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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Snowmass Benchmark Points and Three-Loop Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the full three-loop beta-functions for the MSSM generalised to include additional matter multiplets in 5, 10 representations of SU(5). We analyse in detail the effect of three-loop running on the sparticle spectrum for the MSSM Snowmass Benchmark Points. We also consider the effect on these spectra of additional matter multiplets (the semi-perturbative unification scenario).

I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; A. F. Kord

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines – Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

Three loop MSbar transversity operator anomalous dimensions for fixed moment n <= 8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the anomalous dimensions of the transversity operator at three loops in the MSbar scheme for fixed moment n where n n <= 7.

J. A. Gracey

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pressurized thermal shock: TEMPEST computer code simulation of thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a pressurized water reactor. [Creare 61 and 64  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST computer program was used to simulate fluid and thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a pressurized water reactor under emergency core cooling high-pressure injection (HPI), which is of concern to the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) problem. Application of the code was made in performing an analysis simulation of a full-scale Westinghouse three-loop plant design cold leg and downcomer. Verification/assessment of the code was performed and analysis procedures developed using data from Creare 1/5-scale experimental tests. Results of three simulations are presented. The first is a no-loop-flow case with high-velocity, low-negative-buoyancy HPI in a 1/5-scale model of a cold leg and downcomer. The second is a no-loop-flow case with low-velocity, high-negative density (modeled with salt water) injection in a 1/5-scale model. Comparison of TEMPEST code predictions with experimental data for these two cases show good agreement. The third simulation is a three-dimensional model of one loop of a full size Westinghouse three-loop plant design. Included in this latter simulation are loop components extending from the steam generator to the reactor vessel and a one-third sector of the vessel downcomer and lower plenum. No data were available for this case. For the Westinghouse plant simulation, thermally coupled conduction heat transfer in structural materials is included. The cold leg pipe and fluid mixing volumes of the primary pump, the stillwell, and the riser to the steam generator are included in the model. In the reactor vessel, the thermal shield, pressure vessel cladding, and pressure vessel wall are thermally coupled to the fluid and thermal mixing in the downcomer. The inlet plenum mixing volume is included in the model. A 10-min (real time) transient beginning at the initiation of HPI is computed to determine temperatures at the beltline of the pressure vessel wall.

Eyler, L.L.; Trent, D.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vapor Pressure Measurement of Supercooled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new dewpoint hygrometer was developed for subfreezing temperature application. Vapor pressure of supercooled water was determined by measuring temperatures at the dew-forming surface and the vapor source ice under the flux density balance, and ...

N. Fukuta; C. M. Gramada

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

High pressure water jet mining machine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

Barker, Clark R. (Rolla, MO)

1981-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure...

9

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR CORE WITH PLUTONIUM BURNUP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor is described having a core containing Pu/sup 240/ in which the effective microscopic neutronabsorption cross section of Pu/sup 240/ in unconverted condition decreases as the time of operation of the reactor increases, in order to compensate for loss of reactivity resulting from fission product buildup during reactor operation. This means serves to improve the efficiency of the reactor operation by reducing power losses resulting from control rods and burnable poisons. (AEC)

Puechl, K.H.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

10

The cost of gauge coupling unification in the SU(5) model at three loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-supersymmetric SU(5) model can accommodate heavy neutrinos and gauge coupling unification when augmented with an adjoint fermionic multiplet 24_F. Among the most important phenomenological implications of the model is the prediction of light fermions and scalars, charged under the SU(2) gauge group, in the reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this talk, we report on the recent calculation of the correlation function between the mass scale of the new electroweak multiplets and the gauge coupling unification scale at three loop accuracy.

L. Mihaila

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

The three loop slope of the Dirac form factor and the S Lamb shift in hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last unknown contribution to hydrogen energy levels at order malpha{sup 7}, due to the slope of the Dirac form factor at three loops, is evaluated in a closed analytical form. The resulting shift of the hydrogen nS energy level is found to be 3.016/n{sup 3} kHz. Using the QED calculations of the 1S Lamb shift, the authors extract a precise value of the proton charge radius r{sub p} = 0.883{+-}0.014 fm.

Melnikov, K.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Lattice Free Energy of QCD with Clover Fermions, up to Three-Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the perturbative value of the free energy in Lattice QCD, up to three loops. Our calculation is performed using Wilson gluons and the Sheikholeslami - Wolhert (clover) improved action for fermions. The free energy is directly related to the average plaquette. To carry out the calculation, we compute all relevant Feynman diagrams up to 3 loops, using a set of automated procedures in Mathematica; numerical evaluation of the resulting loop integrals is performed on finite lattice, with subsequent extrapolation to infinite size. The results are presented as a function of the fermion mass m, for any SU(N_c) gauge group, and for an arbitrary number of fermion flavors. In order to enable independent comparisons, we also provide the results on a per diagram basis, for a specific mass value.

A. Athenodorou; H. Panagopoulos; A. Tsapalis

2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

14

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

15

Evaluation of Pressure Transducers under Turbid Natural Waters*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure measurements made in two turbid natural waters have led to the inference that the effective depth-mean in situ density values, ?eff, of these waters are less than (?2.70%–6.5%) their bulk densities (i.e., densities of water–sediment ...

Antony Joseph; Ehrlich Desa; Elgar Desa; David Smith; Vani B. Peshwe; Vijaykumar; J. A. Erwin Desa

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Materials Degradation Issues in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASL: The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors: A U.S. ... Strategies for Studying High Dose Irradiation Effects in Reactor Components.

17

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from

18

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Milestone Report on Materials and Machining of Specimens for the ATR-2 Experiment The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations, which govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants, require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including

19

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely

20

2013 Interim Review of the Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guideline Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) periodically updates its Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) water chemistry guidelines when new information becomes available. An industry review committee meeting in June 2013 determined that a revision of the 2009 version of EPRI’s Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water ...

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

2012 Interim Review of the Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guideline Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) periodically updates its Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) water chemistry guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). An industry review committee meeting in September 2012 determined that a revision of the 2009 version of EPRI’s Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

Omar Diallo, Souleymane [ORNL; Jazdzewska, Monika [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland; Palmer, Jeremy [North Carolina State University; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Gubbins, Dr. K. E. [North Carolina State University; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M [Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 Angstroms. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 < T < 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of "caged" or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

S. O. Diallo; M. Jazdzewska; J. C. Palmer; E. Mamontov; K. E. Gubbins; M. Sliwinska-Bartkowiak

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Overcoming Solubility Limitations to Zinc Addition in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc addition to the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is being used for dose rate reduction and primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) mitigation. This report summarizes results of aqueous zinc oxide solubility experiments from 150 to 350 degrees Celsius (302 to 662 degrees Fahrenheit). These experiments were performed to develop quantitative models of solubility and aqueous-phase solute speciation behavior as functions of temperature, pH, and solution compositio...

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

25

Measurements of the Vapor Pressure of Supercooled Water Using Infrared Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of the vapor pressure of supercooled water utilizing infrared spectroscopy, which enables unambiguous verification that the authors’ data correspond to the vapor pressure of liquid water, not a mixture of liquid water ...

Will Cantrell; Eli Ochshorn; Alexander Kostinski; Keith Bozin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement (decreased toughness) , as shown in Fig. 1.1, and extending operation from 40y to 80y implies a doubling of the neutron exposure for the RPV. Thus,

27

Constant-pressure measurement of steam-water relative permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of steady-state experiments have established relative permeability curves for two-phase flow of water in a porous medium. These experiments have minimized uncertainty in pressure, heat loss, and saturation. By attempting to maintain a constant pressure gradient, the experiments have provided a baseline from which to determine the effect of temperature on relative permeability. The use of a flexible heater with an automatic control system made it possible to assume negligible phase change for the mobile fluid. X-ray computer tomography (CT) aided by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative permeability curves assume a shape similar to those obtained by Corey (1954) for the simultaneous flow of nitrogen and water. Close agreement between the curves by Satik (1998), Mahiya (1999), and this study establishes the reliability of the experimental method and instrumentation adopted in these experiments, though some differences may bear further investigation. In particular, the steam phase relative permeability appears to vary much more linearly with saturation than does the water phase relative permeability.

O'Connor, Peter A.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water or hot water building deferential pressure (DP) or return temperature or flow rate at their setpoints. The chilled water and hot water DP setpoint or return temperature setpoint or flow rate setpoint was a constant value or reset based on outside air temperature. In some buildings, the chilled water and hot water DP setpoints were reset based on flow rate, but in many instances those setpoint schedules were either too low to maintain enough building DP requirement or too high and consumed excess energy. The building DP reset schedule based on flow rate is studied and compared with the other pump speed control methods. Because the building DP setpoint based on flow rate method is achieved by tracking the load change, it saves energy than the other methods. In this paper its calculation procedure is generated and the example of the building DP calculation is given.

Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

2011 Interim Review of the Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines -- Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI periodically updates its PWR water chemistry guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). An industry review committee meeting in September 2011 determined that a revision of the 2009 version of EPRI's Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines is not warranted at this time, nor is interim guidance required.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Subcooled and saturated water flow boiling pressure drop in small diameter helical coils at low pressure  

SciTech Connect

Experimental pressure drop results on boiling water flow through three helical coils of tube inner diameter of 4.03 mm and 4.98 mm and coil diameter to tube diameter ratio of 26.1, 64.1 and 93.3 are presented. Both subcooled and saturated flow boiling are investigated, covering operating pressures from 120 to 660 kPa, mass fluxes from 290 to 690 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and heat fluxes from 50 to 440 kW m{sup -2}. Existing correlations for subcooled flow pressure drop are found not capable to fit the present subcooled database, while the measurements in saturated flow conditions are successfully reproduced by existing correlations for both straight and coiled pipe two-phase flow. The experimental database is included in tabular form. (author)

Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo; Ricotti, Marco E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Survey of Optimization of Reactor Coolant Cleanup Systems: For Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the reactor coolant cleanup systems in the boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment is important for controlling the transport of corrosion products (metals and activated metals), fission products, and coolant impurities (soluble and insoluble) throughout the reactor coolant loop, and this optimization contributes to reducing primary system radiation fields. The removal of radionuclides and corrosion products is just one of many functions (both ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

Corrosion Product Transport during Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Startups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion product transport to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) steam generators and to the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) reactor vessel during startups is of increased interest due to reductions in feedwater transport rates during normal operation and the recent emphasis on minimizing total transport during the cycle. Reductions in transport will reduce deposition on the fuel and the tendency for hot spot formation in BWRs and reduce surface fouling and the tendency for formation of aggressive chemical sol...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Condensate Polishing Guidelines for Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor Plants - 2004 Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful condensate polishing allows more reliable operation of nuclear units by maintaining control of ionic and particulate impurity transport to the pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators and the boiling water reactor (BWR) and recirculation system. This report presents revisions of EPRI's 1997 nuclear industry consensus guidelines for the design and operation of deep bed and filter demineralizer condensate polishers. These guidelines are consistent with the 2000 revisions of EPRI's "BWR W...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Pressure Water Leaching Molybdenum and Nickel from Mo-Ni ore of Black Shale without Reagent. Author(s), Zhigan Deng. On-Site Speaker ...

38

Transmutation rates in the annulus gas of pressure tube water reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor utilizes Pressure Tube (PT) fuel channel design and heavy water as a coolant. Fuel channel annulus gas acts as an… (more)

Ahmad, Mohammad Mateen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2 and Hugh F. Wilson1 1 and Cmcm symmetry at 7.6 and 15.5 Mbar, respectively. The known high pressure ice phases VII, VIII, X positions between nearest O atoms in the ice X, Pbcm, and Pbca phases. PACS numbers: Water ice is one

Militzer, Burkhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Internals Aging Management Program Development Template (MRP-342)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has completed and published guidance for managing the effects of aging degradation in pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals. The initial version of this report, Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Internals Inspection and Evaluation Guidelines (MRP-227, Revision 0), was submitted to the staff of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

Accident management for indian pressurized heavy water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indian nuclear power program as of now is mainly based on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Operating Procedures for normal power operation and Emergency Operating Procedures for operational transients and accidents within design basis exist for all Indian PHWRs. In addition, on-site and off-site emergency response procedures are also available for these NPPs. The guidelines needed for severe accidents mitigation are now formally being documented for Indian PHWRs. Also, in line with International trend of having symptom based emergency handling, the work is in advanced stage for preparation of symptom-based emergency operating procedures. Following a plant upset condition; a number of alarms distributed in different information systems appear in the control room to aid operator to identify the nature of the event. After identifying the event, appropriate intervention in the form of event based emergency operating procedure is put into use by the operating staff. However, if the initiating event cannot be unambiguously identified or after the initial event some other failures take place, then the selected event based emergency operating procedure will not be optimal. In such a case, reactor safety is ensured by monitoring safety functions (depicted by selected plant parameters grouped together) throughout the event handling so that the barriers to radioactivity release namely, fuel and fuel cladding, primary heat transport system integrity and containment remain intact. Simultaneous monitoring of all these safety functions is proposed through status trees and this concept will be implemented through a computer-based system. For beyond design basis accidents, event sequences are identified which may lead to severe core damage. As part of this project, severe accident mitigation guidelines are being finalized for the selected event sequences. The paper brings out the details of work being carried out for Indian PHWRs for symptom based event handling and severe accident management. (authors)

Hajela, S.; Grover, R.; Ghadge, S.G.; Bajaj, S.S. [Directorate of Safety, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited Nabhikiya Urja Bhawan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai-400 094 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Heat transfer and pressure drop data for high heat flux densities to water at high subcritical pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local surface ooeffioients of heat t-ansfer, overall pressure drop data and mean friction factor are presented for heat flamms up to 3.52106 BtuAr ft2 for water flowing in a nickel tabe isder the following conditions: mass ...

Rohsenow, Warren M.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

An inverted hydride-fueled pressurized water reactor concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies conducted at MIT showed that power performance of typical pin geometry PWRs are limited by three main constraints: core pressure drop, critical heat flux (CHF) and fretting phenomena of the fuel rods against ...

Ferroni, Paolo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Life of Plant Activity Estimates for a Nominal 1000 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning nuclear power plant and disposal site managers must understand the radioactive source term of a nuclear power plant to effectively manage disposition of these materials. This study estimates the radioactive source term from nominal 1000 MWe pressurized water and boiling water reactors to support decisions related to radioactive waste storage, processing, and disposal through decommissioning.BackgroundThis study examines the radionuclide ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

Seliskar, Carl J. (Cincinnati, OH); Warner, David K. (Centerville, OH)

1988-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

48

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 January 29, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration RELAP-7 is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code. Development started in October 2011, and during the past quarter the initial capabilities of RELAP-7 were demonstrated by simulating a steady-state single-phase pressurized water reactor (PWR) with two parallel loops and multiple reactor core flow channels (Fig. 1). The PWR configuration matched that of the Three Mile Island 1 LWR, which is a benchmark problem from the

49

Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles Retrieved from Pressure-Broadened Emission Spectra at 22 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the analysis and the evaluation of the retrieval of tropospheric water vapor profiles from pressure-broadened emission spectra at 22 GHz measured with a ground-based microwave spectroradiometer. The spectra have a bandwidth of ...

Alexander Haefele; Niklaus Kämpfer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The selective use of thorium and heterogeneity in uranium-efficient pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic procedures have been developed and applied to assess the uranium utilization potential of a broad range of options involving the selective use of thorium in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating on the ...

Kamal, Altamash

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Conceptual Design of a Large, Passive Pressure-Tube Light Water Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design for a large, passive, light water reactor has been developed. The proposed concept is a pressure tube reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated ...

Hejzlar, P.

52

Surface Water Vapor Pressure and Temperature Trends in North America during 1948–2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over one-quarter billion hourly values of temperature and relative humidity observed at 309 stations located across North America during 1948–2010 were studied. The water vapor pressure was determined and seasonal averages were computed. Data were ...

V. Isaac; W. A. van Wijngaarden

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Design strategies for optimizing high burnup fuel in pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is focused on the strategy for utilizing high-burnup fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR) with special emphasis on the full array of neutronic considerations. The historical increase in batch-averaged discharge ...

Xu, Zhiwen, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, Daniel J. (Export, PA); Schrader, Kenneth J. (Penn Hills, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

McDermott, D.J.; Schrader, K.J.; Schulz, T.L.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analysis of strategies for improving uranium utilization in pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic procedures have been devised and applied to evaluate core design and fuel management strategies for improving uranium utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors operated on a once-through fuel cycle. A principal ...

Sefcik, Joseph A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Effect of Pressure Gradient and InitialWater Saturation on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'40 30 20 10 0 !2 5 Water injection was stopped for 14 hours t q,=5 crn3/rnin,Ap=O.OIO psi/cm qp11 crn

Firoozabadi, Abbas

59

RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

AN INVESTIGATION OF URANIUM CORROSION IN 100 C WATER AND 200 C STEAM AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Material balance in atmospheric-pressure water and steam corrosion of uranium have been studied by examination of the phase composition and valence state of the corrosion product and by hydrogen-evolution measurements. The corrosion rates in atmospheric-pressure steam above 100 deg C are lower than those obtained in tests carried out in water with a hydrogen overpressure. The atmospheric-pressure-water corrosion product was found to be two phase: an oxygen- rich oxide, UO/sub 2.2/, and uncorroded metal particles. No hydride phase was detected, in contrast to previously reported evidence for hydride in uranium corrosion. The differences are explained on the basis of hydrogen pressure in the reaction vessel. (auth)

Stewart, O.M.; Berry, W.E.; Miller, P.D.; Vaughan, D.A.; Schroeder, J.B.; Fink, F.W.; Schwartz, C.M.

1958-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

End-of-Life Rod Internal Pressures in Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure (RIP) is the primary protagonist for several evolutionary changes during long-term dry storage, which affect cladding resistance to failure when spent fuel assemblies are subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport. At the maximum temperature attained, either during vacuum drying or dry storage, EOL RIP determines the maximum stress state in the fuel rod cladding, which in turn sets the initial conditions for potential time-dependent ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Dielectric relaxation of water below the melting point: the effect of inner pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite water is the most studied substance in the Earth, it is not completely understood why its structural and dynamical properties give rise to some anomalous behaviors. Interesting properties emerge when experiments at low temperatures and/or high pressures, are performed. Here we report dielectric measurements of cold water under constrained conditions, i.e. water that below the melting point can not freeze. The inner pressure shifts the {\\alpha} relaxation peak to similar frequencies as seen in ice Ih. Also, when we reach the triple point at 251 K, ice III seems to form. As far as we know, this via to obtain such crystalline phase has not been observed.

Abril Angulo-Sherman; Hilda Mercado-Uribe

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cleaning Using Advanced Ultrasonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Ultrasonic Fuel Cleaning Technology (patent pending) was successfully qualified and demonstrated in the field at AmerenUE Callaway Plant under joint sponsorship of the EPRI Robust Fuel Program, Working Group 1 Fuel/Water Chemistry, and an AmerenUE Tailored Collaboration. In October 1999, the project team cleaned sixteen reload assemblies, which are currently undergoing re-irradiation in Cycle 11 at Callaway Plant. The assemblies show no evidence to date of any adverse fuel performance as a consequen...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Zinc Application Sourcebook, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continually strive to optimize core design, address primary system material issues, and minimize dose impact on plant personnel. To meet these challenges, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Westinghouse, and Southern Nuclear-Plant Farley began zinc injection in 1994 for mitigation of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and radiation field reductions. Additional information from industry research continues to show the beneficial impact of zinc injection on radiation fields...

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project: Advanced Light-Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix (ALWR PWR DM) is an integral piece of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Materials Management Matrix (MMM) initiative for ALWR designs. The MMM provides a tool to assist the industry in proactive identification and consideration of materials issues and mitigation/management opportunities from the design phase through component fabrication and plant construction to operations and maintenance.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09  

SciTech Connect

This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

Progress in understanding of direct containment heating phenomena in pressurized light water reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is described in development of a mechanistic understanding of direct containment heating phemonena arising during high-pressure melt ejection accidents in pressurized water reactor systems. The experimental data base is discussed which forms the basis for current assessments of containment pressure response using current lumped-parameter containment analysis methods. The deficiencies in available methods and supporting data base required to describe major phenomena occurring in the reactor cavity, intermediate subcompartments and containment dome are highlighted. Code calculation results presented in the literature are cited which demonstrate that the progress in understanding of DCH phenomena has also resulted in current predictions of containment pressure loadings which are significantly lower than are predicted by idealized, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Current methods are, nonetheless, still predicting containment-threatening loadings for large participating melt masses under high-pressure ejection conditions. Recommendations for future research are discussed. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ginsberg, T.; Tutu, N.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pressurized Water Reactor Zinc Application: Data Analysis and Evaluation of Primary Chemistry Responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Pressurized Water Reactor Zinc Application Users Group (PWR ZUG) facilitates and improves the use of zinc injection in PWR primary coolant systems by assisting in the evaluation of zinc injection performance; documentation of lessons learned; communication of information on zinc injection qualification, monitoring, and operating experience; and review of zinc application effectiveness regarding primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) and radiation fiel...

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Issue Management Tables—Revision 2 (MRP-205)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ongoing issues related to the degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) components have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues and associated Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) and Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) requirements.

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Internals Inspection and Evaluation Guidelines (MRP-227-A)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) developed inspection and evaluation (I&E) guidelines for managing long-term aging reactor vessel internal components of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) reactor internals. Specifically, the guidelines are applicable to reactor vessel internal structural components; they do not address fuel assemblies, reactivity control assemblies, or welded attachments to the reactor vessel.

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

72

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor is described having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit. 4 figures.

Hill, P.R.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Passive containment cooling system with drywell pressure regulation for boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water reactor having a regulating valve for placing the wetwell in flow communication with an intake duct of the passive containment cooling system. This subsystem can be adjusted to maintain the drywell pressure at (or slightly below or above) wetwell pressure after the initial reactor blowdown transient is over. This addition to the PCCS design has the benefit of eliminating or minimizing steam leakage from the drywell to the wetwell in the longer-term post-LOCA time period and also minimizes the temperature difference between drywell and wetwell. This in turn reduces the rate of long-term pressure buildup of the containment, thereby extending the time to reach the design pressure limit.

Hill, Paul R. (Tucson, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

X-ray scattering intensities of water at extreme pressure and temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have calculated the coherent x-ray scattering intensity of several phases of water at 1500 and 2000 K under high pressure, using ab initio Density Functional Theory (DFT). Our calculations span the molecular liquid, ice VII, and superionic solid phases, including the recently predicted symmetrically hydrogen bonded region of the superionic phase. We show that wide angle x-ray scattering intensity could be used to determine phase boundaries between these high pressure phases, and we compare the results for ice VII and superionic water. We compute simulated spectra and provide new atomic scattering form factors for water at extreme conditions, which take into account frequently neglected changes in ionic charge and electron delocalization. We show that our modifed atomic form factors allow for a nearly exact comaprison to the total x-ray scattering intensities calculated from DFT. Finally, we analyze the effect our new form factors have on determination of the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function.

Goldman, N; Fried, L E

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

75

Generation of a 400 GPa pressure in water using converging strong shock waves  

SciTech Connect

Results related to the generation of an extreme state of water with pressure up to (4.3 {+-} 0.2){center_dot}10{sup 11} Pa, density up to 4.2 {+-} 0.1 g/cm{sup 3}, and temperature up to 2.2 {+-} 0.1 eV in the vicinity of the implosion axis of a converging strong shock wave are reported. The shock wave was produced by the underwater electrical explosion of a cylindrical Cu wire array. A {approx}8 kJ pulse generator with a current amplitude {<=}550 kA and rise time of 350 ns was used to explode arrays having varying lengths, radii, and number of wires. Hydrodynamic numerical simulations coupled to the experimental data of the shock wave propagation in water, rate of energy deposition into the array, and light emission from the compressed water in the vicinity of the implosion axis were used to determine the pressure, density, and temperature profiles during the implosion. Results of a comparison between these parameters obtained with the SESAME and quantum molecular dynamics data bases of equation of state for water are reported as well. Also, the dependences of the maximal pressure in the vicinity of the implosion axes on the array radius and the deposited energy density per unit length are reported.

Fedotov-Gefen, A.; Efimov, S.; Gilburd, L.; Bazalitski, G.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E. [Physics Department, Technion, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF MULTI-PASS PRESSURIZED WATER NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS BY ANALOG COMPUTER TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model of the primary loop of a multi-pass pressurized water reactor power plant is developed to evaluate, by analog computer techniques, the transient response characteristics under conditions of steam generator load and reactor control rod perturbations. Using the 2-pass 28 Mw(t) SM-2 reactor as a typical plant, transient behavior patterns are illustrated and examined for a variety of load inputs, variations in plant constants, and analog model simplifications. (auth)

Brondel, J.O.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sampling Considerations for Monitoring Corrosion Products in the Reactor Coolant System in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry sampling of the reactor coolant system (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) can provide significant information regarding the health of the primary system. Timely detection of increased corrosion product concentrations will aid in evaluating any risks associated with the onset of an axial offset anomaly, increased shutdown releases, increased out-of-core dose rates, or increased personnel doses. This report provides recommendations for improved RCS sampling.

2006-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of Fuel Clad Corrosion Product Deposits and Circulating Corrosion Products in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have experienced negative consequences resulting from build-up of corrosion product deposits (crud) on fuel cladding. The negative consequences include unplanned shifts in core power (axial offset anomaly, or AOA), fuel cladding failure, anomalous shutdown chemistry, and elevated ex-core radiation fields. These problems have grown more common as PWRs have moved toward higher 235U enrichments and higher duty cores needed for extended cycle operation. This report expl...

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

80

Below Core Plate Inspections for Foreign Material in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period 2000–2011, 24 U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs) experienced fuel cladding failures by debris-induced fretting over 38 cycles (source: EPRI Fuel Reliability Database). In 2006, U.S. chief nuclear officers endorsed the “Zero-by- Ten” initiative with the stated goal of reducing all fuel failures to zero by 2010. This effort was very successful, but some failure mechanisms continue to occur. Currently, the mechanism most prominent in PWRs is grid to rod fretting. ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Issue Management Tables - Revision 3 (MRP-205)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities continue to face a number of ongoing issues related to degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) components. These issues have resulted in the need for a summary tool to assist in prioritizing and addressing research and development (R&D) issues and associated EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP) and Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) requirements.BackgroundA comprehensive, integrated ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Minimization of Pressurized Water Reactor Radiation Fields through Fuel Deposit Engineering: Deposit Property Evaluation and Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide an initial assessment of the options for modification of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary side corrosion product deposits (crud) to minimize the incorporation of activated crud into out-of-core surfaces, thus reducing the intensity of out-of-core radiation fields. This report summarizes the current knowledge of PWR fuel crud characteristics, including crystallographic structure (crystal habits), and buildup mechanisms. The report also reviews the ...

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

83

Feasibility study of underground energy storage using high-pressure, high-temperature water. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical, operational and economic feasibility study on the storage of energy as heated high pressure water in underground cavities that utilize the rock overburden for containment is presented. Handling peak load requirements of electric utility power networks is examined in some detail. The cavity is charged by heating water with surplus steaming capacity during periods of low power requirement. Later this hot water supplies steam to peaking turbines when high load demands must be met. This system can be applied to either new or existing power plants of nuclear or fossil fuel type. The round trip efficiency (into storage and back) is higher than any other system - over 90%. Capital costs are competitive and the environmental impact is quite benign. Detailed installation and design problems are studied and costs are estimated. The continental United States is examined for the most applicable geology. Formations favorable for these large cavities exist in widespread areas.

Dooley, J.L.; Frost, G.P.; Gore, L.A.; Hammond, R.P.; Rawson, D.L.; Ridgway, S.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

MCDONALD JP

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

In-situ Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Investigation of the Surface Films on Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in Pressurized Water Reactor-Primary Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet engines [22], steam generators [23-24]. Alloy 600 is aAlloy 690 is used for steam generator tubes, tubesheets, andmaterial used for steam generator tubes of Pressurized Water

Wang, Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel  

SciTech Connect

The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Inst. of Resource Ecology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 51 01 19, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Galperin, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. 12 refs., 7 tabs.

Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of pressure on the phase behavior and structure of water confined between nanoscale hydrophobic and hydrophilic plates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 GPa, the system crystallizes into a bilayer ice. A P-d phase diagram showing the vapor, liquid, and bilayer ice phases is proposed. When water is confined by hydrophilic hydroxylated silica platesEffect of pressure on the phase behavior and structure of water confined between nanoscale

91

Program on Technology Innovation: Hybrid Models of Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation for Nickel Alloy Welds in Low-Electrochemical Potential (ECP) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary Water Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed hybrid models of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel alloy welds.  These models are able to account for differences in tensile properties of each heat, applied stress intensity factor, dissolved hydrogen, water temperature, and the increase in local strain rate caused by the moving crack. The new models show promise for reducing uncertainty in predicting PWSCC for nickel alloy welds by a statistically and practically ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Multivent effects in a large scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam-driven GKSS pressure suppression test facility, which contains 3 full scale vent pipes, has been used for 5 years to investigate the postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a Mark II and Type 69 boiling water reactor. Using the results from several of these tests, wetwell boundary load data (peak pressures and spectral power) during the chugging stage, have been evaluated for sparse pool response (one and two vents in the three vent pool) and for full pool response (one, two, or three vent operation in pools of constant wetwell pool area per vent). The sparse pool results indicate the pool-system, chug event boundary loads are strongly dependent on wetwell pool area per vent, with the load increasing with decreasing area. The full pool results show a substantial increase in the pool-system, chug event boundary loads upon a change from single cell to double cell operation; only minor change occurs in going from double to triple cell operation.

McCauley, E.W.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Boron Dilution Transients in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Within the pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety analyses, attention has increasingly focused in recent years on boron dilution events that could potentially lead to reactivity transients. Mixing of the low-boron water with the ambient coolant of higher boron content provides an important mitigation mechanism before the low-boron water enters the core.Experimental support is needed to validate the computational tools to be applied to analyze the mixing of the low-boron water. Experiments were performed in the three test facilities - the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), the Primaerkreislauf (PKL), and the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) - in Germany.The relevant PKL and UPTF tests were focused on small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) scenarios with reflux-condenser mode and restart of natural circulation. The two test facilities represent a typical western-type PWR and are/were operated by Siemens/KWU now Framatome ANP in Germany. While the restart of natural circulation was investigated in the PKL system test facility (volume 1:145, height 1:1), the UPTF experiments dealt with the mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the cold legs, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) downcomer, and the lower plenum (all these components were full-scale models).The results from the PKL test facility demonstrate that in case of a postulated SBLOCA with reflux condensation phase, natural circulation does not start up simultaneously in all loops. This means that slugs of condensate, which might have accumulated in the pump seal during reflux-condenser mode of operation, would reach the RPV at different points in time. The UPTF tests showed an almost ideal mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the RPV downcomer.The ROCOM test facility has been built in a linear scale of 1:5 for the investigation of coolant mixing phenomena in a wide range of flow conditions in the RPV of the German KONVOI-type PWR. The test results presented are focused on the mixing of a slug of deborated water during the startup of the first reactor coolant pump. Based on experimentally determined pulse responses, a semianalytical model for the description of coolant mixing inside the KONVOI RPV has been developed. Calculations for a presumed boron dilution event during the startup of the first reactor coolant pump have been carried out by means of the semianalytical model and independently by means of the computational fluid dynamics code CFX-4. The semianalytical model is able to describe the time dependent behavior of the deboration front at each fuel element position in a good agreement with the experiment. All main mixing effects, observed in the experiment, are also reproduced by the CFX calculation.

Hertlein, Roland J. [Framatome ANP GmbH (France); Umminger, Klaus [Framatome ANP GmbH (France); Kliem, Soeren [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (Germany); Prasser, Horst-Michael [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (Germany); Hoehne, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (Germany); Weiss, Frank-Peter [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (Germany)

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations-- -2010 Update (MRP-234)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Issues Task Group (ITG) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations. This new qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for the upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably throughout th...

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations - - 2012 Update (MRP-311, Revision 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head (RPVUH) penetrations. This qualification program is being implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Materials Reliability Program: Qualification Protocol for Pressurized Water Reactor Upper Head Penetration Ultrasonic Examinations 2 011 Update (MRP-311)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Reliability Program (MRP) has directed the Inspection Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to establish a qualification program for the examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel upper head penetrations (RPVUHs). This new qualification program was implemented to provide the utilities with a consistent and reliable examination approach for upper head penetrations. The program will provide assurance that flaws of similar size and location will be detected reliably th...

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation: Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations.

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-Jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Pressure calculation in polar and charged systems using Ewald summation: Results for the extended simple point charge model of water  

SciTech Connect

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Hummer, G.; Gro/nbech-Jensen, N. [Theoretical Division, MS K710, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Neumann, M. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)] [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than t...

Hummer, G; Neumann, M; Hummer, Gerhard; Gr{ø}nbech-Jensen, Niels; Neumann, Martin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pressure Calculation in Polar and Charged Systems using Ewald Summation: Results for the Extended Simple Point Charge Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably...

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-Jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Microwave plasma source operating with atmospheric pressure air-water mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model previously developed has been improved in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest. This model provides a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N + O {yields} NO{sup +}+ e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage, according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO{sub 2} and nitrous acid HNO{sub 2} have also been detected by mass and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The relative population density of O({sup 3}P) ground state atoms increases from 8% to 10% in the discharge zone when the input microwave power increases from 200 to 400 W and the water percentage from 1% to 10%. Furthermore, high densities of O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) density is about 0.1% of the total density. This plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest.

Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J. P.; Felizardo, E.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Gordiets, B. [Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Experimental Analysis of Water Based Drilling Fluid Aging Processes at High Temperature and High Pressure Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to render the safest, fastest, and most cost efficient drilling program for a high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP) well the maximization of drilling operational efficiencies is key. Designing an adequate, HT/HP well specific, drilling fluid is of most importance and a technological challenge that can greatly affect the outcome of the overall operational efficiency. It is necessary to have a sound fundamental understanding of the behavior that water-based muds (WBM) exhibit when exposed to HT/HP conditions. Therefore, in order to adequately design and treat a WBM for a HT/HP well specific drilling program, it is essential that the mud be evaluated at HT/HP conditions. Currently, industry standard techniques used to evaluate WBM characteristics involve aging the fluid sample to a predetermined temperature, based on the anticipated bottom hole temperature (BHT), either statically or dynamically, for a predetermined length, then cooling and mixing the fluid and measuring its rheological properties at a significantly lower temperature. This, along with the fact that the fluid is not subjected to the anticipated bottom hole pressure (BHP) during or after the aging process, brings to question if the properties recorded are those that are truly experienced down-hole. Furthermore, these testing methods do not allow the user to effectively monitor the changes during the aging process. The research in this thesis is focused on evaluating a high performance WBM and the current test procedures used to evaluate their validity. Experimental static and dynamic aging tests were developed for comparative analysis as well to offer a more accurate and precise method to evaluate the effects experienced by WBM when subjected to HT/HP conditions. The experimental tests developed enable the user to monitor and evaluate, in real-time, the rheological changes that occur during the aging of a WBM while being subjected to true BHT and BHP. Detailed standard and experimental aging tests were conducted and suggest that the standard industry tests offer false rheological results with respect to true BHT and BHP. Furthermore, the experimental aging tests show that high pressure has a significant effect on the rheological properties of the WBM at elevated temperatures.

Zigmond, Brandon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Experimental Assessment of Water Based Drilling Fluids in High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper selection of drilling fluids plays a major role in determining the efficient completion of any drilling operation. With the increasing number of ultra-deep offshore wells being drilled and ever stringent environmental and safety regulations coming into effect, it becomes necessary to examine and understand the behavior of water based drilling fluids - which are cheaper and less polluting than their oil based counterpart - under extreme temperature and pressure conditions. In most of the existing literature, the testing procedure is simple - increase the temperature of the fluid in steps and record rheological properties at each step. A major drawback of this testing procedure is that it does not represent the continuous temperature change that occurs in a drilling fluid as it is circulated through the well bore. To have a better understanding of fluid behavior under such temperature variation, a continuous test procedure was devised in which the temperature of the drilling fluid was continuously increased to a pre-determined maximum value while monitoring one rheological parameter. The results of such tests may then be used to plan fluid treatment schedules. The experiments were conducted on a Chandler 7600 XHPHT viscometer and they seem to indicate specific temperature ranges above which the properties of the drilling fluid deteriorate. Different fluid compositions and drilling fluids in use in the field were tested and the results are discussed in detail.

Ravi, Ashwin

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in aNuclear Waste Repository  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository forspent fuel and high-level waste, leads to hydrogen gas generation in thebackfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-termrepository safety. Previous modeling studies used a constant H2generation rate. However, iron corrosion and H2 generation rates varywith time, depending on factors such as water chemistry, wateravailability, and water contact area. To account for these factors andfeedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to ironcorrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena thatare driven by gas pressure buildup and water consumption. Resultsindicate that if H2 generation rates are dynamically calculated based ona chemistry model, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup are muchsmaller compared to a simulation in which the coupling between flow andreactive transport mechansism is neglected.

Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

Drinking water arsenic exposure and blood pressure in healthy women of reproductive age in Inner Mongolia, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extremely high exposure levels evaluated in prior investigations relating elevated levels of drinking water arsenic and hypertension prevalence make extrapolation to potential vascular effects at lower exposure levels very difficult. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8790 women who had recently been pregnant in an area of Inner Mongolia, China known to have a gradient of drinking water arsenic exposure. This study observed increased systolic blood pressure levels with increasing drinking water arsenic, at lower exposure levels than previously reported in the literature. As compared to the referent category (below limit of detection to 20 {mu}g of As/L), the overall population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.29 mm Hg (95% CI 0.82, 1.75), 1.28 mm Hg (95% CI 0.49, 2.07), and 2.22 mm Hg (95% CI 1.46, 2.97) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased from 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L, respectively. Controlling for age and body weight (n = 3260), the population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.88 mm Hg (95% CI 1.03, 2.73), 3.90 mm Hg (95% CI 2.52, 5.29), and 6.83 mm Hg (95% CI 5.39, 8.27) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased, respectively. For diastolic blood pressure effect, while statistically significant, was not as pronounced as systolic blood pressure. Mean diastolic blood pressure rose 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI 0.39, 1.16), 1.57 mm Hg (95% CI 0.91, 2.22) and 1.32 mm Hg (95% CI 0.70, 1.95), respectively, for the overall population and rose 2.11 mm Hg (95% CI 1.38, 2.84), 2.74 mm Hg (95% CI 1.55, 3.93), and 3.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84, 4.31), respectively, for the adjusted population (n = 3260) at drinking water arsenic concentrations of 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L. If our study results are confirmed in other populations, the potential burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to drinking water arsenic is significant.

Kwok, Richard K. [RTI International, PO Box 12194, 3040 Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 (United States)], E-mail: rkwok@rti.org; Mendola, Pauline [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Liu Zhiyi [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Savitz, David A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1057, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Heiss, Gerardo [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Ling Heling [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Lobdell, Danelle [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Zeng Donglin [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Thorp, John M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Creason, John P.; Mumford, Judy L. [Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Human Studies Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, MD-58, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reactor physics behavior of transuranic-bearing TRISO-particle fuel in a pressurized water reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) - only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is retained. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

Pope, M. A.; Sen, R. S.; Ougouag, A. M.; Youinou, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Boer, B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); SCK-CEN, Boertang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO{sub 2} assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the {sup 239}Pu and {ge}90% {sub total}Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products.

Chodak, P. III

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analytical and experimental simulation of boiling oscillations in sodium with a low-pressure water system. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and analytical program designed to simulate sodium boiling under low-power, low-flow conditions has been completed. Experiments were performed using atmospheric- pressure water as a simulant fluid and a simple one-dimensional model was developed for the system. Results indicate that water is a suitable simulant for liquid sodium under certain conditions and that the model does a fair job of modeling the system. In addition, oscillations that occur during the boiling process appear to augment substantially the heat transfer between liquid and vapor in condensation.

Levin, A.E.; Griffith, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Synthesis, characterization and application of water-soluble and easily removable cationic pressure-sensitive adhesives. Quarterly technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute studied the adsorption of cationic pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) on wood fiber, and the buildup of PSA in a closed water system during paper recycling; the results are presented. Georgia Tech worked to develop an environmentally friendly polymerization process to synthesize a novel re-dispersible PSA by co-polymerizing an oil-soluble monomer (butyl acrylate) and a cationic monomer MAEPTAC; results are presented. At the University of Georgia at Athens the project focused on the synthesis of water-soluble and easily removable cationic polymer PSAs.

NONE

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Program on Technology Innovation: Weld Metals and Welding Processes for Fabrication of Advanced Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light water reactors have traditionally been constructed using roll-formed plates for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) shells, which were assembled via horizontal and vertical seam welds. Weld filler metals often contained significant quantities of copper, other residual elements such as vanadium, and nonmetallic elements such as phosphorous and sulfur. Low-alloy steel weld filler metals of this chemical composition contributed to the degree of neutron radiation-induced embrittlement of vessel ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

114

European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) SAR ATWS Accident Analyses by using 3D Code Internal Coupling Method  

SciTech Connect

Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) accident analyses make part of the Safety Analysis Report of the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR), covering Risk Reduction Category A (Core Melt Prevention) events. This paper deals with three of the most penalizing RRC-A sequences of ATWS caused by mechanical blockage of the control/shutdown rods, regarding their consequences on the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) and core integrity. A new 3D code internal coupling calculation method has been introduced. (authors)

Gagner, Renata; Lafitte, Helene; Dormeau, Pascal [Framatome ANP, Tour Areva - 1, place de la Coupole - 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Stoudt, Roger H. [Framatome ANP, Lynchburg - 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Pressure difference-based sensing of leaks in water distribution networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human society and civilization rely on the constant availability of fresh water. In regions where a local source of potable water is not available, a transportation and distribution pipe system is employed. When these pipes ...

Kornmayer, Páll Magnús

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Temperature Dependence of Evaporation Coefficient for Water Measured in Droplets in Nitrogen under Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaporation and the thermal accommodation coefficients for water in nitrogen were investigated by means of the analysis of evaporation of pure water droplet as a function of temperature. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap ...

D. Jakubczyk; M. Zientara; K. Kolwas; M. Kolwas

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Pressurized Water Reactor Plutonium Incinerator Based on Thorium Fuel and Seed-Blanket Assembly Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel cycle is proposed, whose purpose is the elimination and degradation of weapons-grade plutonium. This Radkowsky thorium-fuel Pu incinerator (RTPI) cycle is based on a core and assemblies retrofittable to a Westinghouse-type PWR. The RTPI assembly, however, is a seed-blanket unit. The seed is supercritical, loaded with Pu-Zr alloy as fuel in a high moderator-to-fuel ratio configuration. The blanket is subcritical, loaded mainly with ThO{sub 2}, generating and burning {sup 233}U in situ. Blankets are loaded once every 6 yr. The seed fuel management scheme is based on three batches, with one-third of the seed modules replaced every year. The core generates 1100 MW(electric). Equilibrium conditions are achieved with the second seed loading. For equilibrium conditions, the annual average of disposed (loaded) Pu is 1210 kg, of which 702 kg are completely eliminated, and 508 kg are discharged, but with significantly degraded isotopics (i.e., with a high percentage of even mass isotopes). Spontaneous fissions per second in a gram of this degraded Pu are {approx}500, resulting in significantly increased proliferation resistance.Every 6 yr the blanket discharge contains 780 kg of {sup 233}U (including {sup 233}Pa) and 36 kg of {sup 235}U. However, the blankets are initially loaded with an amount of natural uranium selected such that these U fissile isotopes constitute only 12% of the total U discharge, a percentage equivalent to 20% {sup 235}U enrichment; hence, both the discharged uranium isotopics satisfy proliferation-resistant criteria.The RTPI control variables, namely, the moderator temperature coefficient, the reactivity per ppm boron, and the control rods worth, are about equal to those of a PWR. The RTPI spent-fuel stockpile ingestion toxicity over a period of ten million years is about the same as the counterpart toxicities of a regular, or a mixed-oxide (MOX), PWR. Compared with known PWR MOX variants, the RTPI is, per 1000 MW(electric) and per annum, a significantly more efficient incinerator of weapons-grade plutonium.

Galperin, A. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Segev, M. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Materials Reliability Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Issue Management Tables (MRP-205)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides PWR Issue Management Tables (IMTs) that identify, prioritize, and describe R&D gaps related to degradation issues in PWR Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs), Reactor Internals, ASME Class 1 Piping Components, Pressurizers, and Steam Generators. An R&D "Gap" is identified whenever there are needs in the areas of degradation mechanism understanding, mitigation techniques, repair/replacement techniques, or inspection & evaluation technologies to provide reasonable assurance that a component...

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

119

High-loop perturbative renormalization constants for Lattice QCD (II): three-loop quark currents for tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Stochastic Perturbation Theory was able to get three- (and even four-) loop results for finite Lattice QCD renormalization constants. More recently, a conceptual and technical framework has been devised to tame finite size effects, which had been reported to be significant for (logarithmically) divergent renormalization constants. In this work we present three-loop results for fermion bilinears in the Lattice QCD regularization defined by tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and n_f=2 Wilson fermions. We discuss both finite and divergent renormalization constants in the RI'-MOM scheme. Since renormalization conditions are defined in the chiral limit, our results also apply to Twisted Mass QCD, for which non-perturbative computations of the same quantities are available. We emphasize the importance of carefully accounting for both finite lattice space and finite volume effects. In our opinion the latter have in general not attracted the attention they would deserve.

Brambilla, Michele

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residentialgas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Materials Reliability Program: Loading Effects on the Low-Temperature Crack Propagation Phenomenon in 182 Weld Metal in a Pressurize d Water Reactor Environment (MRP-285)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a study of loading effects on the low-temperature crack propagation (LTCP) phenomenon in 182 weld metal in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment.

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Materials Reliability Program: High-Strength Structural Bolting and Nickel-Base Alloy Components in B&W-Design Pressurized Water Rea ctor Internals (MRP-273)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes information pertinent to the seven currently operating B&W-design 177-FA (fuel assembly) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) for the EPRI Materials Reliability Program (MRP).

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

1983-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

Lewis, M E

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

128

Predicting CO2-water interfacial tension under pressure and temperature conditions of geologic CO2 storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of caprock minerals by carbon dioxide. Geofluids 7, 112-122.between water and carbon dioxide. Langmuir 15, 419-428. DaYung, K. H. (1995) Carbon dioxide’s liquid—vapor coexistence

Nielsen, L.C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Th/U-233 multi-recycle in pressurized water reactors : feasibility study of multiple homogeneous and heterogeneous assembly designs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of thorium in current or advanced light water reactors (LWRs) has been of interest in recent years. These interests have been associated with the need to increase nuclear fuel resources and the perceived non-proliferation advantages of the utilization of thorium in the fuel cycle. Various options have been considered for the use of thorium in the LWR fuel cycle. The possibility for thorium utilization in a multi-recycle system has also been considered in past literature, primarily because of the potential for near breeders with Th/U-233 in the thermal energy range. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential of Th/U-233 fuel multi-recycle in current LWRs, focusing on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Approaches for sustainable multi-recycle without the need for external fissile material makeup have been investigated. The intent is to obtain a design that allows existing PWRs to be used with minimal modifications.

Yun, D.; Taiwo, T. A.; Kim, T. K.; Mohamed, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Properly synchronized measurements of droplet sizes for high-pressure intermittent coal-water slurry fuel sprays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation with a laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. A correlation of the SMD with the injection conditions was determined which should show a satisfactory agreement with the measured SMD data. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure.

Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Analytic study of geothermal reservoir pressure response to cold water reinjection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Derivation of the governing equation, including temperature effects, is given where the permeability-viscosity ratio is assumed to be an arbitrary function of r{sup 2}t. This function is represented by a Fermi-Dirac function, whose parameters are determined based upon physical considerations. The solution for the pressure change is analytic except for the final step, where a numerical integration is called for. The results and implications of the calculations are discussed. Summary and concluding remarks are presented.

Tsang, Y.W.; Tsang, C.F.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Digital computer code for simulating the dynamics of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants using a pressurized water reactor as a heat source  

SciTech Connect

A digital simulator was developed for use in calculating the dynamic response of full-size dual-purpose desalting plants. This simulator consists of a multistage flash (MSF) evaporator, a pressurized water reactor (PWR) as the heat source, a drumtype steam generator, and a turbine plant utilizing a back- pressure turbine. A bypass steam system was modeled to achieve flexible operation of the electric power and water portions of the combined plant. The proposed use of this simulator is to investigate various coupling and control schemes and to help determine possible problem areas in full back-pressure turbine dual-purpose desalting plant designs. (auth)

Delene, J.G.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fast track article: Disaggregated water sensing from a single, pressure-based sensor: An extended analysis of HydroSense using staged experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an extended analysis of our previous work on the HydroSense technology, which is a low-cost and easily installed single-point sensor of pressure for automatically disaggregating water usage activities in the home (Froehlich et al., 2009 [53]). ... Keywords: Activity sensing, H1.2, H5.2, Infrastructure-mediated sensing, Sensors, Water usage

Eric Larson; Jon Froehlich; Tim Campbell; Conor Haggerty; Les Atlas; James Fogarty; Shwetak N. Patel

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

INVESTIGATION OF USAGE OF VELOCITY AND PRESSURE DATA WITHIN A WATER DISTRIBUTION LAB MODEL FOR CALIBRATING HYDRAULIC MODELS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water distribution modeling for hydraulics and water quality is an important tool for managing system performance of water utilities. An important component of a water… (more)

Ashby, Robert Craig

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: A custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution $f(r)$ of the water-accessible pores with radii less than $r$. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2 mm diameter glass beads. In particular, the expelled water is found to depend dramatically on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log-normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be $f_0=0.34$. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 9 TO OCTOBER 20, 1955  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the design, development, and construction of PWR power plant systems and components and PWR core and auxiliaries is summarized. The blanket assembly design is described and illustrated. Results of MTR evaluation of fuel element failure instrumentation are reported. Development of fabrication and testing tochaiques for clad fuel elements, fuel rods, plates, and assemblies is described. Investigations of fuel and cladding alloys include crystal structure and thermal stability determinations on U--Mo alloys, studies on the nature of the hydride phase formed during corrosion of gamma -phase alloys in high- temperature water, and specific heat, resistivity, and phase diagram studies of U- -Mo and U--Nb alloys. The equilibrium and kinetics in the system UO/sub 2/--O/ sub 2/ are being studied to gain information on the structure and stability of UO/ sub 2/ under various conditions. Results of irradiation tests on UO/sub 2/ samples and of thermal cycling tests of Zircaloy-2 clad UO/sub 2/ rods are reported. Corrosion test resuIts are summarized for unclad and Zircaloy-2 clad U- - Mo and U--Nb samples. The radiation induced volume change of prototype fuel reds has been investigated. Studies of the fabrication cladding, tensile properties, and corrosion of U-- Si systems are described. Corrosion tests are continuing on Zircaloy-2 clad U-- Zr fuel elements and on various experimental Al alloys for cladding applications. Work was continued on the preparation, corrosion and sinterability of pure UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ containing additives. Operation and chemical analysis of in-pile loop experiments are described. Results are reported from studies of the erosion of UO/sub 2/ in high-velocity coolant, decontamination of water by ion exchange resins, sorption of radioisotopes on stainless steel, and decontamination of corrosion loops. Work in reactor physics has included PWR control calculations using a 2-dimensional UNIVAC code, calculation of fission product activity in the primary coolant, and criticaiity studies on the Flexibie Critical Experiment and on a lattice of UO/ sub 2/ fuel reds in the TRX. Current PWR plant parameters are recapitulated. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 5, 1955 TO JUNE 16, 1955  

SciTech Connect

The current PWR plant and core parameters are listed. Resign requirements are briefly summarized for a radiation monitoring system, a fuel handling water system, a coolant purification system, an electrical power distribution system, and component shielding. Results of studies on thermal bowing and stressing of UO/sub 2/ are reported. A graph is presented of reactor power vs. reactor flow for various hot channel conditions. Development of U-- Mo and U-Nb alloys has been stopped because of the recent selection of UO/sub 2/ fuel material for the PWR core and blanket. The fabrication characteristics of UO/sub 2/ powders are being studied. Seamless Zircaloy-2 tubing has been tested to determine elastic limits, bursting pressures, and corrosion resistance. Fabrication techniques and tests for corrosion and defects in Zircaloy-clad U-Mo and UO/sub 2/ fuel rods are described. The preparation of UO/sub 2/ by various methods is being studied to determine which method produces a material most suitable for PWR fuel elements. The stability of UO/sub 2/ compacts in high temperature water and steam is being determined. Surface area and density measurements have been performed on samples of UO/sub 2/ powder prepared by various methods. Revelopment work on U-- Mo and U--Nb alloys has included studies of the effect on corrosion behavior of additions to the test water, additions to the alloys, homogenization of the alloys, annealing times, cladding, and fabrication techniques. Data are presented on relaxation in spring materials after exposure to a corrosive environment. Results are reported from loop and autoclave tests on fission product and crud deposition. Results of irradiation and corrosion testing of clad and unclad U--Mo and U-Nh alloys are described. The UO/sub 2/ irradiation program has included studies of dimensional changes, release of fission gases, and activity in the water surrounding the samples. A review of the methods of calculating reactor physics parameters has been completed, and the established procedures have been applied to determination of PWR reference design parameters. Critical experiments and primary loop shielding analyses are described. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes in pH, temperature, concentration, charge, and shear forces, stickies can deposit [3]. These deposits can lead to decreased runnability, productivity and expensive downtime. If the stickie remains in the stock, then machine breaks can be common. Finally, if the stickie is not removed or deposited, it will either leave in the final product causing converting and printing problems or recirculate within the mill. It has been estimated that stickies cost the paper industry between $600 and $700 million a year due to the cost of control methods and lost production attributed to stickies [3]. Also, of the seven recycling mills opened in the United States between 1994 and 1997, four have closed citing stickies as the main reason responsible for the closure [4]. Adhesives are widely used throughout the paper and paperboard industry and are subsequently found in the recycled pulp furnish. Hodgson stated that even the best stock preparation process can only remove 99% of the contaminants, of which the remaining 1% is usually adhesives of various types which are usually 10-150 microns in effective diameter [5]. The large particles are removed by mechanical means such as cleaners and screens, and the smaller, colloidal particles can be removed with washing. The stickies that pass through the cleaning and screening processes cause 95% of the problems associated with recycling [6]. The cleaners will remove most of the stickies that have a density varying from the pulp slurry ({approx}1.0 g/cm3) and will accept stickies with densities ranging from 0.95-1.05 g/cm3 [2]. The hydrophobicity of the material is also an important characteristic of the stickie [7]. The hydrophobicity causes the stickies to agglomerate with other hydrophobic materials such as other stickies, lignin, and even pitch. The tacky and viscous nature of stickies contributes to many product and process problems, negatively affecting the practicality of recycled fiber use. The source of stickies that evade conventional removal techniques are usually synthetic polymers, including acrylates, styrene butadiene rub

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Characteristics of Spent Fuel from Plutonium Disposition Reactors. Vol. 3: A Westinghouse Pressurized-Water Reactor Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of a simulation study involving the burnup of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in a Westinghouse pressurized-water reactor (PWR). The MOX was composed of uranium and plutonium oxides, where the plutonium was of weapons-grade composition. The study was part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program and considered the possibility of fueling commercial reactors with weapons plutonium. The isotopic composition, the activities, and the decay heat, together with the gamma and neutron dose rates are discussed for the spent fuel. For the steady-state situation involving this PWR burning MOX fuel, two burn histories are reported. In one case, an assembly is burned in the reactor for two cycles, and in the second case and assembly is burned for three cycles. Furthermore, assemblies containing wet annular burnable absorbers (WABAs) and assemblies that do not contain WABAs are considered in all cases. The two-cycle cases have a burnup of 35 GWd/t, and the three-cycle cases have a burnup of 52.5 GWd/t.

Murphy, B.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF BRAZING ALLOYS FOR AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL FUEL ELEMENTS FOR SERVICE IN 565 F PRESSURIZED WATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since brazing was the method selected for joining the stainless steel SM- l reactor fuel element, corrosion studies were conducted on various potential brazing alloys to evaluate their resistance under the approximate pressurized- water conditions of the SM-1. The program consisted mainly of testing type 304L stainless steel T'' joints brazed with selected alloys in quiescent, degassed, and deionized autoclaved water at 565 deg F under 1200-psi pressure. In the initial phase of the investigation, tests were limited in duration to l000 hr in order to quickly screen some 18 potential alloys for longer time testing. Based on weight-change data and the metallographic examinations, five of the 18 alloys exhibited sufficient corrosion resistance to warrant further investigation. These alloys were subjected to autoclave tests of 12 and 16 months. In these extended tests, 1 cc O/sub 2/liter and a mixture of 1 cc O/sub 2/liter plus 50 cc H/sub 2/liter, respectively, were added to the water to more closely simulate SM- 1 reactor water conditions and to evaluate the effect of different gaseous additions on the corrosion behavior of the alloys. On the basis of weight-change data and metallographic examination after long-term exposure of the tested stainless steel-base joint; these alloys were considered to have acceptable corrosion resistance. No significant differences in the corrosion behavior of these alloys were noted between testing in oxygenated water and water containing the oxygen-hydrogen mixture. (auth)

Beaver, R.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.; English, J.L.

1962-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

147

Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range from 0.11 to 0.13 and termed a discharge coefficient. The value is relatively unchanged for typical surge line flow rates as well as the hydrogen content in the flow. Over a significant range of expected temperature differences for the steam generator and reactor vessel upper plenum, the discharge coefficient also remained consistent. The discharge coefficient is a suitable model for determining the hot leg counter current flow rates during this type of severe accident. (author)

Boyd, Christopher F. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Water  

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150

Steam Generator Management Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Generic Tube Degradation Predictions: Recirculating Steam Generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mill-annealed Alloy 600 heat transfer tubing in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs) has experienced numerous modes of degradation. This report describes predictive models for determining expected tube degradation in recirculating steam generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG tubing. Predictions are based on operating experience with similar designs and use improvement factors to characterize benefits resulting from SG design and material ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

USING LIGA BASED MICROFABRICATION TO IMPROVE OVERALL HEAT TRANSFER EFFICIENCY OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR: I. Effects of Different Micro Pattern on Overall Heat Transfer.  

SciTech Connect

The Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs in Figure 1) were originally developed for naval propulsion purposes, and then adapted to land-based applications. It has three parts: the reactor coolant system, the steam generator and the condenser. The Steam generator (a yellow area in Figure 1) is a shell and tube heat exchanger with high-pressure primary water passing through the tube side and lower pressure secondary feed water as well as steam passing through the shell side. Therefore, a key issue in increasing the efficiency of heat exchanger is to improve the design of steam generator, which is directly translated into economic benefits. The past research works show that the presence of a pin-fin array in a channel enhances the heat transfer significantly. Hence, using microfabrication techniques, such as LIGA, micro-molding or electroplating, some special microstructures can be fabricated around the tubes in the heat exchanger to increase the heat-exchanging efficiency and reduce the overall size of the heat-exchanger for the given heat transfer rates. In this paper, micro-pin fins of different densities made of SU-8 photoresist are fabricated and studied to evaluate overall heat transfer efficiency. The results show that there is an optimized micro pin-fin configuration that has the best overall heat transfer effects.

Zhang, M.; Ibekwe, S.; Li, G.; Pang, S.S.; and Lian, K.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A., E-mail: sedov@dhtp.kial.ru; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel  

SciTech Connect

Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hardware-in-the-loop simulation of pressurized water reactor steam-generator water-level control, designed for use within physically distributed testing environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hardware-in-the-loop model was developed to represent digital sensing and control of steam generator water-level. The model was created with an intention to serve as… (more)

Brink, Michael Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support from Northrop Grumman, and OneCIS). ITER International Organization (ITER-IO) is responsible for design oversight and equipment installation in Cadarache, France. TCWS equipment will be fabricated using ASME design codes with quality assurance and oversight by an Agreed Notified Body (approved by the French regulator) that will ensure regulatory compliance. This paper describes the TCWS design and how U.S. ITER and fabricators will use ASME codes to comply with EU Directives and French Orders and Decrees.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL; Curd, Warren [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Subcooled flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water-based nanofluids at low pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nanofluid is a colloidal suspension of nano-scale particles in water, or other base fluids. Previous pool boiling studies have shown that nanofluids can improve the critical heat flux (CHF) by as much as 200%. In this ...

Kim, Sung Joong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Comparison of MELCOR modeling techniques and effects of vessel water injection on a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station  

SciTech Connect

A fully qualified, best-estimate MELCOR deck has been prepared for the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station and has been run using MELCOR 1.8.3 (1.8 PN) for a low-pressure, short-term, station blackout severe accident. The same severe accident sequence has been run with the same MELCOR version for the same plant using the deck prepared during the NUREG-1150 study. A third run was also completed with the best-estimate deck but without the Lower Plenum Debris Bed (BH) Package to model the lower plenum. The results from the three runs have been compared, and substantial differences have been found. The timing of important events is shorter, and the calculated source terms are in most cases larger for the NUREG-1150 deck results. However, some of the source terms calculated by the NUREG-1150 deck are not conservative when compared to the best-estimate deck results. These results identified some deficiencies in the NUREG-1150 model of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. Injection recovery sequences have also been simulated by injecting water into the vessel after core relocation started. This marks the first use of the new BH Package of MELCOR to investigate the effects of water addition to a lower plenum debris bed. The calculated results indicate that vessel failure can be prevented by injecting water at a sufficiently early stage. No pressure spikes in the vessel were predicted during the water injection. The MELCOR code has proven to be a useful tool for severe accident management strategies.

Carbajo, J.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Materials Reliability Program: Determination of Crack Growth Rates for Alloy 82 at Low K Values Under Pressurized Water Reactor Prim ary Water Environment (MRP-270)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack propagation experiments, which were performed in the past on nickel-based materials under PWR primary water environment, have left some open questions that need to be answered. In particular, no crack growth rate (CGR) data for control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) nozzle materials are available at low stress intensity (K) values (K < 15 MPam). This interim report summarizes the work done during 2009 on a cooperative project to generate crack growth data under low K values for alloy 82 weld metal.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."  

SciTech Connect

Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

High temperature post-irradiation performance of spent pressurized-water-reactor fuel rods under dry-storage conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Post-irradiation studies on failure mechanisms of well characterized PWR rods were conducted for up to a year at 482, 510 and 571/sup 0/C in unlimited air and inert gas atmospheres. No cladding breaches occurred even though the tests operated many orders of magnitude longer in time than the lifetime predicted by Blackburn's analyses. The extended lifetime is due to significant creep strain of the Zircaloy cladding which decreases the internal rod pressures. The cladding creep also contributes to radial cracks, through the external oxide and internal FCCI layers, which propagated into and arrested in an oxygen stabilized ..cap alpha..-Zircaloy layer. There were no signs of either additional cladding hydriding, stress-corrosion cracking or fuel pellet degradation. Using the Larson-Miller formulization, a conservative maximum storage temperature of 400/sup 0/C is recommended to ensure a 1000-year cladding lifetime. This accounts for crack propagation and assumes annealing of the irradiation-hardened cladding.

Einziger, R.E.; Atkin, S.D.; Stellrecht, D.E.; Pasupathi, V.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Cost Comparison Between Once-Through and Plutonium Single-Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the context of long-term waste management and sustainable nuclear fuel supply, there continue to be discussions regarding whether the United States should consider recycling of light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for the current fleet of U.S. LWRs. This report presents a parametric study of equilibrium fuel cycle costs for an open fuel cycle without plutonium recycling (once-through) and with plutonium recycling (single-recycling using mixed-oxide, or MOX, fuel), assuming an all-pre...

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Generic Assessment for Optimized Reactor Coolant System Hydrogen of a Four-loop Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry, Fuel Reliability, and Material Reliability Programs at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a comprehensive elevated reactor coolant system (RCS) hydrogen program that is focused on qualification of plant operation with dissolved hydrogen concentration in the RCS greater than 50 standard cubic centimeters per kilogram (scc/kg) (1.38 in.3/lbm), up to 60 scc/kg (1.66 in.3/lbm), to mitigate primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel-based alloys. Currentl...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comet whole-core solution to a stylized 3-dimensional pressurized water reactor benchmark problem with UO{sub 2}and MOX fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stylized pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel was used to test the accuracy and efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) code. The benchmark problem contains 125 fuel assemblies and 44,000 fuel pins. The COMET code was used to compute the core eigenvalue and assembly and pin power distributions for three core configurations. In these calculations, a set of tensor products of orthogonal polynomials were used to expand the neutron angular phase space distribution on the interfaces between coarse meshes. The COMET calculations were compared with the Monte Carlo code MCNP reference solutions using a recently published an 8-group material cross section library. The comparison showed both the core eigenvalues and assembly and pin power distributions predicated by COMET agree very well with the MCNP reference solution if the orders of the angular flux expansion in the two spatial variables and the polar and azimuth angles on the mesh boundaries are 4, 4, 2 and 2. The mean and maximum differences in the pin fission density distribution ranged from 0.28%-0.44% and 3.0%-5.5%, all within 3-sigma uncertainty of the MCNP solution. These comparisons indicate that COMET can achieve accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo. It was also found that COMET's computational speed is 450 times faster than MCNP. (authors)

Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research...

168

Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect

A novel methodology to detect diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been developed in order to address a long unsolved safeguards verification problem for international safeguards community such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The concept involves inserting tiny neutron and gamma detectors into the guide tubes of a spent fuel assembly and measuring the signals. The guide tubes form a quadrant symmetric pattern in the various PWR fuel product lines and the neutron and gamma signals from these various locations are processed to obtain a unique signature for an undisturbed fuel assembly. Signatures based on the neutron and gamma signals individually or in a combination can be developed. Removal of fuel pins from the assembly will cause the signatures to be visibly perturbed thus enabling the detection of diversion. All of the required signal processing to obtain signatures can be performed on standard laptop computers. Monte Carlo simulation studies and a set of controlled experiments with actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies were performed and validated this novel methodology. Based on the simulation studies and benchmarking measurements, the methodology developed promises to be a powerful and practical way to detect partial defects that constitute 10% or more of the total active fuel pins. This far exceeds the detection threshold of 50% missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, a threshold defined by the IAEA Safeguards Criteria. The methodology does not rely on any operator provided data like burnup or cooling time and does not require movement of the fuel assembly from the storage rack in the spent fuel pool. A concept was developed to build a practical field device, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which will be completely portable and will use standard radiation measuring devices already in use at the IAEA. The use of the device will not require any information provided by the operator or any prior knowledge of the spent fuel assembly. The device can also be operated without any movement of the spent fuel from its storage position. Based on parametric studies conducted via computer simulation, the device should be able to detect diversion of as low as ten percent of the missing or replaced fuel from an assembly regardless of the location of the missing fuel within the assembly, of the cooling time, initial fuel enrichment or burnup levels. Conditions in the spent fuel pool such as clarity of the water or boron content are also not issues for this device. The shape of the base signature is principally dependent on the layout of the guide tubes in the various types of PWR fuel assemblies and perturbations in the form of replaced fuel pins will distort this signature. These features of PDET are all unique and overcome limitation and disadvantages presented by currently used devices such as the Fork detector or the Cerenkov Viewing Device. Thus, this device when developed and tested could fill an important need in the safeguards area for partial defect detection, a technology that the IAEA has been seeking for the past few decades.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pressure Compensation and the Bottom Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is an observed characteristic of oceans that velocities and horizontal pressure gradients are larger new the ocean surface than they are in deeper water. This is conventionally labeled “pressure compensation” whereby baroclinic structure, ...

George L. Mellor; Xiao Hua Wang

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pressure Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Specifications for carbon and alloy steel pressure tubes (ASTM)...medium-strength carbon-molybdenum alloy

171

Dynamic Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The higher pressure range will cover the important application of gas turbine engine testing. Gas turbines are used for propulsion on aircraft and ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

Baker, Tod H. (O' Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pressure transient method for front tracking  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pressure transient technique for tracking the advance of cold water fronts during water flooding and goethermal injection operations has been developed. The technique is based on the concept that the steady state pressure buildup in the reservoir region inside the front can be calculated by a fluid skin factor. By analyzing successive pressure falloff tests, the advance of the front in the reservoir can be monitored. The validity of the methods is demonstrated by application to three numerically simulated data sets, a nonisothermal step-rate injection test, a series of pressure falloffs in a multilayered reservoir, and a series of pressure falloff tests in a water flooded oil reservoir.

Benson, S.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

PRESSURE TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

Sander, H.H.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

SciTech Connect

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Materials Reliability Program: Technical Basis for Preemptive Weld Overlay for Alloy 82/182 Butt Welds in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-169) Revision 1-A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weld overlays can be applied at locations that have not yet shown any cracking but are considered susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). A planned application of the overlay can be facilitated, and potential future cracking is mitigated because of the resulting favorable post-overlay residual stresses at the weld location. Inservice inspection also is expedited because of enhanced joint inspectability provided by the weld overlay. An overlay used in this manner is termed a preemp...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

180

Soret Effect Study on High-Pressure CO2-Water Solutions Using UV-Raman Spectroscopy and a Concentric-Tube Optical Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially resolved deep-UV Raman spectroscopy was applied to solutions of CO2 and H2O (or D2O), which were subject to a temperature gradient in a thermally regulated high-pressure concentric-tube Raman cell in an attempt to measure a Soret effect in the vicinity of the critical point of CO2. Although Raman spectra of solutions of CO2 dissolved in D2O at 10 MPa and temperatures near the critical point of CO2 had adequate signal-to-noise and spatial resolution to observe a Soret effect with a Soret coefficient with magnitude of |ST| > 0.03, no evidence for an effect of this size was obtained for applied temperature gradients up to 19oC. The presence of 1 M NaCl did not make a difference. In contrast, the concentration of CO2 dissolved in H2O was shown to vary significantly across the temperature gradient when excess CO2 was present, but the results could be explained simply by the variation in CO2 solubility over the temperature range and not to kinetic factors. For mixtures of D2O dissolved in scCO2 at 10 MPa and temperatures close to the critical point of CO2, the Raman peaks for H2O were too weak to measure with confidence even at the limit of D2O solubility.

Windisch, Charles F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Maupin, Gary D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-169 Constant-Pressure Measurement of Steam- Water Relative Permeability Peter A. O by measuring in-situ steam saturation more directly. Mobile steam mass fraction was established by separate steam and water inlets or by correlating with previous results. The measured steam-water relative

Stanford University

184

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This work is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core and the pore pressure of the flowing liquid. The results of this study indicate that temperatures is not an important variable that needs to be reproduced in the laboratory. Confining pressure and pore pressure affect permeability in a predictable manner. This allows measurements at a lower pressure level to be extrapolated to higher pressure conditions. 21 refs.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dynamic Response of CTD Pressure Sensors to Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure sensors used in CTDs (conductivity temperature depth) respond to transients in temperature. It is often assumed that these transients have a negligible effect on pressure. However, in a Sea-Bird CTD used in Hawaiian waters, these ...

S. M. Chiswell

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Influence of a Tropical Island Mountain on Solar Radiation, Air Temperature and Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation, air temperature, and water vapor pressure at 17 stations on the northwest flank of Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii are compared with modeled clear day solar radiation and free atmosphere air temperature and water vapor pressure. ...

Dennis Nullet

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Pressurized Water Reactor Hideout Return Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and consistent methods for evaluating hideout return data are important to predict crevice conditions in steam generators. This report summarizes and discusses methods for evaluating hideout return data in PWRs with recirculating steam generators (RSGs).

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Actinide minimization using pressurized water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transuranic actinides dominate the long-term radiotoxity in spent LWR fuel. In an open fuel cycle, they impose a long-term burden on geologic repositories. Transmuting these materials in reactor systems is one way to ease ...

Visosky, Mark Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Balanced pressure techniques applied to geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study is to evaluate balanced pressure drilling techniques for use in combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling. Drilling techniques evaluated are: aerated drilling mud, parasite tubing, concentric drill pipe, jet sub, and low density fluids. Based on the present state of the art of balanced pressure drilling techniques, drilling with aerated water has the best overall balance of performance, risk, availability, and cost. Aerated water with a 19:1 free air/water ratio reduce maximum pressure unbalance between wellbore and formation pressures from 1000 psi to 50 psi. This pressure unbalance is within acceptable operating limits; however, air pockets could form and cause pressure surges in the mud system due to high percent of air. Low density fluids used with parasite tubing has the greatest potential for combating lost circulation in geothermal drilling, when performance only is considered. The top portion of the hole would be aerated through the parasite tube at a 10:1 free air/mud ratio and the low density mud could be designed so that its pressure gradient exactly matches the formation pore pressure gradient. The main problem with this system at present is the high cost of ceramic beads needed to produce low density muds.

Dareing, D.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

pressure_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... piston gauges, ball gages, pressure transducers, pressure gauges, non-mercurial barometers, and manometers in both gas and oil media using ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Impact of Uncertain Centrifuge Capillary Pressure on Reservoir Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capillary pressure in a reservoir determines the saturation distribution, and hence the total in situ volumes of fluids (oil/water/gas). The accurate knowledge of the capillary pressure distribution is one of the primary factors that may be decisive ... Keywords: Volterra, Voronoi cells, capillary pressure, centrifuge, ill-posed, inverse, linear integral equation, measured data, stochastic algorithm, synthetic data, uncertainty

Sam Subbey; Mike Christie; Malcolm Sambridge

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vapor-pressure lowering in geothermal systems  

SciTech Connect

The water vapor-pressure lowering phenomenon in porous media was investigated for a range of temperatures by measuring vapor pressure vs. mass of water adsorbed in consolidated sandstone cores and unconsolidated silica sands. Experimental results showed that the mass of water adsorbed on the rock surface is much more than the amount of pore steam. Results also revealed that the water adsorption is caused mainly by micropores in the porous medium. Measurement of the mass of methane and ethane adsorbed on dry rocks showed that the amount of adsorption is not great in comparison with the pore gas. It was found that adsorption data for water/sandstone core studies could be normalized with respect to temperature. Although this appears not to have been reported previously, it does agree in principle with findings for solid powders with micropores. Another interesting result was that reanalysis of previous studies of capillarity in sandstones indicates that experimental data probably were influenced mostly by adsorption.

Hsieh, C.H.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

OVERVIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF WATER-MIST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by the expansion of the water mist to steam. ... of Operational Parameters for Low Pressure Water Mist ... Back, GG, and Beyler, C. L., “A Model for ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · CoalTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL · Indiana Coal Forecasting · Under-Ground Coal Gasification · Benefits of Oxyfuel Combustion · Economic

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

198

The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Fracture of Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The topic of this research deals with (1) the hydrostatic distribution along dam upstream face cracks and (2) the material resistance versus cracking when water pressure is present in the crack. Fracture experiments were performed where hydrostatic pressure was present during formation and growth of a crack in a concrete specimen. Experimental results yielded information regarding both the pressure distribution along cracks and the fracture properties as affected by the presence of hydrostatic pressure. ...

1995-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pressurization of whole element canister during staging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical model was developed to estimate the buildup of gas pressure for a single outer element in a hot cell test container for a post cold vacuum drying staging/storage test. This model considers various sources of gas generation and gas consumption as a function of time. In a canister containing spent nuclear fuel, hydrogen is generated from the reactions of uranium with free water or hydrated water, hydride decomposition, and radiolysis. The canister pressurization model predicts a stable pressure and a peak temperature during staging, with an assumption that a fuel element contains 40 gm of corrosion products and a decay heat of 2.07 or 1.06 Watts. Calculations were also performed on constant temperature tests for fuel elements containing varied amounts of sludge tested at 150, 125, 105, and 85 C. The pressurization model will be used to evaluate test results obtained from post-drying testing on whole fuel elements.

Huang, F.F.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

PRESSURE WELDING--BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 117 references from the years 1944 to 1961 on pressure welding is presented. (N.W.R.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Spectroscopic Study of the Effects of Pressure Media on High-Pressure Phase Transitions in Natrolite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural phase transitions in natrolite have been investigated as a function of pressure and different hydrostatic media using micro-Raman scattering and synchrotron infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Natrolite undergoes two reversible phase transitions at 0.86 and 1.53 GPa under pure water pressure medium. These phase transitions are characterized by the changes in the vibrational frequencies of four- and eight-membered rings related to the variations in the bridging T-O-T angles and the geometry of the elliptical eight-ring channels under pressure. Concomitant to the changes in the framework vibrational modes, the number of the O-H stretching vibrational modes of natrolite changes as a result of the rearrangements of the hydrogen bonds in the channels caused by a successive increase in the hydration level under hydrostatic pressure. Similar phase transitions were also observed at relatively higher pressures (1.13 and 1.59 GPa) under alcohol-water pressure medium. Furthermore, no phase transition was found up to 2.52 GPa if a lower volume ratio of the alcohol-water to natrolite was employed. This indicates that the water content in the pressure media plays a crucial role in triggering the pressure-induced phase transitions in natrolite. In addition, the average of the mode Grueneisen parameters is calculated to be about 0.6, while the thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter is found to be 1.33. This might be attributed to the contrast in the rigidity between the TO{sub 4} tetrahedral primary building units and other flexible secondary building units in the natrolite framework upon compression and subsequent water insertion.

D Liu; W Lei; Z Liu; Y Lee

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

PRESSURIZER ANALYSIS AND THE PRE DIGITAL PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is given which was programmed for the Philco 2000 (TRANSAC) Computer in order to provide a means for making pressurizer design and performance calculations. The analysis and digital program provide the exibility for studying the effects of various assumptions such as the type of steam compression process (i.e., isentropic or saturation), spray efficiency, wall condensation, and mixing of the pressurizer water and of the insurge. Also included in the program are data on pressure controlled steam and water relief,valves (total of four), pressure controlled heaters (total of five), pressure controlled spray valve, and various input formats allowing the use of either total surge, surge rate or bulk average temperature for the surge, spray fraction or spray rate for the spray and either temperatures or enthalpies for the surge and spray energies. The program uses steam and water properties in the form of empirical equations where the empirical constants in these equations may be changed depending upon the range of interest of the problem. (auth)

Findlay, J.A.

1961-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Model of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ewald summation and physically equivalent methods such as particle-mesh Ewald, kubic-harmonic expansions, or Lekner sums are commonly used to calculate long-range electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of polar and charged substances. The calculation of pressures in such systems is investigated. We find that the virial and thermodynamic pressures differ because of the explicit volume dependence of the effective, resummed Ewald potential. The thermodynamic pressure, obtained from the volume derivative of the Helmholtz free energy, can be expressed easily for both ionic and rigid molecular systems. For a system of rigid molecules, the electrostatic energy and the forces at the atom positions are required, both of which are readily available in molecular dynamics codes. We then calculate the virial and thermodynamic pressures for the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model at standard conditions. We find that the thermodynamic pressure exhibits considerably less system size dependence than the virial pressure. From an analysis of the cross correlation between the virial and thermodynamic pressure, we conclude that the thermodynamic pressure should be used to drive volume fluctuations in constant-pressure simulations. 2 I.

Gerhard Hummer; Niels Grønbech-jensen; Martin Neumann

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Griffin, Mr. Bob [Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc.; Wright, Anthony L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method and apparatus for tritiated water separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a membrane method and apparatus for separating isotopic water constituents from light water. The method involves providing a supported membrane of an aromatic polyphosphazene and pressurizing the water on one side of the membrane thereby forcing the light water through the supported membrane while isotopic water constituents are retained or vice versa. The apparatus of the present invention includes an aromatic polyphosphazene placed on a porous support and means for pressurizing water through the membrane while certain isotopic water constituents are retained.

Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Duncan, James B. (Kennewick, WA); Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

CC Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

The inner vessel heads including bypass and beam tubes had just been welded into place and dye penetrant checked. The vacuum heads were not on at this time but the vacuum shell was on covering the piping penetrating into the inner vessel. Signal boxes with all feed through boards, the instrumentation box, and high voltage boxes were all installed with their pump outs capped. All 1/4-inch instrumentation lines were terminated at their respective shutoff valves. All vacuum piping used for pumping down the inner vessel was isolated using o-ring sealed blind flanges. PV215A (VAT Series 12), the 4-inch VRC gate valve isolating the cyropump, and the rupture disk had to be removed and replaced with blind flanges before pressurizing due to their pressure limitations. Stresses in plates used as blind flanges were checked using Code calcualtions. Before the CC test, vacuum style blanks and clamps were hydrostatically pressure tested to 150% of the maximum test pressure, 60 psig. The Code inspector and Research Division Safety had all given their approval to the test pressure and procedure prior to filling the vessel with argon. The test was a major success. Based on the lack of any distinguishable pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages, the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 3 hrs.). A major leak in the instrumentation tubing was discovered at half of the maximum test pressure and was quickly isolated by crimping and capping with a compression fitting. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The 44 psig relief valve located just outside the cleanroom had to be capped until the pressure in the vessel indicated 38 psi. This was to allow higher supply pressures and hence, higher flows through the pressurizing line. Also, in order to get pressure readings at the cryostat without exposing any personnel to the potentially dangerous stored energy near the maximum test pressure, a camera was installed at the top of the vessel to view the indicator mounted there. The monitor was viewed at the ante room adjacent to the cleanroom. The holding pressure of 32 psig (4/5 of the maximum test pressure) was only maintained for about 20 minutes instead of the half hour recommendation in the procedure. We felt that this was sufficient time to Snoop test and perform the pressure drop test. After the test was completed, the inspector for CBI Na-Con and the Research Divison Safety Officer signed all of required documentation.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1990-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hydrostatic Pressure Retainment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a great deal of attention being concentrated on reducing the weight of pressure vessels and fuel/oxidizer tanks (tankage) by 10% to 20%. Most… (more)

Setlock, Robert J., Jr.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermodynamic and transport property modeling in super critical water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is a thermally-based, remediation and waste-treatment process that relies on unique property changes of water when water is heated and pressurized above its critical point. Above its ...

Kutney, Michael C. (Michael Charles)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Improved Magnus Form Approximation of Saturation Vapor Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Algorithms, based on Magnus's form equations, are described that minimize the difference between several relationships between temperature and water vapor pressure at saturation that are commonly used in archiving data. The work was initiated in ...

Oleg A. Alduchov; Robert E. Eskridge

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

Lopina, Robert F.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Materials Reliability Program: Hot Cell Testing of Baffle/Former Bolts Removed from Two Lead PWR Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) has been observed in core shroud baffle former bolts in pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals. This report describes hot cell testing results for bolts removed from one Westinghouse three-loop nuclear power plant, Farley Unit 1, and one two-loop plant, Point Beach Unit 2.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Miniaturized pressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to pressurization systems and liquid rocket propulsion systems, and particularly to those used to attitude control or maneuvering of small space vehicles or airborne vehicles where the requirement for thrust is intermittent rather than continuous, and must be available rapidly upon demand. This invention also relates to increasing performance of such propulsion systems, by way of eliminating inert mass from the propulsion system. The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

Whitehead, J.C.; Swink, D.G.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

Michael A. Romano

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, D.M.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Giraffe blood pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thing that happens to you when you raise or lower your head. The arteries serving your heart (carotids) constrict when you lower your head, and that lowers the blood pressure...

222

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dynamic surge/swab pressure predictions  

SciTech Connect

It is generally accepted that the pulling and running of pipe causes pressure surges. The prediction of pressure surges is of economic importance in wells where the pressure must be examined within narrow limits to prevent lost circulation and formation-fluid influx. For these wells, the drilling engineer needs the best possible method of calculating surge pressures to drill wells with a minimum of trouble. This paper presents a dynamic surge/swab model that extends existing technology with the following features: (1) pipe and annulus pressures are coupled through the pipe elasticity; (2) longitudinal pipe elasticity and fluid viscous forces determine pipe displacement; (3) fluid properties vary as a function of temperature and pressure; and (4) formation elasticity; pipe elasticity, and cement elasticity are all used to determine the composite elastic response of the wellbore. Comparisons between the model and field data demonstrate good agreement. Data matches have been made for both water- and oil-based muds in both shallow and deep wells. Furthermore, the model matches data that had not been previously matched by other models.

Mitchell, R.F. (Enertech Engineering and Research (US))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pressure multiplying dispenser  

SciTech Connect

A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

ECN Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1991-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

228

New Way To Realize Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ever since then, civilization has used the toxic liquid metal to measure pressure. ... The pressure and temperature of a gas are directly related to its ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pressure Drops Due to Silica Scaling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experience with reinjection returns in many geothermal fields has prompted a move towards injecting waste fluids at some distance from the production field. This means that often, reinjection pipelines cover very long distances. If the waste water in the pipelines is supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica, then the deposition of silica in these pipelines is almost certain. Although the deposit may be of negligible thickness, the inner surface characteristics of the pipe will be different to those of clean mild steel. During a silica scaling experiment. geothermal brine was passed through a series of pipes of different sizes and over a period of three weeks, silica scale formed on the inner surface. The pressure drop along a distance of approximately 5m was measured by a water manometer in all test pipe sections. Significant pressure drop was observed during this time and can be correlated with the increase in the friction factor of the pipe walls due to silica scaling.

Brown, K.L.; Freeston, D.H.; Dimas, Z.O.; Slatter, A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

231

PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

Pope, K.E.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Einstein's Gravity Under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mysterious `dark energy' needed to explain the current observations, poses a serious confrontation between fundamental physics and cosmology. The present crisis may be an outcome of the (so far untested) prediction of the general theory of relativity that the pressure of the matter source also gravitates. In this view, a theoretical analysis reveals some surprising inconsistencies and paradoxes faced by the energy-stress tensor (in the presence of pressure) which is used to model the matter content of the universe, including dark energy.

Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Wellbore pressure transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

SELF-REGULATING BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water reactor was designed which comprises a pressure vessel containing a mass of water, a reactor core submerged within the water, a reflector tank disposed within the reactor, the reflector tank being open at the top to the interior of the pressure vessel, and a surge tank connected to the reflector tank. In operation the reflector level changes as a function of the pressure witoin the reactor so that the reactivity of the reactor is automatically controlled.

Ransohoff, J.A.; Plawchan, J.D.

1960-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

238

Pressure swing adsorption process  

SciTech Connect

An adiabatic pressure swing adsorption process is described for the separation of gas mixtures by adsorbing at least one gas component in each of at least 8 phase staggered operated adsorbent beds, which can continue to be operated without any stoppage of installation even if one adsorbent bed is removed from operation due to a defective valve. 6 claims.

De Meyer, H.; Doclo, R.; Seynaeve, J.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure, and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core, and the pore pressure of the flowing fluid. The effects of flow rate and throughput are also discussed. In contrast to some previous investigations, no effect of temperature on permeability was found beyond experimental errors and effects caused by volumetric throughput. The probable causes of differing results in previous studies are also presented.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Particle-Water Based Model for Water Retention Hysteresis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A particle-water discrete element-based approach to describe water movement in partially saturated granular media is presented and tested. Water potential is governed by both capillary bridges, dominant at low saturations, and pressure of entrapped air, dominant at high saturations. The approach captures the hysteresis of water retention during wetting and drainage by introducing local evolution of liquid-solid contact angles at the level of pores and grains. Next, extensive comparisons against experimental data are presented. While this is made without involving any fitting parameters, the method demonstrates relative high success by achieving a correlation coefficient of at least 82%, and mostly above 90%.

Yixiang Gan; Federico Maggi; Giuseppe Buscarnera; Itai Einav

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalystes to Poisons form High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Janet ChakkamadathilMohandas; Wilson Shafer

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful adaptation of conventional cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts for use in converting biomass-derived syngas hinges in part on understanding their susceptibility to byproducts produced during the biomass gasification process. With the possibility that oil production will peak in the near future, and due to concerns in maintaining energy security, the conversion of biomass-derived syngas and syngas derived from coal/biomass blends to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products to liquid fuels may provide a sustainable path forward, especially considering if carbon sequestration can be successfully demonstrated. However, one current drawback is that it is unknown whether conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt will be suitable without proper development because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using an entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier) than solely from coal, other byproducts may be present in higher concentrations. The current project examines the impact of a number of potential byproducts of concern from the gasification of biomass process, including compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the second year, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities.

Burtron Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Dennis Sparks; Wilson Shafer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

246

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization Sector: Climate, Water Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001507/150730e.pdf References: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC)[1] "The GRAPHIC project seeks to improve our understanding of how groundwater contributes to the global water cycle and thus how it supports ecosystems

247

Pressure suppression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

Morris, D.E.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

254

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

255

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

257

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

258

Dual shell reactor vessel: A pressure-balanced system for high pressure and temperature reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this work was to demonstrate the Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) as a safe and economical reactor for the hydrothermal water oxidation of hazardous wastes. Experimental tests proved that the pressure balancing piston and the leak detection concept designed for this project will work. The DSPBV was sized to process 10 gal/hr of hazardous waste at up to 399{degree}C (750{degree}F) and 5000 psia (34.5 MPa) with a residence time of 10 min. The first prototype reactor is a certified ASME pressure vessel. It was purchased by Innotek Corporation (licensee) and shipped to Pacific Northwest Laboratory for testing. Supporting equipment and instrumentation were, to a large extent, transported here from Battelle Columbus Division. A special air feed system and liquid pump were purchased to complete the package. The entire integrated demonstration system was assembled at PNL. During the activities conducted for this report, the leak detector design was tested on bench top equipment. Response to low levels of water in oil was considered adequate to ensure safety of the pressure vessel. Shakedown tests with water only were completed to prove the system could operate at 350{degree}C at pressures up to 3300 psia. Two demonstration tests with industrial waste streams were conducted, which showed that the DSPBV could be used for hydrothermal oxidation. In the first test with a metal plating waste, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and cyanide concentrations were reduced over 90%. In the second test with a munitions waste, the organics were reduced over 90% using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the oxidant.

Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.; Deverman, G.S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydro-Pac Hydro-Pac Inc. A High Pressure Company * Founded in 1972 * Manufacturer of Hydraulically Driven Intensifiers * High Pressure Hydrogen Compressors Hydrogen Compressor Cost Reduction Topics * Standardize Configuration and Fueling Strategy * Simple Designs and Proven Technologies * Identify Economical Hydrogen Compatible Materials * Specify Well Ventilated Sites with Remote Controls Standardize Configuration and Fueling Strategy * Limit the number of compressors and stages * Narrow the range of supply and discharge pressures * Select a flow and standardize Simple Designs and Proven Technologies * Variable speed drives * Double ended intensifiers * Water cooled cylinders * Flexible operational envelopes * Stop and start under load . Material Research / Installation Requirements

260

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Volume as Function of Temperature (Cold) Name: Hank Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: MA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: At normal atmospheric pressure, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Stability analysis of supercritical water cooled reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is a concept for an advanced reactor that will operate at high pressure (25MPa) and high temperature (500°C average core exit). The high coolant temperature as it leaves the ...

Zhao, Jiyun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pressure Data Within BOP- ODS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

264

Pressure Data Within BOP- XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

265

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Magnetic Switching under Pressure | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition Revealing the Secrets of Chemical Bath Deposition DNA Repair Protein Caught in the Act of Molecular Theft Velcro for Nanoparticles A Molecular Fossil Ultrafast Imaging of Electron Waves in Graphene Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Magnetic Switching under Pressure DECEMBER 2, 2010 Bookmark and Share A schematic representation of the pressure-induced magnetic switching effect. The colored images highlight the direction of the magnetic orbital (grey plane) for the copper centers (green balls: copper, blue: nitrogen, red: oxygen/water, yellow: fluoride). A material's properties are a critical factor in the way that material

267

Managed pressure drilling techniques and tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economics of drilling offshore wells is important as we drill more wells in deeper water. Drilling-related problems, including stuck pipe, lost circulation, and excessive mud cost, show the need for better drilling technology. If we can solve these problems, the economics of drilling the wells will improve, thus enabling the industry to drill wells that were previously uneconomical. Managed pressure drilling (MPD) is a new technology that enables a driller to more precisely control annular pressures in the wellbore to prevent these drillingrelated problems. This paper traces the history of MPD, showing how different techniques can reduce drilling problems. MPD improves the economics of drilling wells by reducing drilling problems. Further economic studies are necessary to determine exactly how much cost savings MPD can provide in certain situation. Furter research is also necessary on the various MPD techniques to increase their effectiveness.

Martin, Matthew Daniel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this report. Results of initial testing showed the expected increase in open-cell voltage associated with elevated pressure. However, stack performance in terms of area-specific resistance was enhanced at elevated pressure due to better gas diffusion through the porous electrodes of the cells. Some issues such as cracked cells and seals were encountered during testing. Full resolution of these issues will require additional testing to identify the optimum test configurations and protocols.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems Use of Air2Air™ Technology to Recover Fresh-Water from the Normal Evaporative Cooling Loss at Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants – SPX Cooling Systems In this project, SPX Cooling Systems, formerly Marley Cooling Technologies, Inc., evaluates the performance of its patented Air2Air(tm) condensing technology in cooling tower applications at coal-fired electric power plants. Researchers quantify Air2Air(tm) water conservation capabilities with results segmented by season and time of day. They determine the pressure drop and energy use during operation. Additionally, SPX Cooling Systems develops a collection method for the recovered water, analyzes water quality, and identifies potential on-site processes capable of utilizing the recovered water.

272

Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Lay-up: Corrosion Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes work completed to date for a project to develop improved lay-up guidance for PWR Steam Generators (SG). Phase 1 of this project included a detailed literature review and a gap analysis of additional work needed to quantify the corrosion behavior of SG materials under wet lay-up conditions. As a result of the gap analysis, EPRI designed a corrosion test program (Phase 2) to measure general corrosion rates of steam generator materials under lay-up conditions. This report summ...

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Pressurized Water Reactor Steam Generator Layup: Corrosion Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report summarizes work completed on a project to evaluate the current PWR steam generator layup guidance based on corrosion mitigation of steam generator components. It was performed in three phases. Phase 1 of this project included an extensive literature review of the corrosion test data, and development of a gap analysis to determine additional data needed to update the current guideline recommendations. Phase 2 was a corrosion test measurement program to evaluate the general corrosion rate...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Pressurized Water Reactor Chemically Enhanced Ultrasonic Fuel Cleaning: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion product deposition on fuel is undesirable because it may lead to crud induced power shift (CIPS), contribute to crud induced localized corrosion (CILC), and lead to larger corrosion product releases during shutdown. Ultrasonic fuel cleaning (UFC) has provided utilities with a method to remove corrosion products from the fuel after shutdown; however, visual inspections of cleaned assemblies indicate that activity removal is not 100% efficient. Researchers have proposed several methods to improve...

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 718 in Pressurized-Water ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

in 92 ml hydrochloric acid with 3 ml nitric acid, and then rinsed in 90 ml nitric acid with 45 drops of ... Boric Acid. Lithium. (LiOH). PH. Conductivity. Dissolved Hydrogen. Chloride. Flouride ... steel and to 2024 T351 aluminum are described

277

Pressurized Water Reactor AgInCd Control Rod Lifetime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swelling of the lower end tip of AgInCd (AIC) absorber rods is one of the lifetime limiting phenomena for PWR control rods. Understanding the relationship between swelling and accumulated fluence is crucial to predicting the service life of these components. This report presents the initial results and analyses from a control rod absorber research program led by the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program, in close collaboration with Westinghouse Electric Company and AREVA NP. The goals of the program are to chara...

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

Trant, Jarrod Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

THE IMPACT OF UNCERTAIN CENTRIFUGE CAPILLARY PRESSURE ON RESERVOIR SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE IMPACT OF UNCERTAIN CENTRIFUGE CAPILLARY PRESSURE ON RESERVOIR SIMULATION SAM SUBBEY, MIKE distribution, and hence the total in situ volumes of fluids (oil/water/gas). The accurate knowledge estimation of hydrocarbon reserves. The centrifuge procedure provides laboratory data, which can be inverted

Sambridge, Malcolm

282

Two phase pressure drop in inclined and vertical pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of calculating the pressure drop in inclined and vertical oil-gas wells is proposed. The data used to establish the method is from a variety of sources but is largely from air and water flowing in systems close ...

Griffith, P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

284

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

285

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

286

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: U.S. EPR™  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the AREVA US EPR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first US EPR plant begins operation.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry in Advanced Light Water Reactors: US-APWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Mitsubishi US-APWR design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary and Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. It is anticipated that the timely identification of any inconsistencies will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them before the first Mitsubishi Nuclear Energy Systems...

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Assessment of PWR Water Chemistry Control in Advanced Light Water Reactors: APR1400  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed the Water Chemistry Guidelines to support improved industry water chemistry operations. This report reviews the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP) APR1400 design to assess the applicability of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Primary (Volume 1) and Secondary (Volume 2) Water Chemistry Guidelines to that design. The timely identification of any inconsistencies and technical gaps will allow EPRI and its member utilities to resolve them ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Deep-Sea Differential Pressure Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure gauge configured to respond to the difference between the ocean pressure and the pressure within a confined volume of compressible oil is found to be especially useful for detecting pressure fluctuations in the frequency range from a ...

Charles Cox; Thomas Deaton; Spahr Webb

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Computer Based Training: Pressure Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ETTM Pressure Measurement is a computer based training module that allows users to access training when desired and review it at their own pace. It provides graphics and limited interactive features to enhance learning. The purpose of this training module is to provide an understanding of the engineering principles associated with pressure measurement through the review of: Definitions and laws, Operation of some typical plant pressure instruments and, Installation and correction considerations that will...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, M.G.

1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Inspection Requirements for Reactor Pressure Vessel Heads at Pressurized Water Reactors- Request for Relief"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) NRC letter to TVA dated January 27, 2006, 'Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Unit 1- Request for Relaxation from the First Revised NRC Order EA-03-009, Dated February 20, 2004, Deferral of Non-visual Nondestructive Examinations (TAC No. MC8543)" 3) TVA letter to NRC dated March 3, 2008, 'Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN)

Mike Skaggs; U. S. Nuclear; Regulatory Commission; Tennessee Valley Authority

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

High Pressure Studies of Superconductivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our… (more)

Hillier, Narelle Jayne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

CONTAM Libraries - Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure Profile Library. The table below contains information on the wind pressure profiles ...

296

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

High pressure heterogeneous catalysis in a low pressure UHV environment  

SciTech Connect

The major thrust of our research is to carry out for the first time a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that normally is observed only at high pressures (>1 atm) of reactant gas at low pressures (<10{sup {minus}4} Torr) in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The reaction we have chosen is the steam reforming of methane on a Ni(111) crystal.

Ceyer, S.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

299

Permeability prediction and drainage capillary pressure simulation in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of reservoir porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure is essential to exploration and production of hydrocarbons. Although porosity can be interpreted fairly accurately from well logs, permeability and capillary pressure must be measured from core. Estimating permeability and capillary pressure from well logs would be valuable where cores are unavailable. This study is to correlate permeability with porosity to predict permeability and capillary pressures. Relationships between permeability to porosity can be complicated by diagenetic processes like compaction, cementation, dissolution, and occurrence of clay minerals. These diagenetic alterations can reduce total porosity, and more importantly, reduce effective porosity available for fluid flow. To better predict permeability, effective porosity needs to be estimated. A general equation is proposed to estimate effective porosity. Permeability is predicted from effective porosity by empirical and theoretical equations. A new capillary pressure model is proposed. It is based on previous study, and largely empirical. It is tested with over 200 samples covering a wide range of lithology (clean sandstone, shaly sandstone, and carbonates dominated by intergranular pores). Parameters in this model include: interfacial tension, contact angle, shape factor, porosity, permeability, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure. These parameters can be measured from routine core analysis, estimated from well log, and assumed. An empirical equation is proposed to calculate displacement pressure from porosity and permeability. The new capillary-pressure model is applied to evaluate sealing capacity of seals, calculate transition zone thickness and saturation above free water level in reservoirs. Good results are achieved through integration of well log data, production data, core, and geological concepts.

Wu, Tao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pressure-slope momentum transfer in ocean surface boundary layers coupled with gravity waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper focuses on the consequences of including surface and subsurface, wind forced, pressure-slope momentum transfer into the oceanic water column, a transfer process which competes with now-conventional turbulence transfer based on mixing ...

George Mellor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

302

Development of High-Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Dry Feed Pressure Dry Feed Pump for Gasification Systems Background Even though coal-based power generation via Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is more efficient, cleaner, and uses less water than conventional pulverized coal burning systems, widespread IGCC deployment has not occurred because of its relatively high cost. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) high-pressure dry feed pump addresses IGCC cost disparity by enabling lower cost and more reliable coal feed

303

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Deaeration of makeup water for LWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen in pressurized water reactor condensate and steam generator feedwater promotes corrosion of secondary cycle piping, heat exchangers and steam generators. Since dissolved oxygen in make-up water is a direct source of secondary cycle oxygen ingress, make-up water system upgrading modifications for production and storage of deoxygenated water are described. Specifications and cost estimates for the addition of a vacuum deaerator and a sealed condensate storage tank to a 300 gpm existing or new make-up water system are given.

Schlesinger, H.A.; Falk, K.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

Fox, R.L.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

Software implementation of hydraulic shock numerical computation in the pressure hydraulic systems without protection devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents software for calculus of hydraulic shock phenomenon in pressure hydraulic systems without protection device. The program is written in Java programming language and responds to the following requirements: easy management of several ... Keywords: flowchart, graphical interface, hydraulic shock (water hammer), method of characteristics, pressure hydraulic system, software

Ichinur Omer

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Nanofiltration Treatment Options for Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Treatment Demands Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a study on the use of nanofiltration (NF) treatment options to enable use of non-traditional water sources as an alternative to freshwater make-up for thermoelectric power plants. The project includes a technical and economic evaluation of NF for two types of water that contain moderate to high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS): (1) cooling tower recirculating water and (2) produced waters from oil & gas extraction operations. Reverse osmosis (RO) is the most mature and commonly considered option for high TDS water treatment. However, RO is generally considered to be too expensive to make treatment of produced waters for power plant use a feasible application. Therefore, SNL is investigating the use of NF, which could be a more cost effective treatment option than RO. Similar to RO, NF is a membrane-based process. Although NF is not as effective as RO for the removal of TDS (typical salt rejection is ~85 percent, compared to >95 percent for RO), its performance should be sufficient for typical power plant applications. In addition to its lower capital cost, an NF system should have lower operating costs because it requires less pressure to achieve an equivalent flux of product water.

310

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants An Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fired Power Plants Using Energy Stored in Main Condenser Cooling Water - University of Florida This project replaces the cooling tower in a fossil fired power plant with an innovative diffusion driven desalination (DDD) plant that will render the power plant a net producer of fresh water. The energy required to drive the desalination process comes from the main condenser cooling water, which would otherwise be discharged. Saline water is used to condense the low pressure steam exiting the turbine. The hot, saline water exiting the condenser is sprayed into the top of a diffusion tower. The diffusion tower is filled with high surface area packing material such as that used in air stripping towers to enhance the water/air surface area. Air is blown through the bottom of the tower and becomes humidified. The humidified air goes to a direct-contact condenser where the fresh water is condensed. This process has an advantage over conventional desalination technology in that it may be driven by waste heat with very low thermodynamic availability. Also, cold air is a byproduct of this process which can be used to cool buildings.

311

NETL: Pressure Swing Absorption Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Project No.: DE-FE0001323 New Jersey Institute of Technology is developing an advanced pressure swing absorption-based (PSAB) device via laboratory-based experiments. The device will be used to accomplish a cyclic process to process low temperature post-shift-reactor synthesis gas resulting from the gasification process into purified hydrogen at high pressure for use by the combustion turbine of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The overall goal of the proposed work is to develop an advanced PSAB device and cyclic process for use in a coal-fired IGCC plant to produce purified hydrogen at high pressure and a highly purified CO2 stream suitable for use or sequestration.

312

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

313

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 8 February 8 th , 2005 Mark J. Warner, P.E. Principal Engineer Quantum Technologies, Inc. Irvine, CA Low Cost, High Efficiency, Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage High Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. 70 MPa Composite Tanks Vent Line Ports Defueling Port (optional) Fill Port Filter Check Valve Vehicle Interface Bracket with Stone Shield In Tank Regulator with Solenoid Lock-off Pressure Relief Device Manual Valve Compressed Hydrogen Storage System In-Tank Regulator Pressure Sensor (not visible here) Pressure Relief Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Impact Resistant Outer Shell (damage resistant) Gas Outlet Solenoid Foam Dome (impact protection)

314

Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

316

Pressure charged airlift pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pumping system is described for pumping fluids, such as water with entrained mud and small rocks, out of underground cavities such as drilled wells, which can effectively remove fluids down to a level very close to the bottom of the cavity and which can operate solely by compressed air pumped down through the cavity. The system utilizes a subassembly having a pair of parallel conduit sections (44, 46) adapted to be connected onto the bottom of a drill string utilized for drilling the cavity, the drill string also having a pair of coaxially extending conduits. The subassembly includes an upper portion which has means for connection onto the drill string and terminates the first conduit of the drill string in a plenum (55). A compressed air-driven pump (62) is suspended from the upper portion. The pump sucks fluids from the bottom of the cavity and discharges them into the second conduit. Compressed air pumped down through the first conduit (46) to the plenum powers the compressed air-driven pump and aerates the fluid in the second conduit to lift it to the earth's surface.

Campbell, Gene K. (Las Vegas, NV)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Workshop on gate valve pressure locking and thermal binding  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Workshop on Gate Valve Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding was to discuss pressure locking and thermal binding issues that could lead to inoperable gate valves in both boiling water and pressurized water reactors. The goal was to foster exchange of information to develop the technical bases to understand the phenomena, identify the components that are susceptible, discuss actual events, discuss the safety significance, and illustrate known corrective actions that can prevent or limit the occurrence of pressure locking or thermal binding. The presentations were structured to cover U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff evaluation of operating experience and planned regulatory activity; industry discussions of specific events, including foreign experience, and efforts to determine causes and alleviate the affects; and valve vendor experience and recommended corrective action. The discussions indicated that identifying valves susceptible to pressure locking and thermal binding was a complex process involving knowledge of components, systems, and plant operations. The corrective action options are varied and straightforward.

Brown, E.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Water Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning EUEC Energy & Environment Conference 2008, EPS,1292008 2 * Water Scarcity Seen Dampening Case...

319

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

320

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NETL: Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC) Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC) Project No.: DE-FE0009448 Oxy-PFBC Layout. Oxy-PFBC Layout. Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) is developing an oxy-fired pressurized fluidized bed combustor (Oxy-PFBC). Pressurized combustion with oxygen enables high efficiency through staged combustion, which results in reduced oxygen use, as well as through recovery of high quality heat from exhaust water vapor. In addition, the process can result in reduced costs for utilization or storage of CO2 because the CO2 is available at increased pressure, reducing compression requirements. Overall, pressurized fluidized bed combustion can result in electricity production from coal with near-zero emissions. PWR will be testing a novel process for pressurized oxy-combustion in a

322

Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Self pressuring HTP feed systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide tanks can be pressurized with decomposed HTP (high test hydrogen peroxide) originating in the tank itself. In rocketry, this offers the advantage of eliminating bulky and heavy inert gas storage. Several prototype self-pressurizing HTP systems have recently been designed and tested. Both a differential piston tank and a small gas-driven pump have been tried to obtain the pressure boost needed for flow through a gas generator and back to the tank. Results include terrestrial maneuvering tests of a prototype microsatellite, including warm gas attitude control jets.

Whitehead, J.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Apparatus and process for water treatment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed utilizing permeable treatment media for treatment of contaminated water, along with a method for enhanced passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media. The apparatus includes a treatment cell including a permeable structure that encloses the treatment media, the treatment cell may be located inside a water collection well, exterior to a water collection well, or placed in situ within the pathway of contaminated groundwater. The passive flow of contaminated water through the treatment media is maintained by a hydraulic connection between a collecting point of greater water pressure head, and a discharge point of lower water pressure head. The apparatus and process for passive flow and groundwater treatment utilizes a permeable treatment media made up of granular metal, bimetallics, granular cast iron, activated carbon, cation exchange resins, and/or additional treatment materials. An enclosing container may have an outer permeable wall for passive flow of water into the container and through the enclosed treatment media to an effluent point. Flow of contaminated water is attained without active pumping of water through the treatment media. Remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons and other water contaminants to acceptable regulatory concentration levels is accomplished without the costs of pumping, pump maintenance, and constant oversight by personnel.

Phifer, Mark A. (North Augusta, SC); Nichols, Ralph L. (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Pressure testing of a high temperature naturally fractured reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted a number of pumping and flow-through tests at the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. These tests consisted of injecting fresh water at controlled rates up to 12 BPM (32 l/s) and surface pressures up to 7000 psi (48 MPa) into the HDR formation at depths from 10,000 to 13,180 feet (3050 to 4000 m). The formation is a naturally fractured granite at temperatures of about 250/sup 0/C. The matrix porosity is <1% and permeability is on the order of 1 nD. Hence most of the injected fluid is believed to move through fractures. There has been no evidence of fracture breakdown phenomena, and hence it is believed that preexisting joints in the formation are opened by fluid injection. Water losses during pumping are significant, most likely resulting from flow into secondary fractures intersecting the main fluid conducting paths. The pressure-time response observed in these tests can be interpreted in terms of non-isothermal, fracture-dominated flow. As the fluid pressure increases from small values to those comparable to fracturing pressures, the formation response changes from linear fracture flow to the highly nonlinear situation where fracture lift-off occurs. A numerical heat and mass flow model was used to match the observed pressure response. Good matches were obtained for pressure buildup and shut-in data by assigning pressure dependent fracture and leak-off permeabilities. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Kelkar, S.M.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Dash, Z.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamic properties of water given any of the following pairs of knowns to define a thermodynamic state: pressure and entropy, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and quality, temperature and pressure, or temperature and quality. These five pairs of knowns allow the user to evaluate any thermodynamic cycle using water, as a working fluid. The basic equations came from Keenan, Keyes, Hill and Moore, Steam Tables, John Wiley and Sons, 1969. A complete derivation of equations, program listing, program symbol description, a complete set of flow charts and a sample steam turbine calculation are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Downhole steam generator using low pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a spiral, tubular heat exchanger is used in the combustion chamber to isolate the combustion process from the water being superheated for conversion into steam. The isolation allows combustion of a relatively low pressure oxidant and fuel mixture for generating high enthalpy steam. The fuel is preheated by feedback of combustion gases from the top of the combustion chamber through a fuel preheater chamber. The hot exhaust gases of combustion at the bottom of the combustion chamber, after flowing over the heat exchanger enter an exhaust passage and pipe. The exhaust pipe is mounted inside the water supply line heating the water flowing into the heat exchanger. After being superheated in the heat exchanger, the water is ejected through an expansion nozzle and converts into steam prior to penetration into the earth formation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at a steam outlet downstream of the nozzle and close when the steam pressure is lost due to flameout.

Fox, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Coupling undulator radiation from Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamlines 3-ID and 13-ID to nuclear resonant inelastic scattering techniques, researchers have determined the phonon density of states for iron under pressures up to 153 gigapascals, equivalent to those found at the Earth's core. Image of the Earth's core. Although indirect measurements and theory have, since the early 1950s, produced an informed picture of the structure and composition of the materials that make up the core of the Earth, direct proof and the answers to some intriguing questions remain unanswered. Previously, ultrahigh-pressure experiments using nuclear resonant inelastic scattering have been difficult to carry out due the tiny samples required.

330

Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA); Arnold, Don W. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Neyer, David W. (Castro Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and...

332

Low pressure carbonylation of heterocycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterocycles, e.g., epoxides, are carbonylated at low pressure with high percentage conversion to cyclic, ring expanded products using the catalyst ##STR00001## where L is tetrahydrofuran (THF).

Coates, Geoffrey W. (Lansing, NY); Kramer, John W. (Mt. Pleasant, MI); Schmidt, Joseph A. R. (Sylvania, OH)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

Low pressure carbonylation of heterocycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterocycles, e.g., epoxides, are carbonylated at low pressure with high percentage conversion to cyclic, ring expanded products using the catalyst ##STR00001## where L is tetrahydrofuran (THF).

Coates, Geoffrey W. (Ithaca, NY); Kramer, John (Ithaca, NY)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

High pressure synthesis gas fermentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

Sealock, Jr., L. John (W. Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Model falsification diagnosis and sensor placement for leak detection in pressurized pipe networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized pipe networks used for fresh-water distribution can take advantage of recent advances in sensing technologies and data-interpretation to evaluate their performance. In this paper, a leak-detection and a sensor placement methodology are proposed ... Keywords: Data interpretation, Leak detection, Sensor placement, System identification, Water distribution

James-A. Goulet, Sylvain Coutu, Ian F. C. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Relations between phase mobilities and capillary pressures for two{phase ows in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jim Douglas, Jr. #3; Felipe Pereira y Li{Ming Yeh z March 11, 2002 1 Introduction The existence in fractured reservoirs is considered. This model corresponds physically to water ooding a naturally.2) where #26; water saturation; P is the global pressure; #3; #11

Douglas Jr., Jim

340

Seafloor Pressure Measurements of Nonlinear Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly resolved pressure measurements on the seafloor over New Jersey’s continental shelf reveal the pressure signature of nonlinear internal waves of depression as negative pressure perturbations. The sign of the perturbation is determined by ...

J. N. Moum; J. D. Nash

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA); Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Development of Screenable Pressure Sensitive Adhesives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An industrial research area of high activity in recent years has been the development of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) products that do not interfere with the processing of post-consumer waste. The problem of PSA contamination is arguably the most important technical challenge in expanding the use of recycled fiber. The presence of PSAs in recovered paper creates problems that reduce the efficiency of recycling and papermaking operations and diminish product quality. The widespread use of PSAs engineered to avoid these problems, often referred to as environmentally benign PSAs, could greatly increase the commercial viability of utilizing secondary fiber. Much of the research efforts in this area have focused on the development of PSAs that are designed for enhanced removal with cleaning equipment currently utilized by recycling plants. Most removal occurs at the pressure screens with the size and shape of residual contaminants in the process being the primary criteria for their separation. A viable approach for developing environmentally benign PSAs is their reformulation to inhibit fragmentation. The reduction of adhesives to small particles occurs almost exclusively during repulping; a process in which water and mechanical energy are used to swell and reduce paper products to their constituent fiber. Engineering PSA products to promote the formation of larger adhesive particles during repulping will greatly enhance their removal and reduce or eliminate their impact on the recycling process.

Steven J. Severtson

2003-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Accidental Gas Emission From Shallow Pressurized Aquifers At Alban Hills Volcano (Rome, Italy)- Geochemical Evidence Of Magmatic Degassing? Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent studies suggested that Alban Hills (Rome) is a quiescent and not an extinct volcano, as it produced Holocene eruptions and several lahars until Roman times by water overflow from the Albano crater lake. Alban Hills are presently characterized by high PCO2 in groundwaters and by several cold gas emissions usually in sites where excavations removed the

344

Riser gas eliminators reduce wellhead pressures on offshore satellite platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Riser gas eliminators installed on the liquid export risers of five Gulf of Mexico platforms have significantly reduced wellhead pressure by releasing trapped gas. Wellhead pressures on the platforms have been reduced an average of 50 psi. The gas eliminators have been installed on lines in which the oil has undergone primary separation (gas/liquid) only and is being transported to another platform with separator pressure. Gas eliminators should be effective on other liquid lines in water depths of 50 ft or more, especially those with low velocities. The riser gas eliminator is an inverted steam trap installed at the top of the riser. The inverted steam trap has an internal float that allows the gas to vent through an orifice. The vented gas can be used for fuel supply or routed through the vent system.

Conner, S.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Cryogenic Pressure Vessels: Progress and Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Vessel workshop, LLNL, February 15, 2011, p. 1 Cryogenic Pressure Vessels: Progress and Plans Salvador Aceves, Gene Berry, Francisco Espinosa, Ibo Matthews, Guillaume...

347

Analysis and design of an in-pipe system for water leak detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leaks are a major factor for unaccounted water losses in almost every water distribution network. Pipeline leak may result, for example, from bad workmanship or from any destructive cause, due to sudden changes of pressure, ...

Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Efficient booster pump placement in water networks using graph theoretic principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal water delivery networks face increasing demands due to population growth. We focus on enhancing a water utility's infrastructure to meet its growing demands in a cost effective manner. Specifically, we consider the problem of placing pressure ...

I. Narayanan; V. Sarangan; A. Vasan; A. Srinivasan; A. Sivasubramaniam; B. S. Murt; S. Narasimhan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Desalination-of water by vapor-phase transport through hydrophobic nanopores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach to desalination of water whereby a pressure difference across a vapor-trapping nanopore induces selective transport of water by isothermal evaporation and condensation across the pore. Transport ...

Lee, Jongho

350

The Interannual Variability and Trend of Precipitable Water over Southern Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The precipitable water (PW) content was estimated over southern Greece for three atmospheric layers, using 28-yr twice-daily radiosonde measurements of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. Precipitable water demonstrates considerable ...

P. A. Kassomenos; G. R. McGregor

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Experimental testing of cooling by low pressure adsorption in a zeolite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small scale facility was designed, constructed, and utilized to test the use of zeolite adsorption of water vapor to augment chill storage in ice for conventional space cooling. The facility uses solar-derived energy, for the heat source and evaporatively chilled water for the heat sump. The product cooling uses sublimation of ice instead of melting. The ZCAT facility utilizes a heat pumping technique in which a water vapor adsorbent functions as the compressor and condenser. The design was based on use of 13X zeolite as the adsorber because of its high adsorbence at low pressures. However, it has been determined that other materials such as silica gel should give superior performance. While zeolite 13X holds more water in the pressure and temperature ranges of interest, silica gel cycles more water and has less residue water. Both points are very important in the design of an efficient and cost effective system.

Redman, C.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Review of VVER Primary Water Chemistry and the Potential for its Use in PWRs: Potassium Hydroxide and/or Ammonia Based Water Chemist ries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Russian designed pressurized water reactors (PWRs) -- vodo-vodyannoy energeticheskiyr reactors (water-cooled, water-moderated reactors), or VVERs -- differ significantly from Western designed PWRs. Most have only stainless steels and zirconium alloys in contact with the primary coolant and use a different primary water chemistry. This report describes the various VVER primary circuit designs and primary water chemistries and considers whether a VVER type of primary water chemistry could be used in a West...

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Spatial Water Balance in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water availability is critical to the economy in the state of Texas. Numerous reservoirs and conveyance structures have been constructed across the State to meet the water supply needs of farmers, municipalities, industries, and power generating facilities. Despite this extensive water management system, water supply remains a concern because of increasing populations and uncertainties about climate stability. The rainfall map of Texas shown in Figure 1.1 clearly shows that water management is a spatial problem. The State as a whole receives about 711 mm year-1 of rainfall, while the area of the State east of the 100th meridian receives 890 mm year-1 and the area west of the 100th meridian receives only 457 mm year-1. In addition to water supply concerns, the assessment of non-point source pollution is another important issue that is largely dependent on the spatial distribution of runoff. Although, the focus of this report is not to address water supply or pollution issues directly, an improved understanding of the spatial water balance - the partitioning of precipitation between evaporation, runoff, and groundwater recharge at different points in space - will directly benefit those who wish to assess water resource availability and non-point source pollution potential across the State. The goal of this study was to gain an improved understanding of the stocks of water in different components (air, soil, water bodies) of the hydrologic cycle and the fluxes between these components. A basic approach for determining stocks and fluxes involves the calculation of a water balance. A water balance, applied to a particular control volume, is an application of the law of conservation of mass which states that matter cannot be created or destroyed. To achieve a balance, the rate of change of storage of water within the control volume must be equal to the difference between its rates of inflow and outflow across the control surface. In this study, three independent water balance models were constructed to model different components of the hydrologic cycle - an atmospheric water balance, a soil-water balance, and a surface water balance. These models were constructed using a geographic information system (GIS). A GIS provides a framework for storing and manipulating spatial data and facilitates modeling on control volumes of various sizes and shapes. In all three cases, the choice of modeling unit was driven by the resolution and characteristics of the input data. The control volumes for the atmospheric, soil, and surface water balance models respectively are (1) an imaginary column confined horizontally by the boundary of Texas and extending to the 300 mb pressure level, (2) 0.5° cells with a depth equal to the plant-extractable water capacity of the soil, and (3) 166 gaged watersheds of differing sizes and shapes. Neither the atmospheric nor the surface water balance involve any simulation of physical processes and are simply mass balances based on empirical data. The soil-water balance does attempt to simulate evaporation from the soil through the use of a soil-moisture extraction function. Both the atmospheric and soil-water balance models are time-varying models, while the surface water balance model is steady-state and uses an empirical relationship to estimate mean annual runoff and evaporation in ungaged areas. One advantage of making three independent water balance calculations is that checks for consistency can be made among the three models. For example, all three models yield an estimate of actual evapotranspiration which is a difficult quantity to estimate, particularly at the regional scale. Previous studies at the scale of Texas have estimated only evaporation from open water surfaces and potential evapotranspiration from the land surface (TDWR, 1983; Dugas and Ainsworth, 1983).

Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

High pressure liquid level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

SNAP: the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer at SNS Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer. The SNAP Diffractometer...

357

PRESSURE DEVELOPMENT IN SEALED CONTAINERS WITH PLUTONIUM BEARING MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation by plutonium-bearing materials in sealed containers has been studied. The gas composition and pressure are determined over periods from months to years. The Pu-bearing materials studied represent those produced by all of the major processes used by DOE in the processing of plutonium and include the maximum amount of water (0.5% by weight) allowed by DOE's 3013 Standard. Hydrogen generation is of high interest and the Pu-bearing materials can be classed according to how much hydrogen is generated. Hydrogen generation by high-purity plutonium oxides packaged under conditions typical for actual 3013 materials is minimal, with very low generation rates and low equilibrium pressures. Materials with chloride salt impurities have much higher hydrogen gas generation rates and result in the highest observed equilibrium hydrogen pressures. Other materials such as those with high metal oxide impurities generate hydrogen at rates in between these extremes. The fraction of water that is converted to hydrogen gas as equilibrium is approached ranges from 0% to 25% under conditions typical of materials packaged to the 3013 Standard. Generation of both hydrogen and oxygen occurs when liquid water is present. The material and moisture conditions that result in hydrogen and oxygen generation for high-purity plutonium oxide and chloride salt-bearing plutonium oxide materials have been characterized. Other gases that are observed include nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane.

Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Corrosion-Product Release in Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colbalt released through corrosion is the primary source of radiation fields on out-of-core surfaces in pressurized water reactors. Lowering colbalt impurity levels in Inconel 600, a generator tubing material, could reduce radiation fields.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Penn Large Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penn Large Water Tunnel Penn Large Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Large Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 4.3 Beam(m) 1.2 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 16.8 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments steady 24 bit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Penn Small Water Tunnel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Tunnel Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Penn Small Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization Pennsylvania State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Length(m) 0.8 Beam(m) 0.3 Depth(m) 0.3 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Closed loop; Turbulence level = 0.1%; Pressure range = 3-60psi; Controlled cavitation = # >0.1; Control Air content = >1ppm per mole Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 21 Recirculating Yes Pressure Range(Psi) 3 - 60 Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments dynamic analyzer, 24-bit

362

Water Boatman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

363

Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Water injected fuel cell system compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

Siepierski, James S. (Williamsville, NY); Moore, Barbara S. (Victor, NY); Hoch, Martin Monroe (Webster, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Stirling engine with pressurized crankcase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two piston Stirling engine wherein the pistons are coupled to a common crankshaft via bearing means, the pistons include pad means to minimize friction between the pistons and the cylinders during reciprocation of the pistons, means for pressurizing the engine crankcase, and means for cooling the crankshaft and the bearing means eliminating the need for oil in the crankcase.

Corey, John A. (Melrose, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Utility water system with a pressureless storage container, particularly for solar installations  

SciTech Connect

A warm water storage system for supplying warm water to a network with water under pressure characterized in that the storage is pressureless and takes place in a ventilated container, and that between the take-off region of the container and the warm water supply network is incorporated a booster pump.

Laing, K.; Laing, N.; Laing, O.; Ludin, L.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

367

Departure from nucleate boiling and pressure drop prediction for tubes containing multiple short-length twisted-tape swirl promoters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous studies conducted at MIT showed that the power performance of an inverted pressurized water reactor (IPWR) conceptual design, i.e. the coolant and moderator are inverted such that the fuel is the continuous medium ...

Arment, Tyrell W. (Tyrell Wayne), 1988-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Dedrick, Daniel E. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, David W. (Riverbank, CA)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

T/g upgrade adds 15 MW, extends unit life. [Turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

This article describes turbogenerator upgrade at Maine Yankee's PWR. Maine Yankee Atomic Power Co.'s excellent experience in the upgrading and uprating of the two low-pressure (l-p) steam turbines at its only generating unit - an 865-MW, three-loop pressurized-water reactor installed in 1972 - has motivated the utility to also contract for replacement of both the high-pressure (h-p) steam path and the generator. ABB Power Generation Inc., North Brunswick, NJ, which retrofitted the l-p steam-path components, will handle the other two projects as well.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Materials Reliability Program: Risk Assessment of ASME Section XI Appendix G Pressure-Temperature (P-T) Limit Curve Methodologies (M RP-368)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an assessment of the conditional probability of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) when normal RPV heatup and cooldown occur along operational constraint boundaries. These boundaries are defined by the maximum allowable pressures determined from regulatory requirements, the evaluation procedures in Appendix G to Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Appendix G), ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

REED BESLER BOILER HIGH PRESSURE STEAM SYSTEM AND THERMAL CYCLING FACILITY. Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure boiler has been installed at ORNL. This Besler boiler is capabie of producing from 150 to 2000 psi saturated steam at steaming rates up to 5000 lbs/hr. The boiler is part of a water-steam circuit whteh also includes two spray water pumps, a steam pressure control valve, a high pressure trapping station, and a low pressure deaerated feedwater system. The new boiler system is piped and instrumented to serve as a thermal cycling facility. Shakedown test thermal cycles to requirements set forth in HRT Specification 1113a have been conducted using the existing Dump Test Autoclave as a test piece. Fourty-four cycles have been run through mid February, 1958. The boiler has been operated a total of 142 hours. Cycles are run completely automatically. Better than three- fourths of the cycles as run fall within the specification prescribed limits. (auth)

Holz, P.P.

1958-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hydrogen Production From Metal-Water Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current methods of hydrogen storage in automobiles are either too bulky (large storage space for gas phase) or require a high input energy (cooling or pressurization systems for liquid hydrogen), making widespread use abundance, high- energy content, and large surface area, is able to combine with water to produce hydrogen

Barthelat, Francois

374

Development of Modeling Capabilities for the Analysis of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop an experimental and theoretical data base for heat transfer in tubes and channels cooled by water and CO2 at supercritical pressures.

Dr. Michael Z. Podowski

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pressure vessel and piping codes  

SciTech Connect

Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code contains simplified design formulas for placing bounds on the plastic deformations in nuclear power plant piping systems. For Class 1 piping a simple equation is given in terms of primary load stress indices (B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/) and nominal pressure and bending stresses. The B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/ stress indices reflect the capacities of various piping products to carry load without gross plastic deformation. In this paper, the significance of the indices, nominal stresses, and limits given in the Code for Class 1 piping and corresponding requirements for Class 2 and Class 3 piping are discussed. Motivation behind recent (1978-1981) changes in the indices and in the associated stress limits is presented.

Moore, S.E.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Recent developments in pressure coring  

SciTech Connect

The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

McFall, A. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

REFLECTOR CONTROL OF A BOILING-WATER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A line connecting the reactor with a spent steam condenser contains a valve set to open when the pressure in the reactor exceeds a predetermined value and an orifice on the upstream side of the valve. Another line connects the reflector with this line between the orifice and the valve. An excess steam pressure causes the valve to open and the flow of steam through the line draws water out of the reflector. Provision is also made for adding water to the reflector when the steam pressure drops. (AEC)

Treshow, M.

1962-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

380

High pressure xenon ionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

Markey, John K. (New Haven, CT)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

High pressure xenon ionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

Markey, J.K.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. We investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G F.

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Type Property Type String Pages using the property "Water Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Freshwater + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + A Alden Large Flume + Freshwater + Alden Small Flume + Freshwater + Alden Tow Tank + Freshwater + Alden Wave Basin + Freshwater + B Breakwater Research Facility + Freshwater + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Freshwater + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Freshwater +

384

Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

HEATING OF OIL WELL BY HOT WATER CIRCULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATING OF OIL WELL BY HOT WATER CIRCULATION Mladen Jurak Department of Mathematics University.prnic@ina.hr Abstract When highly viscous oil is produced at low temperatures, large pressure drops will significantly decrease production rate. One of possible solu- tions to this problem is heating of oil well by hot water

Rogina, Mladen

386

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF STEAM WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITY RELATIONS A REPORT SUBMITTED;Abstract A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous ow of steam and water in porous media with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeability for steam phase

Stanford University

387

BILIWG Meeting: High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Steam Reforming of High Pressure Steam Reforming of Bio-Derived Liquids S. Ahmed, S. Lee, D. Papadias, and R. Kumar November 6, 2007 Laurel, MD Research sponsored by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Rationale and objective Rationale „ Steam reforming of liquid fuels at high pressures can reduce hydrogen compression costs - Much less energy is needed to pressurize liquids (fuel and water) than compressing gases (reformate or H 2 ) „ High pressure reforming is advantageous for subsequent separations and hydrogen purification Objective „ Develop a reformer design that takes advantage of the savings in compression cost in the steam reforming bio-derived liquid fuels - Metric:

388

Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front  

SciTech Connect

Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

Vasco, D. W.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

PRESSURE VESSEL FABRICATION USING T-1 STEEL  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication of pressure vessels using C-l steel is described. The welding, welding electrodes, explosionbulge test, and impact and fatigue properties for the pressure vessel are given. (W.L.H.)

Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

1957-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Basics: Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color...

393

A Computer Program for Simulating Transient Behavior in Steam Turbine Stage Pressure of AHWR  

SciTech Connect

It is proposed to couple the Advanced Heavy water reactor (AHWR), which is being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, with a desalination plant. The objective of this coupling is to produce system make-up and domestic water. The proposed desalination plant needs about 1.9 kg/sec of steam and the minimum pressure requirement is 3 bars. The desalination plant can be fed with bled steam extracted from a suitable stage in low pressure turbine. As the turbine stage pressure changes with the load, it is essential to know the availability of bled steam at aforesaid pressure for various load condition. The objective of the present study is to identify a suitable extraction point so as to ensure availability of steam at desired condition for desalination plant, even at part load conditions. In order to fulfill the above objective a steam and feed system analysis code was developed which incorporates the mathematical formulation of different components of the steam and feed system such as, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbines, re-heater, feed heaters etc. The dynamic equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the stage pressure at various load conditions. Based on the results obtained, the suitable extraction stage in LP turbine was selected. This enables to determine the lowest possible part load operation up to which availability of desalination plant could be ensured. (authors)

Dutta, Anu; Thangamani, I.; Chakraborty, G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Autogenic Pressure Reactions for Battery Materials Manufacture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Autogenic Pressure Reactions for Battery Materials Manufacture Technology available for licensing: A unique method for anode and cathode manufacture autogenicpressurereactions...

396

LOW PRESSURE CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION OF POLYSILICON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THEORY The mass transport processes in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) are similar to those occuring in catalytic reactors

Gieske, R.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect on water and gas usage from cross-flow betweencontrols have on water and gas usage over a large number ofsystems, and their water and gas usage. Hourly schedules for

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Radiolysis Concerns for Water Shielding in Fission Surface Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of radiolysis concerns with regard to water shields for fission surface power. A review of the radiolysis process is presented and key parameters and trends are identified. From this understanding of the radiolytic decomposition of water, shield pressurization and corrosion are identified as the primary concerns. Existing experimental and modeling data addressing concerns are summarized. It was found that radiolysis of pure water in a closed volume results in minimal, if any net decomposition, and therefore reduces the potential for shield pressurization and corrosion.

Schoenfeld, Michael P. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, 800 SW Archer Rd. Bldg.554, P.O. Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Effect of recess pressure ratio on the characteristics of a hybrid bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid (Combination Hydrostatic and Hydrodynamic) bearings have shown good properties in testing and in consideration for applications such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump. However, properties have not been examined for a variation in the design parameters of radial clearance, recess pressure ratio, and recess to land area ratio while holding the other parameters constant. This thesis presents the theoretical and experimental characteristics for an orificecompensated, annulus-fed hybrid water journal bearing for variation in recess pressure ratio. Recess pressure ratio Pr is defined as [ ] where Pr is the recess pressure, P, is the supply pressure, and Pa is the discharge pressure. Rowe (1983) showed that the bearing load capacity can be maximized by a Pr value of 0.58 at the concentric position for hydrostatic bearings. Experimental results showed the maximum load capacity to bear near 0.58 with slight variation as rotor speed and supply pressure are varied. Test results show that maximum stiffness occurs over a range of Pr from 0.4 to 0.7 with variation in operating speed and supply pressure. The direct damping increases as recess pressure ratio is decreased. Whirl frequency ratio and torque show little variation with recess pressure ratio. Predictions are made using HYDROBEARC developed by San Andres (1992). Accuracy of prediction is analyzed by comparison with experimental test results and found to be adequate, with decreasing accuracy as supply pressure and especially rotor speed are increased. Previous work found the accuracy of prediction by HYDROBEARC to increase as the rotor speed is increased.

Ingram, Michael William

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

WH[eta] under pressure  

SciTech Connect

An initial observation of the formation of WH under pressure from W gaskets surrounding hydrogen in diamond anvil cells led to a theoretical study of tungsten hydride phases. At P = 1 atm no stoichiometry is found to be stable with respect to separation into the elements, but as the pressure is raised WH{sub n} (n = 1-6, 8) stoichiometries are metastable or stable. WH and WH{sub 4} are calculated to be stable at P > 15 GPa, WH{sub 2} becomes stable at P > 100 GPa and WH{sub 6} at P > 150 GPa. In agreement with experiment, the structure computed for WH is anti-NiAs. WH{sub 2} shares with WH a hexagonal arrangement of tungsten atoms, with hydrogen atoms occupying octahedral and tetrahedral holes. For WH{sub 4} the W atoms are in a distorted fcc arrangement. As the number of hydrogens rises, the coordination of W by H increases correspondingly, leading to a twelve-coordinated W in WH{sub 6}. In WH{sub 8} H{sub 2} units also develop. All of the hydrides considered should be metallic at high pressure, though the Fermi levels of WH{sub 4} and WH{sub 6} lie in a deep pseudogap. Prodded by these theoretical studies, experiments were then undertaken to seek phases other than WH, exploring a variety of experimental conditions that would favor further reaction. Though a better preparation and characterization of WH resulted, no higher hydrides have as yet been found.

Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Labet, Vanessa; Strobel, Timothy A.; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N.W. (Cornell); (CIW)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effects of Pressure on Oxygen Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To measure the effects of pressure on the output of a membrane oxygen sensor and a nonmembrane oxygen sensor, the authors pressure cycled a CTD sensor package in a laboratory pressure facility. The CTD sensor package was cycled from 30 to 6800 db ...

M. J. Atkinson; F. I. M. Thomas; N. Larson

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Initiatives » Nuclear Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents September 30, 2011 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Initial Assessment of Thermal Annealing Needs and Challenges The most life-limiting structural component in light-water reactors (LWR) is the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) because replacement of the RPV is not considered a viable option at this time. LWR licenses are now being extended from 40y to 60y by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with intentions to extend licenses to 80y and beyond. The RPV materials exhibit varying degrees of sensitivity to irradiation-induced embrittlement

403

Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers Massachusetts Institute of Technology Project Number: FE0012500 Project Description This project will develop and assess a slurry feeding system based on a suspension of coal in liquid CO2 that can be pumped into a high-pressure gasifier. The advantages of this solution are that CO2 has a low heat capacity, a low heat of vaporization and low viscosity. Thus, the liquid CO2 imposes a much smaller thermal load on the gasifier relative to a water slurry, and has the potential to improve the efficiency and economics of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with carbon capture and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal fired power plants. Project Details

404

Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary...

406

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A white paper describing produced water from production ofCE, Veil JA. 2009. Produced Water Volumes and Managementunderground formations (produced water) are often extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California’s Water Conservation Standards for ResidentialCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council, 2006. http://http://www.nrdc.org/water/conservation/edrain/edrain.pdf

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Texas Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coil hot water storage tank, a backup instantaneous electric water heater, a hydronic fan coil unit for space heating, and an efficient plumbing manifold for domestic hot water...

409

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

410

Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

412

Catalytic Behavior of Dense Hot Water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water is known to exhibit fascinating physical properties at high pressures and temperatures. Its remarkable structural and phase complexity suggest the possibility of exotic chemical reactivity under extreme conditions, though this remains largely unstudied. Detonations of high explosives containing oxygen and hydrogen produce water at thousands of K and tens of GPa, similar to conditions of giant planetary interiors. These systems thus provide a unique means to elucidate the chemistry of 'extreme water'. Here we show that water plays an unexpected role in catalyzing complex explosive reactions - contrary to the current view that it is simply a stable detonation product. Using first-principles atomistic simulations of the detonation of high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), we discovered that H{sub 2}O (source), H (reducer) and OH (oxidizer) act as a dynamic team that transports oxygen between reaction centers. Our finding suggests that water may catalyze reactions in other explosives and in planetary interiors.

Wu, C J; Fried, L E; Yang, L H; Goldman, N; Bastea, S

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

413

Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

High-pressure microhydraulic actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

Pressurized solid oxide fuel cell testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pressurized SOFC Test Program is an integral part of the Cooperative Agreement between Westinghouse and DOE and was put into place to evaluate the effects of pressurization on SOFC performance. The goals of the SOFC pressurized test program are to obtain cell voltage versus current (VI) performance data as a function of pressure; to evaluate the effects of operating parameters such as temperature, air stoichiometry, and fuel utilization on cell performance, and to demonstrate long term stability of the SOFC materials at elevated pressures.

Ray, E.R.; Basel, R.A.; Pierre, J.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Low frequency pressure modulation of indium antimonide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped parameter resonator capable of generating megapascal pressures at low frequency (kilohertz) is described. Accelerometers are used to determine the applied pressure, and are calibrated with a piezoelectric sample. A laser diagnostic was also developed to measure the pressure in semiconductor samples through the band gap pressure dependence. In addition, the laser diagnostic has been used to measure the attenuation coefficient {alpha} of commercially available indium antimonide (InSb) wafers. The resonator and laser diagnostic have been used with InSb samples to verify the pressure response.

Hallock, Gary A. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0240 (United States); Meier, Mark A. [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77252-2189 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Magnetohydrodynamic sea water propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental and theoretical investigation of a large scale MHD propulsor has been undertaken whose objectives are to (1) investigate the transient and steady state performance of the thruster over operating parameter ranges that are compatible with achievement of high efficiency, (2) to quantify the principal loss mechanisms within the thruster and (3) to obtain preliminary hydroacoustic data. The performance of the thruster was first investigated theoretically with a 3-D code to quantify the loss mechanisms and identify experimental parameter ranges of interest. The loss mechanisms of interest are ohmic losses within the channel and those resulting from electrical currents at the entrance and exit of the thruster, and enhanced frictional losses. The analysis indicated that the relative importance of the loss mechanisms was a function of the thruster design and operating parameters. The experimental investigation of the large scale propulsor is being conducted on a sea water test facility that was designed to match the capabilities of a large 6-T superconducting magnet. The facility design was such that {approximately}90{degrees} of all losses occurred within the propulsion test train (inlet nozzle, propulsor and diffuser) thus facilitating isolation of the loss mechanisms. The test thruster itself is heavily instrumented to provide local measurements of velocity, pressure, and electric fields. The predicted overall thruster performance and value of the loss mechanisms will be compared with measured values. Comparisons will also be presented of the voltage gradients between electrodes, overall thruster efficiency, axial pressure gradients across the propulsor, change in velocity profiles, axial and vertical current distributions and exit distribution of the electrolytic gases.

Petrick, M.; Thomas, A.; Genens, L.; Libera, J.; Nietert, R.; Bouillard, J.; Pierson, E.; Hill, D.; Picologlou, B.; Ohlsson, O.; Kasprzyk, T.; Berry, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray and their effects on spray development  

SciTech Connect

Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray for direct injection (DI) gasoline engines and their effects on spray development have been analyzed at different injector operating conditions. A simulation tool was utilized and the static air pressure at the centerline of the spray was measured to investigate the static pressure and flow structure inside the swirl spray. To investigate the effect of static air pressure on swirl spray development, a liquid film model was applied and the Mie-scattered images were captured. The simulation and experiment showed that recirculation vortex and air pressure drop inside the swirl spray were observable and the air pressure drop was greater at high injection pressure. At high fuel temperature, the air pressure at the nozzle exit showed higher value compared to the atmospheric pressure and then continuously decreased up to few millimeters distance from the nozzle exit. The pressure drop at high fuel temperatures was more than that of atmospheric temperature. This reduced air pressure was recovered to the atmospheric pressure at further downstream. The results from the liquid film model and macroscopic spray images showed that the air pressure started to affect the liquid film trajectory about 3 mm from the nozzle exit and this effect was sustained until the air pressure recovered to the atmospheric pressure. However, the entrained air motion and droplet size have more significant influence on the spray development after the most of the liquid sheet is broken-up and the spray loses its initial momentum. (author)

Moon, Seoksu; Bae, Choongsik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea); Abo-Serie, Essam [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water Beetles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

422

Water watch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Effect of Pressure Difference Control on Hydraulic Stability in a Variable Flow Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the effects of different pressure difference control methods on hydraulic stability in a variable flow air conditioning system when it is applied to different air conditioning water systems. According to control method and water system, it can be divided into direct return system pass-by control, direct return system terminal control, reversed return system pass-by control and reversed return system terminal control. The results indicate that reversed return system terminal control has the best hydraulic stability.

Zhang, Z.; Fu, Y.; Chen, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &share some of the water-conservation techniques used at theWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &we share some of the water-conservation techniques used atWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

AUTOMATIC CALIBRATING SYSTEM FOR PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatic system for calibrating a number of pressure transducers is described. The disclosed embodiment of the invention uses a mercurial manometer to measure the air pressure applied to the transducer. A servo system follows the top of the mercury column as the pressure is changed and operates an analog- to-digital converter This converter furnishes electrical pulses, each representing an increment of pressure change, to a reversible counterThe transducer furnishes a signal at each calibration point, causing an electric typewriter and a card-punch machine to record the pressure at the instant as indicated by the counter. Another counter keeps track of the calibration points so that a number identifying each point is recorded with the corresponding pressure. A special relay control system controls the pressure trend and programs the sequential calibration of several transducers.

Amonette, E.L.; Rodgers, G.W.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Passive tire pressure sensor and method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

Pfeifer, Kent Bryant (Los Lunas, NM); Williams, Robert Leslie (Albuquerque, NM); Waldschmidt, Robert Lee (Calgary, CA); Morgan, Catherine Hook (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

429

Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

1999-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Deformation of Olivine at Mantle Pressure using D-DIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the rheological properties of mantle materials is critical in modeling the dynamics of the Earth. The high-temperature flow law of olivine defined at mantle conditions is especially important since the pressure dependence of rheology may affect our estimation of the strength of olivine in the Earth's interior. In this study, steady-state high-temperature (up to 1473 K) deformation experiments of polycrystalline olivine (average grain size ? 10 ?m) at pressure up to 9.6 GPa, were conducted using a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) high-pressure apparatus and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The oxygen fugacity (fo2) during the runs was in-between the iron-wustite and the Ni/NiO buffers' fo2. The water content of the polycrystalline samples was generally about 150 to 200 wt. ppm but was as low as 35 wt ppm. Typically, 30 % strain was generated during the uniaxial compression. Sample lengths during the deformation process as well as the differential stresses were monitored in situ by X-ray radiography and diffraction, respectively. The strain rate was derived with an accuracy of 10?6 s?1. Differential stress was measured at constant strain rate (?10?5 s?1) using a multi-element solid-state detector combined with a conical slit. Recovered specimens were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM shows that dislocation glide was the dominant deformation mechanism throughout the experiment. Evidence of dislocation climb and cross-slip as active mechanisms are also reported. Deformation data show little or no dependence of the dislocation creep flow with pressure, yielding to an activation volume V* of 0 {+-} 5 cm3/mol. These new data are consistent with the high-temperature rheological laws at lower pressures, as reported previously.

Li,L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

NIST: NIF - Water Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Sensitivity. Neutrons are extremely sensitive to small amounts of water. To quantify and calibrate this sensitivity we ...

432

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

433

Top Hat Pressure System Hyperbaric Test Analysis | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top Hat Pressure System Hyperbaric Test Analysis Top Hat Pressure System Hyperbaric Test Analysis This file contains data from pressure measurements inside Top Hat 4....

434

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

435

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers  

SciTech Connect

Water uptake profiles of proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in the form of capillary-pressure saturation (Pc-S) curves. The curves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly hydrophilic and require capillary pressures as low as -80 kPa to eject imbibed water. Comparison of materials made with and without Pt indicates a difference in water ejection and uptake phenomena due to the presence of Pt. The addition of Pt increases the tendency of the catalyst layer to retain water. Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) is used to characterize the water-vapor sorption onto Nafion, Pt/C, and C surfaces. The DVS results align with the trends found from the Pc-S curves and show an increased propensity for water uptake in the presence of Pt. The effect of the ion in Nafion, sodium or protonated form, is also compared and demonstrates that although the protonation of the Nafion in the catalyst layer also increases hydrophilicity, the effect is not as great as that caused by Pt.

Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony H.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Improved water-driven lpg slug process  

SciTech Connect

The economics of oil recovery by the LPG-slug process depends upon increasing the sweep efficiency and recovering the injected LPG. There are 2 basic forms of the LPG-slug processes--the gas-driven and the water-driven. The pressure required for miscibility between dry gas and LPG prohibits the use of the gas-driven LPG process in shallow reservoirs. The water-driven LPG slug process normally exhibits good sweep efficiency. However, displacement of the LPG by water is poor. An improvement in this process appears possible by injecting a slug of carbon dioxide between the LPG slug and the water drive. Laboratory experiments were conducted in linear core systems to determine the effect of pressure on the various displacement zones. A displacement test was conducted with LPG and carbon dioxide slugs large enough to avoid interference between the oil-LPG, LPG-carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide- water displacement zones. Under these conditions, essentially complete oil and LPG recovery was obtained. However, a substantial amount of carbon dioxide was left in the core at water breakthrough.

Thompson, J.L.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

WATER AND GROWTH: FUTURE WATER SUPPLIES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reclaimed Water As people use water, a wastewater stream is produced. Once cleaned to acceptable standards and is available as reclaimed water. #12;20 New growth in central Arizona will produce significant quantities to return for wastewater treatment51 . Of the reclaimed water produced, 30% is assumed available to meet

Gelt, Joe

438

Sound speed in liquid–gas mixtures: Water–air and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sound speed of a two-phase fluid, such as a magma-gas, water-air, or water-steam mixture, is dramatically different from the sound speed of either pure component. In numerous geologic situations the sound speed of such two-phase systems may be of interest: in the search for magma reservoirs, in seismic exploration of geothermal areas, in prediction of P wave velocity decreases prior to earthquakes, and in inversion of crustal and upper mantle seismic records. Probably most dramatically, fluid flow characteristics during eruptions of volcanoes and geysers are strongly dependent on the sound speed of erupting two-phase (or multiphase) fluids. In this paper the sound speeds of water, air, steam, water-air mixtures, and water-steam mixtures are calculated. It is demonstrated that sound speeds calculated from classical acoustic and fluid dynamics analyses agree with results obtained from finite amplitude 'vaporization wave ' theory. To the extent that air and steam are represented as perfect gases with an adiabatic exponent •, independent of temperature, their sound speeds vary in a simple manner directly with the square root of the absolute temperature. The sound speed of pure liquid water is a complex function of pressure and temperature and is given here to 8 kbar, 900øC. In pure water at all pressures the sound speed attains a maximum value near 100øC and decreases at higher temperatures; at high pressures the decrease is continuous, but at pressures below 1 kbar the sound speed reaches a minimum value in the

Susan Werner Kieffer

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Mark Leavitt Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide, Inc. August 11, 2011 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information History of Innovations... Announced breakthrough in all-composite lightweight, high capacity, low-cost fuel storage technologies. * Developed a series of robust, OEM compatible electronic control products. Developed H 2 storage system for SunLine Tran-sit Hythane® bus. Awarded patent for integrated module including in-tank regulator * Developed high efficiency H 2 fuel storage systems for DOE Future Truck programs Developed H 2 storage and metering system for Toyota's FCEV platform. First to certify 10,000 psi systems in Japan

440

Low-pressure ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low pressure ion source for a neutron source comprises a filament cathode and an anode ring. Approximately 150V is applied between the cathode and the anode. Other electrodes, including a heat shield, a reflector and an aperture plate with a focus electrode, are placed at intermediate potentials. Electrons from the filament drawn out by the plasma and eventually removed by the anode are contained in a magnetic field created by a magnet ring. Ions are formed by electron impact with deuterium or tritium and are extracted at the aperture in the focus electrode. The ion source will typically generate a 200 mA beam through a 1.25 cm/sup 2/ aperture for an arc current of 10A. For deuterium gas, the ion beam is over 50 percent D/sup +/ with less than 1% impurity. The current density profile across the aperture will typically be uniform to within 20%.

Bacon, F.M.; Brainard, J.P.; O' Hagan, J.B.; Walko, R.J.

1982-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "three-loop pressurized water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

442

High Pressure Rotary Shaft Sealing Mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laterally translatable pressure staged rotary shaft sealing mechanism having a seal housing with a shaft passage therein being exposed to a fluid pressure P1 and with a rotary shaft being located within the shaft passage. At least one annular laterally translatable seal carrier is provided. First and second annular resilient sealing elements are supported in axially spaced relation by the annular seal carriers and have sealing relation with the rotary shaft. The seal housing and at least one seal carrier define a first pressure staging chamber exposed to the first annular resilient sealing element and a second pressure staging chamber located between and exposed to the first and second annular resilient sealing elements. A first fluid is circulated to the first pressure chamber at a pressure P1, and a second staging pressure fluid is circulated to the second pressure chamber at a fraction of pressure P1 to achieve pressure staging, cooling of the seals. Seal placement provides hydraulic force balancing of the annular seal carriers.

Dietle, Lannie (Sugar Land, TX); Gobeli, Jeffrey D. (Houston, TX)

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

443

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric