.c.adapter (EW-91100- 85, Cole Parmer, Vernon Hills, IL). The

  1. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    less recalcitrant biomass feedstocks and improved enzymes.of less recalcitrant biomass feedstocks and improvedpotential of improved biomass feedstocks and enzymes for the

  2. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    facilities did not operate for long due to numerous technical and commercial difficulties, and ultimately alcohol production from wood was abandoned.

  3. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  4. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  5. GREET Pretreatment Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  6. Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

  7. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  8. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass Re-direct Destination: Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal...

  9. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs effective for treatment or pre-treatment of some refinery wastewaters. The best way to start up MECs

  10. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  11. Vertical Pretreatment Reactor System (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBRF poster developed for the IBRF showcase. Describes the two-vessel system for primary and secondary pretreatment of biomass solids at different temperatures.

  12. Effluent and Pretreatment Standards (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe prohibited discharges into surface water and groundwater systems and set effluent standards for secondary treatment facilities. Effluent limitations and pretreatment...

  13. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  14. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  15. DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater An "ALL of the ABOVE" Approach to Ocean Thermal-Arsène d'Arsonval in 1881 conceptualized producing electricity from ocean temperature difference DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND #12;DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND French Inventor Georges Claude

  16. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  17. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic acid compared to water alone. 6) Determine optimal conditions for carbonic acid pretreatment of aspen wood. Optimal severities appeared to be in the mid range tested. ASPEN-Plus modeling and economic analysis of the process indicate that the process could be cost competitive with sulfuric acid if the concentration of solids in the pretreatment is maintained very high (~50%). Lower solids concentrations result in larger reactors that become expensive to construct for high pressure applications.

  18. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , 1994. Pretreatment of Bagasse by Nonionic Surfactantenzymatic hydrolysis of bagasse and decreased the amount of

  19. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Openei Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei...

  20. Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralizatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- a Detailed Overview Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralization...

  1. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  2. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrotherm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged CuBeta Zeolite Catalysts. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged...

  3. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Abstract Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems...

  4. Rhode Island Pretreatment Regulations (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set standards for water pretreatment prior to release to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and require effluent data including the identity, amount, frequency, concentration...

  5. Rheological Study of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalPretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, W; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries. The effect of the (15)comingled biomass and coal slurry are improved for use as ain comingled biomass and coal slurry is shown in Figure 7.

  6. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass offers lower price, lower chemicalby food price fluctuations. Lignocellulosic biomass such as

  7. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, and chemicals.Elsevier. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory.2003,Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2007.

  8. Rheological Study of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalPretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, W; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil demand and increasing concerns about energy security. Gasification and subsequent conversion of the gasification products

  9. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    578. Hsu T. 1996. Bioethanol: Production and Utilization.design and costing of bioethanol technology: a tool for9 Bioethanol

  10. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Klass DL. 1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, andNational Renewable Energy Laboratory.2003, Biomass feedstockKlass DL. 1998. Biomass for Renewable Energy, Fuels and

  11. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    balances, capital and operating cost estimates. Figure 5.1glucose degradation. The estimate of the capital costs forapplied to estimate both capital and operating costs of the

  12. Rheological Study of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalPretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, W; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entrained flow gasification. Fuel Process. Technol. 2009, inratio is 3:1 when using our gasification process. Thus, withas a feedstock for gasification. Table 3 shows the results

  13. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse hemicellulose to producehydrolysis in sweet sorghum bagasse for xylose production.after juices production (bagasse) are combusted to provide

  14. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can reduce the energy consumption of fossil fuels and carbonalternative energy sources to fossil fuels. Renewable/80% of the energy supply now comes from fossil fuels such as

  15. Dilute Acid Hydrolysis of Oligomers in Hydrothermal Pretreatment Hydrolyzate into Monomers with High Yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Yueh-Du

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1998. Biomass for renewable energy, fuels, and chemicals.Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, June 2002.Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, May 2011.

  16. acid-catalyzed hydrothermal pretreatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing...

  17. Rheological Study of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalPretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, W; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based fuels or coal gasification. 1 The transportation andemissions in the coal gasification process while maintainingbe very efficient for gasification of both coal and biomass

  18. Application of High Throughput Pretreatment and Co-Hydrolysis System to Thermochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Introduction Sustainable energy sources are needed to supplement petroleum use in light of limited reserves economically, a large number of factors such as feedstock quality, conversion conditions, and catalyst loadings as well as their complex interactions must be better evaluated to identify combina- tions that can

  19. Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

  20. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  1. High throughput protein production screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beernink, Peter T. (Walnut Creek, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  2. Understanding Substrate Features Influenced by Pretreatments that Limit Biomass Deconstruction by Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Xiadi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high was provided to low temperature pretreatment. In contrast, lignin removal for pretreatment with hot water

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: pretreatment for biomass deconstruc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pretreatment for biomass deconstruc-tion of switchgrass "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries On December...

  4. Diethylamine and ammonia pretreatment of lignocellulose 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holthus, Robert Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a process for pretreating bagasse with diethylamine to enhance lignocellulose reactivity. The bagasse was soaked in diethylamine for 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hour time intervals, and the pressure was released slowly. The treated...

  5. Diethylamine and ammonia pretreatment of lignocellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holthus, Robert Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the diethylamine did not increase reactivity, but it allows the diethylamine to be recovered. In addition to the diethylamine experiments, ammonia was used to pretreat Coastal bermudagrass. This process involves soaking the cellulose fibers in liquid ammonia...

  6. On Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    to the problem of optimizing end-to- end throughput in undirected data networks. We first illustrate the powerOn Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding Zongpeng Li, Baochun Li, Dan Jiang, Lap Chi Lau Abstract-- With the constraints of network topologies and link capacities, achieving the optimal end

  7. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation)...

  8. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials: UOP Approaches High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput...

  9. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)...

  10. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid...

  11. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman...

  12. REFEREED PAPER PRE-TREATMENT OF REFINERY FINAL RUN-OFF FOR CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh I; Stolz Hnp; Ndhlala T

    In the case of a back-end refinery, the final run-off or return syrup of 92-95 % purity and 75 ° brix is generally returned to the raw mill to be combined with raw syrup and boiled in the A-pans. Approximately 8 % of the input raw sugar brix into a refinery is returned, consequently locking up A-pan capacity and, in the case of a factory with marginal pan capacity, cane throughput is restricted. In addition, energy consumption is increased and sugar losses in final molasses are elevated. A number of processes have been considered to eliminate recycling refinery run-off, most of which require pre-treatment and/or high capital investment with a high degree of commercial risk. Test work was undertaken at the Tsb Malalane cane sugar refinery to determine the optimal pre-treatment option for decolorising and softening refinery return syrup. The pre-treatment results indicate that chemical softening, followed by the addition of a cationic colour precipitant and pH adjustment with sulphur dioxide, yields appreciable calcium reduction and modest decolourisation. The overall benefit indicates that the treated final run-off is of suitable quality to apply another crystallisation step and/or alternatively consider for further purification by chromatographic separation and/or resin decolourisation.

  13. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  14. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  15. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  16. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  17. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  18. Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

  19. Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

  20. High throughput 3-D tissue cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Hyuk-Sang, 1971-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the ongoing technological development of high throughput 3-D tissue cytometry.and its applications in biomedicine. 3-D tissue cytometry has been developed in our laboratory based on two-photon microscopy ...

  1. High-throughput quantification of glycoprotein sialylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markely, Lam Raga Anggara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sialic acid can improve qualities of therapeutic glycoproteins, such as circulatory half-life, biological activity, and solubility. In production of therapeutic glycoproteins, a high-throughput method (HTM) is required for ...

  2. High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper for Establishing a User Facility for Synchrotron-based High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire 1 , Matthew J. Kramer 2 , Apurva Mehta 3 1 Joint Center for...

  3. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  4. Investigations of Biomass Pretreatment and Submerged Fixed-bed Fermentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meysing, Daniel

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the MixAlco process and biomass pretreatment, five studies were conducted. Three studies related to fermentation, whereas the other two investigated the effectiveness of shock tube pretreatment (STP) coupled with oxidative lime...

  5. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  6. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  7. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  8. Stable Throughput in a Cognitive Wireless Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanous, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study, from a network layer perspective, the effect of an Ad-Hoc secondary network with N nodes randomly accessing the spectrum licensed to a primary node during the idle slots of the primary user. If the sensing is perfect, then the secondary nodes do not interfere with the primary node and hence do not affect its stable throughput. In case of imperfect sensing, it is shown that if the primary user's arrival rate is less than some calculated finite value, cognitive nodes can employ any transmission power or probabilities without affecting the primary user's stability; otherwise, the secondary nodes should control their transmission parameters to reduce the interference on the primary. It is also shown that in contrast with the primary's maximum stable throughput which strictly decreases with increased sensing errors, the throughput of the secondary nodes might increase with sensing errors as more transmission opportunities become available to them. Finally, we explore the use of the secondary nodes as rel...

  9. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  10. active hydrothermal systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars: channelslocatedalongthe margins of impactcrater Farmer, Jack D. 7 Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Computer Technologies and...

  11. Robust optimization based self scheduling of hydro-thermal Genco ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Soroudi

    2013-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper proposes a robust optimization model for optimal self scheduling of a hydro-thermal generating company. The proposed ...

  12. active hydrothermal system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars: channelslocatedalongthe margins of impactcrater Farmer, Jack D. 7 Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Computer Technologies and...

  13. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Build and demonstrate a working prototype hydrothermal spallation drilling unit that will accelerate commercial deployment of EGS as a domestic energy resource.

  14. assisted hydrothermal synthesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 155 Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring Geosciences Websites Summary: Dynamics...

  15. Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes in the Western Moat of Long Valley Caldera Abstract...

  16. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER...

  17. Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies of core samples Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

  18. A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

  19. Altered Tectonic and Hydrothermal Breccias in Corehole VC-1,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    origin. Hydrothermal breccias and associated crackle zones or stockworks created by hydraulic fracturing can provide significant secondary permeability, as demonstrated by their...

  20. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface...

  1. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System...

  2. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  3. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States...

  4. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at...

  5. apparent hydrothermal vents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater An "ALL of the ABOVE" Approach to Ocean Thermal Energy Ted Jagusztyn - Cotherm of America Corp - Honolulu OTEC Symposium - September...

  6. Cost comparison for REDC pretreatment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Homan, F.J. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis has been prepared to support the planned expenditure to provide the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) with the capability to pretreat their liquid low-level waste (LLLW) before discharging it to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) LLLW system. Pretreatment will remove most of the radioactivity, particularly the transuranic isotopes and Cs-137 from the waste to be discharged. This will render the supernates that accumulate in the storage tanks low-activity Class B low-level wastes rather than high-activity Class B or Class C wastes. The sludges will be Class C rather than remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes. When REDC wastes are commingled with other ORNL LLLW, the present-worth treatment and transport costs are higher by a factor of 1.3 for the no-pretreatment cases. This result is consistent with data from similar studies conducted at other sites. Based on the information presented in this analysis, the recommendation is to proceed with REDC treatment projects.

  7. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain ...

  8. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  9. Chemistry & Biology Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Jun

    Chemistry & Biology Article Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining of Natural-Product Biosynthetic Gene.01.006 SUMMARY We have developed a phage-display method for high-throughput mining of bacterial gene clus- ters

  10. Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks Anastasios Giannoulis Department introduce cross­layer, distributed power control algorithms that guarantee maximum possible data throughput performing dynamic routing and scheduling together with power control. The cross­layer interaction consists

  11. An overlay architecture for throughput optimal multipath routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Nathaniel M.

    Legacy networks are often designed to operate with simple single-path routing, like shortest-path, which is known to be throughput suboptimal. On the other hand, previously proposed throughput optimal policies (i.e., ...

  12. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  13. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain quality of service...

  14. Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO films and their electrochromic characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO 3 films and their electrochromic characteristics.1088/0022-3727/43/28/285501 Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO3 films and their electrochromic characteristics Zhihui Jiao1 , Xiao Wei and their electrochromic characteristics. Plate-like monoclinic WO3 nanostructures were grown directly on fluorine

  15. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long Valley CalderaHydrothermally

  16. Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

  17. Determination of Insoluble Solids in Pretreated Biomass Material...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Report Determination of Insoluble NRELTP-510-42627 Solids in Pretreated Biomass March 2008 Material Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 03212008 A....

  18. CO.sub.2 Pretreatment prevents calcium carbonate formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neavel, Richard C. (Baytown, TX); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL); Chaback, Joseph J. (Worthington, OH)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding carbonate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 14 to about 68 atmospheres and a carbon dioxide partial pressure within the range from about 14 to about 34 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 100.degree. to about 200.degree. C.

  19. Pretreated Slurries; Issue Date: August 2010; Revision Date:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory (NREL) have been optimized to provide compositional analysis for biomass feedstocks as well as for intermediary products of dilute acid pretreatment. The chemical...

  20. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Taiying; Wyman, Charles E; Jakob, Katrin; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for pulping in central-Europe. Biomass Bioenergy 1993, 5:in Europe, it also became of interest as a dedicated biomassBiomass Bioenergy 2000, 8. Pude R: New cultivation methods of Miscanthus in Europe.

  1. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Taiying; Wyman, Charles E; Jakob, Katrin; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sugar yields with various biomass feedstocks, such as cornand other selected biomass feedstocks Biomass Composition (%

  2. Rapid selection and identification of Miscanthus genotypes with enhanced glucan and xylan yields from hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Taiying; Wyman, Charles E; Jakob, Katrin; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry” jointly released by DOE and USDA, energy crops were predicted to become domin- ant at prices

  3. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  4. METHODOLOGY Open Access An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halevy, Itay

    METHODOLOGY Open Access An improved pyrite pretreatment protocol for kinetic and isotopic studies, therefore, desirable. A robust standardized pretreatment protocol for removal of fine particles. Results: Our data demonstrate the presence of large fractions of S0 on untreated pyrite particle surfaces

  5. Pore size of FCC pretreat catalyst important

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyse, B.M.; Cooper, B.H.

    1985-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of sulfur, nitrogen, and polynuclear aromatics can be optimized by varying catalyst pore dimensions and/or particle size. Increased workload and more exacting performance are demanded from today's fluid catalytic cracking feed pretreat catalysts. The desire to process heavier crudes and the inclusion of visbreaker gas oil, unsaturated fractions like coker gas oils, and even resid, have placed greater emphasis on the importance of selection of those catalysts. Also, some older plants are limited to process conditions and equipment designed for easier feedstocks. Data show that the optimum catalyst pore size for a given application depends not only on the reactivity of the feed, but also on the catalyst's diffusional properties. These properties are also factors which determine whether or not a change in catalyst particle size would be advantageous.

  6. BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM WET OXIDSED CORN STOVER USING PRE-TREATED MANURE AS A NUTRIENT SOURCE E for the production of bioethanol. This pre-treatment method, similar to other hot water pre-treatments, acts

  7. Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Maxine Janette

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to improving product yields. The process uses lime pretreatment, which can be enhanced using new decrystallization pretreatment methods, namely hydrodynamic cavitation and shock tube pretreatment.Previous studies on biomass decrystallization showed an increase...

  8. Effects of physical and chemical pretreatments on the crystallinity of bagasse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Maxine Janette

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to improving product yields. The process uses lime pretreatment, which can be enhanced using new decrystallization pretreatment methods, namely hydrodynamic cavitation and shock tube pretreatment.Previous studies on biomass decrystallization showed an increase...

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  10. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enhanced hydrothermal activity at the sea floor seems to be associated with a fresh supply of magma in the crust from the mantle. The presence of the solid floor indicates...

  11. Rational control of hydrothermal nanowire synthesis and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Jaebum

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal nanowire synthesis is a rapidly emerging nanowire discipline that enables low temperature growth and batch process. It has a major impact on the development of novel energy conversion devices, high density ...

  12. Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  13. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefiane K.; Moffat J.R.; Matar O.K.; Craster R.V.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both methanol and ethanol drops...

  14. Base hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Sanchez, J.A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. They also examined products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  15. Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

  16. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  17. Enhanced heat transfer in partially-saturated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of capillarity is potentially important for determining heat transfer in hydrothermal regions. Capillarity allows mixing of phases in liquid/vapor systems and results in enhanced two-phase convection. Comparisons involving a numerical model with capillarity and analytical models without indicate that heat transfer can be enhanced by about an order of magnitude. Whether capillarity can be important for a particular hydrothermal region will depend on the nature of mineral precipitation as well as pore and fracture size distributions.

  18. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); Didlake, Jr., John E. (Livermore, CA); Wu, Benjamin C-P (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  19. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with a High Binding Energy (New Joint UC-BerkeleySymyx DoDDLA Project), Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen...

  20. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials (presentation) High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting...

  1. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami UNREL DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High...

  2. A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric Analysis of Starch Solutions (1 Activity) A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

  3. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAY TH

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Propylene Epoxidation: High-Throughput Screening of Supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Propylene Epoxidation: High-Throughput Screening of Supported Metal Catalysts of propylene using molecular oxygen was studied on a variety of supported metal catalysts. The most promising Propylene Á Epoxidation Á Sol­gel Á High-throughput 1 Introduction Propylene oxide (PO) is an important raw

  5. Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications Thesis by Todd Thorsen, patiently giving me advice on a large variety of subjects, ranging from microfluidics to optics of microfluidic devices for high-throughput screening applications, such as mutant enzyme libraries expressed

  6. Characterization and Pre-treatment of LLW in Turkey - 12572

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-treatment of radioactive waste is the first step in waste management program that occurs after waste generation from various applications in Turkey. Pre-treatment and characterization practices are carried out in Radioactive Waste Management Unit (RWMU) at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNRTC) in Istanbul. This facility has been assigned to take all low-level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear applications in Turkey. The wastes are generated from research and nuclear applications mainly in medicine, biology, agriculture, quality control in metal processing and construction industries. These wastes are classified as low- level radioactive wastes. Pre-treatment practices cover several steps. In this paper, main steps of pre-treatment and characterization are presented. Basically these are; collection, segregation, chemical adjustment, size reduction and decontamination operations. (author)

  7. Physical and chemical characterizations of corn stover and poplar solids resulting from leading pretreatment technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    pretreatment with a Parr reactor. Although dependent on pretreatment and substrate, FT-IR data showed pretreatment technologies Rajeev Kumar a,1 , Gaurav Mago b , Venkatesh Balan c , Charles E. Wyman d,* a Thayer a c t In order to investigate changes in substrate chemical and physical features after pretreatment

  8. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  9. Reproductive traits of pioneer gastropod species colonizing deep-see hydrothermal vents after an eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayer, Skylar (Skylar Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colonization dynamics and life histories of pioneer species are vital components in understanding the early succession of nascent hydrothermal vents. The reproductive ecology of pioneer species at deep-sea hydrothermal ...

  10. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on ...

  11. Verification of numerical models for hydrothermal plume water through field measurements at TAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichers, Sacha

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal vents discharge superheated, mineral rich water into our oceans, thereby providing a habitat for exotic chemosynthetic biological communities. Hydrothermal fluids are convected upwards until they cool and reach ...

  12. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  13. Throughput-cost analysis of optical flow switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Vincent W. S.

    In this paper, we employ a cost model embodying major sources of capital expenditure (CapEx) to compare the throughput-cost tradeoff offered by optical flow switching to that of more traditional optical network architectures.

  14. Maximizing the throughput of large ad hoc wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Y; Huang, Y; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-input, single-output (MISO) protocol. During eachthe maximum throughput of the MISO protocol, in bits-meters/s/ Hz/node, is C MISO = (n ? 1) A log 2 1 + 2n P T ? h

  15. New Tools for High Throughput Chemistry and Biology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galveia, Luciano Paulo Rosa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New strategies for the high-throughput determination of protease substrate specificity using a dual colour microarray based format with a small library of FRET-based peptides were developed. Integral to this process was ...

  16. Development and optimization of high-throughput zebrafish screening platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Bryan Kyo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-throughput zebrafish screening platform is a revolutionary tool that enables subcellular precision in vivo whole animal screening of Danio Rerio. It can perform laser surgery and/or imaging in less than twenty ...

  17. High-Throughput Mass-Spectrometry Monitoring for Multisubstrate Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    (EC 2.4.1.22), and the recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana GT UGT72B1 (EC 2.4.1.-). The GAR (green a fast, high-throughput method for finding potential donors and acceptors from substrate libraries

  18. Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

  19. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Model Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Cu-SSZ-13 (SiAl 2 12), Cu-ZSM-5 (SiAl 2 30) Cu-beta (SiAl 2 38), Cu-Y(SiAl 2 5.2) * Hydrothermal Aging 10% H 2 O in air, 800 o C,...

  20. Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction From an overall systems view, the single most, relative to that of thermal plants, are very small. There are three basic types of hydroelectric plants;2 Pump-storage This kind of hydro plant is a specialized reservoir-type plant which has capability to act

  1. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 Forschungsgemeinschaft. leads to a tremendous increase in the complex- ity of the traditional power optimization mod- els-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  2. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO­THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Carøe 1 , M.P. Nowak 2 , W. R in the complex­ ity of the traditional power optimization mod­ els. The remedy we propose is decomposition which­storage hydro plants and delivery con­ tracts and describe an optimization model for its least­cost operation

  3. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  4. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  5. Permitting plan for project W-236B, initial pretreatment module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System pretreatment process mission is to separate high-level and low-level waste fractions. A comprehensive review of environmental regulations has indicated that several environmental reviews, permits, and approvals are required before construction and operation of the facility. This revised document provides a summary of permit application data requirements, alternative strategies for permit completion and approval, as well as the probability of success for each alternative for the Initial Pretreatment Module resulting from recent revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of four new metal 5-phosphonoisophthalates discovered by high-throughput experimentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Sebastian [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University, Otto-Hahn-Platz 6/7, D 24098 Kiel (Germany); Stock, Norbert [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University, Otto-Hahn-Platz 6/7, D 24098 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ligand, 5-diethylphosphonoisophthalic acid ((HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L), for the hydrothermal synthesis of inorganic-organic hybrid compounds was prepared and characterized by NMR-spectroscopy. Its in situ hydrolysis leads to the corresponding 5-phosphonoisophthalic acid ((HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}, H{sub 4}L). Applying high-throughput methods, different di- and trivalent metal salts for the synthesis of crystalline metal phosphonates based on H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L have been screened. From the resulting discovery library, single-crystals of four new compounds, [Sm{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)(H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (2), Ca{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)[H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}H]{sub 2} (3), and Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3} (4), have been isolated. The single-crystal structure determination of the title compounds shows H{sub 4}L to be a versatile ligand, exhibiting different types of coordination modes between the functional groups and the metal ions. A comparison of the structural features of the title compounds shows a varying degree of M-O-M connectivities. Thus, isolated metal-oxygen clusters (compounds 1 and 2), infinite M-O-M chains (compound 3), and infinite M-O-M layers (compound 4) are observed. The title compounds 1, 2, and 3 were further characterized by IR-spectroscopy, TG-, EDX-, and elemental chemical analysis. - Graphical abstract: Applying high-throughput methods, the new ligand 5-diethylphosphonoisophtalic acid, (HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} (H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L), was reacted with several di- and trivalent metal salts under hydrothermal conditions. Single-crystals of four new inorganic-organic hybrid compounds were isolated from the discovery library. The single-crystal structure analysis shows a varying M-O-M connectivity.

  7. Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300.degree. C. before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil.

  8. Separations/pretreatment considerations for Hanford privatization phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Focus Area is funded to develop, demonstrate, and deploy technologies that will assist in the treatment and closure of its nuclear waste tanks. Pretreatment technologies developed to support the privatization effort by the Department of Energy are reviewed. Advancements in evaporation, solid-liquid separation, sludge treatment, solids controls, sodium management, and radionuclide removal are considered.

  9. Tank Focus Area Pretreatment Program. FY 1995 Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M.I. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); McGinnis, C.P.; Wilkenson, W.T.; Hunt, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program management plan (PMP) describes the FY 1995 project plans for the Pretreatment Program of the Tank Focus Area. The Tank Focus Area is one of five areas of environmental concerns originally identified by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technology Development (EM-50). Projects in the Tank Focus Area relate to the remediation of liquid waste stored in underground storage tanks at various US Department of Energy sites. The Pretreatment Program is an organizational unit performing work within the Tank Focus Area. The function of the Pretreatment Program is to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate new technologies, with emphasis on separations. The 11 Pretreatment Program projects for FY 1995 are (1) Cesium Extraction Testing, (2) Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, (3) Hot Cell Studies, (4) Cesium Removal Demonstration, (5) Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration, (6) Crossflow Filtration, (7) Technical Interchange with CEA, (8) TRUEX Applications, (9) NAC/NAG Process Studies (conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory), (10) NAC/NAG Process and Waste Form Studies (conducted at Florida International University), and (11) Program Management. Section 2 of this PMP contains a separate subsection for each FY 1995 project. A brief description of the project, a schedule of major milestones, and a breakdown of costs are provided for each project. The PMP also contains sections that describe the project controls that are in place. Quality assurance, document control, the project management system, and the management organization are described in these sections.

  10. NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers use imaging technologies to broaden knowledge of plant cell wall structures and identify ideal pretreatment of plant material.

  11. Surface and ultrastructural characterization of raw and pretreated switchgrass Bryon S. Donohoe a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    and economic data on leading pretreatments applied to both corn stover (Eggeman and Elander, 2005; KimSurface and ultrastructural characterization of raw and pretreated switchgrass Bryon S. Donohoe: Pretreatment Enzymatic hydrolysis Biomass Switchgrass Microscopy a b s t r a c t The US Department of Energy

  12. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  13. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  14. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  15. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, R.P. [comp.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

  16. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  17. Hydrothermal metamorphism and low-temperature alteration on the Mid-Atlantic ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peron, Philippe Raymond

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occur to form hydrated rocks. Oxygen isotopic data from hydrothermally metamorphosed rocks show that hydrothermal fluids are derived from a low g 0 source such as sea- 18 water rather than the higher $0 source typical for mantle-derived water... inferred hydrothermal fluid vent sites. The style of alteration of these rocks ranges from weathering at ambient ocean floor temperatures to metamorphism at greenshist facies conditions, The alteration products associated with the weathered ba- salts...

  18. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalCo-Mingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with Different Water tocomingled biomass and coal slurry with a high carbon content

  19. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, J. G.

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking ...

  20. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  2. A GPU-INSPIRED SOFT PROCESSOR FOR HIGH-THROUGHPUT ACCELERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffan, J. Gregory

    Methodology 35 6.1 System Simulation . . . . . . . A GPU-INSPIRED SOFT PROCESSOR FOR HIGH-THROUGHPUT ACCELERATION by Jeffrey Richard Code Kingyens Code Kingyens #12;Abstract A GPU-Inspired Soft Processor for High-Throughput Acceleration Jeffrey

  3. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  4. Agenda from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop on June 26, 2007 Agenda from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput...

  5. Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, R.N.

    1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

  6. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth... KINETIC MODELING AND ASSESSMENT OF LIME PRETREATMENT OF POPLAR WOOD A Dissertation by ROCIO SIERRA RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  7. Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

  8. FLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    the usefulness of flexible channels in the context of 802.11-based networks. Current 802.11 hardware can provideFLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization Shravan for designing 802.11 wireless LANs (WLANs) using flexible channelization -- the choice of an appropriate channel

  9. Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control JIANYONG ZHANG, ANAND storage systems. A consequence of this trend is the need to serve multiple users and/or workloads of the underlying storage system; (2) couple rate and latency allocation in a single scheduler, making them less

  10. On the Throughput Capacity of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    On the Throughput Capacity of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks Pan Li, Member, IEEE, and Yuguang of wireless networks. However, it is commonly assumed that all nodes in the network are identical. The issue of heterogeneous wireless networks with general network settings. Specifically, we consider an extended network

  11. Maximizing Throughput in Wireless Networks with Finite Internal Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Shang

    Maximizing Throughput in Wireless Networks with Finite Internal Buffers Ching-Min Lien, Cheng of a discrete-time wireless network, where only certain sets of links can transmit simultaneously. It is well of the configuration vectors determines the capacity region of the wireless network. In the literature, packet

  12. Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaze, Rahul

    1 Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting Communication System general case of arbitrarily varying energy arrivals is considered, where neither the future energy arrival strategy that invests available energy uniformly over all remaining slots until the next energy arrival

  13. Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    @ou.edu Abstract-- The throughput degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) over lossy links due performance due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two types of loss events in networks with lossy links links are involved in TCP connections. The objective of this paper is to propose a protocol

  14. Enhanced resolution and throughput of Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Enhanced resolution and throughput of Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) using dual Montgomery County Campus, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA * barakk@ee.bgu.ac.il Abstract: Fresnel incoherent Fresnel holography," Opt. Lett. 32(8), 912­914 (2007). 7. J. Rosen and G. Brooker, "Fluorescence

  15. Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , Mohammed Atiquzzaman Honeywell Labs 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418, USA E-mail: haowei.bai@honeywell #12;Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Haowei Bai Honeywell Labs 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418 haowei.bai@honeywell.com David Lilja Electrical

  16. Improving Bluetooth EDR Data Throughput Using FEC and Interleaving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Improving Bluetooth EDR Data Throughput Using FEC and Interleaving Ling-Jyh Chen1 , Tony Sun2 Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) mode detailed in the new Bluetooth spec v2.0. We first studied the APT algorithm/IFEC coding schemes for the new EDR packet types, assessed their ability to alleviate the impact of burst

  17. Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    - grated high-throughput (HTP) screening pipeline. Herein, we report on the engineering of a novel HTP

  18. On Optimal Throughput-Energy Curve for Multi-hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    Laboratory Washington, DC, USA Abstract--Network throughput and energy consumption are two important throughput under some energy constraint or minimizing energy consumption while satisfying some throughput, through- put and energy consumption are two key performance metrics that bear in the minds of network

  19. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  20. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H2O­CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow

  1. In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

  2. Optical Multiplexing for High-Throughput Spectroscopic Analysis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Saadiah

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    in optical biosensor testing as it provides greater throughput and scalability while being an economical and compact solution. v NOMENCLATURE MFPF Multi Frequency Phase Fluorometer MUX Multiplexer LED Light Emitting Diode DIO Digital Input... oxidase in hybrid silicate microsphere that is coated with nanofilm and reference dye (RITC) (Fig. 1) [2]. The phosphorescent dye is excited by a green light from a LED (light emitting diode) to emit luminescence, the intensity of which is dependent...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative pretreatment modalities Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    converts raw biomass to ethanol in high yields. The process was developed... biomass feedstocks such as corn stover, agricultural waste, and energy crops. The pretreatment...

  4. Final Report - "Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasan, Darsh T.

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study the effectiveness of three slurry rheology modifiers. An effective modifier was identified which resulted in lowering the yield stress of the waste simulant. Therefore, the results of this research have led to the basic understanding of the foaming/antifoaming mechanism in waste slurries as well as identification of a rheology modifier, which enhances the processing throughput, and accelerates the DOE mission. The objectives of this research effort were to develop a fundamental understanding of the physico-chemical mechanisms that produced foaming and air entrainment in the DOE High Level (HLW) and Low Activity (LAW) radioactive waste separation and immobilization processes, and to develop and test advanced antifoam/defoaming/rheology modifier agents. Antifoams/rheology modifiers developed from this research ere tested using non-radioactive simulants of the radioactive wastes obtained from Hanford and the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  5. Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chien-Ju

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

  6. Hydrothermal research and development assessment. Task Force report: projections for direct-heat applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low and moderate temperature hydrothermal resources suitable for direct-heat applications have been identified in 37 states. The extent to which three resources might be used over the next 20 years were evaluated and the probable impact of Federal programs on hydrothermal resource utilization was assessed. The use types that comprise the bulk of the market were determined. Representative firms and municipalities were interviewed to determine their willingness to use hydrothermal energy, and to determine the investment decision criteria that would influence their actions. (MHR)

  7. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, A.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

  8. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior, etc. ; 4. HTP of other renewable feedstocks, suchHydro-Thermal Pretreatment (HTP) process that will result inof a laboratory scale HTP process. Four carbonaceous

  9. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  10. Sulfur gas geochemical detection of hydrothermal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, G.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a system of exploration using sulfur gases was capable of detecting convecting hydrothermal systems. Three surveying techniques were used at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA in Utah. These were (a) a sniffing technique, capable of instantaneous determinations of sulfur gas concentration, (b) an accumulator technique, capable of integrating the sulfur gas emanations over a 30 day interval, and (c) a method of analyzing the soils for vaporous sulfur compounds. Because of limitations in the sniffer technique, only a limited amount of surveying was done with this method. The accumulator and soil sampling techniques were conducted on a 1000 foot grid at Roosevelt Hot Springs, and each sample site was visited three times during the spring of 1980. Thus, three soil samples and two accumulator samples were collected at each site. The results are shown as averages of three soil and two accumulator determinations of sulfur gas concentrations at each site. Soil surveys and accumulator surveys were conducted at two additional KGRA's which were chosen based on the state of knowledge of these hydrothermal systems and upon their differences from Roosevelt Hot Springs in an effort to show that the exploration methods would be effective in detecting geothermal reservoirs in general. The results at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah show that each of the three surveying methods was capable of detecting sulfur gas anomalies which can be interpreted to be related to the source at depth, based on resistivity mapping of that source, and also correlatable with major structural features of the area which are thought to be controlling the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. The results of the surveys at Roosevelt did not indicate that either the soil sampling technique or the accumulator technique was superior to the other.

  11. Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Sugar yields from dilute sulfuric acid and sulfur dioxide pretreatments and subsequent enzymatic Dilute sulfuric acid Sulfur dioxide Biofuels Switchgrass a b s t r a c t Dacotah switchgrass was pretreated with sulfuric acid concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt.% at 140, 160, and 180 °C and with 1

  12. Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment on the Enzymatic for pretreating cellulosic biomass, including higher hemicellulose sugar yields, enhanced cellulose digestibility understand these trade-offs, comparative data are reported on xylan and lignin removal and enzymatic

  13. Comparative sugar recovery data from laboratory scale application of leading pretreatment technologies to corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Comparative sugar recovery data from laboratory scale application of leading pretreatment societal benefits, but pretreatment operations essential to economically viable yields have a major impact on costs and per- formance of the entire system. However, little comparative data is available on promising

  14. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  15. Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment.

  16. Pretreatment options for waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, L.F.; Savage, G.M. [CalRecovery, Inc., Hercules, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes various options available for processing MSW before the material is introduced to waste-to-energy facilities. Specifically, the paper reviews the type of equipment currently available for the recovery of resources from the waste stream. In addition, the paper discusses other matters which in many cases are ignored but are extremely important for the design of the processes. Some of these matters include the use of reliable waste characterization data during conceptual design and definition of the properties and specifications of the recovered materials and/or energy forms (e.g., RDF). Finally, the paper discusses other factors that have a critical impact on the facility such as potential environmental consequences of pretreatment of the waste prior to its combustion in waste-to-energy facilities.

  17. Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

  18. Macromolecular structure analysis and effective liquefaction pretreatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suuberg, E.M.; Yun, Y.; Lilly, W.D.; Leung, K.; Gates, T.; Otake, Y.; Deevi, S.C.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was concerned with characterizing the changes in coal macromolecular structure, that are of significance for liquefaction pretreatments of coal. The macromolecular structure of the insoluble portion of coal is difficult to characterize. Techniques that do so indirectly (based upon, for example, NMR and FTIR characterizations of atomic linkages) are not particularly sensitive for this purpose. Techniques that characterize the elastic structure (such as solvent swelling) are much more sensitive to subtle changes in the network structure. It is for this reason that we focused upon these techniques. The overall objective involved identifying pretreatments that reduce the crosslinking (physical or chemical) of the network structure, and thus lead to materials that can be handled to a greater extent by traditional liquid-phase processing techniques. These techniques tend to be inherently more efficient at producing desirable products. This report is divided into seven chapters. Chapter II summarizes the main experimental approaches used throughout the project, and summarizes the main findings on the Argonne Premium coal samples. Chapter III considers synergistic effects of solvent pairs. It is divided into two subsections. The first is concerned with mixtures of CS{sub 2} with electron donor solvents. The second subsection is concerned with aromatic hydrocarbon - alcohol or hydrocarbon - alcohol mixtures, as might be of interest for preliquefaction delivery of catalysts into bituminous coals. Chapter IV deals with questions of how oxidation might influence the results that are obtained. Chapter V briefly details what conclusions may be drawn concerning the elastic behavior of coals, and the effects of thermal treatments on this behavior. Chapter VI is concerned with theories to describe the action of solvents that are capable of dissociating non-covalent crosslinks. Finally, Chapter VII discusses the practical implications of the study.

  19. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  20. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  1. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of

  2. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis

  3. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 toAdvances WindRobust, High-Throughput

  4. automating high-throughput blast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to electron transfer dissoci- ation (ETD) mass spectrometry Shorter, James 15 Using High Throughput Screening to Acquire Promising Drug Candidates Against Mycobacterium...

  5. automated high-throughput cultivations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to electron transfer dissoci- ation (ETD) mass spectrometry Shorter, James 15 Using High Throughput Screening to Acquire Promising Drug Candidates Against Mycobacterium...

  6. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation1 Introduction Microfluidics has gained significant advancesof mammalian cells using microfluidics 3,4 , there have been

  7. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  8. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  9. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  10. Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar yields from different switchgrass sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar Pretreatment Switchgrass Yields a b s t r a c t Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), sulfur dioxide (SO2), liquid hot water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments

  11. EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

  12. Influence of mechanical-biological waste pre-treatment methods on the gas formation in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockreis, A. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: a.bockreis@iwar.tu-darmstadt.de; Steinberg, I. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute for Water Supply and Groundwater Protection, Wastewater Technology, Waste Management, Industrial Material Flows and Environmental Planning (Institute WAR), Chair of Waste Management and Waste Technology, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to minimise emissions and environmental impacts, only pre-treated waste should be disposed of. For the last six years, a series of continuous experiments has been conducted at the Institute WAR, TU Darmstadt, in order to determine the emissions from pre-treated waste. Different kinds of pre-treated waste were incubated in several reactors and various data, including production and composition of the gas and the leachate, were collected. In this paper, the interim results of gas production and the gas composition from different types of waste after a running time of six years are presented and discussed.

  13. SMOV3B WFPC2 UV Contamination Monitoring and Throughput Check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirianni, Marco

    1 SMOV3B WFPC2 UV Contamination Monitoring and Throughput Check A. M. Koekemoer, S. Gonzaga, L is potentially susceptible to significant decreases as a result of contaminants deposited on the cold CCD windows intensive monitoring of this contamination using the F170W filter, to ensure that the throughput never

  14. High-throughput generation of hydrogel microbeads with varying elasticity for cell encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    High-throughput generation of hydrogel microbeads with varying elasticity for cell encapsulation a microfluidic approach for high-throughput generation of 3D microenvironments with different elasticity for studies of cell fate. The generation of agarose microgels with different elastic moduli was achieved by (i

  15. Adaptive Congestion Control in Broadband-ISDN: High Throughput with Sustained Quality of Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsillides, Andreas

    ). The controller regulates QoS by manipulating the flow of controllable traffic into the network. Controllability. In this paper we use an adaptive feedback and feedforward control system to maximise throughput such that the QoAdaptive Congestion Control in Broadband-ISDN: High Throughput with Sustained Quality of Service

  16. Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Catherine P.

    1 Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based Interference crucial design objectives for a number of multihop wireless network applica- tions. As these two this tradeoff between the network throughput and lifetime, for the case of fixed wireless networks where link

  17. Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations Haowei Bai Honeywell@ou.edu Abstract-- The degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) throughput in networks with lossy links. This is very similar to processor performance degradation due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two

  18. Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab-Initio Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab Database have been considered as nanograined, sintered-powder thermoelectrics with the high-throughput ab the electronic band gap and the carrier effective mass, and that the probability of having large thermoelectric

  19. High throughput energy efficient multi-FFT architecture on FPGAs (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    computing, High throughput FFT, Energy efficient design I. INTRODUCTION As FPGAs are programmed specifically in spread spec- trum receiver [4]. In the design of high throughput FFT architectures, energy-efficient design techniques can be used to maximize performance under power dissipation constraints. The power

  20. Parallel Interleaver Architecture with New Scheduling Scheme for High Throughput Configurable Turbo Decoder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Parallel Interleaver Architecture with New Scheduling Scheme for High Throughput Configurable Turbo}@rice.edu, yuanbinguo@huawei.com Abstract--Parallel architecture is required for high throughput turbo decoder to meet also shows great flexibility and scalability compared to prior work. Index Terms--VLSI, turbo decoder

  1. Hydrothermal Methods as a New Way of Actinide Phosphate Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavier, Nicolas [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, CNRS UMR 5257, Bagnols / Ceze, 30207 (France); Dacheux, Nicolas [Groupe de Radiochimie, IPNO - Bat. 100, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay, 91406 (France); Wallez, Gilles; Quarton, Michel [Chimie de la matiere condensee, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS UMR 7574, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, 75005 (France)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation processes driven in hydrothermal conditions were applied to the preparation of phosphate-based ceramics. In particular, three systems composed by a crystallized precursor linked with a high temperature compound were examined: M(OH)PO{sub 4} / M{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (M = Th, U), MPO{sub 4} 0.5 H{sub 2}O / MPO{sub 4} (M = La - Dy), and Th{sub 2-x/2}An{sub x/2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}) H{sub 2}O / {beta}-Th{sub 4-x}An{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M = U, Np, Pu). A significant improvement of several physico-chemical properties of the powders, especially in the sintering capability and the homogeneity of the final solids, was evidenced when starting from the precursors. Furthermore, these phases were also found to control the solubility of lanthanides and actinides during leaching experiments when reaching the saturation conditions in the solution. (authors)

  2. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structure of Neptunium(V) Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, Tori Z. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C.; Soderholm, L. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States)]|[Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Skanthakumar, S. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been synthesized by low-temperature hydrothermal reaction of a (NpO{sub 2}){sup +} stock solution with natural calcite crystals. The structure of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of F{sup 2} for all unique data collected on a Bruker X-ray diffractometer equipped with an APEX II CCD detector. Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} is monoclinic, space group P2/c, with a = 8.168(2) A, b = 6.584(1) A, c = 9.3130(2) A, {beta} = 116.01(1) deg., V = 449.8(2) A{sup 3}, and Z = 1. The structure contains chains of edge-sharing neptunyl pentagonal bi-pyramids linked into sheets through cation-cation interactions with distorted neptunyl square bi-pyramids. Additional cation-cation interactions connect the sheets into a three-dimensional framework. The formation of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the surface of calcite crystals has important implications for the precipitation of isolated neptunyl phases in natural aqueous systems. (authors)

  3. Coprecipitation-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of PLZT hollow nanospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Renqiang [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhu, Kongjun, E-mail: kjzhu@nuaa.edu.cn [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Qiu, Jinhao; Bai, Lin; Ji, Hongli [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate Pb{sub 1-x}La{sub x}(Zr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3} (PLZT) hollow nanospheres have been successfully prepared via a template-free hydrothermal method using the well-mixed coprecipitated precursors and the KOH mineralizer. The structure, composition, and morphology of the PLZT hollow nanospheres were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), ICP (inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectra), TG/DTA (thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and SEAD (selected area diffraction). The results show that the composition and the morphology control of the PLZT products are determined by the KOH concentration. The PLZT hollow nanospheres with uniform size of about 4 nm were synthesized in the presence of 5 M KOH. The crystalline nanoparticles can be prepared at dilute KOH, in contrast to the amorphous powders prepared at concentrated KOH. Formation mechanisms of the PLZT hollow nanospheres are also discussed.

  4. On-chip sub-cellular resolution whole-animal manipulation for high-throughput in vivo screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher Benjamin

    We present a suite of technologies that can be combined to perform complex high-throughput whole-animal genetic and drug screens. When used in various combinations, these devices facilitate a variety of high-throughput ...

  5. Effect of Acid, Alkali, and Steam Explosion Pretreatments on Characteristics of Bio-Oil Produced from Pinewood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Srinivasan, Radhakrishnan; Yu, Fei; Steele, Philip; Li, Qi; Mitchell, Brian

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-oil produced from pinewood by fast pyrolysis has the potential to be a valuable substitute for fossil fuels. Pretreatment prior to the fast pyrolysis process has been shown to alter the structure and chemical composition of biomass. To determine the influence of biomass pretreatments on bio-oil produced during fast pyrolysis, we tested three pretreatment methods: dilute acid, dilute alkali, and steam explosion. Bio-oils were produced from untreated and pretreated pinewood feedstocks in an auger reactor at 450 C. The bio-oils�¢���� physical properties including pH, water content, acid value, density, viscosity, and heating value were measured. Chemical characteristics of the bio-oils were determined by gas chromatographymass spectrometry. Results showed that bio-oil yield and composition were influenced by biomass pretreatment. Of the three pretreatment methods, 1%H2SO4 pretreatment resulted in the highest bio-oil yield and best bio-oil quality.

  6. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL; Maness, Christopher S [ORNL; Senter, James K [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  7. A microfluidic platform for high-throughput multiplexed protein quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpetti, Francesca; Maerkl, Sebastian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-throughput microfluidic platform capable of quantitating up to 384 biomarkers in 4 distinct samples by immunoassay. The microfluidic device contains 384 unit cells, which can be individually programmed with pairs of capture and detection antibody. Samples are quantitated in each unit cell by four independent MITOMI detection areas, allowing four samples to be analyzed in parallel for a total of 1,536 assays per device. We show that the device can be pre-assembled and stored for weeks at elevated temperature and we performed proof-of-concept experiments simultaneously quantitating IL-6, IL-1\\b{eta}, TNF-{\\alpha}, PSA, and GFP. Finally, we show that the platform can be used to identify functional antibody combinations by screening 64 antibody combinations requiring up to 384 unique assays per device.

  8. Enzymatic Digestibility of Corn Stover Fractions in Response to Fungal Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Z. F.; Wan, C. X.; Shi, J.; Sykes, R. W.; Li, Y. B.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover fractions (leaves, cobs, and stalks) were studied for enzymatic digestibility after pretreatment with a white rot fungus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Among the three fractions, leaves had the least recalcitrance to fungal pretreatment and the lignin degradation reached 45% after 30 days of pretreatment. The lignin degradation of stalks and cobs was similar but was significantly lower than that of leaves (p < 0.05). For all fractions, xylan and glucan degradation followed a pattern similar to lignin degradation, with leaves having a significantly higher percentage of degradation (p < 0.05). Hydrolytic enzyme activity also revealed that the fungus was more active in the degradation of carbohydrates in leaves. As a result of fungal pretreatment, the highest sugar yield, however, was obtained with corn cobs.

  9. Computer simulation and economic analysis for ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) pretreatment process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ammonia fiber explosion (AFFECT) process is a promising new pretreatment for enhancing the reactivity of lignocerulose materials with many advantages over existing processes. The material is soaked in high-pressure liquid ammonia for a few...

  10. alternative truex-based pretreatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Here we conducted three experiments to test the pre-treatment effect of water, 30% hydrogen peroxide (H-treated a large number of skeletal samples from five species of corals...

  11. The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessinger, Brad; Apps, John A.

    2003-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous species at elevated temperatures and pressures, this study provides the necessary foundation for future exploration into transport and depositional processes in polymetallic ore deposits. The HKF equation of state parameters for gold, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and silver sulfide and hydroxide complexes were derived from experimental equilibrium constants using nonlinear regression calculations. In order to ensure that the resulting parameters were internally consistent, those experiments utilizing incompatible thermodynamic data were re-speciated prior to regression. Because new experimental studies were used to revise the HKF parameters for H2S0 and HS-1, those metal complexes for which HKF parameters had been previously derived were also updated. It was found that predicted thermodynamic properties of metal complexes are consistent with linear correlations between standard partial molal thermodynamic properties. This result allowed assessment of several complexes for which experimental data necessary to perform regression calculations was limited. Oxygen fugacity-temperature diagrams were calculated to illustrate how thermodynamic data improves our understanding of depositional processes. Predicted thermodynamic properties were used to investigate metal transport in Carlin-type gold deposits. Assuming a linear relationship between temperature and pressure, metals are predicted to predominantly be transported as sulfide complexes at a total aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.05 m. Also, the presence of arsenic and antimony mineral phases in the deposits are shown to restrict mineralization within a limited range of chemical conditions. Finally, at a lesser aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.01 m, host rock sulfidation can explain the origin of arsenic and antimony minerals within the paragenetic sequence.

  12. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  13. The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

  14. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  15. A high throughput (>90%), large compensation range, single-prism femtosecond pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingjie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a high throughput, large compensation range, single-prism femtosecond pulse compressor, using a single prism and two roof mirrors. The compressor has zero angular dispersion, zero spatial dispersion, zero pulse-front tilt, and unity magnification. The high efficiency is achieved by adopting two roof mirrors as the retroreflectors. We experimentally achieved ~ -14500 fs2 group delay dispersion (GDD) with 30 cm of prism tip-roof mirror prism separation, and ~90.7% system throughput with the current implementation. With better components, the throughput can be even higher.

  16. Hydrothermally treated coals for pulverized coal injection. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, D.E.; Rao, P.D.; Ogunsola, O.; Lin, H.K.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating the suitability of hydrothermally dried low-rank coals for pulverized fuel injection into blast furnaces in order to reduce coke consumption. Coal samples from the Beluga coal field and Usibelli Coal Mine, Alaska, are being used for the study. Crushed coal samples were hydrothermally treated at three temperatures, 275, 300 and 325{degrees}C, for residence times ranging from 10 to 120 minutes. Products have been characterized to determine their suitability for pulverized coal injection. Characterization includes proximate and ultimate analyses, vitrinite reflectance, TGA reactivity and thermochemical modeling. A literature survey has been conducted.

  17. Hydrothermal alteration at the Panorama Formation, North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Walter, Malcolm R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne hyperspectral remote sensing dataset was obtained of the North Pole Dome region of the Pilbara Craton in October 2002. It has been analyzed for indications of hydrothermal minerals. Here we report on the identification and mapping of hydrothermal minerals in the 3.459 Ga Panorama Formation and surrounding strata. The spatial distribution of a pattern of subvertical pyrophyllite rich veins connected to a pyrophyllite rich palaeohorizontal layer is interpreted to represent the base of an acid-sulfate epithermal system that is unconformably overlain by the stromatolitic 3.42 Ga Strelley Pool Chert.

  18. Case studies of low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six development projects are examined that use low- (less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F)) to-moderate (90 to 150/sup 0/C (194 to 302/sup 0/F)) temperature geothermal resources. These projects were selected from 22 government cost-shared projects to illustrate the many facets of hydrothermal development. The case studies describe the history of this development, its exploratory methods, and its resource definition, as well as address legal, environmental, and institutional constraints. A critique of procedures used in the development is also provided and recommendations for similar future hydrothermal projects are suggested.

  19. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  20. Enhanced performance of wearable piezoelectric nanogenerator fabricated by two-step hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Yu; Lei, Jixue; Yin, Bing; Zhang, Heqiu; Ji, Jiuyu; Hu, Lizhong, E-mail: lizhongh@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); The Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Dechao [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian Neusoft University of Information, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, Jiming; Liu, Yanhong; Zhao, Yu; Luo, Yingmin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple two-step hydrothermal process was proposed for enhancing the performance of the nanogenerator on flexible and wearable terylene-fabric substrate. With this method, a significant enhancement in output voltage of the nanogenerator from ?10?mV to 7?V was achieved, comparing with the one by conventional one-step process. In addition, another advantage with the devices synthesized by two-step hydrothermal process was that their output voltages are only sensitive to strain rather than strain rate. The devices with a high output voltage have the ability to power common electric devices and will have important applications in flexible electronics and wearable devices.

  1. CellVisualizer : exploring hierarchical, multi-dimensional data with applications to high-throughput microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, InHan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a system for visualizing hierarchical, multi-dimensional, memory-intensive datasets. Specifically, we designed an interactive system to visualize data collected by high-throughput microscopy and ...

  2. Development of High-Throughput Microfluidic Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Analyzing Microdroplets in Droplet Microfluidic System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobahi, Nebras MohammedKamal A.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of a high-throughput microfluidic impedance spectroscopy platform for electrically detecting analyzing impedance measurements of non-contact and label free microdroplets. This microfluidic impedance spectroscopy...

  3. Infrastructure to support ultra high throughput biodosimetry screening after a radiological event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    GUY GARTY1 , ANDREW KARAM2 , & DAVID J. BRENNER3 1 Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Nevis Laboratories, Columbia UniverInfrastructure to support ultra high throughput biodosimetry screening after a radiological event

  4. Cell bioprinting as a potential high-throughput method for fabricating cell-based biosensors (CBBs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, F.

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs) are becoming an important tool for biosecurity applications and rapid diagnostics. For current CBBs technology, cell immobilization and high throughput fabrication are the main challenges. To ...

  5. Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

  6. Engineering a single cell microarray platform for high throughput DNA damage and repair analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weingeist, David McGregor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA damage contributes to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases. Ironically, DNA damaging agents are also commonly used in current cancer treatment. We therefore need robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for ...

  7. The Materials genome : rapid materials screening for renewable energy using high-throughput density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Anubhav, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis relates to the emerging field of high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) computation for materials design and optimization. Although highthroughput DFT is a promising new method for materials discovery, ...

  8. Attendees list from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attendees list from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop on June 26, 2007 Attendees list from the U.S. Department of...

  9. VLPW: The Very Long Packet Window Architecture for High Throughput Network-On-Chip Router Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Haiyin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    -chip routers and the ideal interconnect fabric. To improve throughput, VLPW optimizes Switch Allocation (SA) efficiency. Existing SA normally applies Round-Robin scheduling to arbitrate among the packets targeting the same output port. However, this simple...

  10. Molecular display of synthetic oligonucleotide libraries and their analysis with high throughput DNA sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larman, Harry Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High throughput methods in molecular biology have changed the landscape of biomedical research. In particular, advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies are defining our genomes and the ...

  11. An instrument for high-throughput measurements of fiber mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofek, Grant William, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an instrument is designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring the mechanical properties of single fibers. The instrument is intended to provide high throughput measurement of single fiber geometric ...

  12. A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a Manjunath Hegde of biofilm community formation. Here, we describe the development of a PDMS-based two-layer microfluidic flow

  13. Development of High-Throughput Microfluidic Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Analyzing Microdroplets in Droplet Microfluidic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobahi, Nebras MohammedKamal A.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of a high-throughput microfluidic impedance spectroscopy platform for electrically detecting analyzing impedance measurements of non-contact and label free microdroplets. This microfluidic impedance spectroscopy...

  14. Throughput Optimal Scheduling in the Presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Krishna Prasanna

    We investigate the tail behavior of the steady-state queue occupancies under throughput optimal scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, served by a single ...

  15. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  16. Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

  17. Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems Fabrice J. Fontaine1 and brine phases. Time series of vent temperature and salinity (chlorinity) show that some black-smoker vent below seawater for over a decade, which raises important questions concerning the fate of brines

  18. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  19. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, William M. [Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico, CA, 95929 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  20. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  1. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  2. Mantle helium reveals Southern Ocean hydrothermal venting Gisela Winckler,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    Click Here for Full Article Mantle helium reveals Southern Ocean hydrothermal venting Gisela the distribution of helium isotopes along an oceanic transect at 67°S to identify previously unobserved provided by the helium isotope anomaly with independent hydrographic information from the Southern Ocean

  3. The stability of aqueous nickel(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal solutions: Results of UVVisible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The stability of aqueous nickel(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal solutions: Results of UV of aqueous nickel chloride complexes is important for understanding and quantitatively evaluating nickel for dissolved nickel in perchlorate, triflic acid and sodium chloride solutions at temperatures up to 250 °C

  4. Synthesis of ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machmudah, Siti, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Widiyastuti, W., E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Prastuti, Okky Putri, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Nurtono, Tantular, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Winardi, Sugeng, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia); Wahyudiono,; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium oxide (zirconia, ZrO{sub 2}) is the most common material used for electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Zirconia has attracted attention for applications in optical coatings, buffer layers for growing superconductors, thermal-shield, corrosion resistant coatings, ionic conductors, and oxygen sensors, and for potential applications including transparent optical devices and electrochemical capacitor electrodes, fuel cells, catalysts, and advanced ceramics. In this work, zirconia particles were synthesized from ZrCl{sub 4} precursor with hydrothermal treatment in a batch reactor. Hydrothermal treatment may allow obtaining nanoparticles and sintered materials with controlled chemical and structural characteristics. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at temperatures of 150 – 200°C with precursor concentration of 0.1 – 0.5 M. Zirconia particles obtained from this treatment were analyzed by using SEM, PSD and XRD to characterize the morphology, particle size distribution, and crystallinity, respectively. Based on the analysis, the size of zirconia particles were around 200 nm and it became smaller with decreasing precursor concentration. The increasing temperature caused the particles formed having uniform size. Zirconia particles formed by hydrothermal treatment were monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic crystal.

  5. An Interior-Point Method for Long Term Scheduling of Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    The operational planning of hydrothermal power systems aims to provide an economic and reliable operational policy hydro plants in the same cascade and the nonlinear nature of thermal costs and hydro generation of the hydroelectric plants, using deterministic optimization tools to compute the optimal operation decision

  6. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed aims at the cost optimal scheduling of on/o decisions and output levels for generating units. The power

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    properties investigated using off-axis electron holography and more conventional rock magnetism techniqueHydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles measurements. 1. Introduction The ability of a rock to reliably record the geomagnetic field depends

  8. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Single Phase Pyrite FeS2 Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue; Gul, Sheraz; Volkman, Steven; Guo, Jinghua; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron pyrite nanocrystals with high purity have been synthesized through a surfactant-assisted hydrothermal reaction under optimum pH value. These pyrite nanocrystals represent a new group of well-defined nanoscale structures for high-performance photovoltaic solar cells based on non-toxic and earth abundant materials.

  9. Hydrothermal venting in magma deserts: The ultraslow-spreading Gakkel and Southwest Indian Ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    and direct cooling of the upper mantle, and nonmagmatic heat supplied by exothermic serpentinization of spreading rate, establish a robust linear trend (Fs = 0.98 + 0.015us), implying that the long-term heat supply is the first-order control on the global distribution of hydrothermal activity. Normalizing Fs

  10. Energy for biologic sulfate reduction in a hydrothermally formed ocean on Europa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Energy for biologic sulfate reduction in a hydrothermally formed ocean on Europa Mikhail Y. Zolotov, chemical energy is suggested as a more likely source for oceanic life [Jakosky and Shock, 1998; Mc of chemical energy in the ocean [e.g., McCollom, 1999; Kargel et al., 2000; Chyba and Phillips, 2001; Schulze

  11. PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

  12. PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

  13. Effect of pretreating of host oil on coprocessing. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

    1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this research is to gain information on the role that host petroleum-derived oils (1000{degrees} F+), as well as that of catalytically treated host oils, play when used as liquefaction solvents in coprocessing with coal. The host oil will be extensively characterized and then pretreated in a number of ways which involve catalytic reactions such as hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and isomerization. The pretreated oils will then be characterized by elemental analysis, catalytic dehydrogenation, distillation, GC-MS, and NMR. The effect of the host oil on coprocessing with coal will be compared to that obtained using catalytically modified host oils. When appropriate, model compounds will be used to study specific reactions brought about by the pretreatments.

  14. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

    2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

  15. Towards Chip Scale Liquid Chromatography and High Throughput Immunosensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, J.

    2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes several research projects aimed towards developing new instruments and novel methods for high throughput chemical and biological analysis. Approaches are taken in two directions. The first direction takes advantage of well-established semiconductor fabrication techniques and applies them to miniaturize instruments that are workhorses in analytical laboratories. Specifically, the first part of this work focused on the development of micropumps and microvalves for controlled fluid delivery. The mechanism of these micropumps and microvalves relies on the electrochemically-induced surface tension change at a mercury/electrolyte interface. A miniaturized flow injection analysis device was integrated and flow injection analyses were demonstrated. In the second part of this work, microfluidic chips were also designed, fabricated, and tested. Separations of two fluorescent dyes were demonstrated in microfabricated channels, based on an open-tubular liquid chromatography (OT LC) or an electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) format. A reduction in instrument size can potentially increase analysis speed, and allow exceedingly small amounts of sample to be analyzed under diverse separation conditions. The second direction explores the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a signal transduction method for immunoassay analysis. It takes advantage of the improved detection sensitivity as a result of surface enhancement on colloidal gold, the narrow width of Raman band, and the stability of Raman scattering signals to distinguish several different species simultaneously without exploiting spatially-separated addresses on a biochip. By labeling gold nanoparticles with different Raman reporters in conjunction with different detection antibodies, a simultaneous detection of a dual-analyte immunoassay was demonstrated. Using this scheme for quantitative analysis was also studied and preliminary dose-response curves from an immunoassay of a mo del antigen were obtained. Simultaneous detection of several analytes at the same address can potentially increase the analysis speed, and can further expand the analysis capability of a microarray chip.

  16. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  17. Pretreatment process for forming a smooth surface diamond film on a carbon-coated substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Z.; Brewer, M.; Brown, I.; Komvopoulos, K.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the pretreatment of a carbon-coated substrate to provide a uniform high density of nucleation sites thereon for the subsequent deposition of a continuous diamond film without the application of a bias voltage to the substrate. The process comprises exposing the carbon-coated substrate, in a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, to a mixture of hydrogen-methane gases, having a methane gas concentration of at least about 4% (as measured by partial pressure), while maintaining the substrate at a pressure of about 10 to about 30 Torr during the pretreatment. 6 figures.

  18. Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment of Poplar by Leading Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Comparative data is presented on glucose and xylose release for enzymatic hydrolysis of solids produced by pretreatment of poplar wood by ammonia fiber

  19. rylated SLR1 protein, we pretreated the wild type and gid2-1 with uniconazol, an inhibitor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Richard

    rylated SLR1 protein, we pretreated the wild type and gid2-1 with uniconazol, an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis. We detected one faint radio- active band in uniconazol-pretreated wild type and this band., data not shown. 17. C. M. Steber, S. E. Cooney, P. McCourt, Genetics 149, 509 (1998). 18. E. T. Kipreos

  20. Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Paul R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

  1. Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckman, Kate Lynn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

  2. Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2738. Cowen J. P. and Bruland K. W. (1985) Metal depositsLanding W. M. and Bruland K. W. (1987) The contrastingopen ocean (Landing and Bruland, 1987) or some hydrothermal

  3. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  4. The Coupling of the Numerical Heat Transfer Model of the Pauzhetka Hydrothermal System (Kamchatka, USSR) with Hydroisotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiryukhin, A.V.; Sugrobov, V.M.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the two-dimensional numerical heat-transfer model to the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system allowed us to establish that: (1) a shallow magma body with the anomalous temperature of 700-1000 C and with a volume of 20-30 km{sup 3} may be a heat source for the formation of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system. (2) The water feeding source of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system may be meteoric waters which are infiltrated at an average rate of 5-10 kg/s {center_dot} km{sup 2}. The coupling of the numerical heat-transfer model with hydroisotopic data (D,T,{sup 18}O) obtained from the results of testing of exploitation wells, rivers and springs is the basis to understand more clearly the position of recharge areas and the structure of water flows in the hydrothermal system.

  5. High-throughput scanning confocal microscope for single molecule Chandran R. Sabanayagam, John S. Eid, and Amit Mellera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    High-throughput scanning confocal microscope for single molecule analysis Chandran R. Sabanayagam and probing of single molecules, and an automatic focusing feature that enables the unattended scanning

  6. Now available at the DNA Sequencing and Genotyping Core Facility OpenArray High-throughput nanofluidic PCR technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    -throughput nanofluidic PCR technology from Life Technologies/Applied Biosystems Application/ Service Area Types · Experimental flexibility ­ open-format layout · Nanofluidic design reduces reagent usage Questions? Contact

  7. PROCESS CHANGES TO DWPF TO INCREASE THROUGHPUT AND INCORPORATE SALT STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Michael Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been vitrifying High Level Waste sludge since 1996. Sludge batch 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 have been successfully stabilized. In the last several years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has worked with DWPF to implement process and compositional changes to improve throughput. These changes allowed significant increases in waste throughput for processing of sludge batch 3 and will be necessary to maintain reasonable throughput for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). SB4 processing was initiated in June 2007 and will be the first significantly HM-type sludge batch processed. This sludge is high in aluminum and other components troublesome to DWPF processing. In addition, coupled processing is scheduled to start in the next fiscal year, which will also impact throughput. Coupled processing will begin with the incorporation of waste streams from the Actinide Removal Process and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and will eventually transition to the feed from the larger scale Salt Waste Processing Facility. A discussion of the programs to improve throughput and implement salt processing will be provided.

  8. Functions and requirements for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, L.M.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Site tank waste supernatants will be pretreated to separate the low-level and high-level fractions. The low-level waste fraction, containing the bulk of the chemical constituents, must be processed into a vitrified waste product which will be disposed of onsite, in a safe, environmentally sound, and cost effective manner. The high-level waste fraction separated during supernatant pretreatment (primarily cesium) will be recombined with an additional high-level waste fraction generated from pretreatment of the tank waste sludges and solids. This combined high-level waste fraction will be immobilized as glass and disposed in a geological repository. The purpose of this document is to establish the functional requirements baseline for Project W-236B, Initial Pretreatment Module, by defining the level 5 and 6 functions and requirements for the project. A functional analysis approach has been used to break down the program functions and associated physical requirements that each function must meet. As the systems engineering process evolves, the design requirements document will replace this preliminary functions and requirements document. The design requirements document (DRD) will identify key decisions and associated uncertainties that impact the project. A revision of this document to a DRD is not expected to change the performance requirements or open issues. However, additional requirements and issues may be identified.

  9. Predicted Effect of Minerals on Pretreatment 1013 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Predicted Effect of Minerals on Pretreatment 1013 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113 of Mineral Neutralization and Bisulfate Formation on Hydrogen Ion Concentration for Dilute Sulfuric Acid, such as agricultural residues and forest wastes, can have a significant mineral content. It has been shown

  10. Use of Carbon Mesh Anodes and the Effect of Different Pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Carbon Mesh Anodes and the Effect of Different Pretreatment Methods on Power Production, China, and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Penn State University, 231Q Sackett electrode spacing improves power generation. Carbon cloth and carbon paper materials typically used

  11. Chemical cleaning of coal by molten caustic leaching after pretreatment by low-temperature devolatilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA); Kaushik, Surender M. (Socorro, NM); Shah, Navin D. (Houston, TX); Markuszewski, Richard (Ames, IA)

    1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pretreatment of coal by devolatization at temperatures ranging from about 420.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C. for from about 10 minutes to about 30 minutes before leaching with molten caustic leads to a significant reduction in carbonate formation, greatly reducing the cost of cleaning coal on a per ton basis.

  12. Inhibition of aortic wall calcification in bioprosthetic heart valves by ethanol pretreatment: Biochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Robert

    pretreatment almost com- pletely extracted both phospholipids and cholesterol from the aortic wall; despite of BPHV aortic wall and this effect may be due in part to lipid extraction and protein structure changes and associ- ated minerals in the BPHV tissues. This calcific degen- eration is usually followed by stenosis

  13. Impact of Velocity on Corn Stover Pretreatment 977 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 113116, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    additives, lowers the cost of materials of construction, and generates less waste, but hemicellulose an important role in hemicellulose and lignin degradation and removal. Index Entries: Pretreatment; hot water and chemicals from this low-cost sustainable resource would pro- vide unparalleled environmental, economical

  14. Impact of surfactants on pretreatment of corn stover Qing Qing, Bin Yang 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    glycol 4000 during water-only or dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover at 140­220 °C were evaluated energy security, trade deficit, environmental, and economic issues that are becoming more urgent in light of declining petroleum reserves and increasing international demand for transportation fuels. However

  15. De-oiling and Pre-treatments for High-Quality Potato Chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A de-oiling step using a centrifuge ensures oil content reduction and improves the quality of fried snacks. A commercial deep-fat fryer with the basket loaded with potatoes and a sample holder was used to fry potato slices, non-pretreated, blanched...

  16. Residence Time Distribution Measurement and Analysis of Pilot-Scale Pretreatment Reactors for Biofuels Production: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, D.; Kuhn, E.; Tucker, M.; Stickel, J.; Wolfrum, E.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) data is the focus of this study where data collection methods were developed specifically for the pretreatment reactor environment. Augmented physical sampling and automated online detection methods were developed and applied. Both the measurement techniques themselves and the produced RTD data are presented and discussed.

  17. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical performance of NiO microspheres with different nanoscale building blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Ling; Hao Yanjing; Zhao Yan [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Lai Qiongyu, E-mail: laiqy5@hotmail.co [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Xu Xiaoyun [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    NiO microspheres were successfully obtained by calcining the Ni(OH){sub 2} precursor, which were synthesized via the hydrothermal reaction of nickel chloride, glucose and ammonia. The products were characterized by TGA, XRD and SEM. The influences of glucose and reaction temperature on the morphologies of NiO samples were investigated. Moreover, the possible growth mechanism for the spherical morphology was proposed. The charge/discharge test showed that the as-prepared NiO microspheres composed of nanoparticles can serve as an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor due to the spherical hollow structure. -- Graphical Abstract: Fig. 5 is the SEM image of NiO that was prepared in the different hydrothermal reaction temperatures. It showed that reaction temperature played a crucial role for the morphology of products.

  19. An introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    data was prepared. It was also desired to dig dee- per into pretreatment attributes to try to revealAn introduction to the special section on application of leading pretreatments to switchgrass by the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) Pretreatment is among the most

  20. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  2. Solion ion source for high-efficiency, high-throughput solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koo, John, E-mail: john-koo@amat.com; Binns, Brant; Miller, Timothy; Krause, Stephen; Skinner, Wesley; Mullin, James [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)] [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce the Solion ion source for high-throughput solar cell doping. As the source power is increased to enable higher throughput, negative effects degrade the lifetime of the plasma chamber and the extraction electrodes. In order to improve efficiency, we have explored a wide range of electron energies and determined the conditions which best suit production. To extend the lifetime of the source we have developed an in situ cleaning method using only existing hardware. With these combinations, source life-times of >200 h for phosphorous and >100 h for boron ion beams have been achieved while maintaining 1100 cell-per-hour production.

  3. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal-magma systems: energy transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardee, H.C.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative assessment of five sites is being prepared as part of a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) review of thermal regimes for the purpose of scoping areas for future research and drilling activities. This background report: discusses the various energy transport processes likely to be encountered in a hydrothermal-magma system, reviews related literature, discusses research and field data needs, and reviews the sites from an energy transport viewpoint. At least three major zones exist in the magma-hydrothermal transport system: the magma zone, the hydrothermal zone, and the transition zone between the two. Major energy transport questions relate to the nature and existence of these zones and their evolution with time. Additional energy transport questions are concerned with the possible existence of critical state and super-critical state permeable convection in deep geothermal systems. A review of thermal transport models emphasizes the fact that present transport models and computational techniques far outweigh the scarcity and quality of deep field data.

  4. Ionic liquid pretreatment of poplar wood at room temperature: swelling and incorporation of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Marcel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Steven A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rector, Kirk D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents a potentially sustainable source of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. It could satisfy the energy needs for transportation and electricity generation, while contributing substantially to carbon sequestration and limiting the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Potential feedstocks are abundant and include crops, agricultural wastes, forest products, grasses, and algae. Among those feedstocks, wood is mainly constituted of three components: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. The conversion process of lignocellulosic biomass typically consists of three steps: (1) pretreatment; (2) hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars; and (3) fermentation of the sugars into liquid fuels (ethanol) and other commodity chemicals. The pretreatment step is necessary due to the complex structure of the plant cell wall and the chemical resistance of lignin. Most current pretreatments are energy-intensive and/or polluting. So it is imperative to develop new pretreatments that are economically viable and environmentally friendly. Recently, ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest, due to their ability to dissolve biopolymers, such as cellulose, lignin, native switchgrass, and others. Ionic liquids are also considered green solvents, since they have been successfully recycled at high yields for further use with limited efficiency loss. Also, a few microbial cellulases remain active at high ionic liquid concentration. However, all studies on the dissolution of wood in ionic liquids have been conducted so far at high temperatures, typically above 90 C. Development of alternative pretreatments at room temperature is desirable to eliminate the additional energy cost. In this study, thin sections of poplar wood were swollen at room temperature by a 3 h ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate or EMIMAc) pretreatment. The pretreated sample was then exposed to an aqueous suspension of nanoparticles that resulted in the sample contraction and the deposition of nanoparticles onto the surface and embedded into the cell wall. To date, both silver and gold particles ranging in size from 40-100 nm have been incorporated into wood. Penetration of gold nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter in the cell walls was best confirmed by near-infrared confocal Raman microscopy, since the deposition of gold nanoparticles induces a significant enhancement of the Raman signal from the wood in their close proximity, an enhancement attributed to the surface-enhanced Raman effect (SERS). After rinsing with water, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman images of the same areas show that most nanoparticles remained on the pretreated sample. Raman images at different depths reveal that a significant number of nanoparticles were incorporated into the wood sample, at depths up to 4 {micro}m, or 40 times the diameter of the nanoparticles. Control experiments on an untreated wood sample resulted in the deposition of nanoparticles only at the surface and most nanoparticles were removed upon rinsing. This particle incorporation process enables the development of new pretreatments, since the nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio and could be chemically functionalized. Other potential applications for the incorporated nanoparticles include isotope tracing, catalysis, imaging agents, drug-delivery systems, energy-storage devices, and chemical sensors.

  5. 2005 International Conference on Wireless Networks, Communications and Mobile Computing Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations Haowei Bai Honeywell Labs 3660- The degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) throughput in networks with lossy links is mainly due to processor performance degradation due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two types of loss events

  6. TECHNICAL COMPARISON OF CANDIDATE ION EXCHANGE MEDIA FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE (SCIX) APPLICATIONS IN SUPPORT OF SUPPLEMENTAL LAW PRETREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAMSEY AA; THORSON MR

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    At-tank supplemental pretreatment including both filtration and small column ion exchange is currently under evaluation to facilitate salt waste retrieval and processing in the Hanford tank farms. Spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) resin is the baseline ion exchange resin for use in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). This document provides background and technical rationale to assist in determining whether spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) is also the appropriate ion exchange resin for supplemental LAW pretreatment processes and compares sRF with crystalline silicotitanate (CST) as potential supplemental pretreatment ion exchange media.

  7. High-Throughput Screening of Gene Function in Stem Cells Using Clonal Microarrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, David V.

    High-Throughput Screening of Gene Function in Stem Cells Using Clonal Microarrays RANDOLPH S. ASHTON,a JOSEPH PELTIER,b CHRISTOPHER A. FASANO,c ANALEAH O'NEILL,b JOSHUA LEONARD,b SALLY TEMPLE,c DAVID. Sox2 transcription factor · Akt1 · Neural progenitor cells · Soft lithography ABSTRACT We describe

  8. Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    networks (MANETs) have received a lot of attention for its flexible network architecture. While many network (MANET) is a flexible and dynamic architecture that is attractive due to its ease in network1 Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Lien-Wu Chen

  9. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  10. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  11. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy more »wavelength calibration.« less

  12. Joint Power Control and Link Scheduling in Wireless Networks for Throughput Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Joint Power Control and Link Scheduling in Wireless Networks for Throughput Optimization Liqun Fu--This paper concerns the problem of finding the minimum-length TDMA frame of a power-controlled wire- less formulate the general joint link scheduling and power control problem as an in- teger linear programming

  13. Trapped Capacity: Scheduling under a Power Cap to Maximize Machine-Room Throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakin, Scott

    in the machine room and thereby increase system throughput. Our goal is not to reduce energy or power consumption power and energy in machine rooms. In practice the power for machine rooms is well over-provisioned, specified by high energy LINPACK runs or nameplate power estimates. This results in a considerable amount

  14. Throughput Optimization in Multi-hop Wireless Networks with Multi-packet Reception and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    Mexico College, Espanola, NM - USA Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico layer have enabled the simultaneous reception of multiple packets by a node in wireless net- works. We model for the throughput optimization in MPR-capable wireless net- works, where nodes have one or more

  15. High-throughput two-hybrid analysis The promise and the peril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    , reduction in reagent costs and further refinements of the approach. As throughput escalates, so does use. The first stage is the initial description of a method: the prototype version. Typically. For a large fraction of new technologies, few other examples beyond this proto- type are ever described

  16. Accounting for Memory Use, Cost, Throughput, and Latency in the Design of a Media Server

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Edward Y.

    : the per­stream costs and the worst­case initial latency before a new media request can be satisfied. WeAccounting for Memory Use, Cost, Throughput, and Latency in the Design of a Media Server Edward scheduling and data place­ ment ones. We show that, some disk latency reduction techniques can

  17. SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS Edoardo Regini, Daeseob Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 {eregini, dalim, tajana}@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Maximizing battery lifetime. This is because in heavy traffic conditions, the chance of nodes to successfully transmit a packet decreases

  18. Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae{,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Amar S.

    Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid- producing algae-producing algae of interest in 2nd generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance the study of photosynthesis in algae. Societal challenges in energy sustainability have renewed interest

  19. Applied Catalysis A: General 254 (2003) 97106 Photoionization detection (PID) as a high throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    Applied Catalysis A: General 254 (2003) 97­106 Photoionization detection (PID) as a high throughput 2002 Abstract A versatile photoionization detection (PID) system has been developed to rapidly screen libraries of catalytic materials. The PID approach involves the use of an appropriately selected dc

  20. Throughput Validation of an Advanced Channel Assignment Algorithm in IEEE 802.11 Mohamad Haidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Robert

    assignment for hot-spot service areas in a WLAN by formulating an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) modelThroughput Validation of an Advanced Channel Assignment Algorithm in IEEE 802.11 WLAN Mohamad channel-assignment algorithm at the Access Points (APs) of a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN

  1. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrimon, Norbert

    Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening Eric Brouzesa,b,1 (received for review March 31, 2009) We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range

  2. Throughput analysis for MIMO systems in the high SNR regime Narayan Prasad and Mahesh K. Varanasi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Mahesh K.

    . The throughputs of MISO and SIMO fading channels are extensively analyzed and it is shown that asymptoti- cally [1, 2] and is defined as the maximum rate that can be transmitted reliably over all channel realiza rate which can be reliably transmitted This work was supported in part by NSF Grant CCF-0431170

  3. Effect of Height (Fresnel Clearance) on Signal Strength and Throughput for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Effect of Height (Fresnel Clearance) on Signal Strength and Throughput for Medium and Long Distance obstruction height · Ignoring Fresnel Clearance For 20Km long Wireless Link, Fresnel Clearance requires around, height 4 m at Q ensures 100% Fresnel Clearance On Physical Inspection: No LOS even at 8 meters Distance

  4. A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein- Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial Transcriptional Regulatory Protein Fur

  5. High-Throughput Contention-Free Concurrent Interleaver Architecture for Multi-Standard Turbo Decoder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    High-Throughput Contention-Free Concurrent Interleaver Architecture for Multi-Standard Turbo paral- lel turbo decoder architectures have been developed. However, the interleaver has become a major that can efficiently solve the memory conflict problem for parallel turbo decoders with very high

  6. Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome Annotation software on a high performance computing platform such as the grid. The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) project application to drive grid software development. It is a flagship application for the TeraGrid project [3

  7. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label on the polarizer­ compensator­sample­analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI

  8. HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC SEPARATION Michael D. Vahey conductivity. Using a re- cently developed separation method - iso-dielectric separation (IDS) - we character for developing new screens. THEORY We recently developed a separa- tion method, called iso-dielectric sepa

  9. Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption Canming: {jcm, yshi, thou, wjlou}@vt.edu Abstract Conserving network-wide energy consumption is becoming of wireless networks, the concern of energy consumption is becoming in- creasingly important for network

  10. Advanced concepts in biomass production and biological pretreatment. Annual report, April 1987-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiler, E.A.; Miller, F.R.; McBee, G.G.; Boyle, M.; Boyer, J.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate fundamental processes for enhancing the efficiency of methane from sorghum systems. The report provides specifics of research activities in the Texas AandM biomass and biological pretreatment program sponsored by Gas Research Institute and co-funded by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. Five research groups, each with specific tasks are involved in the project: biomass production, quantity and quality; plant water stress; biological pretreatment and processing; long-term effects of land application of digester effluent; and crop-growth modeling, economics, and systems. Also included is the final report on Electrochemistry for the In-Situ Detection of Volatile Acids in Anaerobic Digesters.

  11. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

  12. Hanford Waste Treatment Plant places first complex piping module in Pretreatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Crews at the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant, also known as the "Vit Plant," placed a 19-ton piping module inside the Pretreatment Facility. The module was lifted over 98-foot-tall walls and lowered into a space that provided less than two inches of clearance on each side and just a few feet on each end. It was set 56 feet above the ground.

  13. Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

  14. Thermal Pretreatment of Wood for Cogasification/cofiring of Biomass and Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ping; Howard, Bret; Hedges, Sheila; Morreale, Bryan; Van Essendelft, Dirk; Berry, David

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of biomass as a co-feed in coal and biomass co-firing and co-gasification requires size reduction of the biomass. Reducing biomass to below 0.2 mm without pretreatment is difficult and costly because biomass is fibrous and compressible. Torrefaction is a promising thermal pretreatment process and has the advantages of increasing energy density, improving grindability, producing fuels with more homogenous compositions and hydrophobic behavior. Temperature is the most important factor for the torrefaction process. Biomass grindability is related to cell wall structure, thickness and composition. Thermal treatment such as torrefaction can cause chemical changes that significantly affect the strength of biomass. The objectives of this study are to understand the mechanism by which torrefaction improves the grindability of biomass and discuss suitable temperatures for thermal pretreatment for co-gasification/cofiring of biomass and coal. Wild cherry wood was selected as the model for this study. Samples were prepared by sawing a single tangential section from the heartwood and cutting it into eleven pieces. The samples were consecutively heated at 220, 260, 300, 350, 450 and 550oC for 0.5 hr under flowing nitrogen in a tube furnace. Untreated and treated samples were characterized for physical properties (color, dimensions and weight), microstructural changes by SEM, and cell wall composition changes and thermal behaviors by TGA and DSC. The morphology of the wood remained intact through the treatment range but the cell walls were thinner. Thermal treatments were observed to decompose the cell wall components. Hemicellulose decomposed over the range of ~200 to 300oC and resulted in weakening of the cell walls and subsequently improved grindability. Furthermore, wood samples treated above 300oC lost more than 39% in mass. Therefore, thermal pretreatment above the hemicelluloses decomposition temperature but below 300oC is probably sufficient to improve grindability and retain energy value.

  15. Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.

    1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

  16. Interim data quality objectives for waste pretreatment and vitrification. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupfer, M.J.; Conner, J.M.; Kirkbride, R.A.; Mobley, J.R.

    1994-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is responsible for storing, processing, and immobilizing the Hanford Site tank wastes. Characterization information on the tank wastes is needed so that safety concerns can be addressed, and retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes can be designed, permitted, and implemented. This document describes the near-term tank waste sampling and characterization needs of the Pretreatment, High-Level Waste (HLW) Disposal, and Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Programs to support the TWRS disposal mission. The final DQO (Data Quality Objective) will define specific waste tanks to be sampled, sample timing requirements, an appropriate analytical scheme, and a list of required analytes. This interim DQO, however, focuses primarily on the required analytes since the tanks to be sampled in FY 1994 and early FY 1995 are being driven most heavily by other considerations, particularly safety. The major objective of this Interim DQO is to provide guidance for tank waste characterization requirements for samples taken before completion of the final DQO. The characterization data needs defined herein will support the final DQO to help perform the following: Support the TWRS technical strategy by identification of the chemical and physical composition of the waste in the tanks and Guide development efforts to define waste pretreatment processes, which will in turn define HLW and LLW feed to vitrification processes.

  17. Improved Multivariate Calibration Models for Corn Stover Feedstock and Dilute-Acid Pretreated Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfrum, E. J.; Sluiter, A. D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied rapid calibration models to predict the composition of a variety of biomass feedstocks by correlating near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic data to compositional data produced using traditional wet chemical analysis techniques. The rapid calibration models are developed using multivariate statistical analysis of the spectroscopic and wet chemical data. This work discusses the latest versions of the NIR calibration models for corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover. Measures of the calibration precision and uncertainty are presented. No statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen between NIR calibration models built using different mathematical pretreatments. Finally, two common algorithms for building NIR calibration models are compared; no statistically significant differences (p = 0.05) are seen for the major constituents glucan, xylan, and lignin, but the algorithms did produce different predictions for total extractives. A single calibration model combining the corn stover feedstock and dilute-acid pretreated corn stover samples gave less satisfactory predictions than the separate models.

  18. Uranium Transport in a High-Throughput Electrorefiner for EBR-II Blanket Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Vaden, DeeEarl [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique high-throughput Mk-V electrorefiner is being used in the electrometallurgical treatment of the metallic sodium-bonded blanket fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Over many cycles, it transports uranium back and forth between the anodic fuel dissolution baskets and the cathode tubes until, because of imperfect adherence of the dendrites, it all ends up in the product collector at the bottom. The transport behavior of uranium in the high-throughput electrorefiner can be understood in terms of the sticking coefficients for uranium adherence to the cathode tubes in the forward direction and to the dissolution baskets in the reverse direction. The sticking coefficients are inferred from the experimental voltage and current traces and are correlated in terms of a single parameter representing the ratio of the cell current to the limiting current at the surface acting as the cathode. The correlations are incorporated into an engineering model that calculates the transport of uranium in the different modes of operation. The model also uses the experimentally derived electrorefiner operating maps that describe the relationship between the cell voltage and the cell current for the three principal transport modes. It is shown that the model correctly simulates the cycle-to-cycle variation of the voltage and current profiles. The model is used to conduct a parametric study of electrorefiner throughput rate as a function of the principal operating parameters. The throughput rate is found to improve with lowering of the basket rotation speed, reduction of UCl{sub 3} concentration in salt, and increasing the maximum cell current or cut-off voltage. Operating conditions are identified that can improve the throughput rate by 60 to 70% over that achieved at present.

  19. Influence of the regional topography on the remote emplacement of hydrothermal systems with examples of Ticsani and Ubinas volcanoes, Southern Peru.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and temperature of the hot springs together with the water table position given by self-potential data can be used-volcanic hydrothermal systems. Keywords: self-potential mapping, hydrothermal system, hot springs, temperature 1 by fu- marolic activity and hot springs on the flanks of the edifice, high electric conductivity

  20. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  1. Template-free hydrothermal derived cobalt oxide nanopowders: Synthesis, characterization, and removal of organic dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassar, Mostafa Y. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha 13518 (Egypt)] [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha 13518 (Egypt); Ahmed, Ibrahim S., E-mail: isahmed2010@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Benha University, Benha 13518 (Egypt)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: XRD patterns of the products obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 160 °C for 24 h, and at different [Co{sup 2+}]/[CO{sub 3}{sup 2?}] ratios: (a) 1:6, (b) 1:3, (c) 1:1.5, (d) 1:1, (e) 1:0.5. Highlights: ? Spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared by hydrothermal approach. ? The optical characteristics of the as-prepared cobalt oxide revealed the presence of two band gaps. ? Adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was investigated and the percent uptake was found to be >99% in 24 h. -- Abstract: Pure spinel cobalt oxide nanoparticles were prepared through hydrothermal approach using different counter ions. First, the pure and uniform cobalt carbonate (with particle size of 21.8–29.8 nm) were prepared in high yield (94%) in an autoclave in absence unfriendly organic surfactants or solvents by adjusting different experimental parameters such as: pH, reaction time, temperature, counter ions, and (Co{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2?}) molar ratios. Thence, the spinel Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} (with mean particle size of 30.5–47.35 nm) was produced by thermal decomposition of cobalt carbonate in air at 500 °C for 3 h. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and thermal analysis (TA). Also, the optical characteristics of the as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles revealed the presence of two band gaps (1.45–1.47, and 1.83–1.93 eV). Additionally, adsorption of methylene blue dye on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was investigated and the uptake% was found to be >99% in 24 h.

  2. Fabrication of hollow mesoporous NiO hexagonal microspheres via hydrothermal process in ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinbo, E-mail: zhaojinb@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China) [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China); Wu, Lili, E-mail: wulili@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China) [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China); Zou, Ke, E-mail: zouk2005@163.com [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China) [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan (China)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors were synthesized in ionic liquid and water solution by hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were prepared by thermal treatment of Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were self-assembled by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals with high specific surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mesoporous structure is stable at 773 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ionic liquid absorbed on the O-terminate surface of the crystals to form hydrogen bond and played key roles in determining the final shape of the NiO novel microstructure. -- Abstract: The novel NiO hexagonal hollow microspheres have been successfully prepared by annealing Ni(OH){sub 2}, which was synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results show that the hollow NiO microstructures are self-organized by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals. The mesoporous structure possessed good thermal stability and high specific surface area (ca. 83 m{sup 2}/g). The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF{sub 4}]) was found to play a key role in controlling the morphology of NiO microstructures during the hydrothermal process. The special hollow mesoporous architectures will have potential applications in many fields, such as catalysts, absorbents, sensors, drug-delivery carriers, acoustic insulators and supercapacitors.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis and catalytic properties of {alpha}- and {beta}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Guangsheng, E-mail: daqingcgs@163.com [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery of Ministry of Education, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Daqing 163318 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery of Ministry of Education, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Daqing 163318 (China); Su, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Li, Hui [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery of Ministry of Education, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Daqing 163318 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery of Ministry of Education, Daqing Petroleum Institute, Daqing 163318 (China)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2} single-crystalline nanostructures were prepared by hydrothermal process. The products were characterized in detail by multiform techniques: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Experimental results indicate that the temperature plays important roles in determining produce {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods. In addition, the as-prepared {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and {beta}-MnO{sub 2} nanorods showed excellent catalytic performance in the Fenton-like reaction.

  4. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

  5. Hydrothermal reactions: From the synthesis of ligand to new lanthanide 3D-coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, Fausthon Fred da; Fernandes de Oliveira, Carlos Alberto; Lago Falcão, Eduardo Henrique [Laboratório de Terras Raras, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DQF-UFPE), 50590-470 Recife, PE (Brazil); Gatto, Claudia Cristina [Laboratório de Síntese Inorgânica e Cristalografia, Instituto de Química, Universidade de Brasília (IQ-UnB), 70904-970 Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Bezerra da Costa, Nivan; Oliveira Freire, Ricardo [Pople Computational Chemistry Laboratory, Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Chojnacki, Jaros?aw [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Alves Júnior, Severino, E-mail: salvesjr@ufpe.br [Laboratório de Terras Raras, Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DQF-UFPE), 50590-470 Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The organic ligand 2,5-piperazinedione-1,4-diacetic acid (H{sub 2}PDA) was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions starting from the iminodiacetic acid and catalyzed by oxalic acid. The X-ray powder diffraction data indicates that the compound crystallizes in the P2{sub 1}/c monoclinic system as reported in the literature. The ligand was also characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic nuclear resonance, infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Two new coordination networks based on lanthanide ions were obtained with this ligand using hydrothermal reaction. In addition to single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the compounds were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Single-crystal XRD showed that the compounds are isostructural, crystallizing in P2{sub 1}/n monoclinic system with chemical formula [Ln(PDA){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (Ln=Gd{sup 3+}(1) and Eu{sup 3+}(2)).The luminescence properties of both compounds were studied. In the compound (1), a broad emission band was observed at 479 nm, redshifted by 70 nm in comparison of the free ligand. In (2), the typical f–f transition was observed with a maximum peak at 618 nm, related with the red emission of the europium ions. Computational methods were performed to simulate the crystal structure of (2). The theoretical calculations of the intensity parameters are in good agreement with the experimental values. - Graphical abstract: Scheme of obtaining the ligand 2,5-piperazinedione-1,4-diacetic acid (H{sub 2}PDA) and two new isostructural 3D-coordination polymers [Ln(PDA){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)](H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (Ln=Gd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+}) by hydrothermal synthesis. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The ligand 2,5-piperazinedione-1,4-diacetic acid was synthetized using the hydrothermic method and characterized. • Two new 3D-coordination polymers with this ligand containing Gd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions were also obtained. • The compounds are isostructural and the typical luminescent properties were observed in both structures.

  6. Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

  7. Increasing throughput of multiplexed electrical bus in pipe-lined architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asaad, Sameh; Brezzo, Bernard V; Kapur, Mohit

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are disclosed for increasing the throughput of a multiplexed electrical bus by exploiting available pipeline stages of a computer or other system. For example, a method for increasing a throughput of an electrical bus that connects at least two devices in a system comprises introducing at least one signal hold stage in a signal-receiving one of the two devices, such that a maximum frequency at which the two devices are operated is not limited by a number of cycles of an operating frequency of the electrical bus needed for a signal to propagate from a signal-transmitting one of the two devices to the signal-receiving one of the two devices. Preferably, the signal hold stage introduced in the signal-receiving one of the two devices is a pipeline stage re-allocated from the signal-transmitting one of the two devices.

  8. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  9. A simple packet retransmission strategy for throughput and delay enhancement on power line communication channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onunga, J.O. (Kenya Posts and Telecommunications Corp., Nairobi (Kenya)); Donaldson, R.W. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, simple, and effective communication protocol is developed and evaluated for use on power line distribution networks. The protocol involves retransmission of unacknowledged packets, which are sent in either single or multiple (N) copies in accordance with estimates of communication link quality. Multiple packet copies can be code combined at the receiver, using majority voting on each bit position, to reduce packet error rates. Adaptive link quality estimates are based on the receipt or absence of positive acknowledgements. Information throughput efficiency is calculated and N optimized in terms of system variables. Performance benefits of code combining are clearly demonstrated. The algorithm was implemented and tested using a five-station intrabuilding power line communications network operating at 1.2, 2.4, 4.8 and 9.6 kbit/s data rate. Substantial throughput and delay improvement occurred on poor quality links, without degrading performance on good links.

  10. Using Channel Output Feedback to Increase Throughput in Hybrid-ARQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Mayur; Love, David J; Balakrishnan, Venkataramanan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its inclusion in the High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSPDA) standard, the hybrid-ARQ protocol has become very popular in packet transmission schemes. Hybrid-ARQ combines the normal automatic repeat request (ARQ) method with error correction codes to increase reliability and throughput. The use of rate-compatible punctured turbo codes has been shown to work well for block fading channels. In this paper, we look at improving upon this performance using feedback information from the receiver; in particular, using a turbo code in conjunction with a proposed linear feedback code for the Rayleigh fading channels. The new hybrid-ARQ scheme is extended to various different multiple-antenna scenarios (MIMO/MISO/SISO) with varying amounts of feedback information. Simulations are given to illustrate gains in throughput.

  11. Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jordan, Scott [Physik Instrumente

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Scott Jordan on "Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  13. High Throughput Synthesis of Uniform Biocompatible Polymer Beads with High Quantum Dot Loading Using Microfluidic Jet-Mode Breakup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Kon

    Uniform polymer microbeads with highly loaded quantum dots (QDs) are produced using high-throughput coherent jet breakup of a biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) prepolymer resin, followed by in-line ...

  14. Evaluation of Tavorite-Structured Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries Using High-Throughput Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Tim

    Cathode materials with structure similar to the mineral tavorite have shown promise for use in lithium-ion batteries, but this class of materials is relatively unexplored. We use high-throughput density-functional-theory ...

  15. High-throughput data mined prediction of inorganic compounds and computational discovery of new lithium-ion battery cathode materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hautier, Geoffroy (Geoffroy T. F.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to computationally predict the properties of new materials, even prior to their synthesis, has been made possible due to the current accuracy of modern ab initio techniques. In some cases, high-throughput ...

  16. High Throughput Computing Impact on Meta Genomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Brooklin [Morgridge Institute for Research] [Morgridge Institute for Research

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes a brief background on High Throughput Computing, correlating gene transcription factors, optical mapping, genotype to phenotype mapping via QTL analysis, and current work on next gen sequencing.

  17. 2008NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods BAC TransgeneOmics: a high-throughput method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    to assess protein function at high throughput. Here we describe a fast and reliable pipeline to study ubiquitous or tissue-specific promoters. As a result they do not reproduce the endogenous regulation

  18. High Throughput Computing Impact on Meta Genomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gore, Brooklin [Morgridge Institute for Research

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes a brief background on High Throughput Computing, correlating gene transcription factors, optical mapping, genotype to phenotype mapping via QTL analysis, and current work on next gen sequencing.

  19. Coev2Net: a computational framework for boosting confidence in high-throughput protein-protein interaction datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosur, Raghavendra

    Improving the quality and coverage of the protein interactome is of tantamount importance for biomedical research, particularly given the various sources of uncertainty in high-throughput techniques. We introduce a ...

  20. Pencil-like zinc oxide micro/nano-scale structures: Hydrothermal synthesis, optical and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée, IPEIT, Université de Tunis, 2 rue Jawaher Lel Nehru 1008, B. P. 229 Montfleury (Tunisia); Sediri, F., E-mail: faouzi.sediri@ipeit.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée, IPEIT, Université de Tunis, 2 rue Jawaher Lel Nehru 1008, B. P. 229 Montfleury (Tunisia); Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 El Manar (Tunisia)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been synthesized hydrothermally. • Photocatalytic activity has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation. • ZnO nanopencils exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than the commercial ZnO. - Abstract: Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process using zinc acetate and diamines as structure-directing agents. The morphology, the structure, the crystallinity and the composition of the materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties of synthesized ZnO were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the material has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. As a result, after the lapse of 150 min, around 82% bleaching was observed, with ZnO nanopencils yielding more photodegradation compared to that of commercial ZnO (61%)

  1. Hydrothermal alteration in the EPF replacement wells, Olkaria Geothermal field, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mungania, J. [Kenya Power & Lighting Co. Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Olkaria Geothermal area is located in the central sector of the Kenya, Rift Valley. A 45MW Geothermal power station has been operational at Olkaria since 1985 supplied by 22 of the 26 wells drilled in the Eastern production field (EPF). Between 1988 and 1993, eight more wells referred to as {open_quote}replacement wells{close_quote} were drilled in the same field to boost steam supply to the station. Petrographic analyses of the drill cuttings is usually done to determine detail stratigraphy of the field, extends of hydrothermal activity, subsurface structures and other parameters which may influence production potential of a well. Analyses of the drill cuttings from the EPF wells show that: Variations in the whole rock alteration intensities correlate with differences in rocktypes. Permeable horizons, especially the productive feeder zones are well marked by enhanced hydrothermal minerals depositions, mainly quartz, calcite, pyrite and epidote. Other aspects of state of reservoir like boiling are signified by presence of bladed calcite.

  2. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

  3. A review on biomass classification and composition, cofiring issues and pretreatment methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Richard D. Boardman

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently around the globe there is a significant interest in using biomass for power generation as power generation from coal continues to raise environmental concerns. Biomass alone can be used for generation of power which can bring lot of environmental benefits. However the constraints of using biomass alone can include high investments costs for biomass feed systems and also uncertainty in the security of the feedstock supply due to seasonal variations and in most of the countries biomass is dispersed and the infrastructure for biomass supply is not well established. Alternatively cofiring biomass along with coal offer advantages like (a) reducing the issues related to biomass quality and buffers the system when there is insufficient feedstock quantity and (b) costs of adapting the existing coal power plants will be lower than building new systems dedicated only to biomass. However with the above said advantages there exists some technical constrains including low heating and energy density values, low bulk density, lower grindability index, higher moisture and ash content to successfully cofire biomass with coal. In order to successfully cofire biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications need to be established to direct pretreatment options that may include increasing the energy density, bulk density, stability during storage and grindability. Impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation and boiler tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications including composition and blend ratios if necessary. Some of these limitations can be overcome by using pretreatment methods. This paper discusses the impact of feedstock pretreatment methods like sizing, baling, pelletizing, briquetting, washing/leaching, torrefaction, torrefaction and pelletization and steam explosion in attainment of optimum feedstock characteristics to successfully cofire biomass with coal.

  4. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth pre-treated at 80 {sup o}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, Ivet, E-mail: ivet.ferrer@upc.ed [Environmental Engineering Division, Department of Hydraulic, Maritime and Environmental Engineering. Technical University of Catalonia, C/ Jordi Girona 1-3, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Palatsi, Jordi [GIRO Technological Centre, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, E-08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Campos, Elena [Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, Centre UdL-IRTA, Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Flotats, Xavier [GIRO Technological Centre, Rambla Pompeu Fabra 1, E-08100 Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Agrifood Engineering and Biotechnology, Technical University of Catalonia, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia Edifici D-4, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) is a fast growing aquatic plant which causes environmental problems in continental water bodies. Harvesting and handling this plant becomes an issue, and focus has been put on the research of treatment alternatives. Amongst others, energy production through biomethanation has been proposed. The aim of this study was to assess the anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The effect of a thermal sludge pre-treatment at 80 {sup o}C was also evaluated. To this end, anaerobic biodegradability tests were carried out at 35 {sup o}C and 55 {sup o}C, with raw and pre-treated water hyacinth. According to the results, the thermal pre-treatment enhanced the solubilisation of water hyacinth (i.e. increase in the soluble to total chemical oxygen demand (COD)) from 4% to 12% after 30 min. However, no significant effect was observed on the methane yields (150-190 L CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids). Initial methane production rates for thermophilic treatments were two fold those of mesophilic ones (6-6.5 L vs. 3-3.5 L CH{sub 4}/kg COD.day). Thus, higher methane production rates might be expected from thermophilic reactors working at short retention times. The study of longer low temperature pre-treatments or pre-treatments at elevated temperatures coupled to thermophilic reactors should be considered in the future.

  5. Hydrothermal investigation of SYNROC formulations from 150/sup 0/ to 610/sup 0/ at 100-MPa water pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, L.E.; Bazan, C.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Smith, G.S.; Wootton, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The static leaching behavior of seven formulations of SYNROC and two preparations of hollandite have been investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Each formulation was tested at several times (1 to 60 days) and temperatures (150 to 610/sup 0/C) at 100-MPa water pressure, using distilled water as the fluid. Both cored and powdered samples were employed in the hydrothermal experiments. Leach rates (g SYNROC/m/sup 2/ day) were calculated on the basis of element concentrations observed in the leachate. Postrun SEM and XRD observations of some core specimens revealed crystalline precipitates occurring on core surfaces, which are interpreted to be metastable phases and/or precipitates that were formed during quenching. As a result, calculated leach rates based on some elements in the fluid phase are not true leach rates. The temperature dependence of apparent leach rate was erratic. The time dependence of apparent leach rate was consistent and well defined for all SYNROC formulations; it decreased as a function of time. Analysis of hydrothermal results suggests that runs of 30 to 60 days are required to approach, or to attain, steady-state apparent leach rates. Sample form appears to have a demonstrable effect on leaching behavior. For comparable run conditions, powders generally have lower apparent leach rates but have a higher percentage of material leached than cores. The mineral hollandite appears to be very resistant to hydrothermal leaching, with only titanium found in the leachate.

  6. 1256 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2003 Short-Term Hydrothermal Generation Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    long and mid-term models, have been used to optimize the amount of hydro energy to be used during1256 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2003 Short-Term Hydrothermal are obtained for each of both hydro and thermal units. Future cost curves of hydro generation, obtained from

  7. Preliminary survey of separations technology applicable to the pretreatment of Hanford tank waste (1992--1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, W.E.; Kurath, D.E.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to manage and dispose of radioactive wastes stored at the Hanford Site. Within this program are evaluations of pretreatment system alternatives through literature reviews. The information in this report was collected as part of this project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A preliminary survey of literature on separations recently entered into the Hanford electronic databases (1992--1993) that have the potential for pretreatment of Hanford tank waste was conducted. Separation processes that can assist in the removal of actinides (uranium, plutonium, americium), lanthanides, barium, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr,{sup 129 }I, {sup 63}Ni, and {sup 99}Tc were evaluated. Separation processes of interest were identified through literature searches, journal reviews, and participation in separation technology conferences. This report contains brief descriptions of the potential separation processes, the extent and/or selectivity of the separation, the experimental conditions, and observations. Information was collected on both national and international separation studies to provide a global perspective on recent research efforts.

  8. Initial studies of pretreatment methods for neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J L

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing conceptual and experimental studies for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) aimed at determining the effectiveness of various pretreatment methods for the neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge currently being stored at the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of such pretreatment methods is to separate the transuranic (TRU) elements and the bulk components of the waste (primarily zirconium, sodium, fluoride, and hydroxide) to a level low enough that the bulk components can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW), with only a small volume, TRU-containing fraction requiring geologic disposal. This objective is driven primarily by the large cost differential projected between LLW and geologic disposal procedures. This report contains the results of the first three years (1987, 1988, and 1989) of the program. These results were earlier reported informally in letter reports; they are here compiled in appendix form in this formal report to be more readily available to other workers and the public. The results of work done in 1990 and in following years will be reported in separate formal reports.

  9. Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

  10. Combined Dilute Acid and Solvent Based Pretreatment of Agricultural Wastes for Efficient Lignocellulosic Fractionation and Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodeur, G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Wilson, C.; Telotte, J.; Collier, J.; Stickel, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A true biorefinery for processing lignocellulosic biomass should achieve maximum utilization of all major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, & lignin) within the feedstock. In this work a combined pretreatment process of dilute acid (DA) and N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMMO) is described that allows for both fractionation and subsequent complete hydrolysis of the feedstocks (corn stover and sugarcane bagasse). During this multi-step processing, the dilute acid pretreatment solubilizes the majority (>90%) of the hemicellulosic fraction, while the NMMO treatment yields a cellulosic fraction that is completely digestible within 48 hours at low enzyme loadings. With both the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions being converted into separate, dissolved sugar fractions, the remaining portion is nearly pure lignin. When used independently, DA and NMMO pretreatments are only able to achieve ~80% and ~45% cellulosic conversion, respectively. Mass balance calculations along with experimental results are used to illustrate the feasibility of separation and recycling of NMMO.

  11. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-assisted synthesis through a hydrothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobhani, Azam [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Reaction of a SeCl{sub 4} aqueous solution with a NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O aqueous solution in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as capping agent and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant, produces nanosized nickel selenide through a hydrothermal method. The effect of temperature, reaction time and amounts of reductant on the morphology, particle sizes of NiSe nanostructures has been investigated. Highlights: ? NiSe nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? A novel Se source was used to synthesize NiSe. ? SDBS as capping agent plays a crucial role on the morphology of products. ? A mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe was prepared in the presence of 2 ml hydrazine. ? A pure phase of NiSe was prepared in the presence of 4 or 6 ml hydrazine. -- Abstract: The effects of the anionic surfactant on the morphology, size and crystallization of NiSe precipitated from NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and SeCl{sub 4} in presence of hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant were investigated. The products have been successfully synthesized in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant via an improved hydrothermal route. A variety of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time and temperature, capping agent and amount of reducing agent have a significant effect on the particle size, phase purity and morphology of the obtained products. The sample size became bigger with decreasing reaction temperature and increasing reaction time. In the presence of 2 ml hydrazine, the samples were found to be the mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe. With increasing the reaction time and amount of hydrazine a pure phase of hexagonal NiSe was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate phase, particle size and morphology of the products. Chemical composition and purity of the products were characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the optical properties of NiSe samples.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis and infrared emissivity property of flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, J. X. [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China) [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Beijing Institute of Environmental Features, Beijing, 100854 (China); Zhang, Z. Y., E-mail: zhangzy@nwu.edu.cn [Institute of Photonics and Photon-Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China); Yan, J. F.; Ruan, X. F.; Yun, J. N.; Zhao, W.; Zhai, C. X. [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)] [School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The flower-like SnO{sub 2} particles are synthesized through a simple hydrothermal process. The microstructure, morphology and the infrared emissivity property of the as-prepared products are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and infrared spectroradio meter (ISM) respectively. The results show that the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are all indexed to tetragonal cassiterite phase of SnO{sub 2}. The different molarity ratios of the OH{sup ?} concentration to Sn{sup 4+} concentration ([OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}]) and the polyacrylamide (PAM) lead to the different morphological structures of SnO{sub 2}, which indicates that both the [OH{sup ?}]:[Sn{sup 4+}] and the PAM play an important role in the morphological evolution respectively. The infrared emissivities of the as-prepared SnO{sub 2} products are discussed.

  13. Fabrication of indium sulfide nanofibers via a hydrothermal method assisted by AAO template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Xiaoyi [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Ma Junfeng [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China) and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China)]. E-mail: majf@mail.ouc.edu.cn; Wang Yonggang [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Tao Jiantao [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zhou Jun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Zhao Zhongqiang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Xie Lijin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China); Tian Hua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003 (China)

    2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    {beta}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanofibers were successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal method with AAO membrane as a template at 150 deg. C for 15 h. XRD patterns indicated the perfect crystallization of {beta}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. SEM images showed that the {beta}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanofibers grew up from the channel ends of the AAO template. TEM images confirmed that the nanofibers had a high aspect ratio of ca. 40-50 and diameters of about 10 nm. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of the {beta}-In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanofibers indicated its potential applications in light-emission devices.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis and crystallographic properties of silicoaluminophosphate with different content of silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, A.S.; Fernandes, V.J. Jr.; Diniz, J.C.; Silva, A.O.S.; Silva, C.C.; Santos, R.H.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieves of SAPO-11 type were synthesized with variation in the [Si/(Al + Si + P)] ratio, using the hydrothermal method, starting from silica, pseudobohemite, orthophosphoric acid and water, in the presence of a di-isopropylamine organic template. The samples were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporation of silicon into the framework of SAPO-11 is demonstrated by the variation of the unit-cell volume with the silicon content. CELREF software was used to index and refine the main lines of the XRD patterns. It is shown that the unit-cell volume decreases over a wide range of silicon content.

  15. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis and characteristics of anions-doped calcium molybdate red powder phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Shikao, E-mail: ssk02@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qing [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Zhou, Ji [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Four anion-doped CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} red phosphors were prepared by hydrothermal approach. • Some samples exhibit nearly spherical morphology and well-distributed fine particles. • The red luminescence can be obviously enhanced after certain amount of anion doping. • The improved phosphor system is a potential candidate for white LED applications. - Abstract: Applying hydrothermal and subsequent heat-treatment process, CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} was doped with four anions (SiO{sub 3}{sup 2?}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2?} and ClO{sub 3}{sup ?}) to prepare fine red powder phosphors. The introduction of small amount of anions into the host had little influence on the structure, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction patterns. The anion-doped phosphor samples (except SiO{sub 3}{sup 2?}) exhibited nearly spherical morphology, and the particle sizes were in the range of 0.3–0.4 ?m for SO{sub 4}{sup 2?}-doped samples, and 0.8–1.2 ?m for PO{sub 4}{sup 3?} and ClO{sub 3}{sup ?}-doped samples. Excited with 395 nm near-UV light, all samples showed typical Eu{sup 3+} red emission at 615 nm, and PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2?} and ClO{sub 3}{sup ?}-doped samples enhanced the red luminescence as compared with the individual CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} sample. In particular, relative emission intensity for optimum ClO{sub 3}{sup ?}-doped phosphors reached more than 6-fold that of the commercial red phosphor, which is highly desirable for the powder phosphors used in the solid-state lighting industry.

  17. ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES: SRNL GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has authorized a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America to develop a systematic approach to increase high level waste melter throughput (by increasing waste loading with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). This task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. Four specific tasks have been proposed to meet these objectives (for details, see WSRC-STI-2007-00483): (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. Task 2, Crystal Accumulation Modeling/Higher Waste Loading Glasses is the focus of this report. The objective of this study is to provide supplemental data to support the possible use of alternative melter technologies and/or implementation of alternative process control models or strategies to target higher waste loadings (WLs) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--ultimately leading to higher waste throughputs and a reduced mission life. The glass selection strategy discussed in this report was developed to gain insight into specific technical issues that could limit or compromise the ability of glass formulation efforts to target higher WLs for future sludge batches at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These technical issues include Al-dissolution, higher TiO{sub 2} limits and homogeneity issues for coupled-operations, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility, and nepheline formation. To address these technical issues, a test matrix of 28 glass compositions has been developed based on 5 different sludge projections for future processing. The glasses will be fabricated and characterized based on the protocols outlined in the SRNL Task and Quality Assurance (QA) plan.

  18. Getter sputtering system for high-throughput fabrication of composition spreads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dover, R. B. van; Jin Jing; Di Salvo, Francis J.; Abruna, Hector D. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a sputtering system that can deposit composition spreads in an effectively UHV environment but which does not require the high-throughput paradigm to be compromised by a long pump down each time a target is changed. The system deploys four magnetron sputter guns in a cryoshroud (getter sputtering) which allows elements such as Ti and Zr to be deposited with minimal contamination by oxygen or other reactive background gases. The system also relies on custom substrate heaters to give rapid heating and cool down. The effectiveness of the gettering technique is evaluated, and example results obtained for catalytic activity of a pseudoternary composition spread are presented.

  19. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Kim, Rosalind (Moraga, CA); Jancarik, Jamila (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughput mini-bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-throughput mini-bioreactor Yinjie Tang †,1 , Davidexamined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlyreduction. The mini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid

  1. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  2. Phase I high-level waste pretreatment and feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel, A.F.

    1996-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the preliminary planning basis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a sufficient quantity of high-level waste feed to the privatization contractor during Phase I. By this analysis of candidate high-level waste feed sources, the initial quantity of high-level waste feed totals more than twice the minimum feed requirements. The flexibility of the current infrastructure within tank farms provides a variety of methods to transfer the feed to the privatization contractor`s site location. The amount and type of pretreatment (sludge washing) necessary for the Phase I processing can be tailored to support the demonstration goals without having a significant impact on glass volume (i.e., either inhibited water or caustic leaching can be used).

  3. Preliminary design requirements document (DRD) for Project W-236B, ``Initial Pretreatment Module``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify and define the functions, with associated requirements, which must be performed to separate Hanford Site tank waste supernatants into low-level and high-level fractions. This documents sets forth function requirements, performance requirements, and design constraints necessary to begin conceptual design for the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). System and physical interfaces between the IPM project and the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) are identified. The constraints, performance requirements, and transfer of information and data across a technical interface will be documented in an Interface Control Document. Supplemental DRDs will be prepared to provide more detailed requirements specific to systems described in the DRD.

  4. Impact of Mixed Feedstocks and Feedstock Densification on Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Shi; Vicki S. Thompson; Neal A. Yancey; Vitalie Stavila; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Lignocellulosic biorefineries must be able to efficiently process the regional feedstocks that are available at cost-competitive prices year round. These feedstocks typically have low energy densities and vary significantly in composition. One potential solution to these issues is blending and/or densifying the feedstocks in order to create a uniform feedstock. Results/discussion: We have mixed four feedstocks - switchgrass, lodgepole pine, corn stover, and eucalyptus - in flour and pellet form and processed them using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Sugar yields from both the mixed flour and pelletized feedstocks reach 90% within 24 hours of saccharification. Conclusions: Mixed feedstocks, in either flour or pellet form, are efficiently processed using this pretreatment process, and demonstrate that this approach has significant potential.

  5. Surface pretreatment of plastics with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet - Influence of generator power and kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritzer, E., E-mail: elmar.moritzer@ktp.upb.de; Leister, C., E-mail: elmar.moritzer@ktp.upb.de [Kunststofftechnik Paderborn (KTP), University of Paderborn, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the plastics processing industry has increased significantly in recent years. Users of this treatment process have the possibility to influence the target values (e.g. bond strength or surface energy) with the help of kinematic and electrical parameters. Until now, systematic procedures have been used with which the parameters can be adapted to the process or product requirements but only by very time-consuming methods. For this reason, the relationship between influencing values and target values will be examined based on the example of a pretreatment in the bonding process with the help of statistical experimental design. Because of the large number of parameters involved, the analysis is restricted to the kinematic and electrical parameters. In the experimental tests, the following factors are taken as parameters: gap between nozzle and substrate, treatment velocity (kinematic data), voltage and duty cycle (electrical data). The statistical evaluation shows significant relationships between the parameters and surface energy in the case of polypropylene. An increase in the voltage and duty cycle increases the polar proportion of the surface energy, while a larger gap and higher velocity leads to lower energy levels. The bond strength of the overlapping bond is also significantly influenced by the voltage, velocity and gap. The direction of their effects is identical with those of the surface energy. In addition to the kinematic influences of the motion of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet, it is therefore especially important that the parameters for the plasma production are taken into account when designing the pretreatment processes.

  6. Waste minimization pretreatment via pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, U.K.; Choi, K.; Yang, K.H.; Park, J.K.; Song, M.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear Power Generation Lab.] [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear Power Generation Lab.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis and/or oxidative pyrolysis of organic ion exchange resins and other combustible waste may be effective pretreatment processes before vitrification. Three different methods were examined with the TGA to pretreat the resins: pyrolysis; oxidative pyrolysis; and oxidative pyrolyses of ash remaining after the pyrolysis of resin. The latter two methods were found to provide better volume reduction than the pyrolysis-only process. Between the two types of resins, cationic and anionic, the cationic exchange resin was less volatile. Pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of mixed resin (50% cation and 50% anion by wt.) showed volatilization at the temperatures where volatilization was observed for each of the separate resins. Because of certain limitations of the commercial TGA, tube furnace experiments were performed, generally, to examine the pyrolysis of larger quantities of cationic, anionic, and mixed resin, and to examine off-gas characteristics. The cationic resin-only and anionic resin-only gravimetric results showed good agreement with the smaller-scale TGA results. SEM pictures of the different variants of the resin (cationic, anionic, and mixed) show a different morphology for each. Off-gas data showed the presence of H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, CO, and NO during the pyrolysis of cationic resin. CO was observed during the pyrolysis of anionic resin. The mixed resin trials showed the presence of the gases approximately at the temperatures where the gases would evolve if the results of the two different resins (cationic and anionic) were superimposed. However, the amount of hydrogen sulfide relative to the sulfur dioxide was found to increase significantly compared to the results of the cationic resin-only trials.

  7. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  8. An experimental investigation of the effect of sodium chloride on talc solubility and complexing of aqueous magnesium in supercritical hydrothermal fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabman, Kenneth Bryan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF SODIUM CHLORIDE ON TALC SOLUBILITY AND COMPLEXING OF AQUEOUS MAGNESIUM IN SUPERCRITICAL HYDROTHERMAL FLUIDS A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN GRABMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas... MAGNESIUM IN SUPERCRITICAL HYDROTHERMAL FLUIDS A Thesis by KENNETH BRYAN GRABMAN Approved as to style and content by: ~A. Robert K. Popp (Ch of Commi ee) Andrew Haj sh, Jr. (Member) Brann J son (Me ) J Span (Head o Department) December 1989...

  9. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  10. Development of Control Applications for High-Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaponov, Yurii A.; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Honda, Nobuo; Sasajima, Kumiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Wakatsuki, Soichi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated client-server control system (PCCS) with a unified relational database (PCDB) has been developed for high-throughput protein crystallography experiments on synchrotron beamlines. The major steps in protein crystallographic experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, and data processing) are integrated into the software. All information necessary for performing protein crystallography experiments is stored in the PCDB database (except raw X-ray diffraction data, which is stored in the Network File Server). To allow all members of a protein crystallography group to participate in experiments, the system was developed as a multi-user system with secure network access based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets. Secure remote access to the system is possible from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH/X11 (Secure Shell with graphical user interface) support. Currently, the system covers the high-throughput X-ray data collection stages and is being commissioned at BL5A and NW12A (PF, PF-AR, KEK, Tsukuba, Japan)

  11. A Warm Near-Infrared High-Resolution Spectrograph with Very High Throughput (WINERED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Sohei; Kobayashi, Naoto; Yasui, Chikako; Mito, Hiroyuki; Fukue, Kei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya; Otsubo, Shogo; Kinoshita, Masaomi; Kitano, Ayaka; Hamano, Satoshi; Mizumoto, Misaki; Yamamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Natsuko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WINERED is a newly built high-efficiency (throughput$ > 25-30\\%$) and high-resolution spectrograph customized for short NIR bands at 0.9-1.35 ${\\rm \\mu}$m. WINERED is equipped with ambient temperature optics and a cryogenic camera using a 1.7 ${\\rm \\mu}$m cut-off HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG array detector. WINERED has two grating modes: one with a conventional reflective echelle grating (R$\\sim$28,300), which covers 0.9-1.35 $\\mu$m simultaneously, the other with ZnSe or ZnS immersion grating (R$\\sim$100,000). We have completed the development of WINERED except for the immersion grating, and started engineering and science observations at the Nasmyth platform of the 1.3 m Araki Telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory of Kyoto-Sangyo University in Japan. We confirmed that the spectral resolution ($R\\sim$ 28,300) and the throughput ($>$ 40\\% w/o telescope/atmosphere/array QE) meet our specifications. We measured ambient thermal backgrounds (e.g., 0.06 ${\\rm [e^{-}/sec/pixel]}$ at 287 K), which are roughly consistent ...

  12. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  13. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA “parts” to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  14. Pretreatment Serum Testosterone and Androgen Deprivation: Effect on Disease Recurrence and Overall Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taira, Al V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)], E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States); Allen, Zachariah A.; Lief, Jonathan H. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Wheeling Hospital, Department of Pathology, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Low testosterone has been implicated as a possible adverse prognostic factor in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. We evaluated the impact of pretreatment serum testosterone on survival after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From October 2001 to November 2004, 619 patients underwent brachytherapy and 546 had a pretreatment serum testosterone level measured. Pretreatment serum testosterone levels were assigned by the following criteria: below-normal (n = 105), low normal (n = 246), mid normal (n = 132), high normal (n = 50), and above normal (n = 13). Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Results: Six-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were 97.7%, 99.8%, and 89.2%. When comparing patients with low or low normal testosterone with those with average or higher testosterone, there was no significant difference in bPFS (97.6% vs. 98.4%; p = 0.72), CSS (99.8% vs. 100%; p = 0.72), or OS (88.9% vs. 90.8%; p = 0.73). Among patients with average and higher pretreatment testosterone, there was no significant difference in outcomes when comparing patients who did and did not receive androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). For patients with low or low normal testosterone levels, there was no significant difference in bPFS or CSS when comparing patients who did and did not receive ADT. However, there was a trend toward lower OS in patients with baseline lower testosterone levels who also received ADT (83.9% vs. 91.3%, p = 0.075). Conclusions: Low pretreatment testosterone levels alone did not affect disease recurrence or OS. Patients with baseline low testosterone who also were treated with ADT had a trend toward decreased OS.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles and their application for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Zhigang, E-mail: xh168688@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China); Zheng, Feng, E-mail: fzheng@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yu, Hongchun; Jiang, Ziran [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Kanglian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles consist of tetragonal nanorods with size readily tunable. Their electrochemical properties and application as anode for lithium-ion battery were evaluated by galvanostatic discharge–charge testing and cycle voltammetry. SnO{sub 2} nanorod flowers possess improved discharge capacity of 694 mA h g{sup ?1} up to 40th cycle at 0.1 C. - Highlights: ? The flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles with tunable size by controlling concentration of SnCl{sub 4}. ? A probable formation mechanism of SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles has been proposed.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  17. Analysis of the obstacles to financing geothermal hydrothermal commercialization projects and the government programs designed to remove them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks associated with geothermal hydrothermal commercialization are broken down into five categories: resource risk; technological risk; regulatory risk; investment parity risks; and institutional risk aversion. The impact of each risk upon geothermal financing is assessed. The federal government's programs to provide financial incentives for geothermal development are presented as follows: tax incentives; indirect financial incentives programs; direct grant/cost-sharing programs; and attempts at reducing regulatory risk through the enactment of legal and institutional reforms. (MHR)

  18. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobate–zirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori, E-mail: hirano@aitech.ac.jp; Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}–4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. • The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. • The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad-band emission under excitation at 240 nm. • The emission is originated from the niobate octahedral group [NbO{sub 6}]{sup 7?}. • The nanocrystals showed orange and red luminescences ({sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} , Eu{sup 3+})

  19. Quantitative analysis of the hydrothermal system in Lassen Volcanic National Park and Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lassen hydrothermal system is in the southern Cascade Range, approximately 70 kilometers east-southeast of Redding, California. The conceptual model of the Lassen system is termed a liquid-dominated hydrothermal system with a parasitic vapor-dominated zone. The essential feature of this model is that steam and steam-heated discharge at relatively high elevations in Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP) and liquid discharge with high chloride concentrations at relatively low elevations outside LVNP in the Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) are both fed by an upflow of high-enthalpy, two-phase fluid within the Park. Liquid flows laterally away from the upflow area towards the areas of high-chloride discharge, and steam rises through a vapor-dominated zone to feed the steam and steam-heated features. The geometric model corresponds to an areally restricted flow regime that connects the Bumpass Hell area in LVNP with regions of chloride hot springs in the Mill Creek canyon in the KGRA south of LVNP. Simulations of thermal fluid withdrawal in the Mill Creek Canyon were carried out in order to determine the effects of such withdrawal on portions of the hydrothermal system within the Park. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Effect of reductant and PVP on morphology and magnetic property of ultrafine Ni powders prepared via hydrothermal route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jun, E-mail: j-zhang@126.com; Wang, Xiucai; Li, Lili; Li, Chengxuan; Peng, Shuge

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The ultrafine Ni powders with the shapes including sphere, pearl-string, leaf, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet and silknet were prepared through one-step hydrothermal reduction using different reductants. Their saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercivity sequentially increase, and the coercivity of hexagonal sheet-like Ni powders increases by 25% compared with the Ni bulk counterpart. - Highlights: • The ultrafine Ni powders with various shapes of sphere, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet, etc. • Facile and one-step hydrothermal reduction using three reductants and PVP additive was developed. • Magnetic properties of the ultrafine Ni powders with different shapes were measured. • Compared with bulk Ni material, coercivity of hexagonal sheet Ni increases by 25%. • The formation mechanism of the shapes was suggested. - Abstract: The ultrafine nickel particles with different shapes including sphere, pearl-string, leaf, fish-bone, hexagonal sheet and silknet were prepared through one-step hydrothermal reduction using hydrazine hydrate, sodium hypophosphite and ethylene glycol as reductants, polyvinylpyrrolidone as structure-directing agent. It has been verified with the characterization of X-ray powder diffraction and transmission/scanning electronic microscopy that as-prepared products belong to face-centered cubic structure of nickel microcrystals with high purity and fine dispersity. The magnetic hysteresis loops measured at room temperature reveal that the values of saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and coercivity rise sequentially from silknet, sphere to hexagonal sheet. In comparison with nickel bulk counterpart, the coercivity of the hexagonal sheet nickel powders increases by 25%.

  1. A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using He+ 30.4nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using Entrance slit farm with ~ 1000 slits Photon counting imager Concave grating used near normal incidence >> Need a higher throughput diffuse EUV spectrometer solar wind respond to coronal

  2. Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of Pu(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, Travis H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Actinide Science, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Sykora, Richard E. [Department of Chemistry, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688 (United States); Haire, Richard G. [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Actinide Science, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)], E-mail: albreth@auburn.edu

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction between PuO{sub 2} and SeO{sub 2} under mild hydrothermal conditions results in the formation of Pu(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} as brick-red prisms. This compound adopts the Ce(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} structure type, and consists of one-dimensional chains of edge-sharing [PuO{sub 8}] distorted bicapped trigonal prisms linked by [SeO{sub 3}] units into a three-dimensional network. Crystallographic data: Pu(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n, a=6.960(1) A, b=10.547(2) A, c=7.245(1) A, {beta}=106.880(9){sup o}, V=508.98(17) A{sup 3}, Z=4 (T=193 K), R(F)=2.92% for 83 parameters with 1140 reflections with I>2{sigma}(I). Magnetic susceptibility data for Pu(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} are linear from 35 to 320 K and yield an effective moment of 2.71(5) {mu}{sub B} and a Weiss constant of -500(5) K. - Graphical abstract: A depiction of the three-dimensional structure of Pu(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2} formed from the interconnection of one-dimensional chains of edge-sharing PuO{sub 8} dodecahedra by selenite anions.

  4. Yttrium-succinates coordination polymers: Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amghouz, Zakariae; Roces, Laura; Garcia-Granda, Santiago [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Garcia, Jose R., E-mail: jrgm@uniovi.e [Departamentos de Quimica Fisica y Analitica y Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Souhail, Badredine [Departement de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, 93002 Tetouan, Maroc (Morocco); Mafra, Luis; Shi, Fa-nian; Rocha, Joao [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New polymeric yttrium-succinates, Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O and Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, have been synthesized, and their structures (solved by single crystal XRD) are compared with that of Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O. Three compounds were obtained as single phases, and their thermal behaviour is described. - Graphical abstract: In the field of coordination polymers or MOF's, few studies report on the polymorphs of Ln(III)-succinic acid. Here, we describe the hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of two novel yttrium-succinates coordination polymers, respectively 2D and 3D, Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O and Y{sub 2}(C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}.

  5. Textural properties of synthetic nano-calcite produced by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German; Charlet, L; Tisserand, Delphine; Renard, F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 1/4 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used to synthesize fine particles of calcite. This method allows a high carbonation efficiency (about 95% of Ca(OH)2-CaCO3 conversion), a significant production rate (48 kg/m3 h) and high purity of product (about 96%). However, the various initial physicochemical conditions have a strong influence on the crystal size and surface area of the synthesized calcite crystals. The present study is focused on the estimation of the textural properties of synthesized calcite (morphology, specific surface area, average particle size, particle size distribution and particle size evolution with reaction time), using Rietveld refinements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. This study demonstrate that the pressure, the temperatu...

  6. Internal Technical Report, Hydrothermal Injection Program - East Mesa 1983-84 Test Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiburger, R.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a test data index and a data plots for a series of 12 drawdown and tracer injection-withdrawal tests in porous-media aquifers at the East Mesa Geothermal Field located in the Imperial Valley near El Centro, California. Test and instrumentation summaries are also provided. The first 10 of these tests were completed during July and August 1983. The remaining 2 tests were completed in February 1984, after a 6-month quiescent period, in which tracers were left in the reservoir. The test wells used were 56-30 and 56-19, with 38-30 supplying water for the injection phase and 52-29 used as a disposal well during the backflowing of the test wells. Six other wells in the surrounding area were measured periodically for possible hydrologic effects during testing. It is not the intent of this report to supply analyzed data, but to list the uninterpreted computer stored data available for analysis. The data have been examined only to the extent to ensure that they are reasonable and internally consistent. This data is stored on permanent files at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cyber Computer Complex. The main processors for this complex are located at the Computer Science Center (CSC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Hydrothermal Injection Test program, funded by the Department of Energy, was a joint effort between EG and G Idaho, Inc., the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) and Republic Geothermal, Inc. (RGI) of Santa Fe Springs, California.

  7. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E., E-mail: rbell@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400–820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm{sup ?1} grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ?0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  8. Development and Operation of High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  9. Learning quantitative sequence-function relationships from high-throughput biological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwal, Gurinder S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the transcriptional regulatory code, as well as other types of information encoded within biomolecular sequences, will require learning biophysical models of sequence-function relationships from high-throughput data. Controlling and characterizing the noise in such experiments, however, is notoriously difficult. The unpredictability of such noise creates problems for standard likelihood-based methods in statistical learning, which require that the quantitative form of experimental noise be known precisely. However, when this unpredictability is properly accounted for, important theoretical aspects of statistical learning which remain hidden in standard treatments are revealed. Specifically, one finds a close relationship between the standard inference method, based on likelihood, and an alternative inference method based on mutual information. Here we review and extend this relationship. We also describe its implications for learning sequence-function relationships from real biological data. Fin...

  10. Heterogeneous High Throughput Scientific Computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Abdurachmanov; Brian Bockelman; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. We report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  11. High-throughput, dual probe biological assays based on single molecule detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Balhorn, Rodney L. (Livermore, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Darrow, Christopher (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus with the sensitivity to detect and identify single target molecules through the localization of dual, fluorescently labeled probe molecules. This can be accomplished through specific attachment of the taget to a surface or in a two-dimensional (2D) flowing fluid sheet having approximate dimensions of 0.5 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m. A device using these methods would have 10.sup.3 10.sup.4 greater throughput than previous one-dimensional (1D) micro-stream devices having 1 .mu.m.sup.3 interrogation volumes and would for the first time allow immuno- and DNA assays at ultra-low (femtomolar) concentrations to be performed in short time periods (.about.10 minutes). The use of novel labels (such as metal or semiconductor nanoparticles) may be incorporated to further extend the sensitivity possibly into the attomolar range.

  12. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordmeyer, Robert A. (San Leandro, CA); Snell, Gyorgy P. (Richmond, CA); Cornell, Earl W. (Antioch, CA); Kolbe, William F. (Moraga, CA); Yegian, Derek T. (Oakland, CA); Earnest, Thomas N. (Berkeley, CA); Jaklevich, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA); Cork, Carl W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Santarsiero, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL); Stevens, Raymond C. (La Jolla, CA)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  13. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William; Yegian, Derek; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevic, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  14. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  15. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bell, Ronald E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  16. High throughput ultrasoft x-ray polychromator for embedded impurity pellet injection studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Tamura, N.; Kalinina, D.; Matsubara, A.; Sato, K.; Sudo, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype ultrasoft x-ray polychromator has been developed for local particle transport measurements in magnetic fusion devices using the H{sub {alpha}} charge exchange emission from low-Z impurity pellets. High throughput together with few cm radial resolution in the plasma are achieved using a toroidally aligned grid collimator, while a few A spectral bandpass together with strong background rejection are obtained using planar multilayer mirrors and foil filters. As high sensitivity detectors we use a new type of compact, efficient and high-gain multichannel plates. The prototype instrument has been evaluated in the laboratory and tested on the Large Helical Device in Japan. In addition to transport studies, this type of device is of interest for next step experiments, where high beam energy and strong attenuation will make visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy difficult.

  17. An infrared imaging method for high-throughput combinatorial investigation of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation and new phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    An infrared imaging method for high-throughput combinatorial investigation of hydrogenation Received 9 April 2009; accepted 30 June 2009; published online 30 July 2009 We have developed an infrared imaging setup enabling in situ infrared images to be acquired, and expanded on capabilities of an infrared

  18. Novel mixed polyanions lithium-ion battery cathode materials predicted by high-throughput ab initio computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Novel mixed polyanions lithium-ion battery cathode materials predicted by high-throughput ab initio (>700 Wh/kg) cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. 1 Introduction The widespread use of lithium-ion monoclinic phase).5 However, the field of lithium-ion batteries is very active, and a large number

  19. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 32, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 1791 DevStaR: High-Throughput Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    of C. elegans embryonic viability in high-throughput (HTP) applications. A leading genetic model organism for the study of animal development and behavior, C. elegans is particularly amenable to HTP the algorithmic design of the DevStaR system and demonstrate its performance in scoring image data acquired in HTP

  20. A Cross-Referencing-Based Droplet Manipulation Method for High-Throughput and Pin-Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    -Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays* Tao Xu and Krishnendu Chakrabarty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA {tx, krish}@ee.duke.edu Abstract Digital microfluidic. As high-throughput bioassays are mapped to digital microfluidic platforms, the need for design automation

  1. Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska Anand Sivasubramaniam Qian Wang Erik Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska and managing storage systems. A consequence of this trend is the need to serve multiple users that can be built on top of an existing storage utility. This frame- work uses a low-level feedback

  2. been the key to their success is the use of high-throughput experiments to assess various zeo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    it and the resulting pore structure. It could be that the hexamethonium molecules pack in such a way as to providebeen the key to their success is the use of high- throughput experiments to assess various zeo and shape of the resulting pores cor- responds to the size and shape of the organic molecule. ITQ-33

  3. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening: Classifying the activities of various compounds towards Cobalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening to the existing HTS method, via Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) using Artificial Neural in solving non-linear pattern classification problems, we propose several different models of neural networks

  4. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup ?1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  5. Pretreatment of Tc-Containing Waste and Its Effect on Tc-99 Leaching From Grouts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aloy, Albert; Kovarskaya, Elena N. [RosAtom, 'V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute' (KRI), 2-nd Murinsky str., 28, Saint Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Harbour, John R.; Langton, Christine A.; Holtzscheiter, E. William [Savannah River National Laboratory, Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A salt solution (doped with Tc-99), that simulates the salt waste stream to be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, was immobilized in grout waste forms with and without (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag and (2) pretreatment with iron salts. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. Although Fe (+2) was shown to be effective in reducing Tc-99 to the +4 state, the strong reducing nature of the blast furnace slag present in the grout formulation dominated the reduction of Tc-99 in the cured grouts. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.75 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol. The leaching results show that, even in the presence of a concentrated salt solution, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. The measured diffusivity was introduced into a flow and transport model (PORFLOW) to calculate the release of Tc-99 from a Saltstone Vault as a function of hydraulic conductivity of the matrix. (authors)

  6. Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

  7. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  8. PRETREATMENT OF TC CONTAINING WASTE AND ITS EFFECT ON 99 TC LEACHING FROM GROUTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A salt solution (doped with Tc-99), that simulates the salt waste stream to be processed at the Saltstone Production Facility, was immobilized in grout waste forms with and without (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag and (2) pretreatment with iron salts. The degree of immobilization of Tc-99 was measured through monolithic and crushed grout leaching tests. Although Fe (+2) was shown to be effective in reducing Tc-99 to the +4 state, the strong reducing nature of the blast furnace slag present in the grout formulation dominated the reduction of Tc-99 in the cured grouts. An effective diffusion coefficient of 4.75 x 10{sup -12} (Leach Index of 11.4) was measured using the ANSI/ANS-16.1 protocol. The leaching results show that, even in the presence of a concentrated salt solution, blast furnace slag can effectively reduce pertechnetate to the immobile +4 oxidation state. The measured diffusivity was introduced into a flow and transport model (PORFLOW) to calculate the release of Tc-99 from a Saltstone Vault as a function of hydraulic conductivity of the matrix.

  9. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  10. Method of aeration disinfecting and drying grain in bulk and pretreating seeds and a transverse blow silo grain dryer therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danchenko, Vitaliy G. (Dnipropetrovsk, UA); Noyes, Ronald T. (Stillwater, OK); Potapovych, Larysa P. (Dnipropetrovsk, UA)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aeration drying and disinfecting grain crops in bulk and pretreating seeds includes passing through a bulk of grain crops and seeds disinfecting and drying agents including an ozone and air mixture and surrounding air, subdividing the disinfecting and drying agents into a plurality of streams spaced from one another in a vertical direction, and passing the streams at different heights through levels located at corresponding heights of the bulk of grain crops and seeds transversely in a substantially horizontal direction.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and afterglow luminescence properties of hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres for potential application in drug delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Pengfei; Zhang, Jiachi, E-mail: zhangjch@lzu.edu.cn; Qin, Qingsong; Hu, Rui; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We designed a novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} for the first time. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres with afterglow were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} is a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery. - Abstract: A novel afterglow labeling material SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} with hollow sphere shape and intense afterglow luminescence is prepared by hydrothermal method at 180 °C for the first time. The morphology and the sphere growth process of this material are investigated by scanning electron microscopy in detail. The afterglow measurement shows that this hydrothermal obtained material exhibits obvious red afterglow luminescence (550–700 nm) of Sm{sup 3+} which can last for 542 s (0.32 mcd/m{sup 2}). The depth of traps in this hydrothermal obtained material is calculated to be as shallow as 0.58 eV. The results demonstrate that although it is necessary to further improve the afterglow performance of the hydrothermal derived hollow SnO{sub 2}:Sm{sup 3+},Zr{sup 4+} spheres, it still can be regarded as a potential afterglow labeling medium for drug delivery.

  12. Effects of temperature and acidic pre-treatment on Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE-spent granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, E.; Huling, S.G. [Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center, Ada, OK (United States)

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of temperature and acidic pretreatment on Fenton-driven chemical oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)-spent granular activated carbon (GAC, derived from bituminous coal) were investigated. Limiting factors in MTBE removal in GAC include the heterogeneous distribution of amended Fe, and slow intraparticle diffusive transport of MTBE and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) into the 'reactive zone'. Acid pretreatment of GAC before Fe amendment altered the surface chemistry of the GAC, lowered the pH point of zero charge, and resulted in greater penetration and more uniform distribution of Fe in GAC. This led to a condition where Fe, MTBE, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} coexisted over a larger volume of the GAC contributing to greater MTBE oxidation and removal. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction and MTBE removal in GAC increased with temperature. Modeling H{sub 2}O{sub 2} transport and reaction in GAC indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} penetration was inversely proportional with temperature and tortuosity, and occurred over a larger fraction of the total volume of small GAC particles (0.3 mm diameter) relative to large particles (1.2 mm diameter). Acidic pretreatment of GAC, Fe-amendment, elevated reaction temperature, and use of small GAC particles are operational parameters that improve Fenton-driven oxidation of MTBE in GAC. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slininger, Patricia J; Shea-Andersh, Maureen A; Thompson, Stephanie R; Dien, Bruce S; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Balan, Venkatesh; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Dale, Bruce E; Cotta, Michael A

    2015-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant, renewable feedstock useful for the production of fuel-grade ethanol via the processing steps of pretreatment, enzyme hydrolysis, and microbial fermentation. Traditional industrial yeasts do not ferment xylose and are not able to grow, survive, or ferment in concentrated hydrolyzates that contain enough sugar to support economical ethanol recovery since they are laden with toxic byproducts generated during pretreatment.

  14. Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthonie W. J. Muller

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

  15. Lifecycle Assessment of Microalgae to Biofuel: Thermochemical Processing through Hydrothermal Liquefaction or Pyrolysis.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennion, Edward P.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moses, John; Agblevor, Foster; Quinn, Jason C.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae are currently being investigated as a renewable transportation fuel feedstock based on various advantages that include high annual yields, utilization of poor quality land, does not compete with food, and can be integrated with various waste streams. This study focuses on directly assessing the impact of two different thermochemical conversion technologies on the microalgae to biofuel process through life cycle assessment. A system boundary of a “well to pump” (WTP) is defined and includes sub-process models of the growth, dewatering, thermochemical bio-oil recovery, bio-oil stabilization, conversion to renewable diesel, and transport to the pump. Models were validated with experimental and literature data and are representative of an industrial-scale microalgae to biofuel process. Two different thermochemical bio-oil conversion systems are modeled and compared on a systems level, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and pyrolysis. The environmental impact of the two pathways were quantified on the metrics of net energy ratio (NER), defined here as energy consumed over energy produced, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Results for WTP biofuel production through the HTL pathway were determined to be 1.23 for the NER and GHG emissions of -11.4 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. WTP biofuel production through the pyrolysis pathway results in a NER of 2.27 and GHG emissions of 210 g CO2 eq (MJ renewable diesel)-1. The large environmental impact associated with the pyrolysis pathway is attributed to feedstock drying requirements and combustion of co-products to improve system energetics. Discussion focuses on a detailed breakdown of the overall process energetics and GHGs, impact of modeling at laboratory- scale compared to industrial-scale, environmental impact sensitivity to engineering systems input parameters for future focused research and development and a comparison of results to literature.

  16. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. Synergistic control of these parameters offers the potential for further improvements in carbonation reactivity. A new sonication exfoliation system incorporating a novel sealing system was developed to carry out the sonication studies. Our initial studies that incorporate controlled sonication have not yet lead to a significant improvement in the extent of carbonation observed. Year 2 studies will emphasize those approaches that offer the greatest potential to cost effectively enhance carbonation, as well as combined approaches that may further enhance carbonation. Mechanistic investigations indicate incongruent dissolution results in the observed silica-rich passivating layer formation. Observations of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating layers that form indicate the layers can exhibit significant permeability to the key reactants present (e.g., Mg{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and HCO{sub 3} -). Atomistic modeling supports the observation of robust passivating layers that retain significant permeability to the key reaction species involved. Studies in Year 2 will emphasize the impact that controlled aqueous speciation and activity and slurry-flow dynamics have on the mechanisms that control carbonation reactivity and the potential they offer to substantially reduce olivine mineral sequestration process cost.

  17. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (i) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (ii) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (iii) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. We have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. Synergistic control of the slurry-flow and aqueous chemistry parameters offers further potential to improve carbonation reactivity, which is being investigated during the no-cost extension period. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation system with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated(Abstract truncated).

  18. NiO nanowall array prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method and its enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, F., E-mail: caofenghz@126.com [Department of Chemistry, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou, 313000 (China); Pan, G.X.; Tang, P.S.; Chen, H.F. [Department of Chemistry, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou, 313000 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Self-supported NiO nanowall array is fabricated by a facile hydrothermal synthesis method and exhibits noticeable Li ion battery performance with good cycle life and high capacity. Highlights: ? NiO nanowall array is prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method. ? NiO nanowall array with high capacity as anode material for Li ion battery. ? Nanowall array structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Free-standing quasi-single-crystalline NiO nanowall array is successfully fabricated via a simple hydrothermal synthesis method. The as-prepared NiO film exhibits a highly porous nanowall structure composed of many interconnected nanoflakes with thicknesses of ?20 nm. The NiO nanowalls arrange vertically to the substrate resulting in the formation of extended porous net-like structure with pores of 30–300 nm. As anode material for lithium ion batteries, the quasi-single-crystalline NiO nanowall array exhibits pretty good electrochemical performances with high capacity, weaker polarization, higher coulombic efficiency and better cycling performance as compared to the dense polycrystalline NiO film. The quasi-single-crystalline NiO nanowall array presents an initial coulombic efficiency of 76% and good cycling life with a capacity of 564 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.5 A g{sup ?1} after 50 cycles, higher than that of the dense polycrystalline NiO film (358 mAh g{sup ?1}). The enhanced performance is due to the unique nanowall array structure providing faster ion/electron transport and better morphological stability.

  19. Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M., E-mail: e.m.a.roeloffzen@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vulpen, Marco van; Battermann, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Roermund, Joep G. van [Department of Urology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Saibishkumar, Elantholi P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Monninkhof, Evelyn M. [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (<18 points), the risk of AUR was only 0%-5%. However, in patients with a high sum score (>35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

  20. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FOR TANK WASTE PRETREATMENT AT THE DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive wastes from one hundred seventy-seven underground storage tanks in the 200 Area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State will be retrieved, treated and stored either on site or at an approved off-site repository. DOE is currently planning to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which would be treated and permanently disposed in separate facilities. A significant volume of the wastes in the Hanford tanks is currently classified as medium Curie waste, which will require separation and treatment at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Because of the specific challenges associated with treating this waste stream, DOE EM-21 funded a project to investigate the feasibility of using fractional crystallization as a supplemental pretreatment technology. The two process requirements for fractional crystallization to be successfully applied to Hanford waste include: (1) evaporation of water from the aqueous solution to enrich the activity of soluble {sup 137}Cs, resulting in a higher activity stream to be sent to the WTP, and (2) separation of the crystalline salts that are enriched in sodium, carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate and sufficiently depleted in {sup 137}Cs, to produce a second stream to be sent to Bulk Vitrification. Phase I of this project has just been completed by COGEMA/Georgia Institute of Technology. The purpose of this report is to document an independent expert review of the Phase I results with recommendations for future testing. A team of experts with significant experience at both the Hanford and Savannah River Sites was convened to conduct the review at Richland, Washington the week of November 14, 2005.

  1. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  2. High-throughput liquid-absorption air-sampling apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (95706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler [PHTLAAS] has an asymmetric air inlet through which air is drawn upward by a small and light-weight centrifugal fan driven by a direct current motor that can be powered by a battery. The air inlet is so configured as to impart both rotational and downward components of motion to the sampled air near said inlet. The PHTLAAS comprises a glass tube of relatively small size through which air passes at a high rate in a swirling, highly turbulent motion, which facilitates rapid transfer of vapors and particulates to a liquid film covering the inner walls of the tube. The pressure drop through the glass tube is <10 cm of water, usually <5 cm of water. The sampler's collection efficiency is usually >20% for vapors or airborne particulates in the 2-3.mu. range and >50% for particles larger than 4.mu.. In conjunction with various analyzers, the PHTLAAS can serve to monitor a variety of hazardous or illicit airborne substances, such as lead-containing particulates, tritiated water vapor, biological aerosols, or traces of concealed drugs or explosives.

  3. Integrated Controlling System and Unified Database for High Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaponov, Yu.A.; Igarashi, N.; Hiraki, M.; Sasajima, K.; Matsugaki, N.; Suzuki, M.; Kosuge, T.; Wakatsuki, S. [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated controlling system and a unified database for high throughput protein crystallography experiments have been developed. Main features of protein crystallography experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, data processing) were integrated into the software under development. All information necessary to perform protein crystallography experiments is stored (except raw X-ray data that are stored in a central data server) in a MySQL relational database. The database contains four mutually linked hierarchical trees describing protein crystals, data collection of protein crystal and experimental data processing. A database editor was designed and developed. The editor supports basic database functions to view, create, modify and delete user records in the database. Two search engines were realized: direct search of necessary information in the database and object oriented search. The system is based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets with four predefined sending and receiving behaviors, which support communications between all connected servers and clients with remote control functions (creating and modifying data for experimental conditions, data acquisition, viewing experimental data, and performing data processing). Two secure login schemes were designed and developed: a direct method (using the developed Linux clients with secure connection) and an indirect method (using the secure SSL connection using secure X11 support from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH support). A part of the system has been implemented on a new MAD beam line, NW12, at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring for general user experiments.

  4. A search model for topological insulators with high-throughput robustness descriptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kesong; Setyawan, Wahyu; Wang, Shidong; Nardelli, Marco B.; Curtarolo, Stephano

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators (TI) are becoming one of the most studied classes of novel materials because of their great potential for applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computers. To fully integrate TI materials in electronic devices, high-quality epitaxial single-crystalline phases with sufficiently large bulk bandgaps are necessary. Current efforts have relied mostly on costly and time-consuming trial-and-error procedures. Here we show that by defining a reliable and accessible descriptor {cflx X}TI, which represents the topological robustness or feasibility of the candidate, and by searching the quantum materials repository aflowlib.org, we have automatically discovered 28 TIs (some of them already known) in five different symmetry families. These include peculiar ternary halides, Cs{l_brace}Sn,Pb,Ge{r_brace}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 3}, which could have been hardly anticipated without high-throughput means. Our search model, by relying on the significance of repositories in materials development, opens new avenues for the discovery of more TIs in different and unexplored classes of systems.

  5. Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

  6. Ultrahigh throughput plasma processing of free standing silicon nanocrystals with lognormal size distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Ilker; Kramer, Nicolaas J.; Westermann, Rene H. J.; Verheijen, Marcel A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dohnalova, Katerina; Gregorkiewicz, Tom [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smets, Arno H. M. [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Sanden, Mauritius C. M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a method for synthesizing free standing silicon nanocrystals in an argon/silane gas mixture by using a remote expanding thermal plasma. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal that the distribution has a bimodal shape consisting of two distinct groups of small and large silicon nanocrystals with sizes in the range 2-10 nm and 50-120 nm, respectively. We also observe that both size distributions are lognormal which is linked with the growth time and transport of nanocrystals in the plasma. Average size control is achieved by tuning the silane flow injected into the vessel. Analyses on morphological features show that nanocrystals are monocrystalline and spherically shaped. These results imply that formation of silicon nanocrystals is based on nucleation, i.e., these large nanocrystals are not the result of coalescence of small nanocrystals. Photoluminescence measurements show that silicon nanocrystals exhibit a broad emission in the visible region peaked at 725 nm. Nanocrystals are produced with ultrahigh throughput of about 100 mg/min and have state of the art properties, such as controlled size distribution, easy handling, and room temperature visible photoluminescence.

  7. Bonus Organisms in High-Throughput Eukaryotic Whole-Genome Shorgun Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Platt, Darren

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced over 50 eukaryotic genomes, ranging in size from 15 MB to 1.6 GB, over a wide range of organism types. In the course of doing so, it has become clear that a substantial fraction of these data sets contains bonus organisms, usually prokaryotes, in addition to the desired genome. While some of these additional organisms are extraneous contamination, they are sometimes symbionts, and so can be of biological interest. Therefore, it is desirable to assemble the bonus organisms along with the main genome. This transforms the problem into one of metagenomic assembly, which is considerably more challenging than traditional whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The different organisms will usually be present at different sequence depths, which is difficult to handle in most WGS assemblers. In addition, with multiple distinct genomes present, chimerism can produce cross-organism combinations. Finally, there is no guarantee that only a single bonus organism will be present. For example, one JGI project contained at least two different prokaryotic contaminants, plus a 145 KB plasmid of unknown origin. We have developed techniques to routinely identify and handle such bonus organisms in a high-throughput sequencing environment. Approaches include screening and partitioning the unassembled data, and iterative subassemblies. These methods are applicable not only to bonus organisms, but also to desired components such as organelles. These procedures have the additional benefit of identifying, and allowing for the removal of, cloning artifacts such as E.coli and spurious vector inclusions.

  8. FBI Fingerprint Image Capture System High-Speed-Front-End throughput modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathke, P.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has undertaken a major modernization effort called the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFISS). This system will provide centralized identification services using automated fingerprint, subject descriptor, mugshot, and document processing. A high-speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (FICS) is under development as part of the IAFIS program. The FICS will capture digital and microfilm images of FBI fingerprint cards for input into a central database. One FICS design supports two front-end scanning subsystems, known as the High-Speed-Front-End (HSFE) and Low-Speed-Front-End, to supply image data to a common data processing subsystem. The production rate of the HSFE is critical to meeting the FBI`s fingerprint card processing schedule. A model of the HSFE has been developed to help identify the issues driving the production rate, assist in the development of component specifications, and guide the evolution of an operations plan. A description of the model development is given, the assumptions are presented, and some HSFE throughput analysis is performed.

  9. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B.; Morreale, Bryan D.; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 10×10 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  10. Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs Sandjai The Netherlands Email: sbhulai@few.vu.nl Rob van der Mei a,b b CWI Advanced Communication Networks P.O. Box 94079@feweb.vu.nl Abstract-- The wireless LAN technology 802.11, also called Wi-Fi, offers high speed wireless Internet

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 8, AUGUST 2001 1307 Attainable Throughput of an Interference-Limited Multiple-Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driessen, Peter F.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 8, AUGUST 2001 1307 Attainable Throughput, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V82 3P6 Canada. L. J. Greenstein is with AT&T Laboratories

  12. On-chip whole-animal manipulation for high-throughput subcellular-resolution in-vivo drug/genetic screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    Techniques for rapid and automated small-animal manipulation and immobilization are necessary for high-throughput in vivo genetic/drug screens using cellular and sub-cellular features in multicellular organisms. We present ...

  13. New Challenges of the Computation of Multiple Sequence Alignments in the High-Throughput Era (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Notredame, Cedric [Centre for Genomic Regulation

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cedric Notredame from the Centre for Genomic Regulation gives a presentation on "New Challenges of the Computation of Multiple Sequence Alignments in the High-Throughput Era" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Throughput Study of Diffusion and Phase Transformation Kinetics of Magnesium-Based Systems For Automotive Cast Magnesium Alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ohio State University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-throughput study...

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn; Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. • The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. • Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 2–10 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  16. THE ROLE OF LIQUID WASTE PRETREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN SOLVING THE DOE CLEAN-UP MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilmarth, B; Sheryl Bush, S

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to describe the pretreatment solutions that allow treatment to be tailored to specific wastes, processing ahead of the completion schedules for the main treatment facilities, and reduction of technical risks associated with future processing schedules. Wastes stored at Hanford and Savannah River offer challenging scientific and engineering tasks. At both sites, space limitations confound the ability to effectively retrieve and treat the wastes. Additionally, the radiation dose to the worker operating and maintaining the radiochemical plants has a large role in establishing the desired radioactivity removal. However, the regulatory requirements to treat supernatant and saltcake tank wastes differ at the two sites. Hanford must treat and remove radioactivity from the tanks based on the TriParty Agreement and Waste Incidental to Reprocessing (WIR) documentation. These authorizing documents do not specify treatment technologies; rather, they specify endstate conditions. Dissimilarly, Waste Determinations prepared at SRS in accordance with Section 3116 of the 2005 National Defense Authorization Act along with state operating permits establish the methodology and amounts of radioactivity that must be removed and may be disposed of in South Carolina. After removal of entrained solids and site-specific radionuclides, supernatant and saltcake wastes are considered to be low activity waste (LAW) and are immobilized in glass and disposed of at the Hanford Site Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) or formulated into a grout for disposal at the Savannah River Site Saltstone Disposal Facility. Wastes stored at the Hanford Site or SRS comprise saltcake, supernate, and sludges. The supernatant and saltcake waste fractions contain primarily sodium salts, metals (e.g., Al, Cr), cesium-137 (Cs-137), technetium-99 (Tc-99) and entrained solids containing radionuclides such as strontium-90 (Sr-90) and transuranic elements. The sludges contain many of the transition metal hydroxides that precipitate when the spent acidic process solutions are rendered alkaline with sodium hydroxide. The sludges contain Sr-90 and transuranic elements. The wastes stored at each site have been generated and stored for over fifty years. Although the majority of the wastes were generated to support nuclear weapons production and reprocessing, the wastes differ substantially between the sites. Table 5 shows the volumes and total radioactivity (including decay daughters) of the waste phases stored in tanks at each site. At Hanford, there are 177 tanks that contain 56.5 Mgal of waste. SRS has 51 larger tanks, of which 2 are closed, that contain 36.5 Mgal. Mainly due to recovery operations, the waste stored at Hanford has less total curies than that stored at Savannah River. The total radioactivity of the Hanford wastes contains approximately 190 MCi, and the total radioactivity of the Savannah River wastes contains 400 MCi.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of new rare earth silicate fluorides: A novel class of polar materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, Colin D., E-mail: cmcmill@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Emirdag-Eanes, Mehtap, E-mail: mehtapemirdag@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce koyu, Urla, Izmir 35430 (Turkey)] [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce koyu, Urla, Izmir 35430 (Turkey); Stritzinger, Jared T., E-mail: jstritz@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Kolis, Joseph W., E-mail: kjoseph@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar crystals provide an interesting avenue for materials research both in the structures they form and the properties they possess. This work describes the hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of three novel silicate fluorides. Compound (1), LiY{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 2} crystallizes in space group C2/c, with a=17.651(4) A, b=4.8868(10) A, c=11.625(2) A and {beta}=131.13(3) Degree-Sign . BaY{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})F{sub 2} (2) crystallizes in space group P-1, with a=5.1576(10) A, b=6.8389(14) A, c=11.786(2) A, {alpha}=93.02(3) Degree-Sign , {beta}=102.05(3) Degree-Sign and {gamma}=111.55(3) Degree-Sign . Finally, the structure of Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} (3) was determined in the polar orthorhombic space group Pba2, having unit cell parameters a=8.8864(18) A, b=12.764(3) A and c=5.0843(10) A. The structures are compared based on their building blocks and long range polarities. Aligned silicate tetrahedra segregated into a single layer in (3) impart the observed polarity. - Graphical abstract: The polar structure of Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural yttrium silicate fluoride minerals are briefly reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis and structures of LiY{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 2}, BaY{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})F{sub 2} and Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} crystallizes in the polar space group Pba2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polarity occurs primarily through aligned silicate tetrahedra in a segregated layer.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Novel Zn-Triazole-Benzenedicarboxylate Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunsoo; Moureau, David M.; Parise, John B. (SBU)

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers were synthesized hydrothermally using Zn2+ ion, 1,2,4-triazole, and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (BDC): Zn5(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)3 {center_dot} 3.9H2O (1), Zn2(C2H2N3)2(C2H3N3)(C8H4O4) {center_dot} 2.5H2O (2), and Zn4(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)2 {center_dot} 14H2O (3). Their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their thermal properties were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Structure 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 10.192(2) {angstrom}, b = 17.764(4) {angstrom}, c = 24.437(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 91.19(3){sup o}, and V = 4423.3(15) {angstrom}3. Structure 2 crystallizes in the triclinic P space group with a = 7.797(2) {angstrom}, b = 10.047(2) {angstrom}, c = 13.577(3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 110.18(3){sup o}, {beta} = 105.46(3){sup o}, {gamma} = 93.90(3){sup o}, and V = 947.0(3) {angstrom}3. Structure 3 crystallizes in monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 13.475(3) {angstrom}, b = 26.949(5) {angstrom}, c = 13.509(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 95.18(3){sup o}, and V = 4885.7(17) {angstrom}3. In structure 1, the units of the triazole-Zn polyhedra are linked by BDC in a zigzag fashion to create the stacking of phenyl groups along the a axis. In structure 2, both triazole and BDC bridge Zn polyhedra in the (011) plane, resulting in the eight-membered channels along the a axis. In the case of structure 3, the BDC links the Zn polyhedra along the b axis to form a pillared open framework. This structure is the most porous of the compounds presented in this work.

  19. J. Phys. III France 6 (1996) 843-852 JULY 1996, PAGE 843 Dielectric Properties of Hydrothermal Nickel-Zinc Ferrites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Nickel-Zinc Ferrites Anderson Dias (*), Nelcy Della Santina Mohallem and Roberto Luiz Moreira, mechanical alloying, and granulation Abstract. NiZn ferrites were hydrothermally prepared and sintered of the ferrites and the presence of a masked relaxation, revealed after a mathematical treatment. The relaxation

  20. RESULTS OF THE FY09 ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste (HLW) throughput (i.e., the amount of waste processed per unit time) is a function of two critical parameters: waste loading (WL) and melt rate. For the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), increasing HLW throughput would significantly reduce the overall mission life cycle costs for the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this task is to develop data, assess property models, and refine or develop the necessary models to support increased WL of HLW at SRS. It is a continuation of the studies initiated in FY07, but is under the specific guidance of a Task Change Request (TCR)/Work Authorization received from DOE headquarters (Project Number RV071301). Using the data generated in FY07, FY08 and historical data, two test matrices (60 glasses total) were developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to generate data in broader compositional regions. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), viscosity, liquidus temperature (TL) measurement and durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The results of this study are summarized below: (1) In general, the current durability model predicts the durabilities of higher waste loading glasses quite well. A few of the glasses exhibited poorer durability than predicted. (2) Some of the glasses exhibited anomalous behavior with respect to durability (normalized leachate for boron (NL [B])). The quenched samples of FY09EM21-02, -07 and -21 contained no nepheline or other wasteform affecting crystals, but have unacceptable NL [B] values (> 10 g/L). The ccc sample of FY09EM21-07 has a NL [B] value that is more than one half the value of the quenched sample. These glasses also have lower concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. (3) Five of the ccc samples (EM-13, -14, -15, -29 and -30) completely crystallized with both magnetite and nepheline, and still had extremely low NL [B] values. These particular glasses have more CaO present than any of the other glasses in the matrix. It appears that while all of the glasses contain nepheline, the NL [B] values decrease as the CaO concentration increases from 2.3 wt% to 4.3 wt%. A different form of nepheline may be created at higher concentrations of CaO that does not significantly reduce glass durability. (4) The T{sub L} model appears to be under-predicting the measured values of higher waste loading glasses. Trends in T{sub L} with composition are not evident in the data from these studies. (5) A small number of glasses in the FY09 matrix have measured viscosities that are much lower than the viscosity range over which the current model was developed. The decrease in viscosity is due to a higher concentration of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). A high iron concentration is the cause of the increase in NBO. Durability, viscosity and T{sub L} data collected during FY07 and FY09 that specifically targeted higher waste loading glasses was compiled and assessed. It appears that additional data may be required to expand the coverage of the T{sub L} and viscosity models for higher waste loading glasses. In general, the compositional regions of the higher waste loading glasses are very different than those used to develop these models. On the other hand, the current durability model seems to be applicable to the new data. At this time, there is no evidence to modify this model; however additional experimental studies should be conducted to determine the cause of the anomalous durability data.

  1. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

  2. Synthesis of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Matsuda, Atsunori, E-mail: matsuda@ee.tut.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 °C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 °C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 °C against time. Highlights: • Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. • Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. • Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. • Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. • Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties of NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Linlin; Zi Wenwen; Li Guanghuan; Lan Shi; Ji Guijuan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Gan Shucai, E-mail: gansc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zou Haifeng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Xu Xuechun [College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method using ammonia as pH value regulator. The hydrothermal process was carried out under aqueous condition without the use of any organic solvent, surfactant, and catalyst. The experimental results demonstrate that the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor powders are single-phase scheelite structure with tetragonal symmetry. Moreover, the phosphor under the excitation of 390 and 456 nm exhibited blue emission (486 nm) and yellow emission (574 nm), corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} transition and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transition of Dy{sup 3+} ions, respectively. In addition, the yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. All chromaticity coordinates of the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors are located in the white-light region. The results indicate that this kind of phosphor may has potential applications in the fields of near UV-excited and blue-excited white LEDs. - Graphical abstract: It can be seen from the SEM images that a pompon-like shape was obtained with an average diameter of about 1 {mu}m, and it is composed of many nanoflakes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission at 486 nm and yellow emission at 574 nm were obtained from the samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} can be efficiently excited by the blue light and the near ultraviolet light.

  4. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation apparatus with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated investigations to explore the potential that sonication may offer to enhance carbonation reactivity. During the second project year, we extended our investigations of the effects of sonication on the extent of carbonation as a function of the following parameters: particle size distribution, the mass of solid reactant, volume fraction of aqueous solution present, sonication power, time, temperature, and CO{sub 2} pressure. To date, none of the conditions investigated have significantly enhanced carbonation. Mechanistic investigations of the stirred ({approx}1,500 rpm) aqueous olivine carbonation process indicate the carbonation process involves both incongruent magnesium dissolution and silica precipitation, which results in robust silica-rich passivating layer formation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry observation of H within the passivating layer that forms during static carbonation suggests 2H{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ion exchange is associated with incongruent dissolution. Apparently, H{sub 2}O forms at or near the olivine/passivating-layer interface during the process and diffuses out through the passivating layers during the carbonation reaction. This is

  5. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  6. New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhave, Ramesh R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site R. Bhave (Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oak Ridge, TN) and M. R. Poirier* (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC) Solid-liquid separation is the limiting step for many waste treatment processes at the Savannah River Site. SRNL researchers have identified the rotary microfilter as a technology to improve the rate of solid-liquid separation processes. SRNL is currently developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service and plans to deploy the technology as part of the small column ion exchange process. The rotary microfilter can utilize any filter media that is available as a flat sheet. The current baseline membrane is a 0.5 micron (nominal) porous metal filter (Pall PMM050). Previous testing with tubular filters showed that filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produce higher flux than filters composed only of porous metal. The authors are working to develop flat sheet filter media composed of a ceramic membrane and/or ceramic-metal composite on top of a porous stainless steel support that can be used with the rotary microfilter to substantially increase filter flux resulting in a more compact, energy efficient and cost-effective high level radioactive waste treatment system. Composite membranes with precisely controlled pore size distribution were fabricated on porous metal supports. High quality uniform porous metal (316SS) supports were fabricated to achieve high water permeability. Separative layers of several different materials such as ultrafine metal particles and ceramic oxides were used to fabricate composite membranes. The fabrication process involved several high temperature heat treatments followed by characterization of gas and liquid permeability measurements and membrane integrity analysis. The fabricated composite membrane samples were evaluated in a static test cell manufactured by SpinTek. The composite membranes were evaluated on several feed slurries: 1 wt. % strontium carbonate in deionized water, 1 wt. % monosodium titanate in simulated salt solution, and 1 wt. % simulated sludge in simulated salt solution and deionized water. Flux as a function of feed flow rate and transmembrane pressure was measured for each of the above described feed slurries. The authors will discuss the new membrane development efforts, waste slurry filtration performance evaluations and scale-up considerations.

  7. Impact of Pretreatment and Aging on the Iodine Capture Performance of Silver-Exchanged Mordenite - 12314

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.; Ramey, D.W.; Spencer, B.B.; Anderson, K.K.; Robinson, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatile gas emissions from a nuclear fuel recycle facility in the United States are governed by several key regulations, including 10 CFR 20, 40 CFR 61, and 40 CFR 190. Under 40 CFR 190, the total quantity of iodine that may be released to the environment from the entire fuel cycle is limited to 5 millicuries of I-129 per gigawatt-year of electrical energy produced by the fuel cycle. With a reasonable engineering margin, an iodine decontamination factor (DF) of approximately 1000 will be required for the complete fuel cycle. Off-gas treatment in a fuel reprocessing plant must address several gas streams containing iodine, among a number of volatile radionuclides. Past research and developmental activities identified silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) as a very promising sorbent based on its acid resistance, relatively high iodine and methyl iodide capacity, and high achievable DF. Recent studies at ORNL have focused on the impacts of long-term exposure to simulated off-gas streams (aging) and pretreatment on the iodine adsorption performance of hydrogen-reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag{sup 0}Z). Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of long-term exposure to both dry and moist air on the iodine sorption capacity of Ag{sup 0}Z. The data indicates that aging reduces the capacity of Ag{sup 0}Z, which must be accounted for to prevent degradation of DF. Because of its high acid resistance, a AgZ sorbent has been selected specifically for application in treating off-gas streams containing iodine. While extensive tests have been conducted in the United States on a form of this sorbent, the specific material previously tested is no longer commercially available and similar materials are currently being evaluated. As part of this evaluation, tests were conducted to determine the iodine sorption properties of this replacement media and the effects of long-term (up to 6 months) exposure to simulated off-gas streams. The ultimate goal is to develop an understanding of the fundamental phenomena that controls aging for this material and other zeolites that could be considered for use in off-gas treatment in the future. The trends in the study results indicate that the amount of elemental silver observed by XRD increases from 0.3 wt% in vendor-supplied AgZ to approximately 5 wt% by reducing the material with hydrogen. The study also concluded that aging decreases the quantity of elemental silver in the material. After 2 months of aging, the Ag{sup 0} content of an experimental sample was reduced from 5 wt% to about 1.3 wt%. The form into which the elemental silver is converted during aging was not determined. Experimental tests have been initiated to study how aging of Ag{sup 0}Z impacts iodine loading on the zeolite. Loading tests with un-aged Ag{sup 0}Z resulted in an 81% silver utilization. The loading capacity of iodine on Ag{sup 0}Z was reduced with aging in dry air. Material aged for 6 months in dry air had a 40% reduction in iodine loading capacity. Under moist-air aging conditions, a significant decrease in the rate and total loading (?45% of theoretical) of iodine uptake can be observed beginning with the shortest aging period (i.e., after 1 month) when compared with the loading curve using Ag{sup 0}Z with no aging. Increasing exposure time to the humid air used to age the Ag{sup 0}Z beyond 1 month resulted in a slight additional reduction in capacity to about 35% of theoretical at 2 months. Virtually identical capacity was observed with 4 months of aging. Compared to the non-aged material, the 1 month dry-air aged Ag{sup 0}Z shows about a 35% reduction (approximate) in iodine loading capacity and the 6 month dry-air aged Ag{sup 0}Z shows about a 50% reduction. These studies generated several questions that will be addressed in future tests. They include the following: Is there indeed degradation over time (in storage) in the iodine adsorption performance of Ag{sup 0}Z? Once reduced, how should the Ag{sup 0}Z be stored- under a hydrogen atmosphere, an inert atmosphere, a desiccant, or some other method or c

  8. Use of the TRUEX process for the pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge -- Results of FY 1990 studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this process is to separate the transuranic elements from the bulk components so that the bulk components can be disposed of as low-level waste with only a small transuranic-containing fraction requiring geologic disposal. The pretreatment process examined here is the one indicated to be most promising in the initial studies. It involves dissolving the unwashed sludge in nitric acid and then using the TRUEX solvent extraction process to remove the transuranic elements from the bulk components of the waste. The areas identified in this work that need additional information are gradual precipitate formation as dissolved sludge solutions age, and formation of solid material when the dissolved sludge solution is contacted with the solvent used in the TRUEX process. 5 refs., 71 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. SU-E-T-65: Characterization of a 2D Array for QA and Pretreatment Plan Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anvari, A; Aghamiri, S [Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, S [Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alaei, P [UniversityMinnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The OCTAVIUS detector729 is a 2D array of 729 air vented cubic plane parallel ion chambers used for pretreatment verification and QA. In this study we investigated dosimetric characteristics of this system for clinical photon beam dosimetry. Methods: Detector performance evaluation included determination of the location of the effective point of measurement (EPM), sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility of detector response, as well as output factor, dose rate, and source to surface distance (SSD) dependence. Finally, assessment of wedge modulated fields was carried out. All the evaluations were performed five times for low and high photon energies. For reference measurements, a 0.6 cc ionization chamber was used. Data analysis and comparison of the OCTAVIUS detector with reference ion chamber data was performed using the VeriSoft patient plan verification software. Results: The reproducibility and stability of the measurements are excellent, the detector showed same signal with a maximum deviation of less than 0.5% in short and long term. Results of sensitivity test showed same signal with a maximum deviation of approximately 0.1%. As the detector 729 response is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurement at regions of high dose gradient effectively. The detector agrees with the ionization chamber measurement to within 1% for SSD range of 75 to 125 cm. Also, its measured wedge modulated profiles matched very well with ion chamber dose profiles acquired in a water tank. Conclusions: As the response of the detector 729 is linear with dose and dose rate, it can be used for the measurements in the areas of dose gradients effectively. Based on the measurements and comparisons performed, this system is a reliable and accurate dosimeter for QA and pretreatment plan verification in radiotherapy.

  10. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  11. RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

  12. High-throughput characterization of stresses in thin film materials libraries using Si cantilever array wafers and digital holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Y. W.; Ludwig, A. [Institute for Materials, Chair for Materials for Microsystems, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Materials Research Department, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Hamann, S.; Ehmann, M. [Institute for Materials, Chair for Materials for Microsystems, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of an advanced high-throughput stress characterization method for thin film materials libraries sputter-deposited on micro-machined cantilever arrays consisting of around 1500 cantilevers on 4-inch silicon-on-insulator wafers. A low-cost custom-designed digital holographic microscope (DHM) is employed to simultaneously monitor the thin film thickness, the surface topography and the curvature of each of the cantilevers before and after deposition. The variation in stress state across the thin film materials library is then calculated by Stoney's equation based on the obtained radii of curvature of the cantilevers and film thicknesses. DHM with nanometer-scale out-of-plane resolution allows stress measurements in a wide range, at least from several MPa to several GPa. By using an automatic x-y translation stage, the local stresses within a 4-inch materials library are mapped with high accuracy within 10 min. The speed of measurement is greatly improved compared with the prior laser scanning approach that needs more than an hour of measuring time. A high-throughput stress measurement of an as-deposited Fe-Pd-W materials library was evaluated for demonstration. The fast characterization method is expected to accelerate the development of (functional) thin films, e.g., (magnetic) shape memory materials, whose functionality is greatly stress dependent.

  13. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task II: fracture permeability of crystalline rocks as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrothermal alteration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective is to measure and understand the variation of the fracture permeability of quartzite subjected to hydrothermal conditions. Pore fluids will consist of distilled water and aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions at temperatures to 250/sup 0/C, fluid pressures to 20 MPa and effective normal stresses to 70 MPa. Fluid flow rates will be controllable to rates at least as small as 0.2 ml/day (approx. 4 fracture volumes). Experiments are designed to assess what role, if any, pressure solution may play at time scales of those of the experiments (less than or equal to 2 weeks). Secondary objectives are: (1) continue simulated fracture studies, incorporating inelastic deformation into model and characterize the nature of inelastic deformation occurring on loaded tensile fractures in quartzite; (2) continue dissolution experiment, with emphasis on dissolution modification of tensile fracture surfaces on quartzite; and (3) study natural fractures in a quartzite exhibiting hydrothermal dissolution features.

  14. Comparison of structural and electrical properties of Co{sup 2+}doped Mn-Zn soft nano ferrites prepared via coprecipitation and hydrothermal methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anwar, Humaira, E-mail: merey_anwar@yahoo.com [Thermal Transport Laboratory, Materials Engineering Department, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering (SCME), National University of Sciences and Technology, H-12, Islamabad (Pakistan); Maqsood, Asghari [Centre for Emerging Sciences, Engineering and Technology (CESET), I-10/3, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Coprecipitation and hydrothermal synthesis of Co{sup 2+} doped Mn-Zn ferrites. • Dielectric measurements at 3 MHz and 1 GHz frequencies. • Enhanced DC electrical resistivity for samples prepared from hydrothermal technique. • Impedance studies for the prepared samples showing major contribution due to grains. - Abstract: A series of Co doped Mn-Zn ferrites compounds with the formula Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5?x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 and 0.50) were successfully synthesized by polyethylene glycol-assisted coprecipitation and hydrothermal methods. The structural characterization of the samples was done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the samples found to have cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size of all nanoparticles were estimated using Scherrer's formula and found to lie between 10 and 25 ± 3 nm with small size distribution of particles prepared by hydrothermal method. The FTIR spectrum showed two absorption bands of tetrahedral and octahedral metal-oxygen sites. DC electrical resistivity varied from 4.12 × 10{sup 7} to 8.32 × 10{sup 10} ohm cm with cobalt doping. The dielectric measurements were performed from 20 Hz to 3 MHz and from 1 MHz to 1 GHz frequency ranges. The value of dielectric constant (??) varies from 15.54 to 106.25 (1 MHz) and 6.73–16.48 (1 GHz) for all the samples at room temperature. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out from 20 Hz to 3 MHz, at room temperature to study the grains and grain boundaries effect.

  15. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites: Inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis and application in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixun, E-mail: qxguo@xmu.edu.cn; Guo, Pengfei; Li, Juntao, E-mail: jtli@xmu.edu.cn; Yin, Hao; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Feilong; Shen, Daoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites with a particle size of ?80 nm have been synthesized through an organic-free hydrothermal synthesis strategy by using Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} as an inorganic dispersant, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Nano-sized and micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} without CNTs have also been prepared for comparison. The cycle performances of the as-obtained Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are highly size-dependent. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites can deliver reversible discharge capacity of ?700 mA h/g at a current density of 50 mA/g after 50 cycles. The discharge capacity of the micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} decreased to 171 mA h/g after 50 cycles. Our work not only provides new insights into the inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxides nanocrystals but also gives guidance for finding new nanocomposites as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared through an inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis strategy, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced performance. - Highlights: • Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} is a good inorganic dispersant for the hydrothermal synthesis of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • The cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode are much better than that of micro Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode. • Compositing CNTs can enhance the cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode.

  16. Synthesis of high intrinsic loss power aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted hydrothermal-reduction route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behdadfar, Behshid, E-mail: bbehdadfar@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, Ahmad [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat [School of Pharmacy, Isfahan Pharmaceutical Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Morales, Maria del Puerto [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Mozaffari, Morteza [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticle were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results showed that certain concentrations of citric acid (CA) are required to obtain only magnetic iron oxides with mean particle sizes around 8 nm. CA acts as a modulator and reducing agent in iron oxide formation which controls nanoparticle size. The XRD, magnetic and heating measurements showed that the temperature and time of hydrothermal reaction can affect the magnetic properties of obtained ferrofluids. The synthesized ferrofluids were stable at pH 7. Their mean hydrodynamic size was around 80 nm with polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.158. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) was 9.4 nHm{sup 2}/kg. So this clean and cheap route is an efficient way to synthesize high ILP aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. - Graphical abstract: Monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction method with citric acid as reductant which is an efficient way to synthesize aqueous ferrofluids applicable in magnetic hyperthermia. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were synthesized by hydrothermal-reduction route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Citric acid acted as reducing agent and surfactant in the route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aqueous iron oxide ferrofluids were monodispersed and stable at pH of 7. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated intrinsic loss power of the synthesized ferrofluids was very high.

  17. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  18. PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

  19. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Niikura, Naoki [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)] [Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yang Wei [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rohren, Eric [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Valero, Vicente [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Woodward, Wendy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alvarez, Ricardo H. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lucci, Anthony [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ueno, Naoto T. [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Breast Medical Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A., E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morgan Welch Inflammatory Breast Cancer Clinic, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph nodes, and unsuspected sites of distant metastasis. This information is important in the design of radiotherapy treatment fields and, therefore, we recommend that PET/CT be a component of initial staging for IBC.

  20. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.