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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Robust carbon monolith having hierarchical porosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A carbon monolith includes a robust carbon monolith characterized by a skeleton size of at least 100 nm, and a hierarchical pore structure having macropores and mesopores.

Dai, Sheng; Guiohon, Georges A; Liang, Chengdu

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

Robust carbon monolith having hierarchical porosity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon monolith includes a robust carbon monolith characterized by a skeleton size of at least 100 nm, and a hierarchical pore structure having macropores and mesopores.

Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Guiochon, Georges A. (Farragut, TN); Liang, Chengdu (Knoxville, TN)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

Peter C. Eklund (deceased); T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Optimization of porosity and thickness of a battery electrode by means of a reaction-zone model  

SciTech Connect

If electrode kinetics are fast and concentration gradients can be ignored, the reaction in a battery electrode is confined to a narrow zone, which moves through the electrode as the battery is discharged. During this process, the ohmic resistance increases, and the cutoff potential may signal the end of the discharge. It is desirable to have a matching of the capacity of the electrode (and hence its thickness) with the time t[sub d] of discharge. Assuming that there is a certain specified separator thickness and that the electrolyte of the separator is the same as that permeating the positive electrode, it is possible to obtain the optimum porosity as a compromise between the desire to have active material present and the necessity to have a conduction path through the pores of the electrode. For a system with a foil negative electrode and an open-circuit potential which is independent of state of charge, this optimum value depends on one principal parameter T = U[kappa]t/q[sub +]L[sup 2], one which involves the time of discharge, the open-circuit potential U, the conductivity [kappa], and thickness L of the separator, and the capacity q[sub +] per unit volume of solids in the positive electrode. There is one other parameter: the ratio of the cutoff potential to the open-circuit potential. Other parameters are introduced to account for a more complex structure of the battery.

Newman, J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Division Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Impedance-based study of capacitive porous carbon electrodes with hierarchical and bimodal porosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hierarchical and bimodal supercapacitor electrodes. First detailed characterization of hierarchical carbon Supercapacitor Capacitive deionization Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy Hierarchical carbon a b s t r a c

Santiago, Juan G.

6

Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include • Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. • Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Carbon Abundances in the Galactic Thin and Thick Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although carbon is, together with oxygen and nitrogen, one of the most important elements in the study of galactic chemical evolution its production sites are still poorly known and have been much debated (see e.g. Gustafsson et al. 1999; Chiappini et al. 2003). To trace the origin and evolution of carbon we have determined carbon abundances from the forbidden [C I] line at 8727 A and made comparisons to oxygen abundances from the forbidden [O I] line at 6300 A in a sample of 51 nearby F and G dwarf stars. These data and the fact that the forbidden [C I] and [O I] lines are very robust abundance indicators (they are essentially insensitive to deviations from LTE and uncertainties in the stellar parameters, see, e.g., Gustafsson et al. 1999; Asplund et al. 2005) enable us to very accurately measure the C/O ratio as well as individual C and O abundances. Our first results indicate that the time-scale for the main source that contribute to the carbon enrichment of the interstellar medium operate on the same time-scale as those that contribute to the iron enrichment (and can possibly be AGB stars...)

T. Bensby; S. Feltzing

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Microparticles with hierarchical porosity  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure provides oxide microparticles with engineered hierarchical porosity and methods of manufacturing the same. Also described are structures that are formed by templating, impregnating, and/or precipitating the oxide microparticles and method for forming the same. Suitable applications include catalysts, electrocatalysts, electrocatalysts support materials, capacitors, drug delivery systems, sensors and chromatography.

Petsev, Dimiter N; Atanassov, Plamen; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Carroll, Nick; Olson, Tim

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Investigation of the Gas-Diffusion-Electrode Used as Lithium/Air Cathode in Non-aqueous Electrolyte and the Importance of Carbon Material Porosity  

SciTech Connect

The gas-diffusion-electrode used in a Li-air cell has been studied in a unique homemade electrochemical cell. Three major obstacles for the development of a feasible Li-air system were discussed with a focus on the development of a functional gas-diffusion-electrode in non-aqueous electrolytes and the way of avoiding the passivation of gas-diffusion-electrodes caused by the deposition of the reduction products. It is the first time that the importance of establishing the 3-phase electrochemical interface in non-aqueous electrolyte is demonstrated by creating air-diffusion paths and an air saturated portion for an air cathode. A model mechanism of electrode passivation by the reaction products was also proposed. Lithium oxides formed during O{sub 2} reduction tend to block small pores, preventing them from further utilization in the electrochemical reaction. On the other hand, lithium oxides would accumulate inside the large pores during the reduction until the density of oxides becomes high enough to choke-off the mass transfer. Carbon materials with a high surface area associated with larger pores should be selected to make the gas-diffusion-electrode for Li-air battery. For the first time, a near linear relationship between the capacity of GDE in a non-aqueous electrolyte and the average pore diameter was demonstrated, which could be used to estimate the capacity of the GDE quantitatively.

Qu, D.; Yang, X.; Tran, C.

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

Processing and characterization of high porosity aerogel films  

SciTech Connect

Aerogels are highly porous solids having unique morphology among materials because both the pores and particles making up the material have sizes less than wavelengths of visible light. Such a unique morphology modifies the normal molecular transport mechanisms within the material, resulting in exceptional thermal, acoustical, mechanical, and electrical properties. For example, aerogels have the lowest measured thermal conductivity and dielectric constant for any solid material. Special methods are required to make aerogel films with high porosity. In this paper, we discuss the special conditions needed to fabricate aerogel films having porosities greater than 75% and we describe methods of processing inorganic aerogel films having controllable thicknesses in the range 0.5 to 200 micrometers. We report methods and results of characterizing the films including thickness, refractive index, density (porosity), and dielectric constant. We also discuss results of metallization and patterning on the aerogel films for applications involving microminiature electronics and thermal detectors.

Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

Development of long-lived thick carbon stripper foils for high energy heavy ion accelerators by a heavy ion beam sputtering method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past decade, we have developed extremely long-lived carbon stripper foils of 1-50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness prepared by a heavy ion beam sputtering method. These foils were mainly used for low energy heavy ion beams. Recently, high energy negative Hydrogen and heavy ion accelerators have started to use carbon stripper foils of over 100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} in thickness. However, the heavy ion beam sputtering method was unsuccessful in production of foils thicker than about 50 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} because of the collapse of carbon particle build-up from substrates during the sputtering process. The reproduction probability of the foils was less than 25%, and most of them had surface defects. However, these defects were successfully eliminated by introducing higher beam energies of sputtering ions and a substrate heater during the sputtering process. In this report we describe a highly reproducible method for making thick carbon stripper foils by a heavy ion beam sputtering with a Krypton ion beam.

Muto, Hideshi [Center of General Education, Tokyo University of Science, Suwa, 5000-1 Toyohira, Chino Nagano 391-0292 (Japan); Ohshiro, Yukimitsu [Center for Nuclear Study, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-1 Hirosawa, Riken Campus, Wako Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, Katsunori [Van de Graaff Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Oyaizu, Michihiro [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki [Heavy Ion Cancer Therapy Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage Chiba 263-855 (Japan)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

13

Porosity in Cast Equiaxed Alloy 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

techniques and the total percentage of porosity across each lmm wide band through ... Figure 3 shows the average percentage porosity as a function of position ...

14

The study of neutron activation yields in spallation reaction of 400 MeV/u carbon on a thick lead target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spallation-neutron yield was studied experimentally by bombarding a thick lead target with 400 MeV/u carbon beam. The data were obtained with the activation analysis method using foils of Au, Mn, Al, Fe and In. The yields of produced isotopes were deduced by analyzing the measured {\\gamma} spectra of irradiated foils. According to the isotopes yields, the spatial and energy distributions of the neutron field were discussed. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed by the GEANT4 + FLUKA code.

F. Ma; H. L. Ge; X. Y. Zhang; H. B. Zhang; Y. Q. Ju; L. Chen; L. Yang; F. Fu; Y. L. Zhang; J. Y. LI; T. J. Liang; B. Zhou; S. L. Wang; J. Y. Li; J. K. Xu; X. G. Leir; Z. Qin; L. Gu; G. M. Jin

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

15

The geometry variation of as-grown carbon coils with Ni layer thickness and hydrogen plasma pretreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Ni layer on SiO2 substrate was used as a catalyst ...

Young-Chul Jeon, Semi Park, Sung-Hoon Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Secondary porosity in immature Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstones, northeast Alaska and northwest Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petrographic and scanning electron microscope analysis of Upper Cretaceous to lower Eocene sandstone from outcrops west of the Mackenzie delta and in the central Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) reveals secondary porosity. Recognizing this secondary porosity is important for oil and gas exploration because early diagenesis has eliminated most primary porosity in these immature litharenites. The litharenites are dominated by grains of quartz, cherty argillite, chert, volcanic rock fragments, variable amounts of feldspar, and minor amounts of metamorphic rock fragments. Because of the abundance of ductile grains all deep burial (probable burial to depths in excess of 3,000 m), these sandstones have suffered the loss of most primary porosity. Additional reduction of primary porosity has occurred due to the formation of minor amount of precompaction rim cement (carbonate, chlorite, and illite/smectite) and syncompaction quartz overgrowths. Dissolution of framework grains and, to a lesser degree, matrix has resulted in secondary porosities of up to 8% in outcrop samples. Framework grains commonly dissolved include volcanic rock fragments, feldspar, chert, cherty argillite, argillite, and quartz. Two processes are responsible for the dissolution. The first process is the direct dissolution of grains. The second process involves two steps in which grains and matrix are initially replaced by carbonate cement followed by dissolution of the cement and creation of secondary porosity. Secondary porosity is reported to exceed 20% in subsurface samples in northwest Canada.

Myers, M.D. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA)); Smith, T.N. (State Div. of Oil and Gas, Anchorage, AK (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 1:30pm SLAC, Conference...

18

Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic is described which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers. 3 figures.

Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fabrication of dual porosity electrode structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A substantially entirely fibrous ceramic which may have dual porosity of both micro and macro pores. Total porosity may be 60-75% by volume. A method of spraying a slurry perpendicularly to an ambient stream of air is disclosed along with a method of removing binders without altering the fiber morphology. Adding fine ceramic particulates to the green ceramic fibers enhances the sintering characteristics of the fibers.

Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Kucera, Eugenia H. (Downers Grove, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Facies development and porosity relationships in Dundee Limestone of Gladwin County, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian of the Michigan basin was a time of transgressive seas and extensive carbonate deposition, including coral and stromatoporoid buildups. Deposited during the Middle Devonian, the Dundee Limestone represents deposition in subtidal, intertidal, and restricted environments. The Buckeye oil field, located in south-central Gladwin County, is a combined stratigraphic and structural carbonate trap that produces from a series of intertonguing patch reefs, fringing sand bodies, and intertidal island fenestral zones. The major reef-building organisms include stromatoporoids, corals, calcareous algae, brachiopods, and crinoids, with the stromatoporoids providing the major framework. The patch-reef facies is composed of massive stromatoporoid boundstones that contain primary intraparticle porosity. The fringing grainstone sands are composed of coarse crinoid and brachiopod skeletal debris that have interparticle porosity. The intertidal island zone found in the North Buckeye field is represented by a pelletal packstone that has abundant fenestral porosity.

Montgomery, E.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon Technology III: Anode Quality Control - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully automatic method for image analysis of porosity in baked carbon anodes has been developed. The method is based on optical microscopy, and is ...

25

Porosity and Surface Topography Characterization of Titanium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes · Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion · Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on ...

26

Synthesis of high porosity, monolithic alumina aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many non-silica aerogels are notably weak and fragile in monolithic form. Particularly, few monolithic aerogels with densities less than 50kg/m3 have any significant strength. It is especially difficult to prepare uncracked monoliths of pure alumina aerogels that are robust and moisture stable. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis of strong, stable, monolithic, high porosity (>98% porous) alumina aerogels, using a two-step sol-gel process. The alumina aerogels have a polycrystalline morphology that results in enhanced physical properties. Most of the measured physical properties of the alumina aerogels are superior to those for silica aerogels for equivalent densities.

Poco, J F; Satcher, J H; Hrubesh, L W

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale water O2interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in ourfield study.

Jin, Lixin [University of Texas at El Paso; Ryan, Mathur [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Alex, Carone [Pennsylvania State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered sample. This work highlights the impact of shale-water-O2 interactions in near-surface environments: (1) black shale weathering is important for global carbon cycles as previously buried organic matter is quickly oxidized; and (2) black shales weather more quickly than less organic- and sulfide-rich shales, leading to high porosity and mineral surface areas exposed for clay weathering. The fast rates of shale gas exploitation that are ongoing in Pennsylvania, Texas and other regions in the United States may furthermore lead to release of metals to the environment if reactions between water and black shale are accelerated by gas development activities in the subsurface just as they are by low-temperature processes in our field study.

Jin, Lixin [ORNL; Mathur, Ryan [Juniata College, Huntingdon; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Williams, Jennifer [Pennsylvania State University; Carone, Alex [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Brantley, Susan L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic...

30

W-86: Porosity Characterization of Surrogates for Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W-118: Titania Based One-Dimensional Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Batteries .... W-86: Porosity Characterization of Surrogates for Oxide Nuclear Fuels: A ...

31

Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University] [Case Western Reserve University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High-resolution, three-dimensional, compressional and shear wave velocity models, derived from microearthquake traveltimes, are used to map the distribution of Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California. Spatial resolution of the three-dimensional Poisson's ratio and porosity distributions is estimated to be 0.5 km horizontally and 0.8 km vertically. Model uncertainties, + or -1% in the interior and + or -2.3% around the edge of the model, are estimated by a jackknife method. We use perturbations of r = V p /V s ratio and Psi = V p

33

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of

34

Porosity level estimation in polymer composites using microwaves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of microwaves to monitor variations in porosity level of composite samples is studied. Measurements of several carefully prepared samples with different air volume fractions are performed at the frequency range of 8.2--18 GHz. The measurement results indicated that there is an excellent sensitivity to small differences in porosity level. A two-phase mixing model used for predicting the dielectric properties as a function of porosity level shows good agreement with the measured results. This model may be used to closely predict the amount of air content from measured dielectric properties. Changes in clustered (local) porosity are studied experimentally as well. Microwave scan of specially prepared samples with about 5% change in air content (local porosity variation) are also presented.

Gray, S.; Ganchev, S.; Qaddoumi, N.; Beauregard, G.; Radford, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Zoughi, R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Permeability-Porosity Relationship for Surface Deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The changes to porosity and permeability resulting from surface deposition and early dissolution in an initial rhombohedral array of uniform spheres are calculated. Very rapid decreases of permeability result from early deposition, with 48% reduction predicted in permeability from 8% reduction in porosity. After deposition has caused about a 1% increase in the radii of the spherical array, relative permeability reductions vary approximately as the square of relative changes in porosity. These theoretical results are matched with experimental data of Ioti et al. and shown to be satisfactory in some cases, but for others, a more complex model of the porous medium is needed.

Weir, G.J.; White, S.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterization of porosity in support of mechanical property analysis  

SciTech Connect

Previous laboratory investigations of tuff have shown that porosity has a dominant, general effect on mechanical properties. As a result, it is very important for the interpretation of mechanical property data that porosity is measured on each sample tested. Porosity alone, however, does not address all of the issues important to mechanical behavior. Variability in size and distribution of pore space produces significantly different mechanical properties. A nondestructive technique for characterizing the internal structure of the sample prior to testing is being developed and the results are being analyzed. The information obtained from this technique can help in both qualitative and quantitative interpretation of test results.

Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thick film hydrogen sensor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrated Analysis and Application of Reservoir Models to Early Permian Detrital Carbonate Deposits, Midland Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 3-D seismic volume, wireline logs and core data were integrated to determine the spatial distribution of porous reservoirs within the Wolfcampian-Leonardian detrital carbonate slope and basin strata in Glasscock County, Texas. A 3-D seismic amplitude volume was used to construct a seismic facies analysis of the detrital carbonate section, and generated attribute volumes helped identify detrital carbonate depositional trends, as well as establish a potential correlation between thick detrital carbonate intervals and associated amplitude response. Eight lithofacies were identified in core and were subsequently classified into three main facies: debris flow, grain flow/turbidite, and basinal shale. A facies type log was then created, which was used to supervise the creation of facies logs within other wells to ultimately use in the creation of a 3-D facies model. Cross sections through the study area show an increase in bathymetric relief beginning in Wolfcampian time and continuing through the Leonardian. Detrital carbonate deposition increases dramatically during the Leonardian, consisting of large gravity flows deposited basinward in a northwest-southeast linear trend, rapidly thinning basinward. Individual flows are discontinuous and bounded by basinal shale facies. Four seismic facies were identified within the interval of interest using a structurally smoothed attribute volume, while an RMS amplitude attribute volume provided a correlation between high RMS amplitude values and detrital carbonate thickness. A high RMS amplitude value corresponding to the debris flow facies was extracted from the RMS attribute volume in the form of a seismic geobody. Two facies models and one porosity model were generated by using upscaled values from the gamma ray, total porosity, and lithofacies logs, which were applied over areas with the densest well control. Although the facies model populated from upscaled GR values was useful in stratigraphic interpretation, it is determined that the models should be applied over areas with denser well spacing in order to provide a more accurate and geologically viable subsurface model.

Johnston, Travis 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Diagenesis and porosity development associated with major sea level fluctuations, Upper Permian, Jameson land, east Greenland  

SciTech Connect

The Upper Permian of Jameson Land includes two major carbonate sequences, represented by the Karstryggen and Wegener Halvoe formations. The initial Karstryggen transgression led to the development of a shallow marine platform with structurally controlled evaporite basins (salinas) separated by stromatolitic, peloidal, or micritic carbonate depositional areas. The Wegener Havloe sequence reflects more rapid and extensive transgression with the deposition of three subcycles of fully marine, platform, or biohermal carbonates containing minor evaporites near the basin margins. Bioherms (bryozoan-brachiopod-marine cement mounds) show > 100 m of relief, indicating that large relative sea level changes were involved. Both the Karstryggen and Wgener Havloe cycles were terminated by major regressions, which led to karstic and/or fluvial incision of the underlying sequences. Not surprisingly, carbonate and evaporite diagenesis was greatly affected by these regional or eustatic sea level fluctuations. Evaporites dissolved or were replaced by calcite and celestite under the influence of meteoric waters. Limestones show collapse brecciation, grain leaching, soil development, and characteristic vadose and phreatic cements. Most significantly meteoric flushing led to massive dissolution of botryoidal marine cements (aragonite and probable high-Mg calcite) within biohermal facies on the Wegener Peninsula. This early porosity resurrection led to the preservation of porous bioherm core zones until hydrocarbon migration. Only late (posthydrocarbon), probably hydrothermal fluid flow led to cementation of the bioherm cores while expelling most of the reservoired hydrocarbons. If the sea level changes affecting the Greenlandic Permian are eustatic, then this study may provide significant clues to porosity development throughout the largely unexplored northern Zechstein basin.

Scholle, P.A.; Ulmer, D.S. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (USA)); Stemmerik, L. (Greenland Geological Survey, Copenhagen (Denmark))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

43

Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures  

SciTech Connect

Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

from the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space, the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space, and permeability of the target formations were lower than expected, and that the pressure in the formations increased with low injection rates. These results confirm the complex nature of the formations and demonstrate the importance of extensive drilling, formation evaluation, and testing to characterize and identify appropriate formations for CO 2 storage within the Appalachian Basin prior to injection. In addition to providing a significant geologic understanding of the formation, the project also provided several "lessons learned," ranging from practices

45

3D porosity prediction from seismic inversion and neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we address the problem of transforming seismic reflection data into an intrinsic rock property model. Specifically, we present an application of a methodology that allows interpreters to obtain effective porosity 3D maps from post-stack ... Keywords: Feed-forward neural network, Matlab, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

Emilson Pereira Leite; Alexandre Campane Vidal

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

POROSITY AND PERMEABILITY EVOLUTION ACCOMPANYING HOT FLUID INJECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additionally, funding was provided by the SUPRI-A Industrial Affiliates and the President's Fund of Stanford to the setup used by Koh et al. (1996), but it allows for measurement of porosity by CT scanning. A Blue-M oven to the oven set- point temperature. System pressure is elevated by a back-pressure regulator and injection

47

Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH); Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Correlating Spatial Heterogeneities in Porosity and Permeability with Metal Poisoning within an Individual Catalyst Particle using X-ray Microscopy Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - 1:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-226 Presented by Darius Morris, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a refining process for converting large and/or heavy molecules of oil feedstock into smaller and lighter hydrocarbons such as gasoline. During the cracking process, metal contaminants from the oil feedstock deactivate and restrict access into the catalyst particle, thus reducing the yield of gasoline byproducts. Full-field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) has been used to determine the 3D composition and structure of an equilibrated (spent) FCC particle in

50

Development of a new graded-porosity FeAl alloy by elemental reactive synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A new graded-porosity FeAl alloy can be fabricated through Fe and Al elemental reactive synthesis. FeAl alloy with large connecting open pores and permeability were used as porous supports. The coating was obtained by spraying slurries consisting of mixtures of Fe powder and Al powder with 3 5 m diameter onto porous FeAl support and then sintered at 1100 C. The performances of the coating were compared in terms of thickness, pore diameter and permeability. With an increase in the coating thickness up to 200 m, the changes of maximum pore size decreased from 23.6 m to 5.9 m and the permeability decreased from 184.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1 to 76.2 m3m 2kPa 1h 1, respectively, for a sintering temperature equal to 1100 C. The composite membranes have potential application for excellent filters in severe environments.

Shen, P Z [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; He, Y H [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Gao, H Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Zou, J [School of Engineering and Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, QLD; Xu, N P [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009, C; Jiang, Y [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Huang, B [State Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China; Lui, C T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate  

SciTech Connect

Zeolite with trimodal porosity can be synthesized by desilication of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate. In the desilication process, the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores of zeolite nanocrystal aggregate were enlarged into large mesopore, and the new small intracrystalline mesopore channel was created, thus the Zeolite with trimodal porosity was formed. The structure of resulted zeolite, both on aggregate and mesopore level can be fine tuned by the desilication degree. - Graphical abstract: The Si from the edges and boundary of nanocrystals was first removed resulted the surface roughness and enlarges of the originally existed intercrystalline mesopores. As the degree of alkali-treatment increasing, the Si species inside zeolite nanocrystals was also removed, leading to further enlarges the intercrystalline mesopores and the formation of small intracrystalline mesopores. In case the alkali-treatment is serve enough to completely dissolve the bridges between zeolite nanocrystals, zeolite nanocrystals were exfoliated from the aggregate. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite with trimodal porosity by desilication of zeolite nanocrystals aggregate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The original intercrystalline mesopores were enlarged into large mesopore. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new intracrystalline mesopores were created as the inside Si extracted out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aggregate structure, crystallinity and acidity of parent zeolite remained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desilication is start on the edges then in the inner part of zeolite.

Wang Yuxin; Liu Kaituo [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China) [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); He Tao; Wu Jinhu [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Fang Yunming, E-mail: fangym@qibebt.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese academy of Sciences, 189 Songling road, Qingdao 266101 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

On the influence of porosity on the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect in sintered iron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sintered irons of four different porosities were strained in tension at temperatures between 295 (room temperature) and 873 K. Serrated stress-strain curves and high work hardening in the temperature range from 333 to 693 K, for all porosities, were characteristic of dynamic strain aging. The activation energy for the onset of serration was {+-}0.82 eV and was independent of porosity. On the contrary, the parameter {beta} from the relation for dislocation density increased with increasing porosity.

Palma, E.S. [UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Laser Detection Of Material Thickness  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detection Of Material Thickness Detection Of Material Thickness Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Detection Of Material Thickness There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of

55

Nitrogen Adsorption in Carbon Aerogels: A Molecular Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen Adsorption in Carbon Aerogels: A Molecular Simulation Study S. Gavalda, K. E. Gubbins,*, Y a molecular model for carbon aerogel in which the mesopore space is represented by carbon spheres-ray diffraction. The resulting model aerogel had a surface area, porosity, and pore size distribution that closely

56

Measurement of Porosity in Dilute Acid Pretreated Corn Stover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) pretreated corn stover appeared to have more accessible pore volume than raw corn stover; (2) solute exclusion method--differences in the pore volume were not detectable due to the high variability of the measurements; (3) thermoporosimetry--differences in pore volume between pretreated samples were not observed despite the low variability of the measurement and a good correction was found between unfrozen water at 240K and xylan content; and (4) porosity measurements showed no correlation between ethanol yields and the volume accessible to an enzyme size probe, for this sample set.

Ishizawa, C.; Davis, M. F.; Johnson, D. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Process of making porous ceramic materials with controlled porosity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making metal oxide ceramic material is disclosed by which the porosity of the resulting material can be selectively controlled by manipulating the sol used to make the material. The method can be used to make a variety of metal oxide ceramic bodies, including membranes, but also pellets, plugs or other bodies. It has also been found that viscous sol materials can readily be shaped by extrusion into shapes typical of catalytic or adsorbent bodies used in industry, to facilitate the application of such materials for catalytic and adsorbent applications.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Ku, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

H22: Parameters Influence on Morphology and Porosity of High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ceramic coatings presented high sensitivity to variation in automatization .... of the Cracking of Carbon Anodes by Image Analysis for Aluminum Industry.

59

Tuning the porosity of bimetallic nanostructures by a soft templating approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use hexagonal mesophases made of oil-swollen surfactant-stabilized tubes arranged on a triangular lattice in water and doped with metallic salts as templates for the radiolytic synthesis of nanostructures. The nanostructures formed in this type of soft matrix are bimetallic palladium-platinum porous nanoballs composed of 3D-connected nanowires, of typical thickness 2.5 nm, forming hexagonal cells. We demonstrate using electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering that the pore size of the nanoballs is directly determined by the diameter of the oil tube of the doped mesophases, which we have varied in a controlled fashion from 10 to 55 nm. Bimetallic nanostructures comprising various proportions of palladium and platinum can be synthesized. Their alloy structure was evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high-angular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments. Our templating approach allows therefore the synthesis of bimetallic nanoballs of tunable porosity and composition.

Anaïs Lehoux; Laurence Ramos; Patricia Beaunier; Daniel Bahena Uribe; Philippe Dieudonné; Fabrice Audonnet; Arnaud Etcheberry; Miguel José-Yacaman; Hynd Remita

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

60

A dual-porosity reservoir model with a nonlinear coupling term  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since their introduction by Barenblatt et al. (1960), double-porosity models have been widely used for simulating flow in fractured reservoirs, such as geothermal reservoirs. In a dual-porosity system, the matrix blocks provide most of the storage of the reservoir, whereas the fractures provide the global transmissivity. Initially, most work on dual-porosity models emphasized the development of analytical solutions to idealized reservoir problems. Increasingly, the dual-porosity approach is being implemented by numerical reservoir simulators. Accurate numerical simulation of a dual-porosity problem often requires a prohibitively large number of computational cells in order to resolve the transient pressure gradients in the matrix blocks. We discuss a new dual-porosity model that utilizes a nonlinear differential equation to approximate the fracture/matrix interactions, When implemented into a numerical simulator, it eliminates the need to discretize the matrix blocks, and thereby allows more efficient simulation of reservoir problems.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Matrix-fracture interactions in dual porosity simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method for simulating flow in fractured media is presented which uses a truncated version of the analytical solution to resolve pressure transients in the rock matrix. The point at which the series solution may be truncated is a known function of the problem, and may therefore be readily determined. Furthermore, the functional form of the method is essentially dimension-independent, and implementation of the method requires only minimal modification to an existing dual porosity simulator. Three test cases are presented comparing results from fine grid simulations, Warren and Root simulations, and the new formulation. In each of the three cases presented, excellent agreement with the fine grid simulations is obtained using the new method. The W&R formulation exhibits excessive error throughout the simulated time, first underpredicting outflow rates, and then overpredicting rates. The error using the W&R formulation is largest for 3-D fracture networks, but is large for all cases tested.

Shook, G.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Target preparations and thickness measurements  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of isotope target preparative methods have been used, including rolling of metals, vapor deposition, electrodeposition, chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering, to obtain thin and thick films of most elements or compounds of elements in the Periodic Table. Most thin films prepared for use in self-supported form as well as those deposited on substrates require thickness measurement (atom count and distribution) and/or thickness uniformity determination before being used in nuclear research. Preparative methods are described together with thickness and uniformity determination procedures applicable to samples being prepared (in situ) and to completed samples. Only nondestructive methods are considered applicable to target samples prepared by the ORNL Solid State Division, Isotope Research Materials Laboratory. Thickness or areal density measurements of sufficient sophistication to yield errors of less than +-1 percent have been achieved with regularity. A statistical analysis procedure is applied which avoids error caused by balance zero-point drift in direct weight measurement methods. (auth)

Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Porosity and permeability of Eastern Devonian gas shale  

SciTech Connect

High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight Devonian gas shale samples from the Appalachian basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian Age Huron member of the Ohio shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eight core sample consists of Middle Devonian Age Marcellus shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, WV. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the work has identified a number of geological factors that influence gas production from organic-rich shales. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and gas permeability of the rock matrix is commonly less than 0.1 ..mu..d at reservoir stress. The Marcellus shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10%, and a surprisingly high permeability of 20 ..mu..d. Gas permeability of the Marcellus was highly stress-dependent, however; doubling the net confining stress reduced the permeability by nearly 70%. The conclusion reached from this study is that the gas productivity potential of Devonian shale in the Appalachian basin is influenced by a wide range of geologic factors. Organic content, thermal maturity, natural fracture spacing, and stratigraphic relationships between gray and black shales all affect gas content and mobility. Understanding these factors can improve the exploration and development of Devonian shale gas.

Soeder, D.J.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Porosity and permeability of eastern Devonian gas shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision core analysis has been performed on eight samples of Devonian gas shale from the Appalachian Basin. Seven of the core samples consist of the Upper Devonian age Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, six of which came from wells in the Ohio River valley, and the seventh from a well in east-central Kentucky. The eighth core sample consists of Middle Devonian age Marcellus Shale obtained from a well in Morgantown, West Virginia. The core analysis was originally intended to supply accurate input data for Devonian shale numerical reservoir simulation. Unexpectedly, the results have also shown that there are a number of previously unknown factors which influence or control gas production from organic-rich shales of the Appalachian Basin. The presence of petroleum as a mobile liquid phase in the pores of all seven Huron Shale samples effectively limits the gas porosity of this formation to less than 0.2%, and permeability of the rock matrix to gas is less than 0.1 microdarcy at reservoir stress. The Marcellus Shale core, on the other hand, was free of a mobile liquid phase and had a measured gas porosity of approximately 10% under stress with a fairly strong ''adsorption'' component. Permeability to gas (K/sub infinity/ was highly stress-dependent, ranging from about 20 microdarcies at a net stress of 3000 psi down to about 5 microdarcies at a net stress of 6000 psi. The conclusion reached from this study is that Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin is a considerably more complex natural gas resource than previously thought. Production potential varies widely with geographic location and stratigraphy, just as it does with other gas and oil resources. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Soeder, D.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Production of tectonically caused overpressures in carbonates by using resistivity and bulk density of associated shales  

SciTech Connect

In tectonically caused overpressured carbonate reservoirs associated with thick shale beds (e.g., 50 m and more), several shale properties can be used as predictive techniques: low porosities, high acoustic (sonic) velocities, high resistivities, and high bulk densities. The reason these properties are used is because the greater the degree of overcompaction (due to tectonic forces), the greater the amount of water squeezed from the shales, which, in turn, overpressures the associated reservoirs. Two case studies from the Soviet Union and Iran illustrate this occurrence. For comparison purposes, the prediction of overpressures caused by undercompaction (e.g., due to rapid sedimentation) using conventional overpressure indicators, such as resistivity, acoustic and density logs, and bulk density of shale cuttings, are reviewed and illustrated via a typical Tertiary sand/shale sequence.

Chilingarian, G.V. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA)); Fertl, W.H. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Houston, TX (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Secondary porosity and hydrocarbon reservoirs in Lower-Middle Miocene Sandstones, southern San Joaquin basin, California  

SciTech Connect

Immature lower to middle Miocene marine sandstones constitute important reservoir rocks in many southern San Joaquin basin oil fields. Surface samples from the east and west margins of the basin and subsurface samples from Round Mountain, Belridge, and Coalinga fields were examined. These localities have undergone recurrent uplift since middle Tertiary time and maximum burial probably did not exceed 2500-3000 m. Diagenetic features common to east- and west-side sandstones include phosphatization, early calcite cementation, pressure solution and replacement of silicate grains by calcite cement, framework grain dissolution and creation of secondary porosity, and replacement of biotite and hornblende by chlorite. Differences include recrystallization and dolomitization of early calcite on the west side, and massive carbonate dissolution followed by extensive crushing and pressure solution of silicate grains and late replacement of plagioclase by calcite and calcite by hematite on the east side. Replacement of biotite by chlorite occurred only in the deepest samples on either side of the basin. Basinwide differences in diagenesis reflect different tectonic evolutions between east and west sides of the basin. Local variations in diagenetic patterns are pronounced in all areas and are controlled by initial sediment composition. For example, in one core from Coalinga early calcite cement, recrystallized calcite cement, and dolomitized calcite cement are interbedded over the 60-m interval sampled. Hydrocarbons in all samples reside mainly in secondary pores created by cement and framework-grain dissolution, underscoring the importance of diagenesis in creating reservoirs in this basin.

Horton, R.A. Jr.; Menzie, R.J. Jr.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Support vector regression for porosity prediction in a heterogeneous reservoir: A comparative study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In wells with limited log and core data, porosity, a fundamental and essential property to characterize reservoirs, is challenging to estimate by conventional statistical methods from offset well log and core data in heterogeneous formations. Beyond ... Keywords: Core data, Log data, Neural networks, Porosity estimation, Support vector machines

A. F. Al-Anazi; I. D. Gates

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Characteristics of Porosity in Biomass Chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of pyrolysis temperature (T) in the range of 200-900oC on the characteristics of porosity in biomass chars was investigated. The samples were characterized by N2 isothermal adsorption/desorption method and scanning electron ... Keywords: biomass, pyrolysis, porosity

Peng Fu; Song Hu; Jun Xinag; Lushi Sun; Tao Yang; Anchao Zhang; Yi Wang; Gang Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Rock Physics-Based Carbonate Reservoir Pore Type Evaluation by Combining Geological, Petrophysical and Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pore type variations account for complex velocity-porosity relationship and intensive permeability heterogeneity and consequently low oil and gas recovery in carbonate reservoir. However, it is a challenge for geologist and geophysicist to quantitatively estimate the influences of pore type complexity on velocity variation at a given porosity and porosity-permeability relationship. A new rock physics-based integrated approach in this study was proposed to quantitatively characterize the diversity of pore types and its influences on wave propagation in carbonate reservoir. Based on above knowledge, permeability prediction accuracy from petrophysical data can be improved compared to conventional approach. Two carbonate reservoirs with different reservoir features, one is a shallow carbonate reservoir with average high porosity (>10%) and another one is a supper-deep carbonate reservoir with average low porosity (Permian basin, West Texas. Meanwhile, the complex paleokarst system is explained by using a carbonate platform hydrological model, similar to modern marine hydrological environments within carbonate islands. How to evaluate carbonate reservoir permeability heterogeneity from 3D seismic data has been a dream for reservoir geoscientists, which is a key factor to optimize reservoir development strategy and enhance reservoir recovery. A two-step seismic inversions approach by integrating angle-stack seismic data and rock physics model is proposed to characterize pore-types complexity and further to identify the relative high permeability gas-bearing zones in low porosity reservoir (< 5%) using ChangXing super-deep carbonate reservoir as an example. Compared to the conventional permeability calculation method by best-fit function between porosity and permeability, the results in this study demonstrate that gas zones and non-gas zones in low porosity reservoir can be differentiated by using above integrated permeability characterization method.

Dou, Qifeng

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

Barnitt, Robb Allan

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effects Of Porosity And Mineral Composition On Cement Alteration During Geological Carbon Sequestration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases such as CO2, it is likely that major climate change will occur by the end of the century if… (more)

Brunet, Jean-patrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

System for measuring film thickness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, Paul R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

Lagasse, P.R.

1985-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fermion localization on thick branes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider chiral fermion confinement in scalar thick branes, which are known to localize gravity, coupled through a Yukawa term. The conditions for the confinement and their behavior in the thin-wall limit are found for various different BPS branes, including double walls and branes interpolating between different AdS{sub 5} spacetimes. We show that only one massless chiral mode is localized in all these walls, whenever the wall thickness is keep finite. We also show that, independently of wall's thickness, chiral fermionic modes cannot be localized in dS{sub 4} walls embedded in a M{sub 5} spacetime. Finally, massive fermions in double wall spacetimes are also investigated. We find that, besides the massless chiral mode localization, these double walls support quasilocalized massive modes of both chiralities.

Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); Tempo, Jose David [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); Centro de Estudios Cientificos CECS, Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bryan Pivovar (PI) Bryan Pivovar (PI) National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sept 30, 2009 Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives To assist the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in meeting cost, durability, and performance targets in the areas of Electrocatalysts and MEAs. Approach: Novel Synthesis and Electrode Studies Pt nanotubes (UC-R) Pt coated carbon nanotubes Synthesis of novel catalysts based on extended surfaces due to 3M's demonstrated improvements in specific activity and durability using similar systems. Electrode architecture design, based on novel catalyst structures that allow thick (~10 µm), dispersed electrodes to

79

Thick-thin battery jar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A battery jar is described comprised of side, end and bottom walls wherein the side and end walls are divided into upper, middle and lower sections with the wall thickness in each section being T, T1 and T2, respectively, wherein T2 is greater than T1 and less than T.

Hardigg, J.S.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Optimal Porosity Distribution for Minimized Ohmic Drop across a Porous Electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers the design of spatially varying porosity profiles in next-generation electrodes based on simultaneous optimization of a porous-electrode model. Model-based optimal design (not including the solid-phase ...

Braatz, Richard D.

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81

Carbons for battery anodes prepared using inorganic templates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unique carbons with demonstrated utility as anodes for lithium secondary batteries have been prepared by heating hydrocarbons within an inorganic template. Disordered carbons with novel and desirable molecular porosity were synthesized by the pyrolysis of pyrene at 700 C within a pillared clay. The clay was removed by treatment with acid, leaving behind carbons with 15 to 50 {angstrom} holes. These holey carbons, when converted into electrodes, allow rapid diffusion of the lithium into and out of a carbon. Favorable results have been obtained in several tests, for example, a reversible capacity of 825 mAh/g has been achieved, about four times greater than commercial batteries using convention pyrolytic carbon.

Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Sandi, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Microcellular carbon foam and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control flow capacity. However, recent extensive microscopic studies reveal that there exist massive micro- and nano- pore systems in shale matrices. Because of this, the actual flow mechanisms in shale reservoirs are considerably more complex than can be simulated by the conventional dual porosity models and Darcy’s Law. Therefore, a model capturing multiple pore scales and flow can provide a better understanding of complex flow mechanisms occurring in these reservoirs. Through the use of a unique simulator, this research work establishes a micro-scale multiple-porosity model for fluid flow in shale reservoirs by capturing the dynamics occurring in three separate porosity systems: organic matter (mainly kerogen); inorganic matter; and natural fractures. Inorganic and organic portions of shale matrix are treated as sub-blocks with different attributes, such as wettability and pore structures. In the organic matter or kerogen, gas desorption and diffusion are the dominant physics. Since the flow regimes are sensitive to pore size, the effects of smaller pores (mainly nanopores and picopores) and larger pores (mainly micropores and nanopores) in kerogen are incorporated in the simulator. The separate inorganic sub-blocks mainly contribute to the ability to better model dynamic water behavior. The multiple porosity model is built upon a unique tool for simulating general multiple porosity systems in which several porosity systems may be tied to each other through arbitrary transfer functions and connectivities. This new model will allow us to better understand complex flow mechanisms and in turn to extend simulation to the reservoir scale including hydraulic fractures through upscaling techniques

Yan, Bicheng

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas (NATCARB). (Acknowledgement to the WESTCARB web site at http://www.westcarb.org/index.htm)

85

Self-Assembling Sup-porosity: The Effect On Fluid Flow And Seismic Wave Propagation  

SciTech Connect

Fractures and joints in the field often contain debris within the void spaces. Debris originates from many different mechanisms: organic and/or inorganic chemical reactions/mineralization, sediment transport, formation of a fracture, mechanical weathering or combinations of these processes. In many cases, the presence of debris forms a â??sub-porosityâ? within the fracture void space. This sub-porosity often is composed of material that differs from the fracture walls in mineralogy and morphology. The â??sub-porosityâ? may partially fill voids that are on the order of hundreds of microns and thereby reduce the local porosity to lengths scales on the order of sub-microns to tens of microns. It is quite clear that a sub-porosity affects fracture porosity, permeability and storativity. What is not known is how the existence/formation of a sub-porosity affects seismic wave propagation and consequently our ability to probe changes in the subsurface caused by the formation or alteration of a sub-porosity. If seismic techniques are to be developed to monitor the injection and containment of phases in sequestration reservoirs or the propping of hydraulically induced fracture to enhance oil & gas production, it is important to understand how a sub-porosity within a fracture affects macroscopic seismic and hydraulic measurements. A sub-porosity will directly affect the interrelationship between the seismic and hydraulic properties of a fracture. This reports contains the results of the three main topics of research that were performed (1) to determine the effect of a sub-porosity composed of spherical grains on seismic wave propagation across fractures, (2) to determine the effect of biofilm growth in pores and between grains on seismic wave propagation in sediment, and (3) to determine the effect of the scale of observation (field-of-view) on monitoring alteration the pore space within a fracture caused by reactive flow. A brief summary of the results for each topic is contained in the report and the full details of the research and approach are contained in the publications found in the Attachment section of this report. A list of presentation and publications of all work associated with this grant is also provided.

Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. [Purdue University

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same. The cathode includes a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode has a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

Kaun, T.D.; Mrazek, F.C.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm...

89

Rock compressibility, compaction, and subsidence in a high-porosity Chalk Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

A case study of the North Sea Valhall chalk reservoir demonstrates the significant impact that rock compressibility can have on field performance. Porosity reduction, reservoir interval compaction, and seabed subsidence have been observed in conjunction with reservoir pressure depletion. Full-diameter samples from a recently cut core of the unconsolidated high-porosity chalk were subjected to a series of uniaxial-strain experiments to determine compaction and PV compressibility. The laboratory measurements were corrected to field stress rates and pressure, and porosity-dependent rock-compressibility curves were developed. The uniaxial compaction data were used both in a reservoir model to recognize the significant additional reservoir energy resulting from the lithic drive of large-scale rock compaction and in a subsidence model to predict the impact of reservoir depletion on seabed displacements.

Ruddy, I. (Amoco Norway Oil Co. (US)); Andersen, M.A.; Pattillo, P.D.; Bishiawi, M. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (USA)); Foged, N. (Danish Geotechnical Inst. (US))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Local Atomic Density of Microporous Carbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the structure of two disordered carbons: activated carbon fibers (ACF) and ultramicroporous carbon (UMC). These carbons have highly porous structure with large surface areas and consequently low macroscopic density that should enhance adsorption of hydrogen. We used the atomic pair distribution function to probe the local atomic arrangements. The results show that the carbons maintain an in-plane local atomic structure similar to regular graphite, but the stacking of graphitic layers is strongly disordered. Although the local atomic density of these carbons is lower than graphite, it is only {approx}20% lower and is much higher than the macroscopic density due to the porosity of the structure. For this reason, the density of graphene sheets that have optimum separation for hydrogen adsorption is lower than anticipated.

Dmowski, Wojtek; Contescu, Cristian I.; Llobet, Anna; Gallego, Nidia C.; Egami, Takeskhi (Tennessee-K); (ORNL); (LANL)

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Porosity and Permeability Evolution Accompanying Hot fluid Injection into Diatomite, SUPRI TR-123  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study of silica dissolution was performed to probe the evolution of permeability and porosity in siliceous diatomite during hot fluid injection such as water or steam flooding. Two competing mechanisms were identified. Silica solubility in water at elevated temperature causes rock dissolution thereby increasing permeability; however, the rock is mechanically weak leading to compressing of the solid matrix during injection. Permeability and porosity can decrease at the onset of fluid flow. A laboratory flow apparatus was designed and built to examine these processes in diatomite core samples.

Diabira, I.; Castanier, L.M.; Kovscek, A.R.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

Knudsen-Hydrodynamic Crossover in Liquid 3He in High Porosity Aerogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the drag force acting on a high porosity aerogel immersed in liquid ${}^3$He and its effect on sound propagation. The drag force is characterized by the Knudsen number, which is defined as the ratio of the quasiparticle mean free path to the radius of an aerogel strand. Evidence of the Knudsen-hydrodynamic crossover is clearly demonstrated by a drastic change in the temperature dependence of ultrasound attenuation in 98% porosity aerogel. Our theoretical analysis shows that the frictional sound damping caused by the drag force is governed by distinct laws in the two regimes, providing excellent agreement with the experimental observation.

Takeuchi, H; Nagai, K; Choi, H C; Moon, B H; Masuhara, N; Meisel, M W; Lee, Y; Mulders, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Method of using in situ porosity measurements to place an upper bound on geothermal reservoir compaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Placing an upper bound on reservoir compaction requires placing a lower bound on the reservoir effective compaction modulus. Porosity-depth data can be used to find that lower-bound modulus in a young sedimentary basin. Well-log and sample porosity data from a geothermal field in the Imperial Valley, CA, give a lower-bound modulus of 7.7 x 10{sup 3} psi. This modulus is used with pressure drops calculated for a reservoir to determine an upper bound on reservoir compaction. The effects of partial reinjection and aquifer leakage on upper-bound subsidence estimated from the compaction are illustrated for a hypothetical reservoir and well array.

Schatz, J.F.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Cheney, J.A.

1979-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analysis of porosity in lower Ismay phylloid algal packstone using high-resolution computed x-ray tomography  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional images of porosity were created using high- resolution computed tomographic (CT) analysis as part of a larger study of phylloid algal packstone from bioherms in the lower Ismay (Des Moinesian, Paradox Formation). The sample imaged was collected at Eight Foot Rapids along the San Juan River in southeastern Utah 40 km west of the Aneth field. The larger study includes analysis of lithofacies, diagenesis, and quantitative analysis of porosity. Our goal is to predictively model porosity in phylloid algal reservoirs. Field observations suggest a relationship between porosity and lithology. Porosity is best established in phylloid algal packstone such as the one chosen for three-dimensional imaging. Locally, porosity is also associated with fractures and stylolitization. Petrographic observations suggest that formation of moldic and vuggy porosity in this sample was controlled by multiple episodes of dissolution and infill of blocky calcite. Porosity in thin section (5.94%) was measured using NIH Image (public domain) on a Macintosh desktop computer. High-resolution CT radiography of a 2.3 cm diameters cm high, cylindrical sample generated a series of 110 images at 0.1 mm intervals. Three-dimensional isosurface images of porosity reveal the degree of interconnection, pore size (up to 12 mm long and from 0.5 mm to 7 mm wide), and their highly irregular shape. These images can also be used to create animations of scans through the rock and three-dimensional, rotating images of the pores.

Beall, J.L., Gordon, I.T.; Gournay, J.P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Clean Cast Steel Technology: Effect of Micro-porosity on Tensile and Charpy Properties of Four Cast Steels  

SciTech Connect

The effect of these large shrink cavities on mechanical properties could be easily calculated using well established engineering formulas. Over the years, increases in computational and metallurgical resources have allowed the modeler to improve accuracy and increase the complexity of numerical predictors. An accurate prediction of micro-porosity, not observable using conventional radiographic techniques, and an engineering understanding of the effect on mechanical properties would give a designer confidence in using a more efficient casting design and a lower safety factor. This will give castings an additional design advantage. The goal of this project is to provide current and future modelers/designers with a tensile and Charpy property dataset for validation of micro-porosity predictors. The response of ultimate strength, elongation, and reduction in area to micro-porosity was very similar in all four alloys. Ultimate strength was largely unaffected by tensile fracture surface porosity until values of about 25% were reached and decreased linearly with increasing values. Elongation and reduction in area decreased sharply after less than 5% fracture surface porosity. Niyama values of about 0.7 were produced sound material and acceptable tensile properties. Ultrasonic velocities of 0.233 in/usec and higher produced acceptable tensile properties. Metallographic examination revealed a ratio of 4-6 to 1 in fracture surface porosity to metallographic porosity. Charpy impact properties were largely unaffected by the microporosity concentrations examined in this study and did not correlate to either Niyama values, fracture surface porosity, or metallographic porosity.

Griffin, John, A.; Bates, Charles, E.

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ultrasonic thickness measuring imaging system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system in which an ultrasonic probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area of the tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

Bylenok, P.J.; Patmos, W.M.; Wagner, T.A.; Martin, F.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 455460 Breeder foam: an innovative low porosity solid breeder material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion Engineering and Design 81 (2006) 455­460 Breeder foam: an innovative low porosity solid@ucla.edu (S. Sharafat). breeder pebble beds remains a field of intense R&D for fusion power reactor B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.fusengdes.2005.06.374 #12;456 S. Sharafat et al. / Fusion

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

99

Simple and inexpensive method of wood pellets macro-porosity measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel simplified stereometric measurement method for determining the macro-porosity of wood pellets through geometrical approach was successfully developed and tested. The irregular ends of pellets of circular cross-section were sanded flat so that their geometry becomes cylinder and their volumes evaluated using mensuration formula. Such formed cylindrical pellets were loose or tap filled to selected volumes to evaluate the macro-porosity and the constant specific weight. The method was extended to evaluate actual wood pellets properties. Overall macro-porosity of actual wood pellets was determined as 41.0 2.5% and 35.5 2.7%, mean bulk density as and, and classified as Class-3:Medium and Class-3&4:Medium to Low for loose and tapped fills, respectively. Hausner ratio and Carr s compressibility index classify wood pellets as freely flowing. The developed stereometric method can be used as a handy inexpensive laboratory procedure to estimate the macro-porosity of different types and makes of wood pellets and other similar packaged materials.

Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University; Tumuluru, J.S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lim, C. Jim [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mohammad, E. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Distinguishing Carbonate Reservoir Pore Facies with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of carbonate rocks may involve identifying the important pore types which are present. In the past, this task has required detailed petrographic analysis of many core samples. Here, we describe a method which uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements to reduce the amount of petrographic analysis needed for porosity typing of carbonate reservoir rocks.For a rock sample which has been measured with NMR, our method decomposes the log(T{sub 2}) spectrum into at most three Gaussian-shaped components and gives a set of nine parameters. Two characteristic quantities having geological significance are extracted from the nine parameters. Values of the two quantities are compared with a reference set, established from samples having both NMR and petrographic evaluations of porosity types. We use a Bayesian approach to the classification of the dominant porosity type.Tests of our method on 103 samples show a correct prediction in 60 to 90 percent of the samples. The lower success rate was obtained for samples with five porosity types from three fields; the higher success rate obtained with samples with three porosity types from one well. The use of geologically significant quantities extracted from the decomposition gives comparable success rate to those obtained using a standard, non-geological approach such as canonical variates.

Genty, Coralie [ExxonMobil Production Company (United States); Jensen, Jerry L. [University of Calgary, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (Canada)], E-mail: jjensen@ucalgary.ca; Ahr, Wayne M. [Texas A and M University, Department of Geology and Geophysics (United States)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas permeability of carbon aerogels  

SciTech Connect

Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the aqueous polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and subsequent pyrolysis at 1050 [degree]C. As a result of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell/pore size, and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications such as supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, the permeability of carbon aerogels was calculated from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have permeabilities on the order of 10[sup [minus]12] to 10[sup [minus]10] cm[sup 2] over the density range from 0.05--0.44 g/cm[sup 3]. Like many other aerogel properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density, reflecting differences in the average mesopore size. Comparing the results from this study with the permeability of silica aerogels reported by other workers, we found that the permeability of aerogels is governed by a simple universal flow equation. This paper discusses the relationship between permeability, pore size, and density in carbon aerogels.

Kong, F.; LeMay, J.D.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

jPOR: An ImageJ macro to quantify total optical porosity from blue-stained thin sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast and effective method has been developed to measure total optical porosity (TOP) of blue resin-impregnated thin sections. This utilises a macro file (jPOR.txt) for ImageJ, which can be used on digital photomicrographs of thin sections. The method ... Keywords: Image analysis, Image processing, Operator error, Petrology, Point count, Porosity

Clayton Grove; Dougal A. Jerram

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A New Definition on Fractal Porous Rock Damage Variable and Study on Evolution Characteristics of Porosity-permeability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considered the fractal characteristic of rock with porosity structure, a rock damage variable which describes rock damage of the reservoir of fractal structure with hydraulic fracturing is defined, and this damage variable that describes the state of ... Keywords: hydraulic fracturing, damage variable, fractal, porosity pore structure, permeability evolving

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting; Ai Chi; Sun Chengyan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Localizing gravity on exotic thick 3-branes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider localization of gravity on thick branes with a nontrivial structure. Double walls that generalize the thick Randall-Sundrum solution, and asymmetric walls that arise from a Z{sub 2} symmetric scalar potential, are considered. We present a new asymmetric solution: a thick brane interpolating between two AdS{sub 5} spacetimes with different cosmological constants, which can be derived from a 'fake supergravity' superpotential, and show that it is possible to confine gravity on such branes.

Castillo-Felisola, Oscar [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Ramirez, Alba [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Acoustic impedance inversion of the Lower Permian carbonate buildups in the Permian Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonate reservoirs are usually diffcult to map and identify in seismic sections due to their complex structure, lithology and diagenetic frabrics. The Midland Basin, located in the Permian Basin of West Texas, is an excellent example of these complex carbonate structures. In order to obtain a better characterization and imaging of the carbonate buildups, an acoustic impedance inversion is proposed here. The resolution of the acoustic impedance is the same as the input seismic data, which is greatly improved with the addition of the low frequency content extracted from well data. From the broadband volume, high resolution maps of acoustic impedance distributions were obtained, and therefore the locations of carbonate buildups were easily determined. A correlation between acoustic impedance and porosity extracted from well data shows that areas with high acoustic impedance were correlated with low porosity values, whereas high porosities were located in areas of low acoustic impedance. Theoretical analyses were performed using the time-average equation and the Gassmann equation. These theoretical models helped to understand how porosity distributions affect acoustic impedance. Both equations predicted a decrease in acoustic impedance as porosity increases. Inversion results showed that average porosity values are 5% [plus or minus] 5%, typical for densely cemented rocks. Previous studies done in the study area indicate that grains are moderately to well-sorted. This suggests that time-average approximation will overestimate porosity values and the Gassmann approach better predicts the measured data. A comparison between measured data and the Gassmann equation suggests that rocks with low porosities (less than 5%) tend to have high acoustic impedance values. On the other hand, rocks with higher porosities (5% to 10%) have lower acoustic impedance values. The inversion performed on well data also shows that the ?uid bulk modulus for currently producing wells is lower than in non-productive wells, (wells with low production rates for brine and hydrocarbons), which is consistent with pore ?uids containing a larger concentration of oil. The acoustic impedance inversion was demonstrated to be a robust technique for mapping complex structures and estimating porosities as well. However, it is not capable of differentiating different types of carbonate buildups and their origin.

Pablo, Buenafama Aleman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluating the presence of porosity in Brazilian archaeological pottery associating x-radiography and PIXE  

SciTech Connect

X-Radiography technique has been used effectively for decades to evaluate and identify differences in homogeneities in samples. It is a simple, fast and non-destructive technique that provides a view of internal structure helping investigating manufacturing details of archaeological ceramics. Characteristics of the paste used in the matrix composition can be derived using PIXE technique through the determination of the major elemental composition allowing the calculation of its expected density. Combining this information with x-ray images is possible to check for differences in the average density of material indicating the presence of homogeneously distributed porosity or temper. The present work evaluates the porosity in a set of native Brazilian pottery sherds that were collected in the Aldeia Lalima archaeological site, located at Mato Grosso do Sul State.

Curado, J. F.; Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Postal 66318, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Method for making surfactant-templated, high-porosity thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An evaporation-induced self-assembly method to prepare a surfactant-templated thin film by mixing a silica sol, a surfactant, and a hydrophobic polymer and then evaporating a portion of the solvent during coating onto a substrate and then heating to form a liquid-phase, thin film material with a porosity greater than approximately 50 percent. The high porosity thin films can have dielectric constants less than 2 to be suitable for applications requiring low-dielectric constants. An interstitial compound can be added to the mixture, with the interstitial compound either covalently bonded to the pores or physically entrapped within the porous structure. The selection of the interstitial compound provides a means for developing thin films for applications including membranes, sensors, low dielectric constant films, photonic materials and optical hosts.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Lu, Yunfeng (San Jose, CA); Fan, Hongyou (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings  

SciTech Connect

Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed and tested using the results of the permeability experiments. The permeability model for flow parallel to the columnar dendrites predicted the experimental permeability results closely when the liquid volume fraction data from equilibrium calculations were used. The permeability gradient model was constructed in order to test the impact of interdendritic channel constriction on the flow of liquid through the mushy zone of a casting. The model examines two different regimes: (i) Dendritic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in liquid volume fraction and dendrite arm spacing, and (ii) Eutectic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in viscosity of eutectic mixture. It is assumed that the eutectic mixture behaves like a slurry whose viscosity increases with increasing solid fraction. It is envisioned that this model can be developed into a tool that can be very useful for metal casters.

Albany Research Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electrochemical Performance of Graphene as Effected by Electrode Porosity and Graphene Functionalization  

SciTech Connect

Graphene-based electrodes have recently gained popularity due to their superior electrochemical properties. However, the exact mechanisms of electrochemical activity are not yet understood. Here, we present data from NADH oxidation and ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe experiments to demonstrate that both (i) the porosity of the graphene electrodes, as effected by the packing morphology, and (ii) the functional group and the lattice defect concentration play a significant role on their electrochemical performance.

Punckt, Christian; Pope, Michael A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Aksay, Ilhan A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Means and method for reducing carbon dioxide to a product  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for reducing carbon dioxide to a product comprising the steps of: providing carbon dioxide to a catholyte chamber of a reaction cell; providing water to an anolyte section of the reaction cell, forming a passageway through the reaction cell with a dual porosity cathode between the passageway and catholyte chamber and with a porous anode between the passageway and anolyte chamber; provides an electrolyte in a manner so that it passes through the passageway; and provides a direct current voltage across the dual porosity cathode and anode so as to cause a reduction of the carbon dioxide in cooperation with the electrolyte and hydrogen ions passing through the anode. This passes to a product contained within the electrolyte and causes oxygen to be emitted from the anolyte chamber.

Ang, P.G.P.; Sammels, A.F.

1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Thick-Shell Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous

113

Cloud Optical Thickness Estimation from Irradiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer algorithms are developed to estimate the optical thickness of clouds using an irradiance detector located above, deep within, and beneath a cloud. Both monodirectional and diffuse illumination cases are considered. For each ...

H. C. Yi; N. J. McCormick; R. Sanchez

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

115

Properties of CO2-Rich Pore Fluids and Their Effect on Porosity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description While...

116

Acoustic logging through casing to detect hydrocarbons and determine porosity in the Wilmington Field, CA  

SciTech Connect

The Wilmington Field, located in the Los Angeles Basin, CA, is composed of relatively unconsolidated turbiditic sands waterflooded for more than 40 years. As is common in this and other oil fields in California and elsewhere, considerable bypassed oil remains in place. The water-oil ratio from one well selectively completed in high-oil saturation sands is significantly lower than the water-oil ratio in adjacent wells. We have begun a 2-year test program to identify sands with high remaining oil saturations by logging old cased wells using a high power low frequency acoustic logging tool as part of a project co-funded by the Department of Energy (DOE PON PS22-94BC14972). Formation compressional-wave velocity is obtained from monopole data. Formation shear-wave velocity is obtained by analyzing dipole wave modes. In some wells, however, problems associated with poor cement-casing and cement-formation bond, casing eccentricity in the well, and tool eccentricity in the casing make it difficult to detect the dipole mode. Where good data has been obtained, compressional-wave velocities determined in the same cased hole from logs recorded by two different companies agree quite well, as do open- and cased-hole compressional and shear-wave velocities. Porosities determined through casing using shear-wave velocities match conventional open-hole log values. Saturations determined from the velocities and their ratio are similar to those calculated using Archie's Law. Relationships between porosities, saturations, and velocities are consistent with theoretical expectations. The results indicate that it is possible to determine porosity and saturation through casing using acoustic methods even in relatively unconsolidated sands such as those found in the Wilmington Field, provided sufficiently good monopole and dipole waveforms can be obtained.

Moos, D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Hooks, A. (MPI, Houston, TX (United States)); Walker, S. (Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effect of porosity on resistance of epoxy coatings to cold-wall blistering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities use polymer coatings for corrosion protection in a variety of locations, such as cooling towers, water boxes, and tubesheets. In some cases, these coatings are vulnerable to failure in areas where a temperature gradient exists between a cold substrate and relatively warm fluid (cold-wall blistering). Six epoxy-based coating systems were tested for their resistance to degradation in the form of cold wall blistering. The coatings were applied to type 1010 steel substrates and exposed to heated water for up to 10 months in Atlas test cells as a modified version of NACE Standard TM0174. The performance of the coatings was measured by the exposure time for the coatings to start blistering, the time for the corrosion potential of the coating substrates to shift toward active values, and the delamination rate of the coatings. Good cold-wall blistering resistance was observed for two polyamine-cured epoxy coating systems with porosity levels 1 vol%. Poor cold-wall blistering resistance was shown by a polyamide epoxy system, an amine adduct epoxy system, and an amido-amine epoxy system, all of which had porosity levels > 1 vol%. Most of the coating samples exhibited linear blistering rates, which indicated that the kinetics of cold-wall blistering were diffusion controlled. The two coating systems that showed the best resistance to cold-wall blistering also showed the lowest blistering rates, indicating that these coatings may have had lower permeabilities and/or better adherences than the poorer performing coatings, probably as a result of their lower porosity levels and similar compositions.

Kosek, J.R.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.  

SciTech Connect

A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

Aagesen, Larry K. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Madison, Jonathan D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Electrical properties of geothermal reservoir rocks as indicators of porosity distribution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the electrical resistivity of metashales from borehole SB-15-D in The Geyers geothermal area at a variety of conditions in the laboratory provide information regarding the distribution of porosity as interpreted from observations of boiling as downstream pore pressure. Electrical resistivity measurements on core,with and without pore pressure control, to confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150 C allow assessment of the separate and combined effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature for rocks from this borehole.

Duba, A.; Roberts, J.; Bonner, B.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

STUDY OF PROPANE ADSORPTION ISOTHERM ON PURIFIED HIPCO SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Isotherms of one atom thick film of adsorption for propane on purified Hipco single-walled carbon nanotube were experimentally studied at 6 different temperatures ranging from… (more)

Furuhashi, Toyohisa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance  

SciTech Connect

Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 ?m, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

B. R. Marshall

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

124

Deepwater Gulf of Mexico turbidites -- Compaction effects on porosity and permeability  

SciTech Connect

The deepwater Gulf of Mexico is now a major area of activity for the US oil industry. Compaction causes particular concern because most prospective deepwater reservoirs are highly geo-pressured and many have limited aquifer support; water injection may also be problematic. To address some of the issues associated with compaction, the authors initiated a special core-analysis program to study compaction effects on turbidite sand porosity and permeability specifically. This program also addressed a number of subsidiary but no less important issues, such as sample characterization and quality, sample preparation, and test procedures. These issues are particularly pertinent, because Gulf of Mexico turbidites are generally unconsolidated, loose sands, and are thus susceptible to a whole array of potentially serious core-disturbing processes. One key result of the special core analysis program is that turbidite compressibilities exhibit large variations in both magnitude and stress dependence. These variations correlate with creep response in the laboratory measurements. The effects of compaction on permeability are significant. To eliminate complicating effects caused by fines movement, the authors made oil flow measurements at initial water saturation. The measurements indicate compaction reduces permeability four to five times more than porosity on a relative basis.

Ostermeier, R.M.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Investigation of Micro Porosity Sintered wick in Vapor Chamber for Fan Less Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro Porosity Sintered wick is made from metal injection molding processes, which provides a wick density with micro scale. It can keep more than 53 % working fluid inside the wick structure, and presents good pumping ability on working fluid transmission by fine infiltrated effect. Capillary pumping ability is the important factor in heat pipe design, and those general applications on wick structure are manufactured with groove type or screen type. Gravity affects capillary of these two types more than a sintered wick structure does, and mass heat transfer through vaporized working fluid determines the thermal performance of a vapor chamber. First of all, high density of porous wick supports high transmission ability of working fluid. The wick porosity is sintered in micro scale, which limits the bubble size while working fluid vaporizing on vapor section. Maximum heat transfer capacity increases dramatically as thermal resistance of wick decreases. This study on permeability design of wick structure is 0.5 - 0.7, especially permeability (R) = 0.5 can have the best performance, and its heat conductivity is 20 times to a heat pipe with diameter (Phi) = 10mm. Test data of this vapor chamber shows thermal performance increases over 33 %.

C. S. Yu; W. C. Wei; S. W. Kang

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Understanding and engineering interfacial charge transfer of carbon nanotubes and graphene for energy and sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene is a one-atom thick planar monolayer of sp2 -bonded carbon atoms organized in a hexagonal crystal lattice. A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be thought of as a graphene sheet rolled up into a seamless ...

Paulus, Geraldine L. C. (Geraldine Laura Caroline)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

129

A Prognostic Relationship for Entrainment Zone Thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thickness of the entrainment zone at the top of the atmospheric mixed layer is analyzed using measurements made with a ground-based lidar during the BLX83 and CIRCE field programs. When the entrainment-zone depth normalized by mixed-layer ...

Eric Nelson; Roland Stull; Edwin Eloranta

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The center conjecture for thick spherical buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that a convex subcomplex of a spherical building of type E7 or E8 is a subbuilding or the group of building automorphisms preserving the subcomplex has a fixed point in it. Together with previous results of Muehlherr-Tits, and Leeb and the author, this completes the proof of Tits' Center Conjecture for thick spherical buildings.

Ramos-Cuevas, Carlos

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Free Energy of thick Center Vortices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The free energy of thick center vortices is calculated in continuum Yang-Mills theory in one-loop approximation using the proper time regularization. The vortices are represented by Abelian gauge field configurations on the torus which satisfy twisted boundary conditions.

Ch. Korn; H. Reinhardt; T. Tok

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

Estimating local thickness for finite element analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the development of motor vehicles, crash safety is one of the most important attributes. To comply with the ever increasing requirements of shorter cycle times and costs reduction, car manufacturers keep intensifying the use of virtual development ... Keywords: FEA mesh, automotive crash simulations, ray tracing, structural modelling, thickness estimation

Vânio Ferreira; Luís Paulo Santos; Ricardo Simoes; Markus Franzen; Omar O. Ghouati

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Double layer capacitance of carbon foam electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have evaluated a wide variety of microcellular carbon foams prepared by the controlled pyrolysis and carbonization of several polymers including: polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), divinylbenzene/methacrylonitrile (DVB), phenolics (furfuryl/alcohol), and cellulose polymers such as Rayon. The porosity may be established by several processes including: Gelation (1-5), phase separation (1-3,5-8), emulsion (1,9,10), aerogel/xerogel formation (1,11,12,13), replication (14) and activation. In this report we present the complex impedance analysis and double layer charging characteristics of electrodes prepared from one of these materials for double layer capacitor applications, namely activated cellulose derived microcellular carbon foam.

Delnick, F.M.; Ingersoll, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Firsich, D. [EG& G Mound Lab., Miamisburg, OH (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Functional networks as a new data mining predictive paradigm to predict permeability in a carbonate reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability prediction has been a challenge to reservoir engineers due to the lack of tools that measure it directly. The most reliable data of permeability obtained from laboratory measurements on cores do not provide a continuous profile along the ... Keywords: Carbonate reservoir, Data mining, Feedforward neural networks, Functional networks, Fuzzy logic, Minimum description length, Permeability, Porosity, Statistical regression

Emad A. El-Sebakhy; Ognian Asparouhov; Abdul-Azeez Abdulraheem; Abdul-Aziz Al-Majed; Donghui Wu; Kris Latinski; Iputu Raharja

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Observation and analysis of a pronounced permeability and porosity scale-effect in unsaturated fractured tuff  

SciTech Connect

Over 270 single-hole (Guzman et d., 1996) and 44 cross-hole pneumatic injection tests (Illman et al., 1998; Illman, 1999) have been conducted at the Apache Leap Research Site (ALRS) near Superior, Arizona. They have shown that the pneumatic pressure behavior of fractured tuff at the site is amenable to analysis by methods which treat the rock as a continuum on scales ranging from meters to tens of meters, and that this continuum is representative primarily of interconnected fractures. Both the single-hole and cross-hole test results are free of skin effect. Single-Role tests have yielded estimates of air permeability at various locations throughout the tested rock volume, on a nonind support scale of about 1 m. The corresponding log permeability data exhibit. spatial behavior characteristic of a random fractal and yield a kriged estimate (Fig. 1) of how these 1-m scale log permeabilities vary in three-dimemional space (Chen et al., 2000). Cross-hole tests have been analyzed by means of a thee-dimensional inverse model (Vesselinov et al., 2000) in two ways: (a) by interpreting pressure 1n:ccirds from individual borehole monitoring intervals, one at a time, while treating the rock as if it was spatially uniform; and (b) by using the inverse model to interpret pressure records from multiple tests and borehole monitoring intervals simultaneously, while treating the rock as a random fractal characterized by a power variogram. The first approach has yielded equivalent air permeabilities and air-filled porosities for a rock volume characterized by a length-scale of several tens of meters. Comparable results have been obtained by means of type-curves (Illman and Neuman, 2001). The second approach mounts to three-tlimensional pneumatic tomography, or stochastic imaging, of the rock. It has yielded a high-resolution geostatistical estimate of how air permeability and air-filled porosity, defined over grid blocks having a length-scale of 1 m, vary throughout the modeled rock volume (Fig.2). These tomographic images are compwable to those obtained by the kriging of 1-rn scale log permeability data from single-hole tests (Fig. 1). The results reveal a highly pronounced scale effect in permeability and porosity at the ALRS. We analyze the scaling of permeability at the site on ihe basis of a recent theory, which is consistent with our representation of the rack as a random fractal.

Illman, W. A. (Walter A.); Hyun, Y. (Yunjung); Neuman, S. P.; Di Federico, V. (Vittorio); Tartakovsky, D. M. (Daniel M.); Vesselinov, V. V. (Velimir V.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

SciTech Connect

During the 1980's, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an Aerocapacitor''; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m[sup 2]/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm[sup 3] and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The aerocapacitor: A carbon aerogel based supercapacitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1980`s, a wide variety of carbon foams, formed by the pyrolysis of polymeric foams, were developed at several Department of Energy Laboratories. These foams are known for their monolithic structure and the ability to tailor their critical parameters (e.g. porosity, density). Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) exclusively developed a unique type of carbon foam, known as carbon aerogels. Carbon aerogels are a special class of open-cell foams with (1) homogeneous ultrafine particle and pore size, (2) very large useful surface area per unit volume, and (3) monolithic structure, that yields (4) excellent electrical conductivity due to the intimate connection of the particles. We have applied carbon aerogels to make an ``Aerocapacitor``; a high power- and energy-density electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC) that uses carbon aerogels as electrodes. Carbon aerogel surface areas range from about 100 to 700 m{sup 2}/cc (as measured by BET analysis), with bulk densities of 0.05 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and their morphology allows stored energy to be released rapidly, resulting in high power-densities.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Robust Numerical Simulation of Porosity Evolution in Chemical Vapor Infiltration III: Three Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the carbon/silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite, the preform, which is a porous array of carbon fibers the two- dimension model proposed in [15][16], where the fiber surface is mod- eled as an evolving) is an important and widely used tech- nology for fabricating fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite (CMC

Jin, Shi

139

On Constitutive Equations and Effective Stress for Deformable, Double Porosity Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tuncay and Corapcioglu [1995] used volume averaging methods to derive an effective stress principle for the bulk volumetric strain in a deformable double-porosity medium. The coefficients of the matrix pore pressure and fracture pore pressure in their equation for the effective stress are shown to be identical to those which can be obtained from the constitutive equation approach of Berryman and Wang (1995). Representative values for a fractured Berea sandstone show that a change in pore pressure within matrix blocks produces about 10% of the volume change due to an equal but opposite change in confining pressure, whereas the same change in pore pressure within fractures is about 90% as effective. A similar result is true for Westerly granite. 1 Introduction The theory of poroelasticity lies at the intersection of mechanics of porous media and fluid flow within porous media. As a consequence, papers dealing with poroelasticity appear in journals that appeal primarily to one or the oth...

Herbert F. Wang; James G. Berryman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

METALLICITY GRADIENTS OF THICK DISK DWARF STARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the metallicity distribution of the Galactic thick disk using F, G, and K dwarf stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 8. Using the large sample of dwarf stars with proper motions and spectroscopically determined stellar parameters, metallicity gradients in the radial direction for various heights above the Galactic plane and in the vertical direction for various radial distances from the Galaxy center have been found. In particular, we find a vertical metallicity gradient of -0.113 {+-} 0.010 (-0.125 {+-} 0.008) dex kpc{sup -1} using an isochrone (photometric) distance determination in the range 1 kpc solar neighborhood. Metallicity gradients in the thin and thick disks are important probes into possible formation scenarios for our Galaxy and a consistent picture is beginning to emerge from results using large spectroscopic surveys, such as the ones presented here.

Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Zhao Gang, E-mail: carrell@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Solar absorption in thick and multilayered glazings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thick and multilayered glazings generally have a nonuniform distribution of absorbed solar radiation which is not taken into account by current methods for calculating the center of glass solar gain and thermal performance of glazing systems. This paper presents a more accurate method for calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside thick and multilayered glazings and demonstrates that this can result in a small but significant difference in steady-state temperature profile and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient for some types of glazing systems when compared to the results of current methods. This indicates that a more detailed approach to calculating the distribution of absorbed solar radiation inside glazings and resulting thermal performance may be justified for certain applications.

Powles, Rebecca; Curcija, Dragan; Kohler, Christian

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ultrasonic thickness testing of aging offshore structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of this thesis concern the use of ultrasonic thickness (UT) testing for use in the offshore industry. Evidence from prior studies conducted at Texas A&M University suggests that the corrosion on the surface of offshore structural members is not distributed in a random fashion. It was therefore desired to study the matter more extensively to 1) determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic thickness measurements for assessment of corroded members in offshore structures, 2) determine the amount of data needed for meaningful assessment, and 3) identify any common patterns of corrosion in offshore structural members, which might be used in designing a more effective assessment protocol. First, three specimens from an earlier study were available for use here. These "Riverside Specimens'' were subjected to extensive UT measurements. An important statistical tool, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), was used to determine the probability that thickness variations along the length and around the circumference of each member could be a random event. Both longitudinal and circumferential non-random variations were found in some of these members. A study of reduced sample size confirmed that reduction of data caused more uncertainty in the results. Next, a field study was conducted on recently salvaged offshore jackets in Morgan City, LA. Six tubular bracing specimens (three horizontal, three diagonal) near the splash zone were evaluated. The statistical evidence for corrosion trends was found to be rather weak. Nonetheless, it was possible to make certain generalizations. In particular, the outside facing sections tend to be the most corroded (thinnest), while the surfaces toward the center of the structure tend to be the least corroded (thickest). This also agrees with industry observations. Finally, the effect of sample size on the detection of strength loss was observed. Using some basic assumptions regarding sample mean and standard deviation, it was shown that even with greatly reduced numbers of measurement points, one may still obtain reasonable estimates of critical thickness values corresponding to certain strength loss ratios.

Ellison, Brian Kirk

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates  

SciTech Connect

Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on carbonate reservoirs of widely varying moldic pore systems that represent the major of reservoirs in Kansas and are important nationally and worldwide. A goal of the project is to measure wettability, using representative oils from Kansas fields, on a wide range of moldic-porosity lithofacies that are representative of Kansas and midcontinent shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs. This investigation will discern the relative influence of wetting and pore architecture. In the midcontinent, reservoir water saturations are frequently greater than 'irreducible' because many reservoirs are largely in the capillary transition zone. This can change the imbibition oil-water relative permeability relations. Ignoring wettability and transition-zone relative permeabilities in reservoir modeling can lead to over- and under-prediction of oil recovery and recovery rates, and less effective improved recovery management. A goal of this project is to measure drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeabilities for a large representative range of lithofacies at differ ent initial water saturations to obtain relations that can be applied everywhere in the reservoir. The practical importance of these relative permeability and wettability models will be demonstrated by using reservoir simulation studies on theoretical/generic and actual reservoir architectures. The project further seeks to evaluate how input of these new models affects reservoir simulation results at varying scales. A principal goal is to obtain data that will allow us to create models that will show how to accurately simulate flow in the shallow-structure, complex carbonate reservoirs that lie in the transition zone. Tasks involved to meet the project objectives include collection and consolidation of available data into a publicly accessible relational digital database and collection of oil and rock samples from carbonate fields around the state (Task 1). Basic properties of these rocks and oils will be measured and used in wettability tests. Comparison will be performed between crude and synthetic oil wettability and

Alan P. Byrnes; Saibal Bhattacharya; John Victorine; Ken Stalder

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

146

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

147

Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene  

SciTech Connect

Patterned, continuous carbon fibers with controlled surface geometry were produced from a novel melt-processible carbon precursor. This portends the use of a unique technique to produce such technologically innovative fibers in large volume for important applications. The novelties of this technique include ease of designing and fabricating fibers with customized surface contour, the ability to manipulate filament diameter from submicron scale to a couple of orders of magnitude larger scale, and the amenable porosity gradient across the carbon wall by diffusion controlled functionalization of precursor. The geometry of fiber cross-section was tailored by using bicomponent melt-spinning with shaped dies and controlling the melt-processing of the precursor polymer. Circular, trilobal, gear-shaped hollow fibers, and solid star-shaped carbon fibers of 0.5 - 20 um diameters, either in self-assembled bundle form, or non-bonded loose filament form, were produced by carbonizing functionalized-polyethylene fibers. Prior to carbonization, melt-spun fibers were converted to a char-forming mass by optimizing the sulfonation on polyethylene macromolecules. The fibers exhibited distinctly ordered carbon morphologies at the outside skin compared to the inner surface or fiber core. Such order in carbon microstructure can be further tuned by altering processing parameters. Partially sulfonated polyethylene-derived hollow carbon fibers exhibit 2-10 fold surface area (50-500 m2/g) compared to the solid fibers (10-25 m2/g) with pore sizes closer to the inside diameter of the filaments larger than the sizes on the outer layer. These specially functionalized carbon fibers hold promise for extraordinary performance improvements when used, for example, as composite reinforcements, catalyst support media, membranes for gas separation, CO2 sorbents, and active electrodes and current collectors for energy storage applications.

Hunt, Marcus A [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Rebecca H [ORNL; Kumbhar, Amar S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, and mineral composition is an integral part of unconventional shale reservoir formation evaluation. Porosity requirement for economically viable flow of gas in very-low permeability shales. Brittle shales are favorable

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

150

Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

A dual-porosity reservoir model with an improved coupling term  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new dual-porosity model is developed for single-phase flow in fractured/porous media. As in the commonly-used approach, flow is assumed to take place through the fracture network, and between the fractures and matrix blocks. The matrix blocks are treated in a lumped-parameter manner, with a single average pressure used for each matrix block. However, instead of assuming that fracture/matrix flux is proportional to the difference between the fracture pressure and matrix pressure at each point, as in the Warren-Root model, a nonlinear equation is used which accurately models the flux at both early and late times. This flux equation is verified against analytical solutions for spherical blocks with prescribed pressure variations on their boundaries. This equation is then used as a source/sink term in the numerical simulator TOUGH. The modified code allows more accurate simulations than the conventional Warren-Root method, and with a large savings in computational time compared to methods which explicitly discretize the matrix blocks.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Chen, G.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Pyrolysis of tire rubber: Porosity and adsorption characteristics of the pyrolytic chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tire rubber has been pyrolyzed at various temperatures under a nitrogen atmosphere. The resulting chars have been analyzed for their porosity using nitrogen gas adsorption and for their aqueous adsorption characteristics using phenol, methylene blue, and the reactive dyes Procion Turquoise H-A and Procion Red H-E3B. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were modeled to the BET and Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equations to determine effective surface areas, mesopore volumes, and micropore volumes. Results showed that pyrolysis of tire rubber was essentially complete at 500 C and resulted in a char yield of approximately 42 wt%. Pyrolytic chars exhibited BET surface areas up to 85 m{sup 2}/g and micropore volumes up to 0.04 mL/g. Owing to their poorly developed micropore structure, the pyrolytic chars exhibited limited aqueous adsorption capacity for compounds of small molecular weight, such as phenol. However, the chars possessed significantly greater adsorption capacity for species of large molecular weight which was attributed to the presence of large mesopore volumes (up to 0.19 mL/g).

Miguel, G.S.; Fowler, G.D.; Sollars, C.J. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes. Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division Date and Time: Sunday, February 13, 2005 ~ 8:30 am-5:00 pm

154

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET ...

155

Radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness  

SciTech Connect

A radiation phantom comprising a body with a general humanoid shape and at least a portion having an adjustable thickness. In one embodiment, the portion with an adjustable thickness comprises at least one tissue-equivalent slice.

Lehmann, Joerg (Pleasanton, CA); Levy, Joshua (Salem, NY); Stern, Robin L. (Lodi, CA); Siantar, Christine Hartmann (Livermore, CA); Goldberg, Zelanna (Carmichael, CA)

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Piezoelectric Thick-Film Structures for High-Frequency Transducer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dielectric, mechanical and piezoelectric parameters of selected thick films will be ... and Their Electrochemical Performance for Energy Storage Applications

157

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

158

Confined-unconfined changes above longwall coal mining due to increases in fracture porosity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence and strata movement above longwall (total extraction) coal mines produce complex hydrologic responses that can occur independently of drainage to the mine. One response is dewatering from confined to unconfined conditions in bedrock aquifers as a result of loss of water into new void space created by fracture and bedding separations. This dewatering process has been little studied but accounts for several hydraulic and geochemical effects of longwall mining. This article presents a conceptual model of the process and reviews evidence from case studies. Confined bedrock aquifers in subsiding zones exhibit dramatically steep head drops because of the low value of confined storage coefficients relative to the volume of water drained into the new fracture void space. The aquifer changes rapidly to an unconfined condition. Tight units to which air entry is restricted may even develop negative water pressures. In the unconfined state, sulfide minerals present in the strata readily oxidize to soluble hydrated sulfates. When the aquifer re-saturates, these salts are rapidly mobilized and produce a flush of increased sulfate and total dissolved solids (TDS) levels. Observations made in our previous studies in Illinois are consistent with the confined-unconfined model and include rapid head drops, changes to unconfined conditions, and increases in sulfate and TDS during re-saturation of a sandstone aquifer. Studies reported from the Appalachian coalfield show aspects consistent with the model, but in this high-relief fractured setting it is often difficult to distinguish aquifers from aquitards, confined from unconfined states, and the fracture-porosity cause of head drops from several others that occur during mine subsidence.

Booth, C.J. [North Illinois University, De Kalb, IL (USA). Dept. of Geology & Environmental Geoscience

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Determination of porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simonsâ ’ stain and NMR techniques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

porosity porosity of lignocellulosic biomass before and after pretreatment by using Simons' stain and NMR techniques Xianzhi Meng a , Marcus Foston a,1 , Johannes Leisen b , Jaclyn DeMartini c , Charles E. Wyman c , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,⇑ a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th Street, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and Technology, University of California, Riverside, BioEnergy Science Center, Riverside, CA 92507, USA h i g h l i g h t s  Cellulose accessibility was tested by Simons' stain and multiple NMR techniques.  Pretreatment increases the pore size and overall surface area of the

160

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

162

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Separate effects of surface roughness, wettability and porosity on boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux and optimization of boiling surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The separate effects of surface wettability, porosity, and roughness on critical heat flux (CHF) and heat transfer coefficient (HTC) were examined using carefully-engineered surfaces. All test surfaces were prepared on ...

O'Hanley, Harrison Fagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thick planar domain wall: its thin wall limit and dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a planar gravitating thick domain wall of the $\\lambda \\phi^4$ theory as a spacetime with finite thickness glued to two vacuum spacetimes on each side of it. Darmois junction conditions written on the boundaries of the thick wall with the embedding spacetimes reproduce the Israel junction condition across the wall in the limit of infinitesimal thickness. The thick planar domain wall located at a fixed position is then transformed to a new coordinate system in which its dynamics can be formulated. It is shown that the wall's core expands as if it were a thin wall. The thickness in the new coordinates is not constant anymore and its time dependence is given.

S. Ghassemi; S. Khakshournia; R. Mansouri

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Generalized triangle inequalities in thick Euclidean buildings of rank 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give the generalized triangle inequalities which determine the possible vector valued side lengths of n-gons in thick Euclidean buildings of rank 2.

Ramos-Cuevas, Carlos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Numerical Investigation of Residual Stress in Thick Titanium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 22, 2010 ... thick welded components with EBW is very difficult, especially for .... Because the welded plate is symmetrical about the weld centerline, only ...

167

Effects of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic carbon deposited in a fluidized bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-density, isotropic pyrolytic carbon layer beneath the silicon carbide (IPyC) plays a key role in the irradiation performance of coated particle fuel. The IPyC layer protects the kernel from reactions with chlorine during deposition of the SiC layer, provides structural support for the SiC layer, and protects the SiC from fission products and carbon monoxide. The process conditions used by the Germans to deposit the IPyC coating produced a highly isotropic, but somewhat permeable IPyC coating. The permeability of the IPyC coating was acceptable for use with the dense German UO{sub 2} kernels, but may not be suitable when coating UCO kernels. The UCO kernels are typically more porous and thus have a larger surface area than UO{sub 2} kernels. The lower density and the higher surface area of UCO kernels could make them more susceptible to attack by HCl gas during the silicon carbide (SiC) coating process, which could result in heavy metal dispersion into the buffer and IPyC coatings and a higher level of as-manufactured SiC defects. The relationship between IPyC deposition conditions, permeability, and anisotropy must be understood and the appropriate combination of anisotropy and permeability for particle fuel containing UCO kernels selected. A reference set of processing conditions have been determined from review of historical information and results of earlier coating experiments employing 350 and 500 {micro}m UO{sub 2} kernels. It was decided that a limited study would be conducted, in which only coating gas fraction (CGF) and temperature would be varied. Coatings would be deposited at different rates and with a range of microstructures. Thickness, density, porosity and anisotropy would be measured and permeability evaluated using a chlorine leach test. The results would be used to select the best IPyC coating conditions for use with the available natural enrichment uranium carbide/uranium oxide (NUCO) kernels. The response plots from the investigation of the deposition of pyrolytic carbon in a fluidized bed graphically depict the relationships between processing parameters and coating properties. The additional figures present optical, scanning electron microscopy, and other images to highlight microstructural details. For the study, only two parameters (factors), coating gas fraction and deposition temperature, were varied. The plots reveal obvious trends and links between factors and responses. The dominant relationships determined by this study for this range of coating conditions are: (1) rate is dependent upon coating gas fraction or in other terms, reactant concentration; (2) density is controlled by deposition temperature; (3) efficiency is influenced by both CGF and temperature; (4) anisotropy is affect by CGF and temperature, however, the relationship is more complex than for other properties; (5) permeability is dependent upon deposition temperature (thus density); and (6) open porosity is affect by CGF thus is influenced by coating rate. The response plots can be used as 'maps' for the deposition process and are thus valuable for selecting coating conditions necessary to produce desired combinations of properties. The information is useful in predicting the effects of changes to processing on properties and is beneficial in optimizing the process and product properties. Although the study was limited to only two parameters, the information provides a foundation from which other aspects of the coating process can be more easily investigated.

Lowden, Richard Andrew [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Improving dual-porosity simulation of waterflood performance in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we have discussed the methods of analyzing the waterflood performance of the O'Daniel waterflood pilot in the Spraberry Trend Area with the help of reservoir simulation. Spraberry Trend Area is considered to be one of the richest oil fields in the world. However, out of 6-10 billion bbls of original oil only 700 million bbls have been produced. In an effort to increase recovery, several waterflood pilots were conducted in Spraberry beginning in the late 1950's. Because of profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, waterflooding has been only moderately successful, and billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain unrecovered. A recent waterflood pilot study started in 1995 with dramatically different results. The pilot was conducted in the O'Daniel unit of the Spraberry. The recovery in this lease has exceeded 25% of the original oil in place, compared to only 10% recovery in the entire Spraberry. Data from the current waterflood clearly shows that on-trend wells which are outside the pilot and along the major fracture trend responded favorably. In the previous waterflood pilots in Spraberry, the producer located off-trend from the water injectors received all the attention and the response in the on-trend wells was overlooked. In this study, we have developed a waterflood pattern for Spraberry where the target wells for waterflood response will be the on-trend producers. A successful waterflood depends on properly positioning the injectors and producers. In fractured reservoirs, fracture location, orientation and permeability dictates the placing of injection and production wells. So, to understand the fracture distribution, the main intention behind this thesis is to develop a method to determine location, orientation and permeability of fractures in Spraberry by using reservoir simulation. We performed three simulation studies: Humble pilot waterflood, O'Daniel tracer analysis and O'Daniel pilot waterflood. The first two simulation studies were performed with simple two-well models. The fracture orientation and permeability ratio obtained in these models were applied to the full field O'Daniel pilot that consists of 59 wells in about 8500-acre area. Our simulation model shows that a concept of fracture enhancement (grid-blocks with high fracture permeability) in the dual-porosity model is necessary to capture the effect of heterogeneity of fracture network. The major fracture orientation obtained from the simulation is very close to the one obtained from the interference test and horizontal core analysis. The results of this study could be used in determining an optimum waterflood pattern suitable for that area to forecast oil production with different scenarios such as, infill drilling, CO2 injection, horizontal wells etc. Finally, the results of this work will provide a method to assess the economic feasibility of large-scale water injection in the remainder of the field.

Chowdhury, Tanvir

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

170

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Carbon particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Scalable Thick-Film Magnetics: Nano Structured Scalable Thick-Film Magnetics  

SciTech Connect

ADEPT Project: Magnetic components are typically the largest components in a power converter. To date, however, researchers haven't found an effective way to reduce their size without negatively impacting their performance. And, reducing the size of the converter's other components isn't usually an option because shrinking them can also diminish the effectiveness of the magnetic components. GE is developing smaller magnetic components for power converters that maintain high performance levels. The company is building smaller components with magnetic films. These films are created using the condensation of a vaporized form of the magnetic material. It's a purely physical process that involves no chemical reactions, so the film composition is uniform. This process makes it possible to create a millimeter-thick film deposition over a wide surface area fairly quickly, which would save on manufacturing costs. In fact, GE can produce 1-10 millimeter-thick films in hours. The magnetic components that GE is developing for this project could be used in a variety of applications, including solar inverters, electric vehicles, and lighting.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

174

Production and characterization of activated carbons from cereal grains  

SciTech Connect

The term, activated carbon, is a generic name for a family of carbonaceous materials with well-developed porosities and consequently, large adsorptive capacities. Activated carbons are increasingly being consumed worldwide for environmental applications such as separation of volatiles from bulk gases and purification of water and waste-water streams. The global annual production is estimated to be around 300 million kilograms, with a rate of increase of 7% each year. Activated carbons can be prepared from a variety of raw materials. Approximately, 60% of the activated carbons generated in the United States is produced from coal; 20%, from coconut shells; and the remaining 20% from wood and other sources of biomass. The pore structure and properties of activated carbons are influenced by the nature of the starting material and the initial physical and chemical conditioning as well as the process conditions involved in its manufacture. The porous structures of charcoals and activated carbons obtained by the carbonization of kernels have been characterized.

Venkatraman, A.; Walawender, W.P.; Fan, L.T. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50°C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Method for fabricating thin films of pyrolytic carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for fabricating ultra-thin films of pyrolytic carbon. Pyrolytic carbon is vapor deposited onto a concave surface of a heated substrate to a total uniform thickness in the range of about 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer. The carbon film on the substrate is provided with a layer of adherent polymeric resin. The resulting composite film of pyrolytic carbon and polymeric resin is then easily separated from the substrate by shrinking the polymeric resin coating with thermally induced forces.

Brassell, Gilbert W. (Lenoir City, TN); Lewis, Jr., John (Oak Ridge, TN); Weber, Gary W. (Amherst, NY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Method for fabricating thin films of pyrolytic carbon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for fabricating ultrathin films of pyrolytic carbon. Pyrolytic carbon is vapor deposited onto a concave surface of a heated substrate to a total uniform thickness in the range of about 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer. The carbon film on the substrate is provided with a layer of adherent polymeric resin. The resulting composite film of pyrolytic carbon and polymeric resin is then easily separated from the substrate by shrinking the 10 polymeric resin coating with thermally induced forces.

Brassell, G.W.; Lewis, J. Jr.; Weber, G.W.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification of pore type and origin in a Lower Cretaceous carbonate reservoir using NMR T2 relaxation times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the distribution of porosity and permeability is one of the main challenges in carbonate petroleum reservoir characterization and requires a thorough understanding of pore type and origin, as well as their spatial distributions. Conventional studies of carbonate reservoirs require interpretation and analysis of cores to understand porosity. This study investigates the use of NMR logs in the determination of pore type and origin. This study is based on the analysis of both thin section petrographic and NMR data from a single well that cored the Lower Cretaceous (Aptian) shelf carbonates belonging to the Shuaiba Formation of the Middle East. Photographs of thin sections were used to determine pore type and origin according to Ahr's genetic classification of carbonate porosity. Descriptive statistics and modeling were used to analyze the NMR T2relaxation time distributions. Descriptive statistical analyses included estimating arithmetic average, standard deviation, skewness, median, mode and 90th percentile. T2modeling was performed by fitting multiple log-normal distributions to the measured T2distribution. Data from thin section petrography and from NMR measurements were then compared using conditional probabilities. As expected, thin section analysis revealed the predominance of mud-supported fabrics and micropores between matrix grains Vugs and dissolved rudistid fragments account for most of the macro porosity. Descriptive statistics showed that the mode and th percentile of the T2distribution had the greatest power to discriminate pores by origin. The first principal component (PC1) of the mode-90th percentile system was then used to compute the probabilities of having each pore origin, knowing that PC1 belongs to a given interval. Results were good, with each origin being predictable within a certain range of PC1. Decomposition of the T2distributions was performed using up to 3 log-normal component distributions. Samples of different pore origin behaved distinctively. Depositional porosity showed no increase in fit quality with increasing number of distributions whereas facies selective and diagenetic porosity did, with diagenetic porosity showing the greatest increase.

Lodola, Domenico Domenico

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Force criterion prediction of damage for carbon/epoxy composite panels impacted by high velocity ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system and class of layups (quasi-isotropic), delaminationunidirectional carbon/epoxy layup 6.15 mm thick. The FEAhaving quasi-isotropic layup [0/45/90/-45] s , [0/45/90/-45

Rhymer, Jennifer D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbon&oldid271960" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

182

Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

184

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

185

Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous (black) Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In these shales, natural gas occurs in the intergranular and fracture porosity and is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO2 is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO2. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine both CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO2 displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO2 adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton in the more organic-rich zones. There is a direct linear correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO2 adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial volumetric estimates based on these data indicate a CO2 sequestration capacity of as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. In the Big Sandy Gas Field area of eastern Kentucky, calculations using the net thickness of shale with 4 percent or greater total organic carbon, indicate that 6.8 billion tonnes of CO2 could be sequestered in the five county area. Discounting the uncertainties in reservoir volume and injection efficiency, these results indicate that the black shales of Kentucky are a potentially large geologic sink for CO2. Moreover, the extensive occurrence of gas shales in Paleozoic and Mesozoic basins across North America make them an attractive regional target for economic CO2 storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall; Cortland F. Eble; James A. Drahovzal; R. Marc Bustin

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Structural Evolution of Carbon During Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs iOn the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and rnicroporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, C02 and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be "hidden" or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and C02 surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM studies has confined that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering,. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

Adel F. Sarofim; Angelo Kandas

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

THOR—Cloud Thickness from Offbeam Lidar Returns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom is that lidar pulses do not significantly penetrate clouds having an optical thickness exceeding about ? = 2, and that no returns are detectible from more than a shallow skin depth. Yet optically thicker clouds of ? ? 2 ...

Robert F. Cahalan; Matthew McGill; John Kolasinski; Tamás Várnai; Ken Yetzer

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Estimation of Cirrus Optical Thickness from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to estimate the optical thickness of cirrus clouds from ground-based sun photometry. Transfer calculations of solar radiation in ice clouds were made by the Monte Carlo method. A scattering phase function presented by Takano ...

Masataka Shiobara; Shoji Asano

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Consistent 4D cortical thickness measurement for longitudinal neuroimaging study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and reliable method for measuring the thickness of human cerebral cortex provides powerful tool for diagnosing and studying of a variety of neuro-degenerative and psychiatric disorders. In these studies, capturing the subtle longitudinal changes ...

Yang Li; Yaping Wang; Zhong Xue; Feng Shi; Weili Lin; Dinggang Shen

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Benefits of the Multiple Echo Technique for Ultrasonic Thickness Testing  

SciTech Connect

Much effort has been put into determining methods to make accurate thickness measurements, especially at elevated temperatures. An accuracy of +/- 0.001 inches is typically noted for commercial ultrasonic thickness gauges and ultrasonic thickness techniques. Codes and standards put limitations on many inspection factors including equipment, calibration tolerance and temperature variations. These factors are important and should be controlled, but unfortunately do not guarantee accurate and repeatable measurements in the field. Most technicians long for a single technique that is best for every situation, unfortunately, there are no 'silver bullets' when it comes to nondestructive testing. This paper will describe and discuss some of the major contributors to measurement error as well as some advantages and limitations of multiple echo techniques and why multiple echo techniques should be more widely utilized for ultrasonic thickness measurements.

Elder, J.; Vandekamp, R.

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method for reducing coke oven carbonization pressure  

SciTech Connect

A method of reducing the carbonization pressure in the coking of coal is provided which comprises randomly dispersing flakes through the coal, said flakes formed of a material that does not pass through a plastic phase such as pressed sawdust wherein the flakes have a thickness of between about 1/8 '' and about 3/4 '' and a length and width of between about 1'' and about 5''.

Perch, M.

1981-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermal spray and cold spray analysis of density, porosity, and tensile Specimens for use with LIGA applications  

SciTech Connect

This analysis provides a preliminary investigation into using Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray and Cold Spray as material deposition processes for LIGA applications. These spray material processes were studied to make an initial determination of their potential as alternatives to producing mechanical parts via the electroplating process. Three materials, UltraMachinable{reg_sign} Stainless Steel, BondArc{reg_sign}, and aluminum, were sprayed using Thermal Spray. Only aluminum was sprayed using the Cold Spray process. Following the spray procedure, the test specimens were released from a copper mold and then tested. Three tests, density, tensile strength, and porosity, were performed on the specimens to determine the spray effect on material properties. Twin-Wire Arc Thermal Spray did not demonstrate adequate deposition properties and does not appear to be a good process candidate for LIGA. However, Cold Spray yielded better density results and warrants further investigation to analyze the minimum feature size produced by the process.

DECKER,MERLIN K.; SMITH,MARK F.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A high-porosity limit for the transition from conductive to convective burning in gas-permeable explosives  

SciTech Connect

The experimentally known phenomenon of an abrupt transition from slow conductive to fast convective (penetrative) burning in a confined gas-permeable explosive is discussed. A simple model, involving only the most essential physical ingredients, is formulated and analyzed. In addition to commonly utilized assumptions of the solid-gas thermal equilibrium, validity of Darcy's law, immobility of the solid phase, and one-step Arrhenius kinetics, the model employs the distinguished limit combining high-porosity with high solid/gas density ratio, resulting in conservation of enthalpy, advantageous for theoretical analysis. A good qualitative agreement between theoretical and experimental dependencies is obtained. The transition is triggered by a localized autoignition in the extended resistance-induced preheat zone formed ahead of the advancing deflagration, provided the pressure difference between hot gas products and gases deep inside the pores of the unburned solid exceeds a certain critical level. In line with observations the critical overpressure increases with diminishing permeability. (author)

Kagan, Leonid; Sivashinsky, Gregory [Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although carbonates hold more than 60 percent of the world's oil reserves, they, nevertheless, exhibit much lower average recovery factor values than terrigenous sandstone reservoirs. Thus, utilization of advanced enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research utilizes an elastic parameter, defined in a rock physics model of poroelasticity and so-­called as the frame flexibility factor, to successfully quantify the carbonate pore types in core samples available from the Great Bahama Bank (GBB). This study shows that for carbonate samples of a given porosity the lower the frame flexibility factors the higher is the sonic wave velocity. Generally, samples with frame flexibility values of 4 are rocks with intercrystalline and microporosity. Hence, different carbonate pore geometries can be quantitatively predicted using the elastic parameters capable of characterizing the porous media with a representation of their internal structure on the basis of the flexibility of the frame and pore connectivity. In this research, different fluid substitution scenarios of liquid and gaseous CO2 saturations are demonstrated to characterize the variations in velocity for carbonate-specific pore types. The results suggest that the elastic response of CO2 flooded rocks is mostly governed by pore pressure conditions and carbonate rock types. Ultrasonic P-­wave velocities in the liquid-­phase CO2 flooded samples show a marked decrease in the order of 0.6 to 16 percent. On the contrary, samples flooded with gaseous-­phase CO2 constitute an increase in P-­wave velocities for moldic and intraframe porosities, while establishing a significant decrease for samples with intercrystalline and micro-­porosities. Such velocity variations are explained by the stronger effect of density versus compressibility, accounting for the profound effect of pore geometries on the acoustic properties in carbonates. The theoretical results from this research could be a useful guide for interpreting the response of time-­lapse seismic monitoring of carbonate formations following CO2 injection at depth. In particular, an effective rock-­physics model can aid in better discrimination of the profound effects of different pore geometries on seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates.

Mammadova, Elnara

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture. Author(s), Stephen C. Hawkins,  ...

198

Carbon Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations...Vancouver Island, BC, Canada Rural marine 13 0.5 Detroit, MI Industrial 14.5 0.57 Fort Amidor Pier, CZ Marine 14.5 0.57 Morenci, MI Urban 19.5 0.77 Potter County, PA Rural 20 0.8 Waterbury, CT Industrial 22.8 0.89 State College, PA Rural 23 0.9 Montreal, QC, Canada Urban 23 0.9 Durham, NH Rural 28 1.1...

199

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

200

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Small angle x-ray scattering studies of carbon anodes used in lithium rechargeable batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In ANL laboratories, disordered carbons with predictable surface area and porosity properties have been prepared using inorganic templates containing well defined pore sizes. The carbons have been tested in electrochemical cells as anodes in lithium secondary batteries. They deliver high specific capacity and display excellent performance in terms of the number of cycles run. In situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) during electrochemical cycling was carried out at the Advanced Photon Source, at ANL. In order to monitor the carbon electrode structural changes upon cycling, an electrochemical cell was specially designed to allow for the application of electrical current and the collection of SAXS data at the same time. Results show that upon cycling the structure of the carbon remains unchanged, which is desirable in reversible systems.

Sandi, G.; Carrado, K. A.; Winans, R. E.; Seifert, S.; Johnson, C. S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling  

SciTech Connect

The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

Smith, D.H.; Powell, V. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Ibrahim, E. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Ferer, M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ahmadi, G. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Near independence of OLED operating voltage on transport layer thickness  

SciTech Connect

We report organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with weak drive voltage dependence on the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL) for thicknesses up to 1150 Å using the N,N?-Bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N?-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (?-NPD) and N,N'-bis(3-methyl phenyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'diamine (TPD), both of which have hole mobilities in the range of 2 × 10-3 cm2V-1s-1. Lower mobility HTL materials show larger operating voltage dependence on thickness. The near independence of the operating voltage for high mobility transport material thickness was only observed when the energy barrier for charge injection into the transport material was minimized. To ensure low injection barriers, a thin film of 2-(3-(adamantan-1-yl)propyl)-3,5,6-trifluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F3TCNQ-Adl) was cast from solution onto the ITO surface. These results indicate that thick transport layers can be integrated into OLED stacks without the need for bulk conductivity doping.

Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang (Frank) [Frank; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Novel attributes in scaling issues of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, we present a scaling study of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) using a two-dimensional model. We investigate the scaling issues in device performance focusing on transconductance characteristics, output characteristics, ... Keywords: CNTFET, Capacitance model, Carbon nanotube diameter, Gate oxide thickness

Zahra Arefinia; Ali A. Orouji

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Study of semantic features of dimensional adjective Cu 'thick' in mandarin chinese  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu 'thick' is an adjective which is used to describe an object's spatial dimension of thickness. Cu 'thick' used to describe cylindrical objects shares the same sense in essence with Cu 'thick' used to describe granular objects, ... Keywords: Cu 'thick', dimensional adjective, semantic features

Ying Wu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spray Shadowing For Stress Relief And Mechanical Locking In Thick  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials » Advanced Materials » Spray Shadowing For Stress Relief And Mechanical Locking Spray Shadowing For Stress Relief And Mechanical Locking In Thick Protective Coatings A method for applying a protective coating on an article. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Spray Shadowing For Stress Relief And Mechanical Locking In Thick Protective Coatings A method for applying a protective coating on an article, comprising the following steps: selecting an article with a surface for applying a coating thickness; creating undercut grooves on the article, where the grooves depend beneath the surface to a bottom portion with the grooves having an upper width on the surface and a lower width on the bottom portion connected by side walls, where at least one of the side walls connects the

207

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

208

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

210

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

Perdieu, Louisa H. (Overland Park, KS)

2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

212

Some thick brane solutions in $f(R)$-gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thick brane model is considered in $f(R)\\sim R^n$ gravity. It is shown that regular asymptotically anti-de Sitter solutions exist in some range of values of the parameter $n$. A peculiar feature of this model is the existence of a fixed point in the phase plane where all solutions start, and the brane can be placed at this point. The presence of the fixed point allows to avoid fine tuning of the model parameters to obtain thick brane solutions.

V. Dzhunushaliev; V. Folomeev; B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of Carbon-Rod Reinforced Crippling Strength Specimens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the crippling strength of carbon-rod reinforced specimens are presented. One-Edge-Free and No-Edge-Free crippling specimens with width-to-thickness ratios of 6.8 to 27 and 12.6 to 45, respectively, ...

Baker Donald J.; Rousseau Carl Q.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

KINETICS OF FLY ASH BENEFICIATION BY CARBON BURNOUT  

SciTech Connect

Surface area analyses performed on fly ash samples reveal that the surface area is controlled by carbon content. The higher surface areas found in large particles are due to the presence of highly porous carbonaceous particles. Adsorption-desorption isotherms and t-plots of fly ash samples indicate that fly ash is porous. BJH Adsorption/Desorption pore size analysis reveal that pore diameters are independent of sieve size. They appear to be dependent only on the nature of the material which confers porosity. Based on the results of Brown and Dykstra (41) it is reasonable to assume that calculations of reaction rates at temperatures above 550 C were confounded by weight losses from processes other than carbon oxidation and, therefore, are not useful in determination of the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. The results of the present study indicate that temperatures below 550 C should be used for future studies in order to satisfactorily assess the temperature dependence of carbon oxidation in fly ash. Furthermore, it is also advisable that percent carbon determinations be performed on fly ash samples after the oxidation reactions to determine whether all carbon present in fly ash is oxidized. This will ensure that reaction rates are representative of the complete oxidation of carbon. An inverse relationship was determined between reaction rates and oxygen concentration for this study. As discussed, this may be due to volatilization of volatiles from fly ash and ease of transport of products away from the reaction sites by the action of the vacuum applied to the samples. A more accurate determination of oxygen dependence of carbon oxidation can be accomplished by the use of specialty gases containing different concentrations of oxygen which could eliminate the need to apply vacuum to the samples.

Dr. Joseph N.D. Dodoo; Dr. Joseph M. Okoh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites, Methods of Making Carbon ...  

This technology describes methods to fabricate supercapacitors using aligned carbon nanotubes that are decorated with metal oxide or nitride ...

216

DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program Charles E. Schmidt Carbon Sequestration Product Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory David J. Beecy Director, Office of Environmental Systems...

217

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

218

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July of group schemes 8 2.6 Monitoring 9 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 9 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon

219

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.1 July.6 Monitoring 8 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 8 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 9 3. Carbon sequestration 10 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 10 3.2 Carbon baseline 10 3.3 Carbon leakage 11 3.4 Project

220

Predicting Daily Maximum Temperatures Using Linear Regression and Eta Geopotential Thickness Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between forecast geopotential thickness and observed maximum temperature is investigated, and regression equations are calculated using numerical model thickness forecasts for Nashville. Model thickness forecast accuracy is shown ...

Darrell R. Massie; Mark A. Rose

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design of thermal imprinting system with uniform residual thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new thermal imprinting system for the printed circuit boards (PCBs) with both large areas and fine conducting lines was developed adopting hot airs with a high pressure. Several small nickel stamps were used to cover the large area, and the stamps ... Keywords: Patterned circuit boards, Thermal imprinting system, Uniformity of residual thickness

Won-Ho Shin

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon Nanosheets and Nanostructured Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-321  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon nanosheet thin films were employed as nanostructured electrodes in organic solar cells. Due to the nanostructured texture of the carbon nanosheet electrodes, there was an increase in performance over standard ITO electrodes with very thick active layers. ZnO deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used as a hole blocking layer to provide for carrier selectivity of the carbon nanosheets.

Olson, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformities in Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thicknesses for the membrane and catalyst layer. Figure 2.of dry membrane (a) and catalyst-layer (b) thickness (andhollow symbols) and catalyst-layer (filled symbols)

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Completion methods in thick, multilayered tight gas sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tight gas sands, coal-bed methane, and gas shales are commonly called unconventional reservoirs. Tight gas sands (TGS) are often described as formations with an expected average permeability of 0.1mD or less. Gas production rates from TGS reservoirs are usually low due to poor permeability. As such, state-of-the-art technology must be used to economically develop the resource. TGS formations need to be hydraulically fractured in order to enhance the gas production rates. A majority of these reservoirs can be described as thick, multilayered gas systems. Many reservoirs are hundreds of feet thick and some are thousands of feet thick. The technology used to complete and stimulate thick, tight gas reservoirs is quite complex. It is often difficult to determine the optimum completion and stimulating techniques in thick reservoirs. The optimum methods are functions of many parameters, such as depth, pressure, temperature, in-situ stress and the number of layers. In multilayered reservoirs, it is important to include several sand layers in a single completion. The petroleum literature contains information on the various diversion techniques involved in the completion of these multilayered reservoirs. In this research, we have deduced and evaluated eight possible techniques that have been used in the oil and gas industry to divert multilayered fracture treatments in layered reservoirs. We have developed decision charts, economic analyses and computer programs that will assist completion engineers in determining which of the diversion methods are feasible for a given well stimulation. Our computer programs have been tested using case histories from the petroleum literature with results expressed in this thesis. A limited entry design program has also being developed from this research to calculate the fluid distribution into different layers when fracture treating multilayered tight gas reservoirs using the limited entry technique. The research is aimed at providing decision tools which will eventually be input into an expert advisor for well completions in tight gas reservoirs worldwide.

Ogueri, Obinna Stavely

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

228

Mechanomutable Carbon Nanotube Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Polymer Nanocomposites. Presentation Title, Mechanomutable Carbon ...

229

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon/lambda-MnO{sub 2} composites for supercapacitor electrodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work a composite of carbon with lambda-MnO{sub 2} have been synthesized by a simple two-step route. In the first step, to obtain LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/carbon material, mesoporous activated carbon was impregnated with the solution of precursor metal salts and heated subsequently. As-prepared materials were acid treated which resulted in the formation of lambda-MnO{sub 2}/carbon. Physical properties, structure and specific surface area of electrode materials were studied by TEM, X-ray diffraction and nitrogen sorption measurements. Voltammetry cycling, galvanostatic charge/discharge and impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in two- and three-electrode cells have been applied in order to measure electrochemical parameters. TEM images confirmed well dispersed lambda-MnO{sub 2} particles on the surface of carbon material. The carbon in the composite plays an important role as the surface area enhancing component and a support of pseudocapacitive material. Furthermore, the through-connected porosity serves as a continuous pathway for electrolyte transport. A synergetic effect of the porous carbon framework and of the redox properties of the lambda-MnO{sub 2} is at the origin of improvement of specific capacitance values which has been observed for composites after delithiation. - Comparison of capacitance characteristics for initial carbon and synthesised composites for CB in 1 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution.

Malak-Polaczyk, A., E-mail: agnieszka-malak@wp.p [Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3, 60-695 Poznan (Poland); Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, CNRS LRC 7228, 15 Rue Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse (France); Matei-Ghimbeu, C.; Vix-Guterl, C. [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, CNRS LRC 7228, 15 Rue Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse (France); Frackowiak, E. [Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3, 60-695 Poznan (Poland)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration: The fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide in a carbon sink through biological or physical processes. Carbon Sink: ...

234

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Carbon Capture and Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration...

235

Porosity and Nanostructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that by starting with a homogeneous and isotropic ... organic phase on lithium ion transport and mechanical rigidity of these network structures .

236

The Turbulence Power Spectrum in Optically Thick Interstellar Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fourier power spectrum is one of the most widely used statistical tools to analyze the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the interstellar medium. Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) predicted that the spectral slope should saturate to -3 for an optically thick medium and many observations exist in support of their prediction. However, there have not been any numerical studies to-date testing these results. We analyze the spatial power spectrum of MHD simulations with a wide range of sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers, which include radiative transfer effects of the $^{13}$CO transition. We confirm numerically the predictions of Lazarian & Pogosyan (2004) that the spectral slope of line intensity maps of an optically thick medium saturates to -3. Furthermore, for very optically thin supersonic CO gas, where the density or CO abundance values are too low to excite emission in all but the densest shock compressed gas, we find that the spectral slope is shallower than expected from the column density....

Burkhart, Blakesley; Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin  

SciTech Connect

A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

Marra, John J; McNamee, Sara

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Effects of buffer thickness on ATW blanket performance.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of target and buffer design studies for liquid metal cooled accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, aimed at maximizing the source importance while simultaneously reducing the irradiation damage to fuel. Using 840 MWt liquid metal cooled ATW designs, the effects of buffer thickness on the blanket performance have been studied. Varying the buffer thickness for a given blanket configuration, system performance parameters have been estimated by a series of calculations using the MCNPX and REBUS-3 codes. The effects of source importance variation are studied by investigating the low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutron source distribution and the equilibrium cycle blanket performance parameters such as fuel inventory, discharge burnup, burnup reactivity loss, and peak fast fluence. For investigating irradiation damage to fuel, the displacements per atom (dpa), hydrogen production, and helium production rates are evaluated at the buffer and blanket interface where the peak fast fluence occurs. Results for the liquid-metal-cooled designs show that the damage rates and the source importance increase monotonically as the buffer thickness decreases. Based on a compromise between the competing objectives of increasing the source importance and reducing the damage rates, a buffer thickness of around 20 cm appears to be reasonable. Investigation of the impact of the proton beam energy on the target and buffer design shows that for a given blanket power level, a lower beam energy (0.6 GeV versus 1 GeV) results in a higher irradiation damage to the beam window. This trend occurs because of the increase in the beam intensity required to maintain the power level.

Yang, W. S.; Mercatali, L.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

242

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

243

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon Fibers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fibers in Lightweight Systems for Wind Energy and Automotive Applications: Availability and Challenges for the Future Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon...

245

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Developmen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction...

246

Carbon Ion Pump for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

coal fired power plants; oil or gas fired power plants; cement production; bio-fuel combustion; Separation of carbon dioxide from other combustion ...

247

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Carbon Management and Carbon Dioxide Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Gas Stream Component Analysis Techniques and Strategies for Carbon Capture Systems from Oxy-Fuel Combustion (An Overview).

249

Metallic carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NETL: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Carbon Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded cooperative agreements to seven Regional Carbon Sequestration...

251

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

255

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist.

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

259

Abundance trends in the thin and thick disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Milky Way harbours two disks that appear distinct concerning scale-heights, kinematics, and elemental abundance patterns. Recent years have seen a surge of studies of the elemental abundance trends in the disks using high resolution spectroscopy. Here I will review and discuss the currently available data. Special focus will also be put on how we define stars to be members of either disk, and how current models of galaxy formation favour that thick disks are formed from several accreted bodies. The ability for the stellar abundance trends to test such predictions are discussed.

Sofia Feltzing

2004-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

Residual stress measurement and microstructural characterization of thick beryllium films  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium films are synthesized by a magnetron sputtering technique incorporating in-situ residual stress measurement. Monitoring the stress evolution in real time provides quantitative through-thickness information on the effects of various processing parameters, including sputtering gas pressure and substrate biasing. Specimens produced over a wide range of stress states are characterized via transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, in order to correlate the stress data with microstructure. A columnar grain structure is observed for all specimens, and surface morphology is found to be strongly dependent on processing conditions. Analytical models of stress generation are reviewed and discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

Detor, A; Wang, M; Hodge, A M; Chason, E; Walton, C; Hamza, A V; Xu, H; Nikroo, A

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Carbon Footprint and Carbon Deficit Analysis of Iron and Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title ... Study on Capture, Recovery and Utilization of Carbon Dioxide.

262

Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... Polymer Nanocomposites: Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Program ...

263

Carbon Dioxide Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. © C opyright 2009 Carbon Dioxide Compression DOE – EPRI – NIST ... Greenhouse gas sequestration Page 5. 5 © C opyright 2009 ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Carbon Mitigation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sustainable technologies such as CO 2 capture and sequestration (CCS ... property diagnostic tools (under realistic conditions for carbon capture from ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

266

Electrocatalysts on Carbon Nanoparticles  

Carbon nanostructures offer extremely high surface areas and so are attractive candidates to support dispersed catalysts. These nanostructures, ...

267

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land-use changes. When biofuel production increases, land ison carbon releases. If biofuel production does not result in

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Metal-Containing Organic and Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

This document and the accompanying manuscript summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuel cells are important components of the 2003 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative focused on the reduction of America's dependence on oil. To compete with oil as an energy source, however, one must be able to transport and utilize hydrogen at or above the target set by DOE (6 wt.% H{sub 2}) for the transportation sector. Other than liquid hydrogen, current technology falls well short of this DOE target. As a result, a variety of materials have recently been investigated to address this issue. Carbon nanostructures have received significant attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their low molecular weight, tunable microporosity and high specific surface areas. For example, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved 5 to 10 wt.% H{sub 2} storage using metal-doped carbon nanotubes. That study showed that the intimate mix of metal nanoparticles with graphitic carbon resulted in the unanticipated hydrogen adsorption at near ambient conditions. The focus of our LDRD effort was the investigation of metal-doped carbon aerogels (MDCAs) as hydrogen storage materials. In addition to their low mass densities, continuous porosities and high surface areas, these materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because MDCAs contain a nanometric mix of metal nanoparticles and graphitic nanostructures. For FY04, our goals were to: (1) prepare a variety of metal-doped CAs (where the metal is cobalt, nickel or iron) at different densities and carbonization temperatures, (2) characterize the microstructure of these materials and (3) initiate hydrogen adsorption/desorption studies to determine H2 storage properties of these materials. Since the start of this effort, we have successfully prepared and characterized Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogels at different densities and carbonization temperatures. The bulk of this work is described in the attached manuscript entitled 'Formation of Carbon Nanostructures in Cobalt- and Nickel- Doped Carbon Aerogels'. This one-year effort has lead to our incorporation into the DOE Carbon-based Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence at NREL, with funding from DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Program starting in FY05.

Satcher, Jr., J H; Baumann, T F; Herberg, J L

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

CARBON ISOTOPE STRATIGRAPHY AND DIAGENESIS OF PENNSYLVANIAN (DESMOINESIAN-MISSOURIAN) CARBONATES IN EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon isotope stratigraphy of carbonate sediments is instrumental in examining major perturbations in the global carbon cycle and in correlating strata. However, the primary isotopic signal recorded in these sediments can vary with depositional environment and diagenetic alteration. This study examines the carbon isotope stratigraphy and its relation to depositional environment, lithology, and diagenetic history in a section of the 312-307 million year old Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian-Missourian) Snaky Canyon Formation in the Beaverhead Mountains, east-central Idaho. Petrography of 90 thin sections show carbonate rocks ranging from mudstone to boundstone containing variable amounts of eolian siliciclastics with as much as 50% silt to medium sand grains in some samples. The abundance of siliciclastic influx decreases upsection to less than 1% sand and roughly corresponds to an increase in parasequence thickness. Open marine carbonate facies include abundant crinoids, bryozoans, foraminifera, brachiopods, green algae, phylloid algae, and arthropod fragments. Chert, bioturbation features (e.g. burrows), intraclasts, pellets, coarse calcite spar, calcite-filled fractures, and fossil silicification also occur in these rocks. Cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of thin sections reveals a lack of luminescence in nearly all components, suggesting that depositional and diagenetic waters were low in Mn2+ or high in Fe2+. Approximately 130 billets were analyzed to yield 13C/12C and 18O/16O ratios. Fractures have much lower ?18O (-13.9‰)reflecting post-depositional tectonic processes. Most of the isotopic data for micritic components are within -8 to -1‰ for ?18O and -1 to +5‰ for ?13C. Previously reported oxygen isotope values for Pennsylvanian brachiopods from the U.S. Midcontinent are -2.2 ±0.7‰, indicating outlier ?18O values in this study are altered. Most of the isotope data for carbon are within previously reported Pennsylvanian fine grained carbonate ranges of +1 to +5‰. These isotopic values appear to be independent of lithology and percent carbonate; thus, the main controlling influence on the ?13C and ?18O data may be depositional environment. Three significant trends in the ?13C data appear to correspond to thickness and boundaries of stratigraphic parasequences. Isotope values in this study were compared to those of Arrow Canyon,Nevada and showed similar trends for the Desmoinesian but not for the Missourian.

Wood, Stephanie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections December 21, 2012 - 3:15pm Addthis Graphene has properties that could possibly open up the next generation on nanotechnology. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Graphene has properties that could possibly open up the next generation on nanotechnology. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What is graphene? Graphene is a substance made of pure carbon, with atoms arranged in a regular hexagonal pattern similar to graphite, but in a one-atom thick sheet. Everyone has a favorite holiday treat. But what truly makes the season special isn't the tastes or the songs or the scents ... it's the presents. Actually, it's the gatherings with family and friends, the reconnecting

271

Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections Lasting Gifts From Carbon Connections December 21, 2012 - 3:15pm Addthis Graphene has properties that could possibly open up the next generation on nanotechnology. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Graphene has properties that could possibly open up the next generation on nanotechnology. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Lab Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What is graphene? Graphene is a substance made of pure carbon, with atoms arranged in a regular hexagonal pattern similar to graphite, but in a one-atom thick sheet. Everyone has a favorite holiday treat. But what truly makes the season special isn't the tastes or the songs or the scents ... it's the presents. Actually, it's the gatherings with family and friends, the reconnecting

272

Carbon-based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

Y Zhu; S Murali; M Stoller; K Ganesh; W Cai; P Ferreira; A Pirkle; R Wallace; K Cychosz; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Carbon-Based Supercapacitors Produced by Activation of Graphene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supercapacitors, also called ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, store electrical charge on high-surface-area conducting materials. Their widespread use is limited by their low energy storage density and relatively high effective series resistance. Using chemical activation of exfoliated graphite oxide, we synthesized a porous carbon with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of up to 3100 square meters per gram, a high electrical conductivity, and a low oxygen and hydrogen content. This sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon has a continuous three-dimensional network of highly curved, atom-thick walls that form primarily 0.6- to 5-nanometer-width pores. Two-electrode supercapacitor cells constructed with this carbon yielded high values of gravimetric capacitance and energy density with organic and ionic liquid electrolytes. The processes used to make this carbon are readily scalable to industrial levels.

Zhu, Y.; Su, D.; Murali, S.; Stoller, M.D.; Ganesh, K.J.; Cai, W.; Ferreira, P.J.; Pirkle, A.; Wallace, R.M.; Cychosz, K.A., Thommes, M.; Stach, E.A.; Ruoff, R.S.

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical model.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Carbon fiber paper cathodes for lithium ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel lithium ion battery cathode structure was produced which has the potential for excellent capacity retention and good thermal management. In these cathodes, the active cathode material (lithium iron phosphate) was carbon bonded to a thermally and electrically conductive carbon fiber paper (CFP) support. Electrochemical testing was performed on Swagelok cells consisting of CFP cathodes and lithium anodes. High specific energy, near-theoretical capacity, and good cycling performance were demonstrated for 0.11 mm and 0.37 mm thick CFP cathodes.

Kercher, Andrew K [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

Das, Suman

278

Eddy Transport of Thickness and Momentum in Layer and Level Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relation between thickness diffusion in layer and level models is set out. Parameterizations of thickness diffusion are related to a parameterization of eddy effects on momentum. The author anticipates where these parameterizations for ...

Greg Holloway

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A New Apparatus for Monitoring Sea Ice Thickness Based on the Magnetostrictive-Delay-Line Principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-precision ice thickness observations are required to gain a better understanding of ocean–ice–atmosphere interactions and to validate numerical sea ice models. A new apparatus for monitoring sea ice and snow thickness has been developed, ...

Ruibo Lei; Zhijun Li; Yanfeng Cheng; Xin Wang; Yao Chen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mass gap for gravity localized on thick branes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a scalar thick brane configuration arising in a theory of 5D gravity coupled to a self—interacting scalar field. We start from a classical solution of the field equations and study the physics of linear fluctuations around this background which obey a Schrödinger—like equation. We further focus our attention on a special case in which it is possible to solve this equation analytically for any massive mode. This fact allows us to make a closed analysis of the massive spectrum of Kaluza–Klein (KK) excitations and to compute the corrections to Newton’s law in the thin brane limit. There exist two bound states: the massless 4D graviton

N. Barbosa–Cendejas; A. Herrera–Aguilar; U. Nucamendi; I. Quiros; M. A. Reyes Santos; C. Schubert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thick $f(R)$-Brane Solutions in Maximally Symmetric Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present an alternative way of finding thick brane solutions in metric $f(R)$ gravity with a background scalar field. Our main idea is to constrain the bulk curvature as a constant, so that all the dynamical equations reduce to second or even first order ones. To prevent our work from the problem of singularity, we give up the Gaussian normal coordinates. Instead, a more general metric is applied as our set up. The studies we have performed show that as an arbitrary symmetric warp factor $a(y)$ is given, the solution of the background scalar field is determined only by the value of $df(R)/dR$. Different values of $f(R)$ would lead to various types of distribution of the energy density. As another new feature, the kink-like solution of the background scalar field might, but not necessarily connect two extreme points of the scalar potential.

Zhong, Yuan; Yang, Ke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Statistical cloud coverage as a function of cloud optical thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time-averaged, daylight fractional statistical cloud coverages as a function of cloud optical thickness and selected values of cloud transmission were determined for various geographic areas using D1 data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The regions of interest chosen for this report are: global earth, global sea, global land, global coast, and the six 30{degree}-latitude bands over sea, over land, and over coast with longitude 0{degree}--360{degree}. This statistical information is deduced from data determined from satellite measurements of terrestrial, atmospheric and cloud properties by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. In particular the results are based on the ISCCP D1 data base.

Brower, K.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Study on thick-film PTC thermistor fabricated by micro-pen direct writing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Micro-pen direct-write technique has been used to fabricate thick-film PTC thermistor. Thick-film PTC thermistors were fired at 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900^oC. The microstructure and the development of the conductive phase were investigated by optical ... Keywords: Direct writing, Micro-pen, Microstructure, Thick-film PTC thermistor

Zhixiang Cai; Xiangyou Li; Qianwu Hu; Xiaoyan Zeng

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

287

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

288

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

289

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

290

Mesoporous carbon materials  

SciTech Connect

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

292

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Recanati, Catherine

293

Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Folta, James Allen (Livermore, CA); Walton, Christopher Charles (Berkeley, CA)

2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

296

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

297

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

298

Activated carbon material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

Evans, A. Gary (North Augusta, SC)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Production Refineries Etc.... C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 Carbon Sequestration Program Goals * Deliver technologies & best practices that validate:...

300

Carbon Fiber Electronic Interconnects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber is an emerging material in electrical and electronics industry. It has been used as contact in many applications, such as switch, potentiometer, and… (more)

Deng, Yuliang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Capture & Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Energy Department's work to capture and transport CO2 into underground geologic formations, also known as carbon capture and sequestration.

302

Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Carbon Nanomaterials and Heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... This presentation aims to capture those recent research efforts in synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes in Li-ion battery, bioelectronic ...

304

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

305

Carbon Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

306

Digenetic Changes in Macro- to Nano-Scale Porosity in the St. Peter Sandstone:L An (Ultra) Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Backscattered Electron Imagining Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small- and Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS and USANS) provide powerful tools for quantitative analysis of porous rocks, yielding bulk statistical information over a wide range of length scales. This study utilized (U)SANS to characterize shallowly buried quartz arenites from the St. Peter Sandstone. Backscattered electron imaging was also used to extend the data to larger scales. These samples contain significant volumes of large-scale porosity, modified by quartz overgrowths, and neutron scattering results show significant sub-micron porosity. While previous scattering data from sandstones suggest scattering is dominated by surface fractal behavior over many orders of magnitude, careful analysis of our data shows both fractal and pseudo-fractal behavior. The scattering curves are composed of subtle steps, modeled as polydispersed assemblages of pores with log-normal distributions. However, in some samples an additional surface-fractal overprint is present, while in others there is no such structure, and scattering can be explained by summation of non-fractal structures. Combined with our work on other rock-types, these data suggest that microporosity is more prevalent, and may play a much more important role than previously thought in fluid/rock interactions.

Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick [ORNL; Jackson, Andrew [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Littrell, Ken [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Gas transport of oil: It`s impact on sealing and the development of secondary porosity. Annual report, July 1994-June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were completed that show gas capillary sealing can produce completely impermeable zones in strata with multiple sand-shale interfaces. Evidence has been assembled that indicates gas-capillary phenomena are responsible for sealing in the offshore Louisiana Gulf Coast and that these seals exert a fundamental and predictable control on basin fluid flow. The pressure transition zone contains a sufficient number of sand-shale interfaces to explain the sealing by gas-capillary effects. Calculations show that methane streaming past the stacked Block 330 reservoirs could produce the observed vertical chemical zoning. Gas-oil ratios inferred from oil production reported in header logs in the offshore Louisiana Gulf Coast show the increase in gas exolution from the oil at greater depths, and therefore allows deeper sealing. Techniques to model inorganic seal alteration and hydrocarbon chemical zoning caused by venting through a seal were developed. Intra- and sub-seal porosity relations were documented in the SEI Block 330 area that can test models that predict higher sand porosities will be found in these zones if seal migration is inhibited.

Cathles, L.M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

309

The Relative Age of the Thin and Thick Galactic Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the relative ages of the open cluster NGC 188 and selected Hipparcos field stars by isochrone fitting, and compare them to the age of the thick disk globular cluster 47 Tuc. The best fit age for NGC 188 was determined to be $6.5 \\pm 1.0$ Gyr. The solar metallicity Hipparcos field stars yielded a slightly older thin disk age, $7.5 \\pm 0.7$ Gyr. Two slightly metal-poor ($\\feh = -0.22$) field stars whose kinematic and orbital parameters indicate that they are members of the thin disk were found to have an age of $9.7\\pm 0.6$ Gyr. The age for 47 Tuc was determined to be $12.5 \\pm 1.5$ Gyr. All errors are internal errors due to the uncertainty in the values of metallicity and reddening. Thus, the oldest stars dated in the thin disk are found to be $2.8\\pm 1.6$ Gyr younger than 47 Tuc. Furthermore, as discussed by \\citet{Chb99} 47 Tuc has a similar age to three globular clusters located in the inner part of the Galactic halo, implying that star formation in the thin disk started within $2.8\\pm 1.6$ Gyr of star formation in the halo.

Wilson M. Liu; Brian Chaboyer

2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

Nachbar, H.D.

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fiber Bridging Model for Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Professor K. K. Chawla Honorary Symposium on Fibers, Foams and ... fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (

315

Stabilization and carbonization studies of polyacrylonitrile /carbon nanotube composite fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fibers contain more than 90 wt. % carbon. They have low density, high specific strength and modulus, and good temperature and chemical resistance. Therefore,… (more)

Liu, Yaodong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon nanofilaments were grown on the surface of microscale carbon-fibers at relatively low temperature using palladium as a catalyst to create multiscale fiber reinforcing structures… (more)

Garcia, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbon Films Produced from Ionic Liquid Carbon Precursors ...  

The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ...

318

Synthesis of Carbon-Carbon Composite via Infiltration Process of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carbon frame was first pyrolyzed from the wood template. The final composites were then obtained by infiltrating molten coal tar pitch into the carbon frame ...

319

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

320

Optimization of Nano-Carbon Materials for Hydrogen Sorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research undertaken has added to the understanding of several critical areas, by providing both negative answers (and therefore eliminating expensive further studies of unfeasible paths) and positive feasible options for storage. Theoretical evaluation of the early hypothesis of storage on pure carbon single wall nanotubes (SWNT) has been scrutinized with the use of comprehensive computational methods (and experimental tests by the Center partners), and demonstrated that the fundamentally weak binding energy of hydrogen is not sufficiently enhanced by the SWNT curvature or even defects, which renders carbon nanotubes not practical media. More promising direction taken was towards 3-dimensional architectures of high porosity where concurrent attraction of H2 molecule to surrounding walls of nano-scale cavities can double or even triple the binding energy and therefore make hydrogen storage feasible even at ambient or somewhat lower temperatures. An efficient computational tool has been developed for the rapid capacity assessment combining (i) carbon-foam structure generation, (ii) accurate empirical force fields, with quantum corrections for the lightweight H2, and (iii) grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. This made it possible to suggest optimal designs for carbon nanofoams, obtainable via welding techniques from SWNT or by growth on template-zeolites. As a precursor for 3D-foams, we have investigated experimentally the synthesis of VANTA (Vertically Aligned NanoTube Arrays). This can be used for producing nano-foams. On the other hand, fluorination of VANTA did not show promising increase of hydrogen sorption in several tests and may require further investigation and improvements. Another significant result of this project was in developing a fundamental understanding of the elements of hydrogen spillover mechanisms. The benefit of developed models is the ability to foresee possible directions for further improvement of the spillover mechanism.

Yakobson, Boris I [Rice University

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide injection into deep sea sediments below 2700 m water depth and a few hundred meters to fifteen hundred meters deep in the sediment column may provide permanent geologic storage by gravitational trapping. At high pressures and low temperatures common in deep sea sediments a few hundred meters below sea floor, CO{sub 2} will be in its liquid phase and will be denser than the overlying pore fluid. The lower density of the pore fluid provides a cap to the denser CO{sub 2} and ensures gravitational trapping in the short term. The overall storage capacity for CO{sub 2} in such deep sea formations below the ocean floor is primarily determined by the permeability, and will vary with seafloor depth, geothermal gradient, porosity, and pore water salinity. Furthermore, the dissemination of the injected CO{sub 2} in the sediments and potential chemical reactions between CO{sub 2}, pore fluid and sediments will define its fate in the storage reservoir. The main objectives of our research was to evaluate the potential for sub-seabed CO{sub 2} storage in deep sea sediments using a range of approaches including experiments, permeability analysis, and modeling. Over the course of the three-year award, our results support an important role for sub-seabed storage in a diverse portfolio of carbons sequestration options. Our analysis has shown the feasibility of this type of storage, and also emphasizes that escape or leakage from such sites would be negligible. The most difficult challenge is to overcome the low permeability of typical deep-sea sediments, and a variety of approaches are suggested for future research.

Klaus Lackner; Charles Harvey; Bruce Watson

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

322

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

323

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that some extrasolar planets carbon compounds. Pulsar planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

Carbon-free generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon-free generation Carbon-free generation Carbon-free central generation of electricity, either through fossil fuel combustion with carbon dioxide capture and storage or development of renewable sources such as solar, wind, and/or nuclear power, is key to our future energy portfolio. Brookhaven also provides tools and techniques for studying geological carbon dioxide sequestration and analyzing safety issues for nuclear systems. Our nation faces grand challenges: finding alternative and cleaner energy sources and improving efficiency to meet our exponentially growing energy needs. Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory are poised to meet these challenges with basic and applied research programs aimed at advancing the effective use of renewable energy through improved conversion,

325

carbon | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

carbon Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities carbon cities CO2...

326

Nonlinearity of Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled climate–carbon models have shown the potential for large feedbacks between climate change, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and global carbon sinks. Standard metrics of this feedback assume that the response of land and ocean carbon uptake ...

Kirsten Zickfeld; Michael Eby; H. Damon Matthews; Andreas Schmittner; Andrew J. Weaver

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The logic behind thick, liquid-walled, fusion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It may be possible to surround the region where fusion reactions are taking place with a neutronically thick liquid blanket which has penetrations that allow only a few tenths of a percent of the neutrons to leak out. Even these neutrons can be attenuated by adding an accurately placed liquid or solid near the target to shadow-shield the beam ports from line-of-sight neutrons. The logic of such designs are discussed and their evolution is described with examples applied to both magnetic and inertial fusion (HYLIFE-II). These designs with liquid protection are self healing when exposed to pulsed loading and have a number of advantages-over the usual designs with solid first walls. For example, the liquid-protected solid components will last the life of the plant, and therefore the capacity factor is estimated to be approximately 10% higher than for the non-liquid-walled blankets, because no blanket replacement shutdowns are required. The component replacement, operations, and maintenance costs might be half the usual value because no blanket change-out costs or accompanying facilities are required. These combined savings might lower the cost of electricity by 20%. Nuclear-grade construction should not be needed, largely because the liquid attenuates neutrons and results in less activation of materials. Upon decommissioning, the reactor materials should qualify for disposal by shallow burial even when constructed of ordinary 304 stainless steel. The need for a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron test facility to develop first-wall materials is avoided or greatly reduced, saving billions of development dollars. Flowing molten Li, the molten salt Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), and molten Li{sub l7}Pb{sub 83} have been considered. An advantage of molten salt is that it will not burn and has a low tritium solubility and therefore low tritium inventory.

Moir, R.W.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carbon Surface Layers on a High-Rate LiFePO4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image particles of a high-rate LiFePO4 sample containing a small amount of in situ carbon. The particle morphology is highly irregular, with a wide size distribution. Nevertheless, coatings, varying from about 5-10 nm in thickness, could readily be detected on surfaces of particles as well as on edges of agglomerates. Elemental mapping using Energy Filtered TEM (EFTEM) indicates that these very thin surface layers are composed of carbon. These observations have important implications for the design of high-rate LiFePO4 materials in which, ideally, a minimal amount of carbon coating is used.

Gabrisch, Heike; Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

330

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010...

331

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW1 8LH Sector Carbon Product London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change....

332

Nanostructured Carbide Derived Carbon (CDC)  

... can be grown at rates up to 100 micrometers per hour and is composed of graphite, diamond, amorphous carbon and carbon "nano-onions" ...

333

Microfluidic Analysis for Carbon Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on applying microfluidic techniques to analyze two carbon management methods; underground carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. The small scale nature of… (more)

Sell, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the process through which carbon is cycled through the air, ground, plants, animals, and fossil fuels. People and animals inhale oxygen from the air and exhale carbon dioxide...

335

Carbon Trust | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company funded by the UK government to help business and the public sector cut carbon emissions and capture the commercial potential of low carbon technologies....

336

Carbon Capture Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Research Institute of Innovative Energy Carbon Capture Research and Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power...

337

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that this project will show that the application of the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates can be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. The selected site for the demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Work is nearing completion on the reservoir characterization components of the project. The near-term emphasis is to, (1) provide an accurate distribution of original oil-in-place on a waterflood pattern entity level, (2) evaluate past recovery efficiencies, (3) perform parametric simulations, and (4) forecast performance for a site specific field demonstration of the proposed technology. Macro zonation now exists throughout the study area and cross-sections are available. The Oil-Water Contact has been defined. Laboratory capillary pressure data was used to define the initial water saturations within the pay horizon. The reservoir`s porosity distribution has been enhanced with the assistance of geostatistical software. Three-Dimensional kriging created the spatial distributions of porosity at interwell locations. Artificial intelligence software was utilized to relate core permeability to core porosity, which in turn was applied to the 3-D geostatistical porosity gridding. An Equation-of-State has been developed and refined for upcoming compositional simulation exercises. Options for local grid-refinement in the model are under consideration. These tasks will be completed by mid-1995, prior to initiating the field demonstrations in the second budget period.

Wehner, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

340

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Benjamin M. Sleeter Chapter 5 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse-gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the Western United States

Fleskes, Joe

342

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Growth of Thick, On-Axis SiC Epitaxial Layers by High Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Layers by High Temperature Halide CVD for High Voltage Power Devices ... rate, high temperature process ideally suited for thick epitaxial requirements.

344

Fullerene Film as a Coating Material for Silicon Thick Film Anodes ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Fullerene Film as a Coating Material for Silicon Thick Film Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries. Author(s), Arenst Andreas Arie. On-Site Speaker

345

Experimental analysis of disc thickness variation development in motor vehicle brakes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the past decade vehicle judder caused by Disc Thickness Variation (DTV) has become of major concern to automobile manufacturers worldwide. Judder is usually perceived… (more)

Rodriguez, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Implications of Carbonate Petrology and Geochemistry for the Origin of Coal Balls from the Kalo Formation (Moscovian, Pennsylvanian) of Iowa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal balls are carbonate concretions formed in peat during the Pennsylvanian and early Permian. Microprobe and microscope analysis reveal that polycrystals of high-Mg calcite (HMC), which are also high in Sr, are the earliest calcium carbonate to form in the Williamson No. 3 coal balls from the Kalo formation in Iowa. This HMC has early diagenetic rims of ferroan and non-ferroan low-Mg calcite (LMC) suggesting diagenesis in meteoric water. The combination of HMC followed by LMC suggests the earliest coal ball carbonate formed in a hydrologically dynamic environment, where saltwater influx into the mire was followed by a return to meteoric pore water. Subsequent generations of carbonate are ferroan and non-ferroan LMC and appear to result from diagenesis of the original HMC fabric with LMC rims. HMC polycrystals from coal balls are among the first abiotic HMC to be reported from the mid-Pennsylvanian; coal balls may be a good source of Pennsylvanian HMC. Coal balls that formed in porous peat (i.e. wood and surficial leaf mats) commonly have abundant radiating arrays of HMC polycrystals. Coal balls that formed in matrix-rich, low porosity peats consist primarily of permineralizing anhedral calcite, which is ferroan LMC. The link between the HMC and porous permeable peat is supported by the distribution of HMC and ferroan LMC in plant cells. Wood cells, which have porous walls, are filled with HMC; fiber cells, which have impermeable walls, are filled with ferroan LMC. This study demonstrates a link between pore volume, porosity, plant cell type, and carbonate fabric.

Jones, Courtney

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CYCLIC CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) Cyclic CO 2 stimulation is a single-well operation that is developing as a method of rapidly producing oil....

348

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

349

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

350

SRD 134 Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. CARBON DIOXIDE. MW [1]. 44.010. NBP [1]. 194.75 K. TP [1]. 216.59 K. CO 2. Pc [1]. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Carbon nanotube zoom lenses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that convergent or divergent zoom lenses with focal length variations up to approximately 100% can be implemented by growing arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on curved templates. Unique lenses, which can change their character from divergent ...

D. Dragoman; M. Dragoman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

353

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of graphitized carbon fibers. Carbon, 1976. 14 (2): p. 133-chemical vapor deposited carbon fiber. Carbon, 2001. 39 : p.G.G. , Lengths of Carbon Fibers Grown from Iron Catalyst

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

355

Carbon Nanofibers for Intracellular Manipulation  

Carbon Nanofibers for Intracellular Manipulation Tim McKnight CM: Greg Flickinger. Presenter: John Morris

356

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FC

357

Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

Fan, Hongyou

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Initial characterization of mudstone nanoporosity with small angle neutron scattering using caprocks from carbon sequestration sites.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological carbon sequestration relies on the principle that CO{sub 2} injected deep into the subsurface is unable to leak to the atmosphere. Structural trapping by a relatively impermeable caprock (often mudstone such as a shale) is the main trapping mechanism that is currently relied on for the first hundreds of years. Many of the pores of the caprock are of micrometer to nanometer scale. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of porosity at these scales are poorly characterized. Differences in pore shape and size can cause variation in capillary properties and fluid transport resulting in fluid pathways with different capillary entry pressures in the same sample. Prediction of pore network properties for distinct geologic environments would result in significant advancement in our ability to model subsurface fluid flow. Specifically, prediction of fluid flow through caprocks of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs is a critical step in evaluating the risk of leakage to overlying aquifers. The micro- and nanoporosity was analyzed in four mudstones using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). These mudstones are caprocks of formations that are currently under study or being used for carbon sequestration projects and include the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Total organic carbon varies from shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. Neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e. minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume of pores and their arrangement in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. Results from this study, combined with high-resolution TEM imaging, provide insight into the differences in volume and geometry of porosity between these various mudstones.

McCray, John (Colorado School of Mines); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis (Colorado School of Mines); Mouzakis, Katherine (Colorado School of Mines); Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About one-half of U.S. oil reserves are held in carbonate formations. The remaining oil in carbonate reservoirs is regarded as the major domestic target for improved oil recovery. Carbonate reservoirs are often fractured and have great complexity even at the core scale. Formation evaluation and prediction is often subject to great uncertainty. This study addresses quantification of crude oil/brine/rock interactions and the impact of reservoir heterogeneity on oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement from pore to field scale. Wettability-alteration characteristics of crude oils were measured at calcite and dolomite surfaces and related to the properties of the crude oils through asphaltene content, acid and base numbers, and refractive index. Oil recovery was investigated for a selection of limestones and dolomites that cover over three orders of magnitude in permeability and a factor of four variation in porosity. Wettability control was achieved by adsorption from crude oils obtained from producing carbonate reservoirs. The induced wettability states were compared with those measured for reservoir cores. The prepared cores were used to investigate oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition and viscous displacement. The results of imbibition tests were used in wettability characterization and to develop mass transfer functions for application in reservoir simulation of fractured carbonates. Studies of viscous displacement in carbonates focused on the unexpected but repeatedly observed sensitivity of oil recovery to injection rate. The main variables were pore structure, mobility ratio, and wettability. The potential for improved oil recovery from rate-sensitive carbonate reservoirs by increased injection pressure, increased injectivity, decreased well spacing or reduction of interfacial tension was evaluated.

Norman R. Morrow; Jill Buckley

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: soil carbon sequestration; carbon budget;of an energy efficient carbon sequestration mechanism, asin the later section on carbon sequestration. In atmospheric

Shrestha, Gyami

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for reduction of carbon dioxide. IR-SpectroelectrochemicalElectrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide mediated by Re(Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide Mediated by (

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

363

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thickness measurement and crease detection of wheat grains using stereo vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wheat grain quality assessment is important in meeting market requirements. The thickness of grains can be used for the measurement of the mass proportion of grains that pass through a sieve. This measure is known as ''screenings''. The determination ... Keywords: Grain crease detection, Grain thickness measurement, Stereo vision

Changming Sun; Mark Berman; David Coward; Brian Osborne

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Li-doped (Ba,Sr)TiO3 thick film interdigital capacitors for microwave applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave properties of Li-doped (Ba,Sr)TiO"3 thick film interdigital capacitors have been investigated. According to the reported papers, BaSrTiO"3 materials, paraelectric state at the room temperature, have high dielectric permittivity (>500 @ 1MHz) ... Keywords: BST, Microwave properties, Screen printing, Thick film, Tunability

Se-Ho Kim; Jung-Hyuk Koh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

367

Effective Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement with Carbon Dioxide Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portland cement, a common sealing material for wellbores for geological carbon sequestration was reacted with CO{sub 2} in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases at various pressure and temperature conditions to simulate cement-CO{sub 2} reaction along the wellbore from carbon injection depth to the near-surface. Hydrated Portland cement columns (14 mm diameter x 90 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.33) including additives such as steel coupons and Wallula basalt fragments were reacted with CO{sub 2} in the wet supercritical (the top half) and dissolved (the bottom half) phases under carbon sequestration condition with high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 5 months, while small-sized hydrated Portland cement columns (7 mm diameter x 20 mm length; water-to-cement ratio = 0.38) were reacted with CO{sub 2} in dissolved phase at high pressure (10 MPa) and temperature (50 C) for 1 month or with wet CO{sub 2} in gaseous phase at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and temperature (20 C) for 3 months. XMT images reveal that the cement reacted with CO{sub 2} saturated groundwater had degradation depth of {approx}1 mm for 1 month and {approx}3.5 mm for 5 month, whereas the degradation was minor with cement exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the carbonated cement was comprised of three distinct zones; the innermost less degraded zone with Ca atom % > C atom %, the inner degraded zone with Ca atom % {approx} C atom % due to precipitation of calcite, the outer degraded zone with C atom % > Ca atom % due to dissolution of calcite and C-S-H, as well as adsorption of carbon to cement matrix. The outer degraded zone of carbonated cement was porous and fractured because of dissolution-dominated reaction by carbonic acid exposure, which resulted in the increase in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. In contrast, cement-wet CO{sub 2}(g) reaction at low P (0.2 MPa)-T (20 C) conditions for 1 to 3 months was dominated by precipitation of micron-sized calcite on the outside surface of cement, which resulted in the decrease in BJH pore volume and BET surface area. Cement carbonation and pore structure change are significantly dependent on pressure and temperature conditions as well as the phase of CO{sub 2}, which controls the balance between precipitation and dissolution in cement matrix. Geochemical modeling result suggests that ratio of solid (cement)-to-solution (carbonated water) has a significant effect on cement carbonation, thus the cement-CO{sub 2} reaction experiment needs to be conducted under realistic conditions representing the in-situ wellbore environment of carbon sequestration field site. Total porosity and air permeability for a duplicate cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 measured after oven-drying by Core Laboratories using Boyle's Law technique and steady-state method were 31% and 0.576 mD. A novel method to measure the effective liquid permeability of a cement column using X-ray micro-tomography images after injection of pressurized KI (potassium iodide) is under development by PNNL. Preliminary results indicate the permeability of a cement column with water-to-cement ratio of 0.38 is 4-8 mD. PNNL will apply the method to understand the effective permeability change of Portland cement by CO{sub 2}(g) reaction under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions to develop a more reliable well-bore leakage risk model.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hadron energy resolution as a function of iron plate thickness at ICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a detailed study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5 -- 8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2 -- 15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a constant contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this paper. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.

Mohan, Lakshmi S; Devi, Moon Moon; Kaur, Daljeet; Choubey, Sandhya; Dighe, Amol; Indumathi, D; Murthy, M V N; Naimuddin, Md

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Film Thickness Changes in EHD Sliding Contacts Lubricated by a Fatty Alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the appearance of abnormal film thickness features formed in elastohydrodynamic contacts lubricated by a fatty alcohol. Experiments were conducted by varying the slide to roll ratio between a steel ball and a glass disk in a ball-on-disk type device. Lauric alcohol was used as lubricant and film thickness was measured in the contact area by optical interferometry. Experimental results showed that the film thickness distributions under pure rolling conditions remained classical whereas the film shape changed when the slide to roll ratio was increased. The thickness in the central contact area increased and in the same time inlet and exit film thicknesses were modified. In addition, the film shapes observed when the ball surface was moving faster than the disk one and those obtained in the opposite case were different, i.e. when opposite signs but equal absolute values of the slide to roll ratio were applied.

Yagi, Kazuyuki

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

372

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that some extrasolar planets ? 60 M ? will form substantially from silicon carbide and other carbon compounds. Pulsar planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk’s C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptunemass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures. Subject headings: astrobiology — planets and satellites, individual (Mercury, Jupiter) — planetary systems: formation — pulsars, individual (PSR 1257+12)

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Numerical modeling of carbon dioxide sequestration on the rate of pressure solution creep in limestone: Preliminary results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When carbon dioxide (CO2) is injected into an aquifer or a depleted geological reservoir, its dissolution into solution results in acidification of the pore waters. As a consequence, the pore waters become more reactive, which leads to enhanced dissolution-precipitation processes and a modification of the mechanical and hydrological properties of the rock. This effect is especially important for limestones given that the solubility and reactivity of carbonates is strongly dependent on pH and the partial pressure of CO2. The main mechanism that couples dissolution, precipitation and rock matrix deformation is commonly referred to as intergranular pressure solution creep (IPS) or pervasive pressure solution creep (PSC). This process involves dissolution at intergranular grain contacts subject to elevated stress, diffusion of dissolved material in an intergranular fluid, and precipitation in pore spaces subject to lower stress. This leads to an overall and pervasive reduction in porosity due to both grain indent...

Renard, Francois; Hellmann, Roland; Collombet, Marielle; Guen, Yvi Le

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is carbon dioxide? is carbon dioxide? CO2 Dipole Carbon Dioxide Carbon dioxide (chemical name CO2) is a clear gas composed of one atom of carbon (C) and two atoms of oxygen (O). Carbon dioxide is one of many chemical forms of carbon on the Earth. It does not burn, and in standard temperature and pressure conditions it is stable, inert, and non-toxic. Carbon dioxide occurs naturally in small amounts (about 0.04%) in the Earth's atmosphere. The volume of CO2 in the atmosphere is equivalent to one individual in a crowd of 2,500. Carbon dioxide is produced naturally by processes deep within the Earth. This CO2 can be released at the surface by volcanoes or might be trapped in natural underground geologic CO2 deposits, similar to underground deposits of oil and natural gas. As a major greenhouse gas, CO2 helps create and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

BNL | Carbon Cycle Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding of the impacts of global change on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and improve knowledge of possible global change mitigation approaches. The group has three main focus areas. FACE Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management The CCS&T group is an internationally recognized leader in the development of Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) research facilities. We are interested in the design and management of manipulative experiments that examine the effects of carbon dioxide, ozone, other atmospheric pollutants, temperature and precipitation on natural and managed ecosystems. FACE Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping At FACE facilities we have studied the mechanisms that underlie the

382

Success Stories: Carbon Explorer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon LBNL Device Monitors Ocean Carbon Imagine waking up each morning and discovering that twenty percent of all plants in your garden had disappeared over night. They had been eaten. Equally astonishing would be the discovery in the afternoon that new plants had taken their place. This is the norm of life in the ocean. Without the ability to accurately observe these daily changes in ocean life cycles, over vast spatial scales, we lack the ability to predict how the ocean will respond to rising CO2 levels, crippling our ability to develop accurate models of global warming or devise strategies to prevent it. The Carbon Explorer, conceived by Berkeley Lab's James K. Bishop in collaboration with Scripps Institution of Oceanography (La Jolla, California) and WET labs, Inc. (Philomath, Oregon), bridges this

383

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

384

Carbon-particle generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, A.J.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

385

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage - Directions, Challenges, and Opportunities Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Capture and Storage November 13-15, 2007 Austin, Texas C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 U.S. Fossil Fuel Reserves / Production Ratio 250+ Year Supply at Current Demand Levels ! 258 11.7 9.7 0 100 200 300 Coal Oil Natural Gas Anthracite & Bituminous Sub- Bituminous & Lignite Sources: BP Statistical Review, June 2004, - for coal reserves data - World Energy Council; EIA, Advance Summary U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 2003 Annual Report, September 22, 2004 - for oil and gas reserves data. C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 80 120 160 200 240 1970 1975 1980

386

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin - Phase III DE-FC26-05NT42588 Robert J. Finley and the MGSC Project Team Illinois State Geological Survey (University of Illinois) and Schlumberger Carbon Services U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 * The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) via the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program (contract number DE-FC26-05NT42588) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal

387

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Management Carbon Management Ten Sleep Time Structure, 2nd Wall Creek Formation at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC has the field setting, infrastructure, and expertise to play an important role in carbon management testing, demonstration, and research. The unique combination of a publicly-owned and DOE-operated oil field,

388

An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in inconsistent proportions of metal and glassy phase particles present during the subsequent firing process. The consequences were subtle, intermittent changes to the thick film microstructure that gave rise to the reaction layer and, thus, the low pull strength phenomenon. A mitigation strategy would be the use of physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques to create thin film bond pads; this is multi-chip module, deposited (MCM-D) technology.

Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Micro X-ray Radiography for the Coating Thickness Measurement in the Simulated TRISO-coated Fuel Particle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRISO(Tri-Isotropic)-coated fuel particle is utilized owing to its higher stability at a high temperature and its efficient retention capability for fission products in the HTGR(high temperature gas-cooled reactor). The typical spherical TRISO-coated fuel particle with a diameter of about 1 mm is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The outer coating layers consist of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, an inner PyC(I-PyC) layer, a SiC layer, and an outer PyC(O-PyC) layer. Most of the inspection items for the TRISO-coated fuel particle depend on the destructive methods. Recently, X-ray radiography or X-ray CT methods are being applied to nondestructively measure the thickness of the coating layers at the relevant research organizations in the world. The destructive method is very accurate, but it is difficult to prepare test samples. Above all, the number of destructive test samples must be minimized during the fabrication process due to the generation of radioactive wastes during the test procedures. The thickness of the coating layers of the TRISO fuel particle can be nondestructively measured by the X-ray radiography without generating radioactive wastes. In this study, the thickness of coating layers for a simulated TRISO-coated fuel particle with a ZrO{sub 2} kernel instead of a UO{sub 2} kernel was measured by using micro-focus X-ray radiography. The used X-ray system is the Harmony 130 developed at DRGEM Corporation in Korea. The maximum tube voltage/current of the X-ray generator is 130 kV/400 {mu}A. The focus spot size of the X-ray generator is 5 {mu}m. The resolution of the used electronic X-ray detector is 48 {mu}m. The number of pixels is 1024 x 1024. And, the intensity resolution of a pixel is 12 bit (4096 gray levels). The tube voltage/current was 40 kV/100 {mu}A under the inspection condition. Here, the distance from the source to the detector was 397 mm, and the distance from the source to the center of the object ranged from 10 to 50 mm. The exposure time was adjusted to acquire images with a good quality of the boundaries. The radiographic image was also enhanced by an image processing technique to acquire clear boundary lines between the coating layers. The boundary lines were detected on the enhanced image. The thickness of the coating layers was computed by measuring the distance between the boundary lines. The thickness of the coating layers was effectively measured by applying the micro-focus X-ray radiography by using the precise X-ray generator and the electronic detector with a high resolution. The inspection process for the TRISO-coated fuel particles will be improved by the developed micro-focus X-ray radiography technology. (authors)

Woong Ki, Kim; Young Woo, Lee; Ji Yeon, Park [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Duk-jin Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwan Woo, Lee; Jung Byung, Park [DRGEM Corp. 388-1, Asan Medical Center, Songpa, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung Woong, Ra [Chungnam National University, 220 Goong Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon microstructures for electrochemical studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin layers of photoresist were spin coated onto silicon wafers, and then carbonized to form smooth carbon films by heating in nitrogen for 1 hour at temperatures between 600 to 1100 C. Well-defined carbon microstructures on Si wafers that are being considered for electrodes in a microbattery concept were obtained by additional processing steps involving patterning and lithography of the photoresist prior to carbonization. The status of the fabrication of carbon microelectrodes obtained by pyrolysis of photoresist, characterization of the carbons by surface-sensitive techniques and electrochemical analysis by cyclic voltammetry of the I{sup -}/I{sub 3}{sup -} redox reaction is described.

Kostecki, Robert; Song, Xiang Yun; Kinoshita, Kim

2001-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

Carbon Capture and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

392

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

NETL: 2010 - Carbon Sequestration Peer Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Peer Review Carbon Sequestration Peer Review During March 15 - 19, 2010, a total of 16 projects from NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program were peer reviewed....

394

Global Fossil Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global Graphics Global Fossil-Fuel Carbon Emissions - Graphics Carbon Emission Estimates image image Global Per Capita Carbon Emission Estimates...

395

Electron transport through single carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CNTs in a protective carbon fiber coating enables theencapsulation in a carbon fiber coating [9]. This coatingembedded in an amorphous carbon fiber coating that is not

Chai, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

around Surface-Attached Carbon Nanotubes. Ind. Eng. Chem.the flexural rigidity of carbon nanotube ensembles. AppliedNanotechnology in Carbon Materials. Acta Metallurgica, 1997.

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Equinox Carbon Equities LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equinox Carbon Equities LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Equinox Carbon Equities, LLC Place Newport Beach, California Zip 92660 Sector Carbon Product Investment firm focused on...

398

GS Carbon Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GS Carbon Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name GS Carbon Corporation Place New York, New York Zip 10119 Sector Carbon Product The company offsets emissions output with...

399

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key resources related to carbon cycle and climate change research Recent Greenhouse Gas Concentrations Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Illustration of the Global Carbon...

400

Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Preparation and Microstructure of Carbon/Carbon Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, C. Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials ... Carbon fiber felts were firstly densified by carbon using chemical vapor infiltration to ... Character Distribution on Oxidation Resistance of ZG30Cr20Ni10 Heat Resistant Steel.

402

Development of a dual-porosity model for vapor-dominated fractured geothermal reservoirs using a semi-analytical fracture/matrix interaction term  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new type of dual-porosity model is being developed to simulate two-phase flow processes in fractured geothermal reservoirs. At this time it is assumed that the liquid phase in the matrix blocks remains immobile. By utilizing the effective compressibility of a two-phase water/steam mixture in a porous rock, flow within the matrix blocks can be modeled by a single diffusion equation. This equation in turn is replaced by a non-linear ordinary differential equation that utilizes the mean pressure and mean saturation in the matrix blocks to calculate the rate of fluid flow between the matrix blocks and fractures. This equation has been incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH to serve as a source/sink term for computational gridblocks that represent the fracture system. The new method has been compared with solutions obtained using fully-discretized matrix blocks, on a problem involving a three-dimensional vapor-dominated reservoir containing an injection and a production well, and has been found to be quite accurate.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Refractive index gradient measurement across the thickness of a dielectric film by the prism coupling method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed for measuring the refractive index gradient n(z) in nonuniformly thick dielectric films. The method is based on the excitation of waveguide modes in a film using the prism coupling technique and on the calculation of n(z) and film thickness H{sub f} with the help of the angular positions of the TE or TM modes. The method can be used for an arbitrary shape of the index modulation over the film thickness in the limit of a small gradient [{Delta} n(z)/n(z) || 1]. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Sokolov, Viktor I; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Seminogov, V N [Institute of Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optimizing diode thickness for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. We evaluate several diode materials, Si, CdTe, GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials, {sup 10}B and {sup 6}LiF. Investigating a coplanar diode/converter geometry, we determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

Murphy, John W.; Mejia, Israel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A.; Gnade, Bruce [Department of Materials and Science, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Kunnen, George R.; Allee, David [Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Model for the Thickness and Salinity of the Upper Layer in the Arctic Ocean and the Relationship between the Ice Thickness and Some External Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a dynamical model for the salinity and thickness of the upper layer in the Arctic. The parameters are the river runoff to the Arctic, the buoyancy supply through the Bering Strait, the export of ice from the Arctic and a ...

Anders Stigebrandt

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The carbon dioxide dilemma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of burning fossil fuels on the global climate is discussed. It may be that as we produce carbon dioxide by burning fossil fuels, we create a greenhouse effect which causes temperatures on earth to rise. Implications of changes in global temperatures are discussed.

Edelson, E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Carbon Jungle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jungle Jungle Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Jungle Place El Segundo, California Zip 90246 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Jungle's mission is to decrease CO2 in the atmosphere by planting and managing tree plantations, increasing awareness of the facts behind increased CO2 in the atmosphere, and giving companies a means to participate in carbon credit trading. References Carbon Jungle[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Jungle is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "Carbon Jungle" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Jungle&oldid=343237" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

408

Asset Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Asset Carbon Place United Kingdom Product UK-based startup looking to invest in CDMJI projects. References Asset Carbon1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

409

Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

Rushfeldt, Scott I

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

413

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

414

CARBON TECHNOLOGY: I: Petroleum Coke  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CARBON TECHNOLOGY: Session I: Petroleum Coke. Sponsored by: LMD Aluminum Committee Program Organizer: Jean-Claude Thomas , Aluminium ...

415

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Partnerships Carbon Fiber Consortium Manufacturing Industrial Partnerships Staff Partnerships Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry | Partnerships | Industrial...

416

Carbon Nanotubes Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... John Bonevich. Laser Applications Heat Up for Carbon Nanotubes. Longer is Better for Nanotube Optical Properties. Modeling ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

4th Carbon Nanotube Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... measurments, and disseinate this summary to the nanotube community. ... RM) for length separated single-wall carbon nanotubes in aqueous ...

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Carbon Dioxide Utilization Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Mercury Sorbent Field Testing Program Sorbent Technologies Corporation Western Kentucky University 9292003 Enhanced Practical Photosynthesis Carbon Sequestration ORNL...

419

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. Field demonstrations are in progress to collect data for evaluation of horizontal completions in both the Red River and Ratcliffe. A vertical well in the Red River will test attribute analysis of 3D seismic data for prediction of porosity development. Additional seismic acquisitions and interpretation are in progress for both the Ratcliffe and Red River. A water-injectivity test in a new horizontal completion in the Red Rive B zone at Buffalo Field is scheduled for next quarter.

Carrell, L.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cloud Layer Thicknesses from a Combination of Surface and Upper-Air Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud layer thicknesses are derived from base and top altitudes by combining 14 years (1975–1988) of surface and upper-air observations at 63 sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Rawinsonde observations are employed to determine the locations of ...

Kirk D. Poore; Junhong Wang; William B. Rossow

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling Global Sea Ice with a Thickness and Enthalpy Distribution Model in Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parallel ocean and ice model (POIM) in generalized orthogonal curvilinear coordinates has been developed for global climate studies. The POIM couples the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) with a 12-category thickness and enthalpy distribution (TED) ...

Jinlun Zhang; D. A. Rothrock

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Determination of the Scaled Optical Thickness of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the scaled optical thickness of clouds from reflected solar radiation measurements. The procedure compares measurements of the reflection function with asymptotic expressions for the reflection function of ...

Michael D. King

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Future Projections of Landfast Ice Thickness and Duration in the Canadian Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of future landfast ice thickness and duration were generated for nine sites in the Canadian Arctic and one site on the Labrador coast with a simple downscaling technique that used a one-dimensional sea ice model driven by ...

J. A. Dumas; G. M. Flato; R. D. Brown

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness Using Shortwave Broadband Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an empirical equation is presented that can be used to estimate shortwave cloud optical thickness from measurements and analysis of shortwave broadband irradiances. When applied to a time series of broadband observations, this ...

James C. Barnard; Charles N. Long

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Scaling Properties of Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrieved from Ground-Based Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical scale-by-scale analysis, for the first time, has been applied to the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieved from the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) network. The MFRSR data were collected in September 2000 from ...

Mikhail D. Alexandrov; Alexander Marshak; Brian Cairns; Andrew A. Lacis; Barbara E. Carlson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 238U in Thick Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness of a nuclear fuel assembly. The experimental dataproperties similar to a nuclear fuel assembly so that thein ? bjquiter@lbl.gov nuclear fuel could be tested. In this

Quiter, Brian J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms and modeling and experimental capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , "HYLIFE-II: a Molten-Salt Inertial Fusion Energyliquid, such as the molten salts flibe (Li BeF ) orflinabe (of the thick liquid metal or molten salt systems would be to

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Surface?modified RuO2?based thick film resistors using Nd:YAG laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An RuO2?based thick film resistor (TFR) is a cermet?type resistor which consists of RuO2 particles and glass. Paste containing organic vehicles is printed onto an insulating substrate

E. Gofuku; T. Ogama; H. Takasago

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

White-light scanning interferometer for absolute nano-scale gap thickness measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special configuration of white-light scanning interferometer is described for measuring the absolute air gap thickness between two planar plates brought into close proximity. The measured gap is not located in any ...

Xu, Zhiguang

430

The Role of Finite Mixed-Layer Thickness in the Structure of the Ventilated Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the ventilated thermocline consisting of three adiabatic layers surmounted by a mixed layer of finite thickness is presented. The mixed-layer depth density increase continuously northward, and these attributes of the mixed layer are ...

Joseph Pedlosky; Paul Robbins

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Boundary Layer Height and Entrainment Zone Thickness Measured by Lidars and Wind-Profiling Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine measurements of boundary layer height zi and entrainment zone thickness observed with two lidars and with a radar wind profiler during the Flatland96 Lidars in Flat Terrain experiment. Lidar backscatter is proportional to ...

Stephen A. Cohn; Wayne M. Angevine

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

5, 40834113, 2005 Black Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area J. C and Physics Discussions Measurements of Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area License. 4083 #12;ACPD 5, 4083­4113, 2005 Black Carbon Specific Absorption in the Mexico City Metropolitan

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

433

Carbon Accounting in Forest Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbon Pools: Above ground biomass Belowground BiomassBelowground Biomass Soil Organic Carbon Dead: · Aboveground biomassAboveground biomass · Belowground biomass · Soil Organic Carbon · Litter · Dead Wood· Dead Wood · (Wood Products) T�V S�D Industrie Service GmbH #12;Principles · Biomass is usually measured

Pettenella, Davide

434

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

435

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

436

Brief Studying of Oil Crust Thickness Measurement by Gamma Ray Compton Scattering Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relation between the scattering cross section and the scattering angle under different energy condition of the incident rays is analyzed. From Compton scattering total cross section, a formula of quasi-parallel incident gamma ray Compton scattering response function versus to thickness of oil crust target is derived and analyzed. Numerical fitting result shows that there exists cubic relation between response function of gamma ray and thickness of oil crust. Key words: Gamma ray, Compton scattering, oil crust

Mamatrishat, Mamat; Jie, Ding; Shiheng, Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Commercializatzon of thick film solar cells. Quarterly progress report, September 21, 1979-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Starting materials for the preparation of thick film cadmium sulfide and cadmium telluride solar cells have been comminuted. Initial trial films of cadmium sulfide showed that during the next phase of this work, the printing of films, one of the major problem areas will be to obtain sufficient reflow in the printed films to remove the screen-caused variation in film thickness. The thin areas corresponding to the screen pattern caused pinholes to form in the fired parts.

McDonald, G.D.; Goodman, G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Assessment of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods and Analytical Procedures for Thick-Section Component Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant concern for owners and operators, damage in the form of cracking in thick-section components (valves, casings, headers, and so on) in fossil fuel–fired boilers continues to be observed. With increased cyclic duty and the fast startups associated with combined-cycle plants, such damage will remain a prevalent industry problem. Specifically, the concerns for continued operation of cracked thick-section components arise from the uncertainties associated with the nondestructive ...

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electrochemical and spectroscopic evaluation of lithium intercalation in tailored polymethacrylonitrile carbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Disordered polymethacrylonitrile (PMAN) carbon monoliths have been studied as potential tailored electrodes for lithium ion batteries. A combination of electrochemical and surface spectroscopic probes have been used to investigate irreversible loss mechanisms. Voltammetric measurements show that Li intercalates readily into the carbon at potentials 1V positive of the reversible Li potential. The coulometric efficiency rises rapidly from 50% for the first potential cycle to greater than 85% for the third cycle, indicating that solvent decomposition is a self-limiting process. Surface film composition and thickness, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), does not vary substantially when compared to more ordered carbon surfaces. Li{sup +} profiles are particularly useful in discriminating between the bound states of Li at the surface of solution permeable PMAN carbons.

Zavadil, K.R.; Guidotti, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Even, W.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Film thickness measurement techniques applied to micro-scale two-phase flow systems  

SciTech Connect

Recently semi-empirical models to estimate flow boiling heat transfer coefficient, saturated CHF and pressure drop in micro-scale channels have been proposed. Most of the models were developed based on elongated bubbles and annular flows in the view of the fact that these flow patterns are predominant in smaller channels. In these models, the liquid film thickness plays an important role and such a fact emphasizes that the accurate measurement of the liquid film thickness is a key point to validate them. On the other hand, several techniques have been successfully applied to measure liquid film thicknesses during condensation and evaporation under macro-scale conditions. However, although this subject has been targeted by several leading laboratories around the world, it seems that there is no conclusive result describing a successful technique capable of measuring dynamic liquid film thickness during evaporation inside micro-scale round channels. This work presents a comprehensive literature review of the methods used to measure liquid film thickness in macro- and micro-scale systems. The methods are described and the main difficulties related to their use in micro-scale systems are identified. Based on this discussion, the most promising methods to measure dynamic liquid film thickness in micro-scale channels are identified. (author)

Tibirica, Cristiano Bigonha; do Nascimento, Francisco Julio; Ribatski, Gherhardt [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Escola de Engenharia de Sao Carlos (EESC), University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos (Brazil)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thickness porosity carbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Available Technologies: Acceleration of Carbon Dioxide ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration; ADVANTAGES: Accelerated capture of carbon dioxide; Effective at extremely dilute (nanomolar ...

442

Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vertically Aligned and Periodically Distributed Carbon Nanotube (CNT) ... Application of Carbon Nanotubes – Energy to Bioelectronic Sensor.

443

MESOPOROUS CARBON MATERIALS - Energy Innovation Portal  

Building Energy Efficiency ... Solar Thermal; ... wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for ...

444

Carbon Cycle 2.0  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Cycle 2.0 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Pioneering science for sustainable energy solutions Artificial Photosynthesis Energy Storage Combustion Carbon Capture & Storage Developing World Efficiency Photovoltaics Biofuels Energy Analysis Climate Modeling Carbon Cycle 2.0 is... 1. A vision for * a global energy system integrated with the Earth's natural carbon cycles * an interactive Berkeley Lab environment with a shared sense of purpose 2. A program development plan that will allow us to deepen our capabilities and provide more opportunities to have impact 3. An attempt to integrate our basic research with applications using models of technology deployment constraints 4. Set of internal activities aimed at priming the effort

445

6, 34193463, 2006 Black carbon or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous;ACPD 6, 3419­3463, 2006 Black carbon or brown carbon M. O. Andreae and A. Gelencs´er Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Fluctuating Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Changes Estimated by an In Situ Learned and Empirically Forced Neural Network Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice thickness (SIT) is a key parameter of scientific interest because understanding the natural spatiotemporal variability of ice thickness is critical for improving global climate models. In this paper, changes in Arctic SIT during 1982–2003 ...

G. I. Belchansky; D. C. Douglas; N. G. Platonov

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Determination of the Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Radius of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements. Part I: Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for determining the optical thickness and effective particle radius of stratiform cloud layers from reflected solar radiation measurements. A detailed study is presented which shows that the cloud optical thickness (?c) and ...

Teruyuki Nakajima; Michael D. King

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

CARBON7510.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Author's personal copy Author's personal copy NMR a critical tool to study the production of carbon fiber from lignin Marcus Foston a , Grady A. Nunnery b , Xianzhi Meng a , Qining Sun a , Frederick S. Baker b , Arthur Ragauskas a, * a BioEnergy Science Center, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, United States b Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6087, United States A R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 7 April 2012 Accepted 6 September 2012 Available online 14 September 2012 A B S T R A C T The structural changes occurring to hardwood Alcell TM lignin as a result of fiber devolatiliza- tion/extrusion, oxidative thermo-stabilization and carbonization are investigated in this study by solid-state and solution nuclear magnetic resonance

449

Three-Dimensional Microstructure Visualization of Porosity and Fe-Rich Inclusions in SiC Particle-Reinforced Al Alloy Matrix Composites by X-Ray Synchrotron Tomography  

SciTech Connect

Microstructural aspects of composites such as reinforcement particle size, shape, and distribution play important roles in deformation behavior. In addition, Fe-rich inclusions and porosity also influence the behavior of these composites, particularly under fatigue loading. Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of porosity and Fe-rich inclusions in three dimensions is critical to a thorough understanding of fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs), because cracks often initiate at these defects. In this article, we have used X-ray synchrotron tomography to visualize and quantify the morphology and size distribution of pores and Fe-rich inclusions in a SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composite. The 3-D data sets were also used to predict and understand the influence of defects on the deformation behavior by 3-D finite element modeling.

Silva, Flávio de Andrade; Williams, Jason J.; Müller, Bernd R.; Hentschel, Manfred P.; Portella, Pedro D.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION LEADERSHIP FORUM (CSLF): A CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE The undersigned national governmental entities (collectively the "Members") set forth the following Terms of Reference for the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), a framework for international cooperation in research and development for the separation, capture, transportation and storage of carbon dioxide. The CSLF will seek to realize the promise of carbon capture and storage over the coming decades, making it commercially competitive and environmentally safe. 1. Purpose of the CSLF To facilitate the development of improved cost-effective technologies for the separation and capture of carbon dioxide for its transport and long-term safe storage; to make these

451

CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

FUJITA,E.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

453

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

EFFECT OF HEAT TREATMENT ON THERMAL PROPERTIES OF PITCH-BASED AND PAN-BASED CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal properties of two directional (2D) pitch-based carbon fiber with charred resin and three directional (3D) PAN-based carbon fiber with CVI carbon matrix C/C composite were investigated for non-heat treated (NHT) and heat treated (HT) materials through the thickness (z-direction). Heat treatment was performed at 1800, 2100 and 2400 oC for 1-hr in inert argon atmosphere. Thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and bulk density were measured to calculate thermal conductivity. Thermal diffusivity and conductivity was the highest for 3D C/C heat treated at maximum temperature with non-heat treated one exhibiting the lowest one. Similarly, 2D C/C heat treated at maximum temperature exhibited the highest thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Polarized light microscopy (PLM) images of HTT C/C show a progressive improvement in microstructure when compared to NHT C/C. However, HTT 2D and 3D C/C composites exhibited extensive shrinkage of charred resin and CVI carbon matrix, respectively, from fibers resulting in intra and inter-bundles cracking when compared to NHT one. Raman spectroscopy and XRD results of NHT and HTT C/C indicated increased ordering of structure. A progressive improvement in thermal properties was observed with increased heat treatment temperatures.

Iqbal, Sardar S. [Southern Illinois University; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Fillip, Peter [Southern Illinois University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Carbon taxes and India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 'interleaved carbon minibeams' for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams' gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target's proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90 Degree-Sign angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target 'physical' absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method's therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method's merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon's Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method's low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method's smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant tumors. It should also make the method more amenable to administration in either a single dose fraction or in a small number of fractions.

Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: dilmanian@bnl.gov [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Rusek, Adam [NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Fois, Giovanna R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Physics Department, University of Cagliari, Sardinia (Italy); Olschowka, John [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Desnoyers, Nicolle R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts, West Indies (Country Unknown); Park, Jane Y. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Dioszegi, Istvan [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tomasi, Dardo [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Hedok [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Hurley, Sean D. [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Coyle, Patricia K. [Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Meek, Allen G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); O'Banion, M. Kerry [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Credits in Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities K. Thomas Klasson and Brian H. Davison Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6226 Presentation First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 1 Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities

458

Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

Jackson, Theodore (Atlanta, GA); Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Metal Oxidation Kinetics and the Transition from Thin to Thick Films  

SciTech Connect

We report an investigation of growth kinetics and transition from thin to thick films during metal oxidation. In the thin film limit (< 20 nm), Cabrera and Mott’s theory is usually adopted by explicitly considering ionic drift through the oxide in response to electric fields, where the growth kinetics follow an inverse logarithmic law . It is generally accepted that Wagner’s theory, involving self-diffusion, is valid only in the limit of thick film regime (>1?m) and leads to parabolic growth kinetics , where l is the oxide film thickness. Theory presented here unifies the two models and provides a complete description of oxidation including the transition from thin to thick film. The range of validity of Cabrera and Mott’s theory and Wagner’s theory can be well defined in terms of the Debye-Hückel screening length. The transition from drift-dominated ionic transport for thin film to diffusion-dominated transport for thick film is found to strictly follow the direct logarithmic law that is frequently observed in many experiments.

Xu, Zhijie; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Calculated /alpha/-induced thick target neutron yields and spectra, with comparison to measured data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One component of the neutron source associated with the decay of actinide nuclides in many environments is due to the interaction of decay /alpha/ particles in (/alpha/,n) reactions on low Z nuclides. Measurements of (/alpha/,n) thick target neutron yields and associated neutron spectra have been made for only a few combinations of /alpha/ energy and target nuclide or mixtures of actinide and target nuclides. Calculations of thick target neutron yields and spectra with the SOURCES code require /alpha/-energy-dependent cross sections for (/alpha/,n) reactions, as well as branching fractions leading to the energetically possible levels of the product nuclides. A library of these data has been accumulated for target nuclides of Z /le/ 15 using that available from measurements and from recent GNASH code calculations. SOURCES, assuming neutrons to be emitted isotopically in the center-of-mass system, uses libraries of /alpha/ stopping cross sections, (/alpha/,n) reaction cross reactions, product nuclide level branching fractions, and actinide decay /alpha/ spectra to calculate thick target (/alpha/,n) yields and neutron spectra for homogeneous combinations of nuclides. The code also calculates the thick target yield and angle intergrated neutron spectrum produced by /alpha/-particle beams on targets of homogeneous mixtures of nuclides. Illustrative calculated results are given and comparisons are made with measured thick target yields and spectra. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Wilson, W.B.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z