National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thickness ft depth

  1. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  2. Constraints on Moho depth and crustal thickness in the Liguro-Provencal basin from a 3D gravity inversion: geodynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Constraints on Moho depth and crustal thickness in the Liguro- Provencal basin from a 3D gravity~ologie, CNRS-URA 1316, Ecole Normale Sup&ieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France (e-mail: rooke and reflection data to constrain a new Moho depth map in the Liguro-Proven~al basin (Western Mediterranean Sea

  3. Generalized methodology for thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in semi-infinite and finitely thick inhomogeneous solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    . The amplitude and phase of the thermal wave generated by an optical or other thermal energy sourceGeneralized methodology for thermal diffusivity depth profile reconstruction in semi, Canada and Manufacturing Research Corporation of Ontario, 1075 North Service Road West, Suite 201

  4. Coiled tubing velocity string set at record 20,500 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S. )

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that coiled tubing, set at record depth, significantly reduced costs and posed lower mechanical failure risk for recompleting a gas well in the Delaware basin of West Texas. Alternative completions such as replacing the existing tubing string with smaller diameter conventional API production tubing was deemed less economical and effective. The gas well, George M. Shelton No. 2, was recompleted on July 18, 1991, by Chevron U.S.A. Production Co. The gas is produced from the deep, low-pressure Ellenburger formation in the Gomez field. The hang-off depth of 20,500 ft set a world record for the deepest permanently installed coiled tubing. The 1-1/2 in. coiled tubing velocity string, run within the existing 4-1/2 and 4-in. tapered production tubing string, consists of seven segments that vary in wall thickness from 0.087 to 0.156 in.

  5. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  6. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  7. Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural Gas Natural Gas Petroleum & Coal Coal Sulfur (ppm by mass) 1148 699 19 658 22 Alkanes (% vol.) 50

  8. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  9. FT-ICR SWNT 1991 6 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR SWNT 1991 6 5 (SWNT: single-walled carbon nanotube) (MWNT: multi-walled carbon nanotube) 2 SWNTs CVD HiPco ACCVD SWNTs CVD 10 ACCVD FT-ICR (Nd:YAG: 2 532nm10-30m SWNTs ACCVD 5 10 15 20 Number of Atoms RelativeReactionRate(arb.unit) Cobalt Nickel Iron Fig. 1

  10. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  11. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  12. FT-ICR ,,,NX^[,Z-- FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Atomic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,NX^[,Z--ʷ FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Atomic Clusters "`@SZRvZX,,,OEZqEZq NX^[,,,,,,D,,,ŷC'~Z,,OE[ U["-E'`c'NX^[r[OE,,,,ķ, ,,C'Y`fNX^[CVSR"NX^[C^ [,,,Z--ʷ,"

  13. SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in...

  14. SWiFT performs accredited research testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The2/01/12 PageInformation DoESummer1SWiFT

  15. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  16. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  17. Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass Mariano Martn Abstract. In this paper we present the conceptual design for the optimization of FT-diesel production to increase the yield towards green diesel. The optimization of the system is formulated as an equation

  18. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  19. IN-DEPTH REPORT: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in local policy debates about fracking. This In-depth Report from Science for Environment Policy explores

  20. Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, Rafael; Fiorini, Franco

    2011-10-15

    We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

  1. Transition redshift in $f(T)$ cosmology and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; Orlando Luongo; Emmanuel N. Saridakis

    2015-06-18

    We extract constraints on the transition redshift $z_{tr}$, determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable $f(T)$ forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for $z_{tr}$. In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and moreover we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by $f(T)$ cosmology, although compatible with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on $f(T)$ cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent union 2.1 data set.

  2. The covariant formulation of $f(T)$ gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krk, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We show that the well-known problem of frame dependence and violation of local Lorentz invariance in the usual formulation of $f(T)$ gravity is a consequence of neglecting the role of spin connection. We re-formulate $f(T)$ gravity starting, instead of the "pure-tetrad" teleparallel gravity, from the covariant teleparallel gravity, using both the tetrad and the spin connection as dynamical variables, resulting in the fully covariant, consistent, and frame-independent, version of $f(T)$ gravity, which does not suffer from the notorious problems of the usual, pure-tetrad, $f(T)$ theory. We present the method to extract solutions for the most physically important cases, such as the Minkowski, the FRW and the spherically-symmetric ones. We show that in the covariant $f(T)$ gravity we are allowed to use an arbitrary tetrad in an arbitrary coordinate system along with the corresponding spin connection, resulting always to the same physically relevant field equations.

  3. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  4. Geodesic Deviation Equation in $f(T)$ gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Darabi; M. Mousavi; K. Atazadeh

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we show that it is possible to study the notion of geodesic deviation equation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent equations for $f(T)$ gravity which are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

  5. System for measuring film thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA); Rasmussen, Donald E. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

  6. Copyright 2000 FT Asia Intelligence Wire All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2000 FT Asia Intelligence Wire All rights reserved Copyright 2000 The Hindu THE HINDU May 10, 2000 LENGTH: 1384 words HEADLINE: The Hindu-Editorial: Development and goal-setting - I BYLINE: NIRUPAM BAJPAI & JEFFREY D. SACHS BODY: WHILE PRESENTING the Union Budget for 2000-01, the Finance

  7. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Bernstein; Mary Bishai; Edward Blucher; David B. Cline; Milind V. Diwan; Bonnie Fleming; Maury Goodman; Zbigniew J. Hladysz; Richard Kadel; Edward Kearns; Joshua Klein; Kenneth Lande; Francesco Lanni; David Lissauer; Steve Marks; Robert McKeown; William Morse; Regina Rameika; William M. Roggenthen; Kate Scholberg; Michael Smy; Henry Sobel; James Stewart; Gregory Sullivan; Robert Svoboda; Mark Vagins; Brett Viren; Christopher Walter; Robert Zwaska

    2009-08-09

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass in the mega-ton scale will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. In addition to the physics justification there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake, and the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. The depth requirements associated with the various physics processes are reported for water Cherenkov and liquid argon detector technologies. While some of these physics processes can be adequately studied at shallower depths, none of them require a depth greater than 4300 mwe which corresponds to the 4850 ft level at Homestake. It is very important to note that the scale of the planned detector is such that even for accelerator neutrino detection (which allows one to use the accelerator duty factor to eliminate cosmics) a minimum depth is needed to reduce risk of contamination from cosmic rays. After consideration of the science and the practical issues regarding the Homestake site, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850ft level in a timely manner.

  8. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty inversion, seismic anisotropy. 1. Introduction A general formulation of prestack depth migration based numerical methods (Claerbout, 1971) is considered in this paper. A commonshot prestack depth migration

  9. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:...

  10. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  11. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  12. Constraining f(T) gravity in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Iorio; Ninfa Radicella; Matteo Luca Ruggiero

    2015-07-14

    In the framework of $f(T)$ theories of gravity, we solve the field equations for $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{n}$, in the weak-field approximation and for spherical symmetry spacetime. Since $f(T)=T$ corresponds to Teleparallel Gravity, which is equivalent to General Relativity, the non linearity of the Lagrangian are expected to produce perturbations of the general relativistic solutions, parameterized by $\\alpha$. Hence, we use the $f(T)$ solutions to model the gravitational field of the Sun, and exploit data from accurate tracking of spacecrafts orbiting Mercury and Saturn to infer preliminary insights on what could be obtained about the model parameter $\\alpha$ and the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. It turns out that improvements of about one-three orders with respect to the present-day constraints in the literature of magnitude seem possible.

  13. Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

  14. Cosmological perturbation in f(T) gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, Keisuke; Ong, Yen Chin E-mail: ongyenchin@member.ams.org

    2013-06-01

    We perform detailed investigation of cosmological perturbations in f(T) theory of gravity coupled with scalar field. Our work emphasizes on the way to gauge fix the theory and we examine all possible modes of perturbations up to second order. The analysis includes pseudoscalar and pseudovector modes in addition to the usual scalar, vector, and tensor modes. We find no gravitational propagating degree of freedom in the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, as well as pseudovector modes. In addition, we find that the scalar and tensor perturbations have exactly the same form as their counterparts in usual general relativity with scalar field, except that the factor of reduced Planck mass squared M{sub pl}{sup 2}?1/(8?G) that occurs in the latter has now been replaced by an effective time-dependent gravitational coupling ?2(df/dT)|{sub T=T{sub 0}}, with T{sub 0} being the background torsion scalar. The absence of extra degrees of freedom of f(T) gravity at second order linear perturbation indicates that f(T) gravity is highly nonlinear. Consequently one cannot conclusively analyze stability of the theory without performing nonlinear analysis that can reveal the propagation of the extra degrees of freedom.

  15. Can $f(T)$ gravity theories mimic $?$CDM cosmic history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Setare; N. Mohammadipour

    2013-01-12

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function $f(T)$ by demanding a background $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat $\\Lambda$CDM (the radiation ere with $\\omega_{eff}=1/3$, matter and de Sitter eras with $\\omega_{eff}=0$ and $\\omega_{eff}=-1$, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with $\\Omega_{0r}=1$ and the matter dominate during the matter phases when $\\Omega_{0m}=1$. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function $f(T)$ which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  16. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, Morris S. (Richland, WA); Schuster, George J. (Kennewick, WA); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  17. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  18. Lyman alpha Transfer in a thick, dusty, and static medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang-Hyeon Ahn; Hee-Won Lee; Hyung-Mok Lee

    2000-06-13

    We developed a Monte Carlo code that describes the resonant Lyman alpha line transfer in an optically thick, dusty, and static medium. The code was tested against the analytic formula derived by Neufeld (1990). We explain the line transfer mechanism for a wide range of line center optical depths by tracing histories of photons in the medium. We find that photons escape from the medium by a series of wing scatterings, during which polarization may develop. We applied our code to examine the amount of dust extinction around the Lyman alpha in primeval galaxies. Brief discussions on the astrophysical application of our work are presented.

  19. 5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | Open Energy Information 55 et64ft Wave Flume

  20. 6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | Open Energy Information 55ft Wave Flume

  1. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Facility & Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal EnergyRenewable EnergyWAves Nearshore) SNL-SWANinSWiFT

  2. Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration Alexander Druzhinin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration $ Alexander Druzhinin* British Geological Survey of the formula for common-shot or common-receiver amplitude-preserving elastic prestack depth migration (Pre to enhance strongly polarized wave modes prior to prestack depth migration (PreSDM) (e.g. Dillon et al., 1988

  3. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty of a general 3D commonshot elastic prestack depth migration in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium is studied. Geophys. AS CR, Prague 457 #12;L. Klimes 1. INTRODUCTION A general formulation of prestack depth migration

  4. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-15

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  5. FT-ICR ,,,G"}NX^[,AFT-ICR Study of Catalytic Metal Cluster Reaction with Alcohol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,G"}NX^[,ANX,,ZOE,,,,,ͷCS,ŷ ,ɷq,,,, (1,2) DNX^[CI",ͷCT"vNX^[OE, ,,

  6. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  7. Violation of the first law of black hole thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao; Miao, Yan-Gang E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn

    2011-11-01

    We prove that, in general, the first law of black hole thermodynamics, ?Q = T?S, is violated in f(T) gravity. As a result, it is possible that there exists entropy production, which implies that the black hole thermodynamics can be in non-equilibrium even in the static spacetime. This feature is very different from that of f(R) or that of other higher derivative gravity theories. We find that the violation of first law results from the lack of local Lorentz invariance in f(T) gravity. By investigating two examples, we note that f''(0) should be negative in order to avoid the naked singularities and superluminal motion of light. When f''(T) is small, the entropy of black holes in f(T) gravity is approximatively equal to f'(T)/4 A.

  8. Graceful Exit Inflation in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. L. Nashed; W. El Hanafy; Sh. Kh. Ibrahim

    2015-04-04

    We apply a quadratic teleparallel torsion scalar of the $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{2}$ field equations to the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model. We assume two perfect fluid components, the matter component has a fixed equation of state (EoS) parameter $\\omega$, while the torsion component has a dynamical EoS. We obtain an effective scale factor allowing a graceful exit inflation model with no need to slow roll technique. We perform a standard cosmological study to examine the cosmic evolution. In addition, the effective EoS shows consistent results confirming a smooth phase transition from inflation to radiation dominant universe. We consider the case when the torsion is made of a scalar field. This treatment enables us to induce a scalar field sensitive to the spacetime symmetry with an effective potential constructed from the quadratic $f(T)$ gravity. The model is parameterized by two parameters ($\\alpha,\\omega$) both derive the universe to exit out of de Sitter expansion. The first is purely gravitational and works effectively at large Hubble regime of the early stage allowing a slow roll potential. The second parameter $\\omega$ is a thermal-like correction coupled to the kinetic term and works effectively at low Hubble regime of late stages. The slow roll analysis of the obtained potential can perform tensor-to-scalar ratio and spectral index parameters consistent with the recent Planck and BICEP2 data. Both cosmological and scalar field analyses show consistent results.

  9. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  10. Ultrasonic thickness testing of aging offshore structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Brian Kirk

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis concern the use of ultrasonic thickness (UT) testing for use in the offshore industry. Evidence from prior studies conducted at Texas A&M University suggests that the corrosion on the surface ...

  11. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM); Damkroger, Brian K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  12. MonolayerThickness of Block Copolymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    .47 Index of ref. for PS-PEHMA 1.51 #12;Annealing the films Tg 22nm 24nm Height Images #12;AFM 12-33 26nm 28nm 30nm Bi-continuous #12;12-33Area% 13.08 31.55 41 Area % Thickness (nm) Monolayer: 18.86nm Bilayer: 37.72nm #12;Monolayer thickness 12

  13. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana Quochi, Francesco Artizzu, Flavia Saba, Michele Marongiu, Daniela Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  14. Vacuum energy $f(T)$ decay: Inflation at the open universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. El Hanafy; G. L. Nashed

    2014-10-09

    We derived a uniquely exact $f(T)$ formula of the lowest possible energy of an isotropic and homogeneous universe. We show that vanishing of the energy-momentum tensor $\\mathcal{T}^{\\mu \

  15. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Facility Prepared for More-Efficient Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the DOESNL Scaled Wind-Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility picked up in preparation for an enhanced, more-efficient site-enabling advanced research to be executed with more rigor....

  16. FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

  17. A case study, artificial insemination versus natural breeding at Overland Farms, Ft. Worth, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migues, Loraine C.

    1985-01-01

    Record of Study A Case Study: Artificial Insemination Versus Natural Breeding at Overland Farms, Ft. Worth, Texas A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Loraine C. Migues Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A 6 M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE August, 1985 Major Subject: Animal Science Department of Animal Science A Case Study: Artificial Insemination Versus Natural Breeding at Overland Farms, Ft. Worth, Texas A...

  18. Interactive effects of vegetation, soil moisture and bulk density on depth of burning of thick organic soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    5, Canada. D University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H1, Canada consumption. We experimentally altered soil moisture profiles of peat monoliths collected from several. Additional keywords: bog, boreal, carbon, fire, ground-layer fuels, peat, peatland, Sphagnum, smouldering

  19. Interactive effects of vegetation, soil moisture and bulk density on depth of burning of thick organic soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    5, Canada. D University of Alberta, Department of Renewable Resources, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H1, Canada consumption. We experimentally altered soil moisture profiles of peat monoliths collected from several. Additional keywords: bog, boreal, carbon, fire, ground-layer fuels, peat, peatland, smouldering, Sphagnum

  20. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J. [DuPont Electronics, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  1. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  2. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  3. Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between silica nanoparticles in water. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coating thickness and coverage effects on the...

  4. The Square Root Depth Wave Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin C. Cotter; Darryl D. Holm; James R. Percival

    2009-12-11

    We introduce a set of coupled equations for multilayer water waves that removes the ill-posedness of the multilayer Green-Naghdi (MGN) equations in the presence of shear. The new well-posed equations are Hamiltonian and in the absence of imposed background shear they retain the same travelling wave solutions as MGN. We call the new model the Square Root Depth equations, from the modified form of their kinetic energy of vertical motion. Our numerical results show how the Square Root Depth equations model the effects of multilayer wave propagation and interaction, with and without shear.

  5. Optical spectroscopy of sputtered nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubisova-Liskova, Eva Visnovsky, Stefan; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong

    2015-05-07

    Nanometer (nm)-thick yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films present interest for spintronics. This work employs spectral ellipsometry and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra to characterize nm-thick YIG films grown on single-crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by magnetron sputtering. The thickness (t) of the films ranges between 10?nm and 40?nm. Independent on t, the polar MOKE hysteresis loops saturate in the field of about 1.8 kOe, consistent with the saturation magnetization in bulk YIG (4?M{sub s}???1.75?kG). The MOKE spectrum measured at photon energies between 1.3?eV and 4.5?eV on the 38-nm-thick film agrees with that measured on single-crystal YIG bulk materials. The MOKE spectrum of the 12-nm-thick film still preserves the structure of the bulk YIG but its amplitude at lower photon energies is modified due to the fact that the radiation penetration depth exceeds 20?nm. The t dependence of the MOKE amplitude is consistent with MOKE calculations. The results indicate that the films are stoichiometric, strain free, without Fe{sup 2+}, and preserve bulk YIG properties down to t ? 10?nm.

  6. Free Energy of thick Center Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ch. Korn; H. Reinhardt; T. Tok

    2005-08-05

    The free energy of thick center vortices is calculated in continuum Yang-Mills theory in one-loop approximation using the proper time regularization. The vortices are represented by Abelian gauge field configurations on the torus which satisfy twisted boundary conditions.

  7. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  8. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22

    was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

  9. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth Yi Y. Liu,1 optical depth (VOD) retrievals from three satellitebased passive microwave instruments were merged longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38

  10. Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring Virtual Depth for Automotive Instrument Cluster Concepts Nora Broy1,2,3 , Benedikt Zierer instrument cluster. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal more pronounced as auto-stereoscopic displays become available for the car. For instance, Hakkila et

  11. Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janke, Wolfhard

    OFFPRINT Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers T. Vogel, T.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/85/10003 Thickness-dependent secondary structure formation of tubelike polymers the conformational phase diagram of a simple model for flexible polymers with explicit thickness. The thickness

  12. Emergent universe in chameleon, f(R) and f(T) gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2011-05-04

    In this work, we consider an emergent universe in generalized gravity theories like the chameleon, f(R) and f(T) gravities. We reconstruct the potential of the chameleon field under the emergent scenario of the universe and observe its increasing nature with the evolution of the universe. We reveal that in the emergent universe scenario, the equation-of-state parameter behaves like quintessence in the case of f(R) gravity and like phantom in the case of f(T) gravity.

  13. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

  14. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets V#19;aclav Bucha packet prestack depth migration consists of four basic steps: (a) preparation of a velocity model su to the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth

  15. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  16. The Hidden Flat Like Universe: Starobinsky-like inflation induced by f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. El Hanafy; G. G. L. Nashed

    2015-06-02

    We study a single fluid component in a flat like universe (FLU) governed by $f(T)$ gravity theories, where $T$ is the teleparallel torsion scalar. The FLU model, regardless the value of the spatial curvature $k$, identifies a special class of $f(T)$ gravity theories. Remarkably, the FLU $f(T)$ gravity does not reduce to teleparallel gravity theory. In large Hubble spacetime the theory is consistent with the inflationary universe scenario and respects the conservation principle. The equation of state (EoS) evolves similarly in all models $k=0, \\pm 1$. We study the case when the torsion tensor is made of a scalar field, which enables to derive a quintessence potential from the obtained $f(T)$ gravity theory. The potential produces Starobinsky-like model naturally without using a conformal transformation, with higher orders continuously interpolate between Starobinsky and quadratic inflation models. The slow-roll analysis shows double solutions so that for a single value of the scalar tilt (spectral index) $n_{s}$ the theory can predict double tensor-to-scalar ratios $r$ of $E$-mode and $B$-mode polarizations.

  17. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  18. 32 0885-9000/97/$10 .00 1997 IEEE IEEE EXPERT Using Qualitative Physics ft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    32 0885-9000/97/$10 .00 1997 IEEE IEEE EXPERT Using Qualitative Physics ft Create Articulate kinds of educational software has been a motivation for qualitative physics since its inception. 1,2 This goal is now begin- ning to be realized, thanks to advances in qualitative physics

  19. FT-ICR Study of Precursor Clusters of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    vaporization of Ni/Co and Ni/Y doped graphite samples used for the macroscopic laser-oven production of SWNTs production techniques. Experiment The FT-ICR mass spectrometer and chemical reaction system implemented gas was injected to the nozzle. In the atmosphere of helium gas, vaporized atoms condensed to clusters

  20. FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[C <`E'Y`fNX^[,Sw"z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[C NX^[,̻Sw"z i"OE`H`ZZOES1 E"OE`@H 2 j > ,,, to the strong dependency to silicon cluster size. ,PD,,,,ɷ@"OEvZX,,,OEZqEZqNX^[,NX

  1. FT-ICR (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance) ,,, 'Y`fNX^[CVSR"NX^[,Z--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance) ,,, 'Y`fNX^[CVSR"NX^[,Z--ʷ i"OE`H`ZZOESE"OE`@Hj>ͭ췳"CNX",^NX^[CNX^[,VSR"NX

  2. FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI"(Sin , n = 10-30),Sw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI"(Sin + , n = 10-30),̻Sw + in the size range investigated. ,PD,,,, "OEvZX,,,OEZqEZqNX^[,,C--~_"I,NX ^[,ͷC"dZq`fZq,"׻,,,Gb`"O"z',CVD ,,,

  3. Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 1 - 6 November 2004 Vilamoura on Plasma Physics and controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has been changed to be IAEA Fusion Energy and should be moved to the ultimat goal of utilizing fusion energy for human being in near future

  4. FT-ICR reaction study of bimetallic clusters with alcohol and hydrocarbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR reaction study of bimetallic clusters with alcohol and hydrocarbon Satoshi Yoshinaga beam source [1]. In order to investigate the initial reaction of alcohol or hydrocarbon with a metal reaction of catalysts with carbon containing molecules, such as alcohol and hydrocarbon. Fig. 1 shows mass

  5. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  6. In-depth analysis of CIGS film for solar cells, structural and optical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slobodskyy, A; ~Ulyanenkova, T; ~Doyle, S; Powalla, M; ~Baumbach, T; ~Lemmer, U

    2010-01-01

    Space-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements performed on gradient-etched CuIn$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$Se$_2$ (CIGS) solar cells provide information about stress and texture depth profiles in the absorber layer. An important parameter for CIGS layer growth dynamics, the absorber thickness-dependent stress in the molybdenum back contact is analyzed. Texturing of grains and quality of the polycrystalline absorber layer are correlated with the intentional composition gradients (band gap grading). Band gap gradient is determined by space-resolved photoluminescence measurements and correlated with composition and strain profiles.

  7. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  8. Radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Joerg (Pleasanton, CA); Levy, Joshua (Salem, NY); Stern, Robin L. (Lodi, CA); Siantar, Christine Hartmann (Livermore, CA); Goldberg, Zelanna (Carmichael, CA)

    2006-12-19

    A radiation phantom comprising a body with a general humanoid shape and at least a portion having an adjustable thickness. In one embodiment, the portion with an adjustable thickness comprises at least one tissue-equivalent slice.

  9. Thickness determination of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride films by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P. Sutter, E.

    2014-09-01

    We assess scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for thickness measurements on few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the layered dielectric of choice for integration with graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Observations on h-BN islands with large, atomically flat terraces show that the secondary electron intensity in SEM reflects monolayer height changes in films up to least 10 atomic layers thickness. From a quantitative analysis of AES data, the energy-dependent electron escape depth in h-BN films is deduced. The results show that AES is suitable for absolute thickness measurements of few-layer h-BN of 1 to 6 layers.

  10. A Heat Kernel based Cortical Thickness Estimation Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yalin

    thickness, Heat Kernel, Tetrahedral Mesh, Streamline, False Discovery Rate 1 Introduction AlzheimerA Heat Kernel based Cortical Thickness Estimation Algorithm Gang Wang1,2 , Xiaofeng Zhang1.R.China Abstract. Cortical thickness estimation in magnetic resonance imag- ing (MRI) is an important technique

  11. Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mller, Dietmar

    Global Sediment Thickness Dataset updated for the Australian-Antarctic Southern Ocean Joanne author: jo.whittaker@utas.edu.au Key Points - Global minimum sediment thickness compilation updated for Australia Antarctica - Sediment thicknesses computed from seismic reflection and refraction data - Sediment

  12. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  13. Ocean General Circula-on near 1000 m depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lherminier, Pascale

    currents near 1000 m depth Eddy Kine-c Energy near 1000 m depth Seasonal hemisphere), Kuroshio, Oyashio, East Kamchatka, Alaska Stream, Gulf Stream, Labrador, East and West Greenland (northern hemisphere). Alternate zonal bands

  14. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qiguang; Williams, Frances; Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles E.; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  15. Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

  16. Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-12-01

    Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass spectrometry platform that provides the highest levels of performance for mass accuracy and resolving power, there is room for improvement in analyzer cell design as the ideal quadrupolar trapping potential has yet to be generated for a broadband MS experiment. To this end, analyzer cell designs have improved since the fields inception, yet few research groups participate in this area because of the high cost of instrumentation efforts. As a step towards reducing this barrier to participation and allowing for more designs to be physically tested, we introduce a method of FT-ICR analyzer cell prototyping utilizing printed circuit boards at modest vacuum conditions. This method allows for inexpensive devices to be readily fabricated and tested over short intervals and should open the field to laboratories lacking or unable to access high performance machine shop facilities because of the required financial investment.

  17. FT-ICR ,,,",PC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,NX^[,̻Sw"z i1."OE`H`ZZOES@2."OE`@Hj>ͭ췳",PC,,,NX^[,VSR"NX^[ ,Z--ʷ,'ʷ,"sZzSOE^Z--ʷ`'u Resonance)Z--ʷ`'u, --p,,ķs,,,,D,,,FT-ICR ,--p,,NX^[ ,

  18. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy Vaclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration anisotropy and monoclinic anisotropy. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in two ways: a

  19. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models: comparison of triclinic anisotropy depth migration to calculate migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity models interface. The anisotropy in the upper layer is triclinic. We apply Kirch- hoff prestack depth migration

  20. Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater Relationship in the Platte River Valley rates were correlated with depth to groundwater (d) values in the wide alluvial valley of the Platte soils with a shallow groundwater table. The transition depth (dt) between negative and positive values

  1. Ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bylenok, Paul J. (Clifton Park, NY); Patmos, William M. (Schenectady, NY); Wagner, Thomas A. (Bronswick, NY); Martin, Francis H. (Melrose, NY)

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system uses an ultrasonic fsed beam probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of a tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern, and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal and then quantifies the digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of a plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area, e.g. 0.010 inch by 0.010 inch, of tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

  2. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  3. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  4. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  5. FT-ICR Study of Chemical Reaction of Precursor Clusters of SWNT Masamichi Kohno, Shuhei Inoue and Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR Study of Chemical Reaction of Precursor Clusters of SWNT Masamichi Kohno, Shuhei Inoue and Shigeo Maruyama Chemical reaction of carbon clusters and metal-carbon binary clusters (MCn , M = Ni or Co

  6. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the worlds first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STARs spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  7. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  8. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  9. The Galactic thick and thin disks: differences in evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Nykytyuk; T. V. Mishenina

    2006-05-26

    Recent observations demonstrate that the thin and thick disks of the Galaxy have different chemical abundance trends and evolution timescales. The relative abundances of $\\alpha$-elements in the thick Galactic disk are increased relative to the thin disk. Our goal is to investigate the cause of such differences in thick and thin disk abundances. We investigate the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk in the framework of the open two-zone model with gas inflow. The Galactic abundance trends for $\\alpha$-elements (Mg, Si, O) and Fe are predicted for the thin and thick Galactic disks. The star formation histories of the thin and thick disks must have been different and the gas infall must have been more intense during the thick disk evolution that the thin disk evolution.

  10. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Surface configuration, ice thick- ness, volume and bedrockconstruction of the ice thick- ness grids. between flightof the physical ice thick- ness, rather than an ice-

  11. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    php?titleVariableCrustalThicknessInTheWesternGreatBasin-ACompilationOfOldAndNewRefractionData&oldid793047" Categories: Missing Required Information Reference...

  12. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile Effects of Volcanism,...

  13. Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-12-31

    To avoid methane production in F-T synthesis on Fe catalysts, efforts are being made on conversion of synthesis gas to high molecular weight hydrocarbons, such as waxes. Strong acidity of sulfated zirconium oxides, ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}, is being used to pretreat long-chain paraffins with carbon numbers greater than n-C{sub 32}. Progress during this period is reported on reactivity of Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} for hydrocracking n-C{sub 32} and on effects of hydride donor solvent on hydrocracking of n-C{sub 32}. 5 figs.

  14. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies More Documents & Publications Good Practice Guide on Firewall Deployment for SCADA and Process Control Networks Mitigations for...

  15. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudich, James A.

    Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains and Molecular Biology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America, 3 UNC of America Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating

  17. Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Alfred K.

    Measurement of Paint Layer Thickness with Photothermal Infrared Radiometry P. Dorr, A. K. Louis-physical, optical and geometrical properties of multi-layered samples of paint on a metalic substrate. A special infrared radiometry, paint-#12;lm-thickness is measured using lock-in ampli#12;ers. The phase-di#11;erence

  18. Real Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    for estimating location and orientation of a person's head, from depth data acquired by a low quality device. OurReal Time Head Pose Estimation from Consumer Depth Cameras Gabriele Fanelli1 , Thibaut Weise2 and the variance of the head position and orientation. We evaluate three different approaches to jointly take

  19. Instrument for Determining Depth of Dehydration of Frozen Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a de- hydration depth gauge to measure the degree of dehydration in frozen seafoods. Design The dehydration depth gauge adopts the principle was modified by using a heavier gauge blade having a narrow cutting edge extending I mm below the plane's flat

  20. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  1. Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Jun

    Imaging wave-penetrable objects in a finite depth ocean Keji Liu Yongzhi Xu Jun Zou Abstract. We- penetrable inhomogeneous medium in a 3D finite depth ocean. The method is based on a scat- tering analysis extend the direct sampling method proposed in [13] to image a wave- penetrable inhomogeneous medium

  2. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tow, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walter, John B (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

  3. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; zdl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  4. Control for monitoring thickness of high temperature refractory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caines, M.J.

    1982-11-23

    This invention teaches an improved monitoring device for detecting the changes in thickness of high-temperature refractory, the device consists of a probe having at least two electrically conductive generally parallel elements separated by a dielectric material. The probe is implanted or embedded directly in the refractory and is elongated to extend in line with the refractory thickness to be measured. Electrical inputs to the conductive elements provide that either or both the electrical conductance or capacitance can be found, so that charges over lapsed time periods can be compared in order to detect changes in the thickness of the refractory.

  5. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; zdl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmoreto those of other techniques available.less

  6. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  7. Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

    1998-09-01

    Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

  8. OPTICALLY THICK H I DOMINANT IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION TO ''DARK GAS''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Tachihara, K.; Sano, H. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Onishi, T., E-mail: fukui@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Dark gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is believed to not be detectable either in CO or H I radio emission, but it is detectable by other means including ? rays, dust emission, and extinction traced outside the Galactic plane at |b| > 5. In these analyses, the 21 cm H I emission is usually assumed to be completely optically thin. We have reanalyzed the H I emission from the whole sky at |b| > 15 by considering temperature stratification in the ISM inferred from the Planck/IRAS analysis of the dust properties. The results indicate that the H I emission is saturated with an optical depth ranging from 0.5 to 3 for 85% of the local H I gas. This optically thick H I is characterized by spin temperature in the range 10 K-60 K, significantly lower than previously postulated in the literature, whereas such low temperature is consistent with emission/absorption measurements of the cool H I toward radio continuum sources. The distribution and the column density of the H I are consistent with those of the dark gas suggested by ? rays, and it is possible that the dark gas in the Galaxy is dominated by optically thick cold H I gas. This result implies that the average density of H I is 2-2.5times higher than that derived on the optically thin assumption in the local ISM.

  9. Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff Equations and their implications or the structures of relativistic Stars in f(T) gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kpadonou; M. J. S. Houndjo; M. E. Rodrigues

    2015-09-27

    We investigate in this paper the structures of neutron and quark stars in f(T) theory of gravity where T denotes the torsion scalar. Attention is attached to the TOV type equations of this theory and numerical integrations of these equations are performed with suitable EoS. We search for the deviation of the mass-radius diagrams for power-law and exponential type correction from the TT gravity. Our results show that for some values of the input parameters appearing in the considered models, f(T) theory promotes more the structures of the relativistic stars, in consistency with the observational data.

  10. 43 "{"`"MV"|WEu~_W (2006-5) FT-ICR ,,,`J^NX^[,'Y...`f,Sw"z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    43 "{"`"MV"|WEu~_W (2006-5) FT-ICR ,,,`J^NX^[,'Y...`f,̻Sw"z FT-ICR studyOE,,,,"K,ȷ @,ͷ,,,,,,OE,,,D ,,,,ŭ{OENX",--l`S,Z,CX,OEZq"Է,̷,Vtg, ,,,,,,,D,,CRoNX^[,G^m[

  11. FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI",G`OE",Sw"z i"OE`H`ZZOES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI",G`OE",̻Sw"z i"OE`H`ZZOES1 E"OE`@H 2 j >ͭ췳" ,P C. Kohno1 , S. Inoue2 , T. Yoshida2 and S. Maruyama1,2 y,,,,ɷz"OEvZX,,,OEZq EZqNX^[,̷["Z,"\\,,,D, FT-ICR ,--p,,VSR"NX^[CI",G`OE"Zq,̻Sw"zZOE,s,,,,ŷ,,D yZOEz},P,FT-ICR Z

  12. ?CDM model in f(T) gravity: reconstruction, thermodynamics and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salako, I.G.; Kpadonou, A.V.; Houndjo, M.J.S.; Tossa, J.; Rodrigues, M.E. E-mail: esialg@gmail.com E-mail: sthoundjo@yahoo.fr

    2013-11-01

    We investigate some cosmological features of the ?CDM model in the framework of the generalized teleparallel theory of gravity f(T) where T denotes the torsion scalar. Its reconstruction is performed giving rise to an integration constant Q and other input parameters according to which we point out more analysis. Thereby, we show that for some values of this constant, the first and second laws of thermodynamics can be realized in the equilibrium description, for the universe with the temperature inside the horizon equal to that at the apparent horizon. Moreover, still within these suitable values of the constant, we show that the model may be stable using the de Sitter and Power-Law cosmological solutions.

  13. Crustal thickness and support of topography on Venus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, Peter Benjamin

    The topography of a terrestrial planet can be supported by several mechanisms: (1) crustal thickness variations, (2) density variations in the crust and mantle, (3) dynamic support, and (4) lithospheric stresses. Each of ...

  14. Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

    2013-01-01

    High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

  15. Gender Effects on Cortical Thickness , Thompson PM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    thickness was estimated voxel by voxel and projected as a local value (mm) onto the cortical surface, where brains that appears to involve the architecture of the cortical mantle. We detected significantly greater

  16. Thickness trends and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    Thickness trends and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Formation, Appalachian to the lithostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle and Upper Devonian shale succession of the Appalachian

  17. A comparison of thick film and thin film traffic stripes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keese, Charles J

    1952-01-01

    of this thesis. CONTESTS Introduction ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 Scope and Obfectives Method of Conducting Road Service Tests ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 8 PART I A Comparison of Paint Films of Various Thicknesses . . . . . . . . ~ ~, ~, ~ 72 App1ioation... of Test Stripes . Results of Thiokness Tests . 13 19 Conclusions 2$ PART II A Comparison of Various Thick Film and Thin Film Traffic Stripes. 26 Paint Stripes Over Adhesive Films Rosin Striping Compounds. . . + ~ . , ~ 29 ~ ~ ~ Preforsmd Plastic...

  18. Microfluidic devices with thick-film electrochemical detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph; Tian, Baomin; Sahlin, Eskil

    2005-04-12

    An apparatus for conducting a microfluidic process and analysis, including at least one elongated microfluidic channel, fluidic transport means for transport of fluids through the microfluidic channel, and at least one thick-film electrode in fluidic connection with the outlet end of the microfluidic channel. The present invention includes an integrated on-chip combination reaction, separation and thick-film electrochemical detection microsystem, for use in detection of a wide range of analytes, and methods for the use thereof.

  19. Ionospheric slab thickness in middle and low latitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, K.; Liu, X.M. (NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01

    The equivalent slab thickness of the ionosphere at 15 stations in middle and low latitudes was studied to determine its dependence on solar cycle and location. The data were grouped by season. The following are the major conclusions. There appears to be little or no geographical, or geomagnetic, dependence. The slab thickness varies approximately linearly with the 12-month smoothed values of the 10.7-cm solar radio flux. In middle latitudes the winter midnight thickness is essentially independent of the flux, whereas in summer and equinox the midnight thickness increases with increase of solar flux. The noon thickness increases with increase of solar flux in all seasons. The zero-order Fourier coeffficients for the diurnal curves at all 15 stations were expressed as linear functions of the 10.7-cm flux. The higher harmonic coefficients showed no appreciable dependence on solar flux. The pronounced predawn increase in slab thickness is caused by low values of the maximum electron density, not by increase of total electron content. 10 refs.

  20. FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI"(Sin, n = 10-30),SwFT-ICR Mass Spectrometer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR ,,,VSR"NX^[CI"(Sin, n = 10-30),̻Sw, such as Si15E4 + . ,PD,,,, "OEvZX,,,OEZqEZqNX^[,,,,C--~_"I,NX^[,ͷC"dZq`fZq,"׻,,, Gb

  1. Computation of Texture and Stereoscopic Depth in Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahle, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    The computation of texture and of stereoscopic depth is limited by a number of factors in the design of the optical front-end and subsequent processing stages in humans and machines. A number of limiting factors in ...

  2. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facilitys ground-based facilities.

  3. In-Depth Temperature Profiles in Pyrolyzing Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reszka, Pedro

    The move towards performance-based design of the fire resistance of structures requires more accurate design methods. An important variable in the fire performance of timber structures is the in-depth temperature distribution, as wood is weakened...

  4. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  5. Case depth verification of hardened samples with Barkhausen noise sweeps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santa-aho, Suvi; Vippola, Minnamari; Lepist, Toivo [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O. Box 589, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Hakanen, Merja [Stresstech Oy, Tikkutehtaantie 1, 40800 Vaajakoski (Finland); Sorsa, Aki; Leivisk, Kauko [University of Oulu, Control Engineering Laboratory, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2014-02-18

    An interesting topic of recent Barkhausen noise (BN) method studies is the application of the method to case depth evaluation of hardened components. The utilization of BN method for this purpose is based on the difference in the magnetic properties between the hardened case and the soft core. Thus, the detection of case depth with BN can be achieved. The measurements typically have been carried out by using low magnetizing frequencies which have deeper penetration to the ferromagnetic samples than the conventional BN measurement. However, the penetration depth is limited due to eddy current damping of the signal. We introduce here a newly found sweep measurement concept for the case depth evaluation. In this study sweep measurements were carried out with various magnetizing frequencies and magnetizing voltages to detect the effect of different frequency and voltage and their correspondence to the actual case depth values verified from destructive characterization. Also a BN measurement device that has an implemented sweep analysis option was utilised. The samples were either induction or case-hardened samples and sample geometry contained both rod samples and gear axle samples with different case depth values. Samples were also further characterized with Xray diffraction to study the residual stress state of the surface. The detailed data processing revealed that also other calculated features than the maximum slope division of the 1st derivative of the BN signal could hold the information about the case depth value of the samples. The sweep method was able to arrange the axles into correct order according to the case depth value even though the axles were used.

  6. GE Advising & Registration Students FT Faculty PT Faculty Admin Unit 4 Other Staff Students have access to quality GE advising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    GE Advising & Registration Students FT Faculty PT Faculty Admin Unit 4 Other Staff Students have access to quality GE advising 9% 13% 11% 13% 10% 8% Faculty can easily advise students on GE requirements 10% 18% 9% 24% 33% 11% Staff academic advisors can easily advise students on GE requirements 8% 11

  7. Initial Reaction in CVD Nanotube Synthesis by FT-ICR Shuhei Inoue, Satoshi Yoshinaga and Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Initial Reaction in CVD Nanotube Synthesis by FT-ICR Shuhei Inoue, Satoshi Yoshinaga and Shigeo of relatively large catalyst clusters of iron, cobalt and nickel with ethanol. The details of the experimental, and in case of nickel, four hydrogen atoms were dissociated from the clusters. However in case of cobalt

  8. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. No. 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1996-09-05

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

  9. Abstract for MICROSCALE THERMOPHYSICAL ENGINEERING WORKSHOP IN KYONGJU FT-ICR Study of Carbon and Carbon-Metal Binary Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    & Detection Cylinder Electrical Feedthrough Gas Addition Ionization Laser Probe Laser Fig. 1 FT-ICR apparatus, while the other two 60 sectors were used for detection of the image current induced by the cyclotron of a solid sample disk, followed by cooling with supersonic expansion of pulsed helium gas. The ionized

  10. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (2262 Hampton Rd., Livermore, CA 94550); Montcalm, Claude (14 Jami St., Livermore, CA 94550); Walton, Christopher (2927 Lorina St., #2, Berkeley, CA 94705-1852)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  11. Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    beneath the eye Reticulated Python 14 to 18 ft. Distinct reddish eyes; tan body with dark brown net dull with age. Males have larger spikes along back. Black and White Tegu 2 to 3 ft. Dark bands. Yellowish-tan to dark brown; red dewlap with yellow border Ianar Svi NATIVE Look-a-Likes David Barkasy

  12. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  13. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 4 to 25 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.56 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.76.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.56 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 25 cm{sup 2}.

  14. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  15. Measurement of sheath thickness at a floating potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Oh, Se-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    In a cylindrical Langmuir probe measurement, ion current is collected from the surface of the sheath surrounded at probe tip, not at the surface of the probe tip. By using this, the sheath thickness can be obtained, if we know some unknown parameters, such as ion current, plasma density, and electron temperature. In this paper, we present a method to measure sheath thickness by using a wave cutoff method and a floating harmonic method. The measured result is in a good agreement with Allen-Boyd-Reynolds theory.

  16. Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul (Bedford, MA) [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

  17. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perdieu, Louisa H. (Overland Park, KS)

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  18. Quantum rings of non-uniform thickness in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez-Prada, F. A.; Garca, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    We consider a model of crater-shaped quantum dot in form of a thin layer whose thickness linearly increases with the distance from the axis. We show that one-particle wave equation for the electron confined in such structure can be completely separated in the adiabatic limit when the quantum dot thickness is much smaller than its lateral dimension. Analytical solutions found for this model has been used as base functions for analysing the effect of non-homogeneity on the electronic spectrum in the framework of the exact diagonalization method.

  19. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an {alpha} of 0.9. Research is proposed to enable further development and optimization of these catalysts by (1) better understanding the role and interrelationship of various catalyst composition and preparation parameters on attrition resistance, activity, and selectivity of these catalysts, (2) the presence of sulfide ions on a precipitated iron catalyst, and (3) the effect of water on sulfided iron F-T catalysts for its activity, selectivity, and attrition. Catalyst preparations will be based on spray drying. The research employed, among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis at high pressure. Catalyst activity and selectivity is evaluated using a small fixed-bed reactor and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1-m-diameter, 2-m-tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt%. The results show that the use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO2 wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than the type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). The two catalysts were also tested at The Center for Applied Energy Research in Lexington, Kentucky of the University of Kentucky. Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and

  20. August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New 87801, ron@gis.nmt.edu Abstract The Woodford Shale (Upper Devonian) is 0­300 ft thick in southeastern at depths of less than 7,000 ft as it rises out of the Permian Basin. The Woodford Shale is absent from

  1. Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, J.L.

    1996-07-16

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials. 6 figs.

  2. Very thick holographic nonspatial filtering of laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    of a thick photo- polymer with diffusion amplification (PDA). We report results of holo- graphic nonspatial Society of Photo-Optical In- strumentation Engineers. [S0091-3286(97)01606-1] Subject terms: holography information if the input laser beam has an intensity minimum at a critical feature location. It is also

  3. Study of Some Cosmological Parameters for Interacting New Holographic Dark Energy Model in f(T) Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjit, Chayan

    2015-01-01

    The present work is based on the idea of an interacting framework of new holographic dark energy with cold dark matter in the background of $f(T)$ gravity. Here, we have considered the flat modified Friedmann universe for $f(T)$ gravity which is filled with new Holographic dark energy and dark matter. We have derived some cosmological parameters like Deceleration parameter, EoS parameter, State-finder parameters, Cosmographic parameters, {\\it Om} parameter and graphically investigated the nature of these parameters for the above mentioned interacting scenario. The results are found to be consistent with the accelerating universe. Also we have graphically investigated the trajectories in $\\omega $--$ \\omega'$ plane for different values of the interacting parameter and explored the freezing region and thawing region in $\\omega $--$ \\omega'$ plane. Finally, we have analyzed the stability of this model.

  4. Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Noise Analysis and Synthesis for 3D Laser Depth Scanners Xianfang Sun a,b,, Paul L. Rosin a , Ralph the noise present in range data measured by a Konica Minolta Vivid 910 scanner, in order to better characterise real scanner noise. Methods for denoising 3D mesh data have often assumed the noise to be Gaussian

  5. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  6. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    2012-02-14

    as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain...

  7. Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier1 , Edouard Auvinet1 , Jean´erationnelle, Universit´e de Montr´eal, Canada {rougierc, auvinet, meunier, mignotte}@iro.umontreal.ca 2 Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit´e de Montr´eal, ETS, Canada jacques

  8. Wave-current interaction in water of finite depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenhua, 1967-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the nonlinear interaction of waves and current in water of finite depth is studied. Wind is not included. In the first part, a 2D theory for the wave effect on a turbulent current over rough or smooth bottom ...

  9. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  10. Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Lower Bounds on Interactive Compressibility by Constant-Depth Circuits Arkadev Chattopadhyay to prove the first lower bounds on general probabilistic multi-round instance compression. We show, and strengthens results of Dubrov and Ishai [DI06]. We also show that a similar lower bound holds for Majority. We

  11. 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    73 7 Predictive Risk Mapping of Water Table Depths in a Brazilian Cerrado Area R. L. Manzione, M extend from the northern margins of the Amazon rain for- ests to outliers on the southern borders metabolize throughout the year, drawing on soil water reserves, and can withstand short-lived fires. contents

  12. Dual-depth adapted irreducible formal multizeta values Leila Schneps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneps, Leila

    , and the relations between them. Consider the following diagram, in which the four top spaces are Hopf algebras the double shuffle Lie algebra, equipped with the standard weight grading and depth filtration; we write ds = n3dsn and denote the filtration by ds1 ds2 . The double shuffle Lie algebra is dual

  13. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1996-03-21

    The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

  14. Born-Infeld and Charged Black Holes with non-linear source in $f(T)$ Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ednaldo L. B. Junior; Manuel E. Rodrigues; Mahouton J. S. Houndjo

    2015-03-24

    We investigate $f(T)$ theory coupled with a nonlinear source of electrodynamics, for a spherically symmetric and static spacetime in $4D$. We re-obtain the Born-Infeld and Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS solutions. We generalize the no-go theorem for any content that obeys the relationship $\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;0}_{0}=\\mathcal{T}^{\\;\\;1}_{1}$ for the energy-momentum tensor and a given set of tetrads. Our results show new classes of solutions where the metrics are related through $b(r)=-Na(r)$. We do the introductory analysis showing that solutions are that of asymptotically flat black holes, with a singularity at the origin of the radial coordinate, covered by a single event horizon. We also reconstruct the action for this class of solutions and obtain the functional form $f(T) = f_0\\left(-T\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$ and $\\mathcal{L}_{NED} = \\mathcal{L}_0\\left(-F\\right)^{(N+3)/[2(N+1)]}$. Using the Lagrangian density of Born-Infeld, we obtain a new class of charged black holes where the action reads $f(T) = -16\\beta_{BI} \\left[1 - \\sqrt{1 + (T/4\\beta_{BI})}\\right]$.

  15. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  16. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  17. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  18. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  19. Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmignani, B

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

  20. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Menomonee Falls, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject Si-Al-O-N films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500# C. or less.

  1. Probing the neutron skin thickness in collective modes of excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils Paar; Andrea Horvat

    2014-01-13

    Nuclear collective motion provides valuable constraint on the size of neutron-skin thickness and the properties of nuclear matter symmetry energy. By employing relativistic nuclear energy density functional (RNEDF) and covariance analysis related to $\\chi^2$ fitting of the model parameters, relevant observables are identified for dipole excitations, which strongly correlate with the neutron-skin thickness $(r_{np})$, symmetry energy at saturation density $(J)$ and slope of the symmetry energy $(L)$. Using the RNEDF framework and experimental data on pygmy dipole strength ($^{68}$Ni, $^{132}$Sn, $^{208}$Pb) and dipole polarizability ($^{208}$Pb), it is shown how the values of $J$, and $L$, and $r_{np}$ are constrained. The isotopic dependence of moments associated to dipole excitations in $^{116-136}$Sn shows that the low-energy dipole strength and polarizability in neutron-rich nuclei display strong sensitivity to the symmetry energy parameter $J$, more pronounced than in isotopes with moderate neutron-to-proton number ratios.

  2. Method for making thick and/or thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-02

    A method to make thick or thin films a very low cost. The method is generally similar to the conventional tape casting techniques while being more flexible and versatile. The invention involves preparing a slip (solution) of desired material and including solvents such as ethanol and an appropriate dispersant to prevent agglomeration. The slip is then sprayed on a substrate to be coated using an atomizer which spreads the slip in a fine mist. Upon hitting the substrate, the solvent evaporates, leaving a green tape containing the powder and other additives, whereafter the tape may be punctured, cut, and heated for the desired application. The tape thickness can vary from about 1 .mu.m upward.

  3. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  4. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  5. Analysis of Proper Depth for Gaining Seawater Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and seawater temperatures near the city. It is impossible to get deep sea water for Busan area, since according to the season, while that of deep sea water is constant. Point 1 207 Area 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20 the maximum sea water depth around Busan is about 150m. It will be a good option to use surface layer water

  6. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Hybrid laser-arc welding of nickel-base alloys can increase productivity and decrease costs during construction and repair of critical components in nuclear power plants. However, laser and hybrid welding of nickel-base alloys is not well understood. This project sought to understand the physical processes during hybrid welding necessary to fabricate quality joints in Alloy 690, a Ni- Cr-Fe alloy. This document presents a summary of the data and results collected over the course of the project. The supporting documents are a collection of the research that has been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals along with a report from the partner at the national lab. Understanding the solidification behavior of Alloy 690 is important for knowing the final properties of the weldment. A study was undertaken to calculate the solidification parameters, such as temperature gradient, solidification rate, and cooling rate in Alloy 690 welds. With this information and measured cell and dendrite arm spacings, an Alloy 690 map was constructed to guide process parameter development and interpret fusion zones in later hybrid welds. This research is contained in Solidification Map of a Nickel Base Alloy. The keyhole formed under high laser intensity gives the hybrid welding technique the greater penetration depths compared to arc welding. However, keyhole behavior can form defects in the material, so knowing transient keyhole characteristics is important. With international collaborators, a study was undertaken to validate a new process monitoring tool known as inline coherent imaging (ICI), which is able to measure the keyhole depth with spatial and temporal resolutions on the order of 10 microns and 10 microseconds. ICI was validated for five alloy systems, including Alloy 690. Additionally, the keyhole growth rates at the start of welding were measured with unprecedented accuracy. This research is contained in Real Time Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Keyhole Depth by Laser Interferometry. During full penetration welding of thick sections, root defects can form, which result in unacceptable weld quality. A study was undertaken to determine the competing forces in root defect formation by independently changing the weight forces and surface tension forces. The weight force was altered by changing the plate thickness, and the surface tension force was altered by changing the surface condition at the bottom surface. Root defects do depend on these two forces. This research is contained in Mitigation of Root Defect in Laser and Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding. Validation of the hybrid laser-arc model is necessary to properly model heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in Alloy 690 hybrid welds. Therefore, the developed model was validated for low carbon steel. Temperatures calculated by the model were included into a microstructural model in order to calculate the phase fractions. Process maps were developed for the selection of welding parameters to avoid martensite formation. This research is contained in Fusion Zone Microstructure in Full Penetration Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Low Alloy Steel. Alloy 690 suffers from ductility dip cracking, a form of hot cracking. This type of cracking inhibits the use of multipass welding to join Alloy 690. Our partners at ORNL performed some hot ductility testing with Alloy 690 samples using digital image correlation. The results of this work is contained in the report Summary of 690 ductility dip cracking testing using Gleeble and digital image correlation. Macro-porosity is a limiting factor in the widespread deployment of laser and hybrid laser-arc welding for construction and repair of nuclear power plant components. Keyhole instability and fluctuation results in the formation of large bubbles, which become trapped at the advancing solid- liquid interface as pores. Laser and hybrid laser-arc welds were fabricated for a range of conditions. Porosity levels in the welds were measured in X-ray computed tomography (CT), which provides very detailed data on the size and lo

  7. A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability, and nonlinear climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    A depth-derived Pleistocene age model: Uncertainty estimates, sedimentation variability. To avoid biasing this ``depth-derived'' age estimate, the depth scale is first corrected for the effects sediment accumulation rates are estimated and modeled as an autocorrelated stochastic process. Depth-derived

  8. Depth-dependent magnetism in epitaxial MnSb thin films: effects of surface passivation and cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldous J. D.; Sanchez-Hanke C.; Burrows, C.W.; Maskery, I.; Brewer, M.S.; Hase, T.P.A.; Duffy, J.A.; Lees, M. Rs; Decoster, T.; Theis, W.; Quesada, A.; Schmid, A.K.; Bell, G.R.

    2012-03-15

    Depth-dependent magnetism in MnSb(0001) epitaxial films has been studied by combining experimental methods with different surface specificities: polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). A native oxide {approx}4.5 nm thick covers air-exposed samples which increases the film's coercivity. HCl etching efficiently removes this oxide and in situ surface treatment of etched samples enables surface magnetic contrast to be observed in SPLEEM. A thin Sb capping layer prevents oxidation and preserves ferromagnetism throughout the MnSb film. The interpretation of Mn L{sub 3,2} edge XMCD data is discussed.

  9. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haro, Jaume; Amors, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lematre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  10. DYNAMIC DELAMINATION IN THROUGH-THICKNESS REINFORCED DCB SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Bridged crack models using beam theory formulation have proved to be effective in the modeling of quasistatic delamination crack growth in through thickness reinforced structures. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation in these structures with the beam theory formulation. Steady state crack propagation characteristics unique to the dynamic case are first identified. Dynamic crack propagation and the energetics of steady state dynamic crack growth for a Double Cantilever beam (DCB) configuration loaded with a flying wedge is examined next. We find that steady state crack growth is attainable for this loading configuration provided certain conditions are satisfied.

  11. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T. L.

    2001-12-27

    averaged over a distance covered by aircraft in 1 s (-130 m).) tt(X, g = -d) = Sice(t: T, x). (6) The value t = - can be interpreted as the time when S ice(t, x) represents the wave energy due to scattering specifically from depth d, as opposed... of the Greenland ice sheet produced by Mark Fahnestock (Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ron Kwok (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasa- dena). The helpful suggestions and comments of two...

  12. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabamaAboutTotal Energy GlossaryDepth of Crude

  13. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  14. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  15. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 C, 65 C, and 80 C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  16. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  17. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformities in Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    from various parts of a PEFC, thickness distributions can beour previously developed PEFC models. 4,5 The simulations

  18. The effect of film thickness on the failure strain of polymer-supported metal films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    The effect of film thickness on the failure strain of polymer-supported metal films Nanshu Lu-supported copper films with a strong (1 1 1) fiber texture and with thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 1 lm. Films with thicknesses below 200 nm fail by intergranular fracture at elongations of only a few percent. Thicker films

  19. Thick Filament Length and Isoform Composition Determine Self-Organized Contractile Units in Actomyosin Bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardel, Margaret

    Thick Filament Length and Isoform Composition Determine Self-Organized Contractile Units motors are clustered into thick filaments. Although the role of mechanochemistry is well appreciated, the extent to which thick filament length regulates actomyosin contractility is unknown. Here, we study

  20. Bilayer thickness effects on nanoindentation behavior of Ag/Ni multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    by nanoindentation hardness and creep tests. The hardness increased with decreasing bilayer thickness, although of nanoindentation creep tests on Ag/Ni nanomultilayers with various bilayer thicknesses. Multilayered Ag/Ni films thickness. A nanoindentation creep test was used to study the creep behavior of nano- scale multilayers

  1. Effect of surface roughness on magnetic domain wall thickness, domain size, and coercivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    , Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 G. Palasantzas and J. Th. M. De Hosson Department nm thick deposited on plasma etched Si 100 substrates showed that, by increasing surface rough- ness nearly linearly with film thickness. Such an increase of the thickness fluctuations5 was attributed

  2. Test of CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Li; Alfred III Garson; Ira Jung; Michael Groza; Paul Dowkontt; Richard Bose; Garry Simburger; Arnold Burger; Henric Krawczynski

    2007-12-08

    The Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) process produces Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity. Various groups,including our own, previously reported on the test of 2x2x0.5 cm3 MHB CZT detectors grown by the company Orbotech and read out with 8x8 pixels. In this contribution, we describe the optimization of the photolithographic process used for contacting the CZT detector with pixel contacts. The optimized process gives a high yield of good pixels down to pixel diameters/pitches of 50 microns. Furthermore, we discuss the performance of 0.5 cm and 0.75 cm thick detectors contacted with 64 and 225 pixel read out with the RENA-3 ASICs from the company NOVA R&D.

  3. Thick Pixelated CZT Detectors With Isolated Steering Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Jung; A. B. Garson; J. S. Perkins; H. Krawczynski; J. Matteson; R. T. Skelton; A. Burger; M. Groza

    2005-11-18

    We explore the possibility to improve the performance of 0.5 cm thick Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with the help of steering grids on the anode side of the detectors. Steering grids can improve the energy resolution of CZT detectors by enhancing the small pixel effect; furthermore, they can increase their detection efficiency by steering electrons to the anode pixels which otherwise would drift to the area between pixels. Previously, the benefit of steering grids had been compromised by additional noise associated with currents between the steering grids and the anode pixels. We use thin film deposition techniques to isolate the steering grid from the CZT substrate by a 150 nm thick layer of the isolator Aluminiumoxide. While the thin layer does not affect the beneficial effect of the steering grid on the weighting potentials and the electric field inside the detector, it suppresses the currents between the steering grid and the anode pixels. In this contribution, we present first results from a 2 x 2 x 0.5 cm CZT detector with 8 x 8 pixels that we tested before and after deposition of an isolated steering grid. The steering grid improves the 662 keV energy resolution of the detector by a factor of 1.3 (from about 2% to about 1.5%), while not reducing the detection efficiency. To gain further insights into the detector response in the region between pixels, we measured energy spectra with a collimated Cs137 source. The collimator measurements can be used to enhance our understanding of energy spectra measured under flood illumination of the detectors.

  4. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  5. Vertically Loaded Anchor: Drag Coefficient, Fall Velocity, and Penetration Depth using Laboratory Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenac, William

    2011-08-08

    The offshore oilfield industry is continuously developing unique and break-through technologies and systems to extract hydrocarbons from ever increasing ocean depths. Due to the extreme depths being explored presently, large anchors are being...

  6. A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    A Convex Hull Peeling Depth Approach to Nonparametric Massive Multivariate Data Analysis) and Multivariate Data Analysis Definitions on CHP Data Depth (Ordering Multivariate Data) Quantiles and Density with CHP Multivariate Median Skewness and Kurtosis of a Multivariate Distribution Outlier Detection

  7. Seismic evidence for thermal runaway during intermediate-depth earthquake rupture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Sarah A.

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes occur at depths where temperatures and pressures exceed those at which brittle failure is expected. There are two leading candidates for the physical mechanism behind these earthquakes: ...

  8. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband December 2011. [1] A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth

  9. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.1, Effects of supports and promoters on cobalt F-T catalyst behavior in fixed bed vs. slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1995-01-17

    A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina, silica, or titania were prepared with Ru and/or ZrO{sub 2} as promoters. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Similar trends were observed in both reactors for support effects. However, this was not the case for the effects of promoters. Noble metal promotion effects were much more accentuated in the fixed bed reactor than under slurry bubble column reaction conditions, while the opposite seemed to hold true in the case of ZrO{sub 2} promotion effects, at least for SiO{sub 2}-supported Co catalysts.

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense-in-Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Fabro

    2007-10-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing defense-in-depth strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  11. Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kuipers; Mark Fabro

    2006-05-01

    Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing defense-in-depth strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.

  12. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  13. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    by a blue light-emitting diode, the x and x depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric

  14. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude (Livermore, CA); Folta, James Allen (Livermore, CA); Walton, Christopher Charles (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  15. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the ray-based Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple with a differently rotated tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single

  16. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy with simpler the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to the calculation of migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with different types of anisotropy

  17. Depth-domain processing of teleseismic receiver functions and generalized three-dimensional imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    by itself or as a part of depth migration, is usually used for noise suppression in teleseismic receiver generalize the pre-stack depth migration methodology by introducing numerous signal-enhancement schemes could be superior to record summation used in conventional depth migration. #12;3 Introduction

  18. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics, Faculty depth migration. The main advantage of our method over the methods based on Gaussian beams is a direct. Thus, the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is especially suitable for a target-oriented imaging

  19. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated images in simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to correct single

  20. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without vertical gradients-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary The Kirchhoff prestack depth migration is used to calculate. The bottom layer is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both

  1. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate is limited to P-waves. Keywords 3-D Kirchhoff prestack depth migration, anisotropic velocity model, rotation

  2. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic rotations of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single- layer

  3. Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics, Faculty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration the Marmousi data Karel Zacek*, Department Geophysics--stack depth migration. method on Marmousi data (Versteeg & 1991). advantage over methods Gaussian beams. Thus, Gaussian packet pre--stack depth migration is especially suitable target--oriented imaging

  4. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 3: Simple 2-D models V#19;aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.m#11;.cuni.cz Summary Gaussian packet prestack depth migration is used. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth migration, Gabor transform, 2-D velocity model

  5. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both heterogeneous

  6. Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf-surface layer with mean daytime bottom depth of 43740 m (night: 61738 m), and a main migrating layer with mean bottom depth of 333776 m (night: 54727 m). Diel vertical migration rates for dusk ascents reached

  7. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  8. PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO AND WYOMING, UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL) STATIONS IN COLORADO Laituri Mazdak Arabi #12;ii ABSTRACT PRACTICAL SNOW DEPTH SAMPLING AROUND SIX SNOW TELEMETRY (SNOTEL. These stations measure snow depth (SD), snow water equivalent (SWE), air temperature and precipitation. To assess

  9. Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling soil depth from topographic and land cover attributes Teklu K. Tesfa,1 David G. Tarboton,1 June 2009; published 29 October 2009. [1] Soil depth is an important input parameter in hydrological and ecological modeling. Presently, the soil depth data available in national soil databases (STATSGO and SSURGO

  10. Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport COLM independent parameter- izations that use ocean color to estimate the penetration depth of shortwave radiation. This study offers a way to evaluate the changes in irradiance penetration depths in coupled ocean

  11. Total Sq Ft Recreation Sq Ft (gymnasium)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    for Hootie and the Blow Fish. 6 University of Maryland Campus Recreation Services Other Information As part

  12. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  13. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  14. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1992-09-15

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

  15. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body.

  16. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

  17. Super-spinning compact objects generated by thick accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo, E-mail: zilongli@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn [Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2013-03-01

    If astrophysical black hole candidates are the Kerr black holes predicted by General Relativity, the value of their spin parameter must be subject to the theoretical bound |a{sub *}| ? 1. In this work, we consider the possibility that these objects are either non-Kerr black holes in an alternative theory of gravity or exotic compact objects in General Relativity. We study the accretion process when their accretion disk is geometrically thick with a simple version of the Polish doughnut model. The picture of the accretion process may be qualitatively different from the one around a Kerr black hole. The inner edge of the disk may not have the typical cusp on the equatorial plane any more, but there may be two cusps, respectively above and below the equatorial plane. We extend previous work on the evolution of the spin parameter and we estimate the maximum value of a{sub *} for the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei. Since measurements of the mean radiative efficiency of AGNs require ? > 0.15, we infer the ''observational'' bound |a{sub *}|?<1.3, which seems to be quite independent of the exact nature of these objects. Such a bound is only slightly weaker than |a{sub *}|?<1.2 found in previous work for thin disks.

  18. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  19. Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology with a Cobalt Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    . The process, known as gas-to-liquid (GTL), was based on two steps: first, steam reforming of natural gasVed March 30, 2007 Interest in the gas-to-liquid process (GTL) using Fischer-Tropsch reactors (F-T) has of the initial exergy of the gas is used to convert it into liquid fuel. In the present study, we analyze

  20. FT-ICR STUDIES OF CHEMICAL REACTION OF SILICON CLUSTERS, SHIGEO MARUYAMA (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ. Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656), SHUHEI INOUE (Dept.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Abstract FT-ICR STUDIES OF CHEMICAL REACTION OF SILICON CLUSTERS, SHIGEO MARUYAMA (Eng. Res. Inst. The reaction kinetics is compared with Jarrold's ion drift tube experiments with about 106 times higher pressure and 106 times shorter reaction period. The existence of isomers for most of cluster size

  1. FT-ICR Study of Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions Masamichi Kohno, Shuhei Inoue and Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FT-ICR Study of Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions Masamichi Kohno, Shuhei drastically different. The chemical reaction of these clusters with NO was used as the probe of the structure/Co-doped and Ni/Y-doped materials was much more reactive than pure carbon clusters. Chemical reaction of LaC44

  2. Japan/US Joint Seminar: Molecular and Microscale Thermophysical Phenomena in Nanotechnology, August 8 11, 1999, Sendai FT-ICR study of chemical reaction of silicon clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    8 11, 1999, Sendai FT-ICR study of chemical reaction of silicon clusters S. Maruyama, M. Kohno and characterization of the quantum dot. Here, experimental measurements of chemical reaction of silicon clusters Sin reaction of semiconductor materials such as silicon and germanium for the current nanotechnology

  3. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and initial results are also presented along with a discussion of the preliminary findings. Comparative NDE of various defects in reinforced concrete specimens is a key component in identifying the most promising techniques and directing the research and development efforts needed to characterize concrete degradation in commercial NPPs. This requires access to the specimens for data collection using state-of-the-art technology. The construction of the specimen detailed in this report allows for an evaluation of how different NDE techniques may interact with the size and complexities of NPP concrete structures. These factors were taken into account when determining specimen size and features to ensure a realistic design. The lateral dimensions of the specimen were also chosen to mitigate unrealistic boundary effects that would not affect the results of field NPP concrete testing. Preliminary results show that, while the current methods are able to identify some of the deeper defects, improvements in data processing or hardware are necessary to be able to achieve the precision and reliability achieved in evaluating thinner and less heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  4. Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SACM, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Vinyar, I. [PELIN Limited Liability Company 27 A, Gzhatskaya Str, office 103 St. Petersbourg 195220 (Russian Federation); Relland, J. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SIS, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Commeaux, C. [Institut de Physique Nuclaire, campus Universitaire-Bat 103, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-01-29

    In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

  5. SU-E-T-319: The Effect of Slice Thickness On IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, S; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of volume estimated of a treatment planning system is investigated in this study. In addition, the effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning is also studied. Methods: The accuracy in volume determination was investigated using a water phantom containing various objects with known volumes ranging from 1100cm{sup 3}. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (110 mm). The CT data sets were sent to Eclipse TPS for contour delineation and volume calculation. The effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning was studied using a commercial phantom containing four different shaped objects. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (15 mm). IMRT plans were generated for the different CT datasets to calculate TCP, homogeneity (HI) and conformity indices (CI). Results: The variability of volumes with CT slice thickness was significant especially for small volume structures. The minimum and maximum error in the volume estimation is in the range of ?2.3% to 92%. On the other hand, with increasing slice thickness, the PTV mean dose and TCP values decreases. Maximum variation of ?5% was observed in mean dose and ?2% in TCP with slice thickness change from 15 mm. The relative decrease in target volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose is ?5% slice thickness change from 15 mm. HI increases up to 163% and CI decreases by 4% between 15 mm slice thickness change, producing highly inhomogeneous and least conformal plan. Conclusion: Accuracy of volume estimation is dependent on CT slice thickness and the contouring algorithm in a TPS. During TPS commissioning and for all clinical protocols, evaluation of volume should be included to provide the limit of accuracy in DVH calculation. A smaller slice thickness provides superior dosimetry with improved TCP values. Thus, the smallest possible slice thickness should be used for IMRT planning.

  6. Thick-Target Neutron Yield from the 19F(alpha,n) Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. B. Norman; T. E. Chupp; K. T. Lesko; G. L. Woodruff; P. J. Grant

    2015-01-10

    Thick-target neutron yields from the 19F(alpha,n) reaction are reported for E(alpha) = 3.5 - 10.0 MeV.

  7. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayr, Lukas; Kltzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Raffael; Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin ; Rameshan, Christoph; Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/BC/01, 1060 Vienna

    2014-05-15

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for real and inverse model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7, magic angle) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  8. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  9. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  10. Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

    2009-11-01

    Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

  11. The depth of pseudotachylyte formation from detailed thermochronology and constraints on coseismic stress drop variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, James D.; Dobson, Kate J.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Mark, Darren F.; Shipton, Zoe K.

    2012-01-01

    Subnormal Cenozoic geothermal gradients in the extinctC. E. Manning (2003), Geothermal gradients in con- tinentalkm under typical geothermal gradients. At these depths, the

  12. The impact of remineralization depth on the airsea carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, EY; Primeau, F; Sarmiento, JL

    2009-01-01

    on the airsea carbon balance Eun Young Kwon 1 * , Franoistion depthdepends on the balance between particle sinkingfactors can affect this balance, including temperature 1 ,

  13. Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  14. Plant Water Use in Owens Valley, CA: Understanding the Influence of Climate and Depth to Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pataki, Diane E

    2008-01-01

    plant responses to water stress, plant chemical composition,Phreatophytes (Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1423).T. E. Dawson. 2006. Depth of water acquisition by invading

  15. Nonlinear response of dense colloidal suspensions under oscillatory shear: Mode-coupling theory and FT-rheology experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Brader; M. Siebenbuerger; M. Ballauff; K. Reinheimer; M. Wilhelm; S. J. Frey; F. Weysser; M. Fuchs

    2010-10-13

    Using a combination of theory, experiment and simulation we investigate the nonlinear response of dense colloidal suspensions to large amplitude oscillatory shear flow. The time-dependent stress response is calculated using a recently developed schematic mode-coupling-type theory describing colloidal suspensions under externally applied flow. For finite strain amplitudes the theory generates a nonlinear response, characterized by significant higher harmonic contributions. An important feature of the theory is the prediction of an ideal glass transition at sufficiently strong coupling, which is accompanied by the discontinuous appearance of a dynamic yield stress. For the oscillatory shear flow under consideration we find that the yield stress plays an important role in determining the non linearity of the time-dependent stress response. Our theoretical findings are strongly supported by both large amplitude oscillatory (LAOS) experiments (with FT-rheology analysis) on suspensions of thermosensitive core-shell particles dispersed in water and Brownian dynamics simulations performed on a two-dimensional binary hard-disc mixture. In particular, theory predicts nontrivial values of the exponents governing the final decay of the storage and loss moduli as a function of strain amplitude which are in excellent agreement with both simulation and experiment. A consistent set of parameters in the presented schematic model achieves to jointly describe linear moduli, nonlinear flow curves and large amplitude oscillatory spectroscopy.

  16. Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Quarterly report, 1 June 1994--31 August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1994-11-01

    After the authors discovered that aromatics and especially naphthenes can be alkylated by long-chain paraffins, they used short chain paraffins and found they could alkylate aromatics with ethane and ethylene under the same conditions (160 C and 350 psig of H{sub 2}). The hydrocracking of alkylphenolics and alkylaromatics was studied using the same catalyst. It appears that phenolic-OH groups inhibit activity of Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst in alkylation with paraffins. However, a paraffinic side chain attached to the phenol reduces the inhibiting effect of phenolic -OH groups. In situ FT-IR analysis indicated that the presence of phenolic -OH groups affects the ratio of Bronsted to Lewis acid sites. The results suggest that the nature of the aromatic can control the distribution of products obtained in the alkylation of aromatics with alkanes. Results are discussed for the alkylation of aromatics with ethane and ethylene and for hydrocracking of alkylaromatics and alkylphenolics.

  17. Clarification of construction and mining rainfall runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Roberta Davyd

    1982-01-01

    5 ft 0 7ft 3, 5, 7 ft ig 411 depths 35 30 25 20 10 0 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 Settling time (hours) Figure 34. Turbidity removal in column settling of pond 1 sample using 80 mg/1 alum with lime 63 80 70 Legend 0 1ft 0 3 fi' 5 ft p 7ft... Legend 0 1 0 3ft 5 ft D 7 ft 8 5, 7ft ig all depths 140 120 100...

  18. Polyimide-Based Processes for the Fabrication of Thick Electroplated Microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polyimide-Based Processes for the Fabrication of Thick Electroplated Microstructures Mark G. Allen of polyimide as an electroplating mold for thick electroplated microstructures is discussed. Polyimide of the polyimide material can be performed in a conventional manner, and since the polyimide when cured

  19. DC WRRC Report No. 178 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THE OPTIMAL THICKNESS OF A SAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE July 1994 D.C. Water Resources Research Center University of the District OF THE OPTIMAL THICKNESS OF A SAND LAYER IN A SAND FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE Submitted by: Farshad Amini THICKNESS OF A SAND LAYER IN A SAND FILTER WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE July 1994 D.C. Water Resources Research

  20. 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2009 ASME WIND ENERGY SYMPOSIUM Static and Fatigue Testing of Thick Adhesive Joints for Wind as wind blade size has increased. Typical blade joints use paste adhesives several millimeters thick aircraft, which are also of relevance to wind blades in many instances. The strengths of lap-shear and many

  1. Parabolic equation solution of seismo-acoustics problems involving variations in bathymetry and sediment thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sediment thickness Jon M. Collisa and William L. Siegmann Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute110 8th Street within elastic sediment layers. When these methods are implemented together, the parabolic equation method can be applied to problems involving variations in bathymetry and the thickness of sediment layers

  2. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project March 2012. [1] Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared and Assimilation System models. Citation: Johnson, M., et al. (2012), Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness

  3. Finite Ground Coplanar Lines on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Thick Embedded Silicon Oxide Layer Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    Finite Ground Coplanar Lines on CMOS Grade Silicon with a Thick Embedded Silicon Oxide Layer Using grade silicon wafer (poxide layer have been developed using on a CMOS grade silicon substrate ( ~ 4 . 0 1Cl-cm) with an embedded thick silicon oxide layer using

  4. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF A HEMP CONCRETE WALL: IMPACT OF THICKNESS AND COATING.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    to reduce climate change as photosynthesis-mediated carbon sequestration and carbonation serve to reduce sequestration and carbonation. Moreover the increase in the wall's thermal resistance with wall thickness atmospheric carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis is performed on three criteria: wall thickness, renewal

  5. PROCESS ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF LASER FORMING OF VARYING THICKNESS PLATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    of LF varying thickness plate are conducted in this paper. In this paper, the bending mechanism. An analytical model was proposed to predict the bending deformation. A strategy of LF process synthesis-aging the in-plane strain and bending strain. A thickness-dependent da- tabase is established to determine

  6. An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    An Affordable Approach for Robust Design of Thick Laminated Composite Structure Wei Chen* Assistant, composite structure design, hip implant #12;3 1. Introduction With a thick laminated composite structure design freedom and the heterogeneous anisotropic nature of structures, composite structures are much more

  7. A modular process for integrating thick polysilicon MEMS devices with sub-micron CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshari, Ehsan

    A modular process for integrating thick polysilicon MEMS devices with sub-micron CMOS John-1774 ABSTRACT A new MEMS process module, called Mod MEMS, has been developed to monolithically integrate thick (5-10um), multilayer polysilicon MEMS structures with sub-micron CMOS. This process is particularly

  8. Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Coating of a stainless steel tube-wall catalytic reactor with thermally treated polysiloxane thick stainless steel by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition process. Thicknesses up to 10m were developed barrier. Key-words: PACVD, TDMS, stainless steel, surface passivity. 1. Introduction The use of tube

  9. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  10. Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films profiling of polymer films and multilayers using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Deuterium substitution has traditionally been used in depth profiling of polymers but can affect the phase behavior

  11. Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beylkin, Gregory

    Full-wave-equation depth extrapolation for migration Kristian Sandberg1 and Gregory Beylkin2 ABSTRACT Most of the traditional approaches to migration by down- ward extrapolation suffer from laterally varying background. If the background veloci- ty is only depth dependent, then the spectral

  12. Prediction of end-depth ratio in open channels using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    for channels with other cross sections. This global expression not only outperforms other expressions) and can be used for channels with any cross-section and any flow regime. Key words | data modelling in the form of hc AheeB ffiffiffi S0 p is found for calculating the critical depth (hc) and end-depth ratio

  13. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth the satellite measure- ments, the common objective is prediction of Aerosol Opti- cal Depth (AOD). An important

  14. SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    THESIS SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SNOW DEPTH MEASUREMENTS AT TWO MOUNTAIN PASS SNOW TELEMETRY STATIONS Much of the Western United States relies heavily on spring snow melt runoff to meet its industrial, agricultural

  15. Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes (LEDs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashworth, Stephen H.

    Depth of cure and compressive strength of dental composites cured with blue light emitting diodes with either a light emitting diode (LED) based light curing unit (LCU) or a conventional halogen LCU do reserved. Keywords: Blue light emitting diodes; Light curing unit; Composites; Irradiance; Spectrum; Depth

  16. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G Handling Editor: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused

  17. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mller, Dietmar

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused by the viscous

  18. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des donnes gologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  19. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  20. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  1. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  2. Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Total Sediment Load from SEMEP Using Depth-Integrated Concentration Measurements Seema C. Shah sediment load calculations on the basis of depth-integrated sediment concentration measurements for channels with significant sediment transport in suspension. The series expansion of the modified Einstein

  3. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest of microbial consumption of mineral N were reduced relative to production. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization and 100% of potential net N mineralization occurred below 15 cm depth

  4. Decollement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decollement depth versus accretionary prism dimension in the Apennines and the Barbados Sabina] Along representative cross sections of the Apennines and the Northern Barbados accretionary prisms, wecollement than the oceanic sections of the Northern Barbados, 610 km depth and

  5. Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgs, Christian

    Realtime and Robust Hand Tracking from Depth Chen Qian1,2 Xiao Sun1 Yichen Wei1 Xiaoou Tang2 Jian Sun1 1 Microsoft Research 2 Chinese University of Hong Kong {v-xiasun,yichenw,jiansun}@microsoft.com {qc012,xtang}@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract We present a realtime hand tracking system using a depth sensor

  6. Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers underlying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    Hydrochemical evidence of the depth of penetration of anthropogenic recharge in sandstone aquifers of anthropogenic solutes (major ions, trace metals) in Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifers underlying two mature of anthropogenic solutes to depths of between 30 and 47 m below ground in the unconfined sandstone and confirm

  7. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho UNC Charlotte, USA but less for so volumetric data. Volumetric data is characterized by a heavy presence of transparency- ing perception of depth in volumetric data. Our study also suggests that familiarity with 3D games

  8. Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Evaluating Depth Perception of Volumetric Data in Semi-Immersive VR Isaac Cho Wenwen Dou Zachary volumetric data. This poster present results of an initial formal experiment that examines the effectiveness of various display conditions on depth perception of volumetric data. There is an overall benefit

  9. An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    An Evaluation of Depth Perception on Volumetric Displays Tovi Grossman, Ravin Balakrishnan.toronto.edu ABSTRACT We present an experiment that compares volumetric displays to existing 3D display techniques space, volumetric displays allow viewers to use their natural physiological mechanisms for depth

  10. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  11. Thermodynamic Depth of Causal States: When Paddling around in Occam's Pool Shallowness Is a Virtue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Crutchfield; Cosma Rohilla Shalizi

    1998-08-13

    Thermodynamic depth is an appealing but flawed structural complexity measure. It depends on a set of macroscopic states for a system, but neither its original introduction by Lloyd and Pagels nor any follow-up work has considered how to select these states. Depth, therefore, is at root arbitrary. Computational mechanics, an alternative approach to structural complexity, provides a definition for a system's minimal, necessary causal states and a procedure for finding them. We show that the rate of increase in thermodynamic depth, or {\\it dive}, is the system's reverse-time Shannon entropy rate, and so depth only measures degrees of macroscopic randomness, not structure. To fix this we redefine the depth in terms of the causal state representation---$\\epsilon$-machines---and show that this representation gives the minimum dive consistent with accurate prediction. Thus, $\\epsilon$-machines are optimally shallow.

  12. Section 8.5 1. A worker on a roof 50 ft above the ground needs to lift a 300 lb bucket of cement from the ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Kevin K.

    Section 8.5 1. A worker on a roof 50 ft above the ground needs to lift a 300 lb bucket of cement the top of the tank. Note: 1 cubic foot water weighs 62.4 lb. 4. A gas station stores its gasoline;5. A gas station stores its gasoline in a tank under the ground. The tank is a cylinder standing in upright

  13. Chapter 6 x Viscous Flow in Ducts 493 For sheet steel, take H | 0.00015 ft, hence H/Dh | 0.000346. Now relate everything to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    .000346. Now relate everything to the input power: 2 f ft lbf Power 1 hp 550 gQh (0.00234)(32.2)Q[54.4fQ ], s U.01784, V | 80.4 ft/s, Q | 19.6 ft3/s. Ans. 6.91 Heat exchangers often consist of many triangular passages 252.9 L 0.6 870 Then f 0.263, p f V (0.263) (2) U | ' h201 D 2 0.012 2 Ans

  14. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, D. Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A.; Raman, P.; Ruzic, D.

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15??m thick. Using a 0.1?mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1?mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  15. Determining the covering factor of Compton-thick active galactic nuclei with NuSTAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brightman, M; Stern, D; Arevalo, P; Ballantyne, D R; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Craig, W W; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Fuerst, F; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S; Puccetti, S; Rivers, E; Vasudevan, R; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    The covering factor of Compton-thick obscuring material associated with the torus in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is at present best understood through the fraction of sources exhibiting Compton-thick absorption along the line of sight ($N_{H}>1.5\\times10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$) in the X-ray band, which reveals the average covering factor. Determining this Compton-thick fraction is difficult however, due to the extreme obscuration. With its spectral coverage at hard X-rays ($>$10 keV), NuSTAR is sensitive to the AGN covering factor since Compton scattering of X-rays off optically thick material dominates at these energies. We present a spectral analysis of 10 AGN observed with NuSTAR where the obscuring medium is optically thick to Compton scattering, so called Compton-thick (CT) AGN. We use the torus models of Brightman & Nandra which predict the X-ray spectrum from reprocessing in a torus and include the torus opening angle as a free parameter and aim to determine the covering factor of the Compton-thick gas i...

  16. NPB UPC-FT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12 NationalNO FEAR Act Notice NONP User

  17. PULSED EDDY CURRENT THICKNESS MEASUREMENT OF SELECTIVE PHASE CORROSION ON NICKEL ALUMINUM BRONZE VALVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, T. W.; Harlley, D.; Babbar, V. K.; Wannamaker, K. [Department of Physics, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2010-02-22

    Nickel Aluminum Bronze (NAB) is a material with marine environment applications that under certain conditions can undergo selective phase corrosion (SPC). SPC involves the removal of minority elements while leaving behind a copper matrix. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) was evaluated for determination of SPC thickness on a NAB valve section with access from the surface corroded side. A primarily linear response of PEC amplitude, up to the maximum available SPC thickness of 4 mm was observed. The combination of reduced conductivity and permeability in the SPC phase relative to the base NAB was used to explain the observed sensitivity of PEC to SPC thickness variations.

  18. ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about {approx}9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V{sub {phi}}) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios ({approx}0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities ({approx}0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V{sub {phi}}-|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar neighborhood. Our Galactic chemical evolution models show that if we choose two distinctive timescales for star formation in the thin and thick disks, then the models can explain both the observed metallicity distribution functions and correlations between [Mg/Fe] and [Fe/H] for the two disks in a self-consistent manner. We discuss how the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the Galactic thin disk can be influenced by the pre-existing thick disk.

  19. Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Joseph Thomas

    2004-09-30

    The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

  20. Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01

    The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

  1. Effective zero-thickness model for a conductive membrane driven by an electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    The behavior of a conductive membrane in a static (dc) electric field is investigated theoretically. An effective zero-thickness model is constructed based on a Robin-type boundary condition for the electric potential at ...

  2. On-Line Measurement of Lubricant Film Thickness Using Ultrasonic Reflection Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drinkwater, B.W.; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.; Harper, P.

    2004-02-26

    The ultrasonic reflectivity of a lubricant layer between two solid bodies depends on the ultrasonic frequency, the acoustic properties of the liquid and solid, and the layer thickness. In this paper, ultrasonic reflectivity measurements are used as a method for determining the thickness of lubricating films in bearing systems. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the outside of a bearing shell such that the wave is focused on the lubricant film layer. For a particular lubricant film the reflected pulse is processed to give a reflection coefficient spectrum. The lubricant film thickness is then obtained from either the layer stiffness or the resonant frequency. The method has been validated using static fluid wedges and the elastohydrodynamic film formed between a ball sliding on a flat. Film thickness values in the range 50-500 nm were recorded which agreed well with theoretical film formation predictions.

  3. The effect of lubrication film thickness on thermoelastic instability under fluid lubricating condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Yun-Bo

    The effect of lubrication film thickness on thermoelastic instability under fluid lubricating online 14 March 2013 Keywords: Thermoelastic instability Wet clutches Fluid lubrication Critical speed by a thin layer of lubricating fluid is developed to investigate thermoelastic instability with fluid

  4. Thickness of the crust of Mercury from geoid-to-topography ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovan, S; Wieczorek, MA; Margot, JL; Tosi, N; Solomon, SC

    2015-01-01

    the support of planetary topography, J. Geophys. Res. , 86,thickness and support of topography on Venus, J. Geophys.expansion for the topography of Mercury, GTMES_120V02_SHA,

  5. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M. (Siemens Nuclear Power Corp., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an [approximately]0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4.

  6. A determination of the effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target for a quasielastic scattering experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turkewitz, Jared Ripley

    2010-01-01

    The effective thickness of a liquid deuterium target was determined by measuring the yield of the neutron-deuteron elastic scattering cross section. The flux of incident neutrons was determined by a fission ionization ...

  7. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fretwell, P.; Pritchard, H. D.; Vaughan, D. G.; Bamber, J. L.; Barrand, N. E.; Bell, R.; Bianchi, C.; Bingham, R. G.; Blankenship, D. D.; Casassa, G.; Catania, G.; Callens, D.; Conway, H.; Cook, A. J.; Corr, H. F. J.; Damaske, D.; Damm, V.; Ferraccioli, F.; Forsberg, R.; Fujita, S.; Gim, Y.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Griggs, J. A.; Hindmarsh, R.; Holmlund, P.; Holt, J. W.; Jacobel, R. W.; Jenkins, A.; Jokat, W.; Jordan, T.; King, E. C.; Kohler, J.; Krabill, W.; Riger-Kusk, M.; Langley, K. A.; Leitchenkov, G.; Leuschen, Carl; Lyendyk, B. P.; Matsuoka, K.; Mouginot, J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Nogi, Y.; Nost, O. A.; Popov, S. V.; Rignot, E.; Rippin, D. M.; Rivera, A.; Roberts, J.; Roberts, J.; Ross, N.; Siegert, M. J.; Smith, A. M.; Steinhage, D.; Studinger, M.; Sun, B.; Tinto, B. K.; Welch, B. C.; Wilson, D.; Young, D. A.; Xiangbin, C.; Zirizzotti, A.

    2013-02-28

    We present Bedmap2, a new suite of gridded products describing surface elevation, ice-thickness and the seafloor and subglacial bed elevation of the Antarctic south of 60 S. We derived these products using data from a ...

  8. Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

    2012-10-19

    Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

  9. Thickness Measurement of Fracture Fluid Gel Filter Cake after Static Build Up and Shear Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ben

    2011-08-08

    . Despite proven economic benefit, the hydraulic fracture fluid damages the producing formation and the propped fracture. To analyze the gel damage effect quantitatively, the filter cake thickness is used as a parameter that has not been measured before...

  10. In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High Z Substrate for Tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ Measurement of Low-Z...

  11. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In situ measurement of low-Z material coating...

  12. Searching for the metal-weak thick disc in the solar neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacham E. Reddy; David L. Lambert

    2008-09-05

    An abundance analysis is presented of 60 metal-poor stars drawn from catalogues of nearby stars provided by Ariyanto et al. (2005) and Schuster et al. (2006). In an attempt to isolate a sample of metal-weak thick disc stars, we applied the kinematic criteria $V_{\\rm rot} \\geq 100$ km s$^{-1}$, $|U_{LSR}| \\leq 140$ km s$^{-1}$, and $|W_{LSR}| \\leq 100$ km s$^{-1}$. Fourteen stars satisfying these criteria and having [Fe/H] $\\leq -1.0$ are included in the sample of 60 stars. Eight of the 14 have [Fe/H] $\\geq -1.3$ and may be simply thick disc stars of slightly lower than average [Fe/H]. The other six have [Fe/H] from -1.3 to -2.3 and are either metal-weak thick disc stars or halo stars with kinematics mimicking those of the thick disc. The sample of 60 stars is completed by eight thick disc stars, 20 stars of a hybrid nature (halo or thick disc stars), and 18 stars with kinematics distinctive of the halo.

  13. LOW ALLOY STEELS FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report for Period Oct. 1, 1976 to Sept. 30, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS R. M, Horn, E. R. Parker,FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report f o r PeriodManufacture Pressure Vessel Fabrication Under ASME Code

  14. Invertebrate muscles: Thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its regulation, catch and asynchronous muscle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooper, Scott

    Invertebrate muscles: Thin and thick filament structure; molecular basis of contraction and its . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 2.1. Vertebrate thin and thick filament structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 2.2. Cross-bridge driven filament sliding underlies force production

  15. Learning Predictive Models of a Depth Camera & Manipulator from Raw Execution Traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guestrin, Carlos

    can accurately predict future depth camera observations in response to sequences of motor commands. I. We approach this difficult problem from a machine learn- ing perspective. We dispense with problem

  16. High-Resolution Depth for Binocular Image-Based Modelling David Blumenthal-Barby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisert, Peter

    applications like image-based modelling, photo relighting, or the fabrication of physical mod- els with 3D printing require detailed surface geometry rather than depth layering of cluttered scenes. Surface meshes

  17. The Visual Word Recognition and Orthography Depth in Second Language Acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Yunchun

    2011-10-01

    The study investigated whether the orthographic depth of first language (L1) affects the word recognition in second language (L2) learning. Fifteen native Chinese speakers and fifteen Greek native speakers were recruited to test their English naming...

  18. ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    ORNL/TM-2014/218 In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE's Roof or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2014/218 Energy

  19. Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Uranium-series isotope and thermal constraints on the rate and depth of silicic magma genesis A Sciences, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK Abstract: Uranium-series isotopes provide

  20. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  1. Constraining water table depth simulations in a land surface model using estimated baseflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, MH; Yeh, PJF; Famiglietti, JS

    2008-01-01

    northeastern Kansas. Adv Water Resour 2002;25:22138. [68]ing between runoff and soil water storage and differentcycles of base?ow and water table depth show signif- icant

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  3. Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabin E.

    Development of a bioengineered tissue model and its application in the investigation of the depth the development of a bioengineered connective tissue model fabricated by the combination of scaffolding and cross

  4. On the Emissivity of Silver Coated Panels, Effect of Long Term Stability and Effect of Coating Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Emissivity of Silver Coated Panels, Effect of Long Term Stability and Effect of Coating Thickness

  5. A simplified mechanistic rut depth prediction procedure for low-volume roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapa, Kashyapa A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A SIMPLIFIED MECHANISTIC RUT DEPTH PREDICTION PROCEDURE FOR LOW-UOLUME ROADS A Thesis by KASHYAPA ABEYSIRIWARDHANA SENARATH YAPA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... rt L. Lytt ( an of Committee) D as . Li tie ( ember) Walter L. Bradley (Member) Ja T. . Yao (Head of De tment) December 1988 ABSTRACT A Simplified Mechanistic Rut Depth Prediction Procedure for Low-volume Roads. (December 1988) Kashyapa...

  6. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  7. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  8. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  9. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  10. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  11. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  12. 1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH-MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1O.-ON THE INFLUENCE OF LIGHT ON THE PERIODICAL DEPTH- MIGRATIONS OF PELAGIC ANIMAIS BY JACQUES it certain that this periodical depth migration of sea animals is determitied to a certain extent at least and of freshawater lakes is confined chiefly to two regions, one extending from the surface of the sea to a depth

  13. Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Department of Geophysics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Praha 2, Czech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration Karel #20; Z#19;a#20;cek Department of Geophysics method | the Gaussian packet pre{stack depth migration. The advantages over the methods based on Gaussian pre{stack depth migration is especially suitable for a target{oriented imaging. Key words Gaussian

  14. DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra, Emilie Baudin, Pravin Kumar Rana, and Markus Flierl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flierl, Markus

    DENOISING OF VOLUMETRIC DEPTH CONFIDENCE FOR VIEW RENDERING Srinivas Parthasarathy, Akul Chopra of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden ABSTRACT In this paper, we define volumetric depth confidence and pro- pose- perposition principle, we define a volumetric depth confidence de- scription of the underlying geometry

  15. Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13-12,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ras, Zbigniew W.

    Stereo and Motion Cues Effect on Depth Perception in Volumetric Data (Technical Report: CVC-UNCC-13 cues effect on depth judgment of volumetric data," Stereoscopic Displays and Applications XXV (SD&A2014 on Depth Perception of Volumetric Data Isaac Cho, Zachary Wartell, Wenwen Dou, Xiaoyu Wang and William

  16. Uniqueness of RS2 type thick branes supported by a scalar field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. T. Abdyrakhmanov; K. A. Bronnikov; B. E. Meierovich

    2005-03-13

    We study thick brane world models as Z_2-symmetric domain walls supported by a scalar field with an arbitrary potential V(\\phi) in 5D general relativity. Under the global regularity requirement, such configurations (i) have always an AdS asymptotic far from the brane, (ii) are only possible if V(\\phi) has an alternating sign and (iii) V(\\phi) should satisfy a certain fine-tuning type equality. Thus a thick brane with any admissible V(\\phi) is a regularized version of the RS2 brane immersed in the AdS_5 bulk. The thin brane limit is realized in a universal manner by including an arbitrary thick brane model in a one-parameter family, where the parameter "a" is associated with brane thickness; the asymptotic value of V(\\phi) (related to \\Lambda_5, the effective cosmological constant) remains a-independent. The problem of ordinary matter confinement on the brane is discussed for a test scalar field. Its stress-energy tensor is found to diverge at the AdS horizon for both thin and thick branes, making a serious problem for this class of brane world models.

  17. Thick adherent dielectric films on plastic substrates and method for depositing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickboldt, Paul (Walnut Creek, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA); Theiss, Steven D. (Woodbury, MN); Smith, Patrick M. (San Ramon, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thick adherent dielectric films deposited on plastic substrates for use as a thermal barrier layer to protect the plastic substrates from high temperatures which, for example, occur during laser annealing of layers subsequently deposited on the dielectric films. It is desirable that the barrier layer has properties including: a thickness of 1 .mu.m or greater, adheres to a plastic substrate, does not lift-off when cycled in temperature, has few or no cracks and does not crack when subjected to bending, resistant to lift-off when submersed in fluids, electrically insulating and preferably transparent. The thick barrier layer may be composed, for example, of a variety of dielectrics and certain metal oxides, and may be deposited on a variety of plastic substrates by various known deposition techniques. The key to the method of forming the thick barrier layer on the plastic substrate is maintaining the substrate cool during deposition of the barrier layer. Cooling of the substrate maybe accomplished by the use of a cooling chuck on which the plastic substrate is positioned, and by directing cooling gas, such as He, Ar and N.sub.2, between the plastic substrate and the cooling chucks. Thick adherent dielectric films up to about 5 .mu.m have been deposited on plastic substrates which include the above-referenced properties, and which enable the plastic substrates to withstand laser processing temperatures applied to materials deposited on the dielectric films.

  18. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Theodore (Atlanta, GA); Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

  19. Origin of chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about 9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer ...

  20. Jeans analysis of the Galactic thick disk and the local dark matter density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F J; de Diego, J A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical estimates of the mass surface density at the solar radius can be made up to a height of 4 kpc using thick disk stars as tracers of the potential. We investigate why different Jeans estimators of the local surface density lead to puzzling and conflicting results. Using the Jeans equations, we compute the vertical (F_z) and radial (F_R) components of the gravitational force, as well as Gamma(z), defined as the radial derivative of V_c^2, with V_c^{2}= -RF_R. If we assume that the thick disk does not flare and that all the components of the velocity dispersion tensor of the thick disk have a uniform radial scalelength of 3.5 kpc, Gamma takes implausibly large negative values, when using the currently available kinematical data of the thick disk. This implies that the input parameters or the model assumptions must be revised. We have explored, using a simulated thick disk, the impact of the assumption that the scale lengths of the density and velocity dispersions do not depend on the vertical height z a...

  1. Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: catalog of bituminous coals and site selection. Appendix A. National coal resource data system: Ecoal, Wcoal, and Bmalyt. Final report, Phase I. [Bituminous coal; by state; coal seam depth and thickness; identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-31

    Appendix A is a catalog of the bituminous coal in 29 states of the contiguous United States which contain identified bituminous coal resources.

  2. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C. Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C.

    2014-09-21

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 227 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  3. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li., Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemorerange hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.less

  4. Limits on thickness and efficiency of Polish Doughnuts in application to the ULX sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wielgus, Maciek; Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Abramowicz, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Polish Doughnuts (PDs) are geometrically thick disks which rotate with super-Keplerian velocities in their innermost parts, and whose long and narrow funnels along rotation axes collimate the emerging radiation into beams. In this paper we construct extremal family of PDs that maximize both geometrical thickness and radiative efficiency. We then derive upper limits for these quantities and subsequently for the related ability to collimate radiation. PDs with such extreme properties may explain the observed properties of the ULX sources with no need for the black hole masses exceeding ~ 10 solar masses. However, we show that strong advective cooling, which is expected to be one of the dominant cooling mechanisms in accretion flows with super-Eddington accretion rates, tends to reduce geometrical thickness and luminosity of PDs substantially. We also show that the beamed radiation emerging from the PDs' funnels corresponds to "isotropic" luminosities that linearly scale with the mass accretion rate, and do not ...

  5. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemorerange hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.less

  6. Thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} film without substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Wung; Park, Chee-Sung; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyoun-Ee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-13

    In order to fabricate thick PbZr{sub x}Ti{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (PZT) films for microelectromechanical system applications, the authors introduce a concept of freestanding film without a substrate. PZT films with a thickness of up to 20 {mu}m were deposited on a very thin Pt layer without a substrate by the rf-magnetron sputtering method using a single oxide target. The Pt layer (thickness <1 {mu}m) was obtained by sputtering the Pt on a Si substrate with a carbon layer between them, and subsequently removing the carbon layer by oxidation in air at 400 deg. C. Piezoelectric properties of the film were comparable to those of bulk PZT as a result of the removal of clamping effect of the substrate.

  7. Investigation of damage behavior of thermally sprayed coatings depending on coating thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crostack, H.A.; Beller, U.

    1995-12-31

    In order to increase the lifetime of components used for diesel engines or gas turbines surfaces are coated by ceramics. In recent years it succeeded in spraying thermal barrier coatings based on zirconia up to a thickness of a few millimeters. A comparison of the damage behavior between yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings with different thickness will be presented. The coatings are produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. The thickness is varied from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm. In order to characterize the mechanical as well as the damage processes different methods of destructive testing (tensile, bending, and loading test) are applied. Additionally, non-destructive testing methods were used to investigate the damage processes on micro structural level. The results will be discussed according to the microstructure.

  8. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan [Nanjing Univ. (China); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Qiu, Xiangbiao [Nanjing Univ. (China); Su, Dong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhou, Shengqiang [Inst. of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Li., Aidong [Nanjing Univ. (China); Wu, Di [Nanjing Univ. (China)

    2015-01-07

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variable range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.

  9. Physicochemical controls on absorbed water film thickness in unsaturated geological media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, T.

    2011-06-14

    Adsorbed water films commonly coat mineral surfaces in unsaturated soils and rocks, reducing flow and transport rates. Therefore, it is important to understand how adsorbed film thickness depends on matric potential, surface chemistry, and solution chemistry. Here, the problem of adsorbed water film thickness is examined through combining capillary scaling with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Novel aspects of this analysis include determining capillary influences on film thicknesses, and incorporating solution chemistry-dependent electrostatic potential at air-water interfaces. Capillary analysis of monodisperse packings of spherical grains provided estimated ranges of matric potentials where adsorbed films are stable, and showed that pendular rings within drained porous media retain most of the 'residual' water except under very low matric potentials. Within drained pores, capillary contributions to thinning of adsorbed films on spherical grains are shown to be small, such that DLVO calculations for flat surfaces are suitable approximations. Hamaker constants of common soil minerals were obtained to determine ranges of the dispersion component to matric potential-dependent film thickness. The pressure component associated with electrical double layer forces was estimated using the compression and linear superposition approximations. The pH-dependent electrical double layer pressure component is the dominant contribution to film thicknesses at intermediate values of matric potential, especially in lower ionic strength solutions (< 10 mol m{sup -3}) on surfaces with higher magnitude electrostatic potentials (more negative than - 50 mV). Adsorbed water films are predicted to usually range in thickness from 1 to 20 nm in drained pores and fractures of unsaturated environments.

  10. Measurement of neutron yield by 62 MeV proton beam on a thick Beryllium target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alba; M. Barbagallo; P. Boccaccio; A. Celentano; N. Colonna; G. Cosentino; A. Del Zoppo; A. Di Pietro; J. Esposito; P. Figuera; P. Finocchiaro; A. Kostyukov; C. Maiolino; M. Osipenko; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; C. M. Viberti; D. Santonocito; M. Schillaci

    2012-08-08

    In the framework of research on IVth generation reactors and high intensity neutron sources a low-power prototype neutron amplifier was recently proposed by INFN. It is based on a low-energy, high current proton cyclotron, whose beam, impinging on a thick Beryllium converter, produces a fast neutron spectrum. The world database on the neutron yield from thick Beryllium target in the 70 MeV proton energy domain is rather scarce. The new measurement was performed at LNS, covering a wide angular range from 0 to 150 degrees and an almost complete neutron energy interval. In this contribution the preliminary data are discussed together with the proposed ADS facility.

  11. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, D.A.

    1980-05-30

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  12. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; et al

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ?He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at moreis consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ?He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.less

  13. LINKING Ly? AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Ly? emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Ly? emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Ly? emission, the Ly? line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Ly? profiles resemble the H? line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Ly? emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Ly? emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Ly? profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Ly?, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Ly? emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Ly? to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Ly? profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  14. ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2014-11-01

    Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

  15. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  16. Depth Profiling Of Small Molecule Ingress Into Planar and Cylindrical Materials Using NRA and PIXE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard W.; Massingham, Gary; Clough, Anthony S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2003-08-26

    The use of a 3He ion micro-beam technique to study the ingress/diffusion of water into a planar fibre optic grade glass and a cylindrical drug-release polymer is described. One-dimensional concentration profiles showing the depth of water ingress were produced. The depth of penetration of water into the glass was measured by fitting a gaussian function to the concentration profile. The ingress of water into the drug-release polymer was found to be Fickian and a cylindrical diffusion model used to obtain a diffusion coefficient.

  17. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010DepthDepth

  18. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15

    .4 Effect of Planting Depth on Total Chlorophyll Concentration (A), Net Photosynthetic (Pn) Activity (B), and Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential (C) of Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) after 200 d in 10.8 L Containers... Depth on Pre-dawn Stem Water Potential in Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.) When Initially Transplanted (10.8 L) 5 cm Above Soil Grade (A), at Soil Grade (B), or 5 cm Below Soil Grade (C) . 85 4.10 Effect of Date on Relative Growth Rate...

  19. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  20. Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak Richard Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    Influence of wall thickness on the stability of the resistive wall mode in tokamak plasmas Richard.1063/1.2446041 Nonlinear evolution of resistive wall mode in a cylindrical tokamak with poloidal rotation Phys. Plasmas 13); 10.1063/1.1943347 Control of resistive wall modes in a cylindrical tokamak with radial and poloidal

  1. Micro-fabrication of high-thickness spiral inductors for the remote powering of implantable biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    biosensors Jacopo Olivo , Sandro Carrara, Giovanni De Micheli Integrated Circuits Laboratory, EPFL cole Keywords: High-thickness inductors Inductive link Remote powering Implantable biosensors Ordyl a b s t r for the remote power- ing of implantable biosensors through inductive link. The process is suitable for different

  2. INFLUENCE OF HYDRIDE MICROSTRUCTURE ON THROUGH-THICKNESS CRACK GROWTH IN ZIRCALOY-4 SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    1 INFLUENCE OF HYDRIDE MICROSTRUCTURE ON THROUGH-THICKNESS CRACK GROWTH IN ZIRCALOY-4 SHEET P. A and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 2 Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 3 Southwest Research

  3. Estimation of the optical constants and the thickness of thin lms using unconstrained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martnez, Jos Mario

    Estimation of the optical constants and the thickness of thin #12;lms using unconstrained, spectral gradient method, optical constants, thin #12;lms. 1 #12; Proposed running head: Estimation of optical constants of thin #12;lms using SGM Corresponding author: Jos#19;e Mario Mart#19;#16;nez

  4. Created 12/8/05 Nanospec / AFT Film Thickness Measurement System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    objective and refocus. d. Critical Focus required for film thickness suspected to be Control knob until the Photo Intensity Meter reads between 65.0 and 67.0. a. Gain Control knob located in the open back of the cover. DO NOT ADJUST "ZERO", located to the left of GAIN. b. Photo Intensity Meter

  5. The imprints of the Galactic bar on the thick disk with RAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoja, T; Helmi, A; Bienaym, O; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Famaey, B; Gibson, B K; Grebel, E K; Kordopatis, G; Munari, U; Navarro, J; Parker, Q; Reid, W A; Seabroke, G; Steinmetz, M; Zwitter, T

    2015-01-01

    We study the kinematics of a local sample of stars, located within a cylinder of 500 pc radius centered on the Sun, in the RAVE dataset. We find clear asymmetries in the $v_R$-$v_\\phi$ velocity distributions of thin and thick disk stars: here are more stars moving radially outwards for low azimuthal velocities and more radially inwards for high azimuthal velocities. Such asymmetries have been previously reported for the thin disk as being due to the Galactic bar, but this is the first time that the same type of structures are seen in the thick disk. Our findings imply that the velocities of thick disk stars should no longer be described by Schwarzschild's, multivariate Gaussian or purely axisymmetric distributions. Furthermore, the nature of previously reported substructures in the thick disk needs to be revisited as these could be associated with dynamical resonances rather than to accretion events. It is clear that dynamical models of the Galaxy must fit the 3D velocity distributions of the disks, rather th...

  6. Characterization of thick 4H-SiC hot-wall CVD layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.J.; Irvine, K.G.; Kordina, O.; Singh, R.; Palmour, J.W.; Carter, C.H. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Epitaxial 4H-SiC layers suitable for high power devices have been grown in a hot-wall chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) system. These layers were subsequently characterized for many parameters important in device development and production. The uniformity of both thickness and doping is presented. Doping trends vs. temperature and growth rate is shown for the p-type dopant used. The n-type dopant drops in concentration with increasing temperature or increasing growth rate. In contrast, the p-type dopant increases in concentration with decreasing temperature or increasing growth rate. A simple descriptive model for this behavior is presented. The outcome from capacitance-voltage and SIMS measurements demonstrate that transitions from n to n{sup {minus}}, or p to p{sup {minus}}, and even n to p levels can be made quickly without adjustment to growth conditions. The ability to produce sharp transitions without process changes avoids degrading the resulting surface morphology or repeatability of the process. Avoiding process changes is particularly important in growth of thick layers since surface roughness tends to increase with layer thickness. Device results from diodes producing two different blocking voltages in excess of 5 kV is also shown. The higher voltage diodes exhibited a breakdown behavior which was near the theoretical limit for the epitaxial layer thickness and doping level grown.

  7. Measuring Thickness Changes in Thin Films Due to Chemical Reaction by Monitoring the Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutenberg, Andrew

    to the study of lithium-ion batteries. Recently metallic alloys M ~M Si, Sn, Al, etc.! have been proposed force microscope, expansion and contraction, Li-ion battery, surface roughness, thin film thickness as possible negative electrode materials for lithium-ion bat- teries ~Yang et al., 1996; Idota et al., 1997

  8. Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber insertions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static and fatigue bending behavior of pultruded GFRP sandwich panels with through-thickness fiber testing a b s t r a c t This paper presents the findings of a research program that was undertaken to evaluate the effective elastic modulus, shear modulus and degree of composite interaction of the panels

  9. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  10. Study of Dislocation Densities Through the Thickness of 7050 Aluminum Cory Parker, David Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Study of Dislocation Densities Through the Thickness of 7050 Aluminum Cory Parker, David Field WSU number DMR-1062898. Introduction 7050 Aluminum is a lightweight, yet strong, alloy primarily used rather difficult due to the presence of a wide range of particles in the substrate. 7050 goes through

  11. 18 m THICK HIGH FREQUENCY CAPACITIVE HARPSS RESONATORS WITH REDUCED MOTIONAL RESISTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    thermal oxide layer is first grown on the low resistivity SOI substrate. The oxide is patterned and kept be as large as a few tens of microns. Trench sidewalls are coated with a thin sacrificial LPCVD oxide layer. The thickness of the deposited sacrificial oxide layer determines the capacitive gap size in between the SCS

  12. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  13. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  14. Altering Anode Thickness To Improve Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells with Different Electrode Distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altering Anode Thickness To Improve Power Production in Microbial Fuel Cells with Different ABSTRACT: A better understanding of how anode and separator physical properties affect power production is needed to improve energy and power production by microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Oxygen crossover from

  15. Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells%) in optical absorption over both a conventional ITO organic solar cell and a conventional plasmonic organic solar cell with top-loaded metallic grating is predicted in the proposed structure. Optimal positioning

  16. 15.7% Efficient 10-?m-Thick Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using Periodic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branham, Matthew Sanders

    Only ten micrometer thick crystalline silicon solar cells deliver a short-circuit current of 34.5 mA cm[superscript ?2] and power conversion efficiency of 15.7%. The record performance for a crystalline silicon solar cell ...

  17. Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Growth Termination of Carbon Nanotubes at Millimeter Thickness Due to Structural Change in Catalyst, it is reported that "supergrowth" rate decreases with reaction time and finally the growth terminates [2]. Our group recently reproduced "supergrowth" [3] and observed similar "supergrowth" termination within a few

  18. Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Optical Histology: A Method to Visualize Microvasculature in Thick Tissue Sections of Mouse Brain% paraformaldehyde. The organ is then sliced into 1 mm sections and optically cleared, or made transparent, using FocusClear, a proprietary optical clearing agent. After optical clearing, the DiI-labeled tissue

  19. Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks aperture synthesis observations of the nearby, late­type spiral galaxy NGC 6503, and produce HI maps field, while remarkably regular, contains clear evidence for irregularities. The HI is distributed over

  20. Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    Aperture Synthesis Observations of the Nearby Spiral NGC 6503: Modeling the Thin and Thick HI Disks aperture synthesis observations of the nearby, late-type spiral galaxy NGC 6503, and produce HI maps field, while remarkably regular, contains clear evidence for irregularities. The HI is distributed over

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Nonlinear Thickness-shear Vibrations of AT-cut Quartz Crystal Plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    Finite Element Analysis of Nonlinear Thickness-shear Vibrations of AT-cut Quartz Crystal Plates Ji, dujianke}@nbu.edu.cn Abstract--The nonlinear finite element analysis is performed with the nonlinear a smaller size in comparison with the 3D approach. General procedure of nonlinear finite element analysis

  2. Reprocessed emission line profiles from dense clouds in geometrically thick accretion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hartnoll; Eric G. Blackman

    2000-09-19

    The central engines of active galactic nuclei (AGN) contain cold, dense material as well as hot X-ray emitting gas. The standard paradigm for the engine geometry is a cold thin disc sandwiched between hot X-ray coronae. Strong support for this geometry in Seyferts comes from the study of fluorescent iron line profiles, although the evidence is not ubiquitously air tight. The thin disc model of line profiles in AGN and in X-ray binaries should be bench marked against other plausible possibilities. One proposed alternative is an engine consisting of dense clouds embedded in an optically thin, geometrically thick X-ray emitting engine. This model is further motivated by studies of geometrically thick engines such as advection dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). Here we compute the reprocessed iron line profiles from dense clouds embedded in geometrically thick, optically thin X-ray emitting discs near a Schwarzchild black hole. We consider a range of cloud distributions and disc solutions, including ADAFs, pure radial infall, and bipolar outflows. We find that such models can reproduce line profiles similar to those from geometrically thin, optically thick discs and might help alleviate some of the problems encountered from the latter.

  3. Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    the surface of the solar cell, where n is the material refractive index. This ray-optics absorption enhancement limit only holds when the thickness of the solar cell is much greater than the optical wavelength limit of 4n2 50. Introduction Texturing of solar cell surfaces allows for absorption enhancement, owing

  4. Research Paper Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Research Paper Quantitative Image Analysis for Evaluating the Coating Thickness and Pore Distribution in Coated Small Particles F. L. Laksmana,1,3,5 L. J. Van Vliet,2 P. J. A. Hartman Kok,3 H. Vromans method for coating structure based on image analysis, which is particularly promising for the rational

  5. A 3D Volumetric Laplace-Beltrami Operator based Cortical Thickness Estimation Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yalin

    A 3D Volumetric Laplace-Beltrami Operator based Cortical Thickness Estimation Method Gang Wanga the cortical tetrahedral mesh, we adopt the heat kernel [1] based on volumetric Laplace-Beltrami operator can construct the discrete volumetric Laplace-Beltrami operator under the Dirichlet boundary condition

  6. Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery T.S.E. Erikssona,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaoyu

    Modelling volumetric growth in a thick walled fibre reinforced artery T.S.E. Erikssona, , P a combination of both AID and CID to simulate volumetric G&R for a tissue comprised of several different arterial biology. For simulating the volumetric changes that occur during aneurysm enlargement, we observe

  7. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  8. Impacts of Urbanization on Peak Flow Using Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dingman, John

    2008-01-01

    radius n =0.05 n = 0.1 ft/s cfs Depth (ft) ft area (ft^2) wet per ft in Alamo Creek cfs/ha Tassajara Creek Drainagen =0.05 n = 0.1 ft/s cfs area (ft^2) Wet per Tassajara Creek

  9. Simulation studies of hadron energy resolution as a function of iron plate thickness at INO-ICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmi S. Mohan; Anushree Ghosh; Moon Moon Devi; Daljeet Kaur; Sandhya Choubey; Amol Dighe; D. Indumathi; M. V. N. Murthy; Md. Naimuddin

    2015-03-11

    We report on a detailed simulation study of the hadron energy resolution as a function of the thickness of the absorber plates for the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). We compare the hadron resolutions obtained with absorber thicknesses in the range 1.5--8 cm for neutrino interactions in the energy range 2--15 GeV, which is relevant to hadron production in atmospheric neutrino interactions. We find that at lower energies, the thickness dependence of energy resolution is steeper than at higher energies, however there is a thickness-independent contribution that dominates at the lower thicknesses discussed in this work. As a result, the gain in hadron energy resolution with decreasing plate thickness is marginal. We present the results in the form of fits to a function with energy-dependent exponent.

  10. Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged flooding, University of New Hampshire, USA. 2 Numerical Methods Lab., Dartmouth College, USA. 3 Ocean Process Analysis Lab., University of New Hampshire, USA. Abstract Current, sea level and bed load transport

  11. A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    A Depth Controlling Strategy for Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Claire J. Kennedy Department of Computer Science University of Bristol Bristol BS8 1UB, U.K. kennedy@cs.bris.ac.uk Christophe is that of STEPS - Strongly Typed Evolutionary Programming Sys- tem (Kennedy and Giraud-Carrier 1999). STEPS

  12. Laser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    -scattering or in the transmission mode using a variety of sensor probes. In this work we used the infrared (IR) photothermal radioLaser infrared photothermal radiometric depth profilometry of steels and its potential in rail track evaluation A. Mandelis*, M. Munidasa, L. Nicolaides Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  13. Efficient Regression of General-Activity Human Poses from Depth Images Ross Girshick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Pushmeet

    Efficient Regression of General-Activity Human Poses from Depth Images Ross Girshick Jamie Shotton of several decision-tree training ob- jectives. Key aspects of our work include: regression di- rectly from the regression-based ap- proaches that have been a staple of monocular 2D human pose estimation [1, 19, 10, 15

  14. REAL-TIME DEPTH BOUNDARY OPTIMIZATION FOR LOCAL AREA-BASED STEREO David Gallup1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    a snake-like energy optimized with a dynamic programming method. This clean-up step requires only O(#pixels) time and space, making it well-suited for real-time where local area-based stereo is often used. Our depth estimates are needed immediately, or for processing large amounts of data as in urban

  15. Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Predicting fault permeability at depth: incorporating natural permeability controls on fluid flow in oil and gas reservoirs. Fault zones are composed of many deformation elements will receive 20 weeks bespoke, residential training of broad relevance to the oil and gas industry: 10 weeks

  16. Journal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of superconductivity is the diamagnetic response of a superconductor below its transition temperature To. The abilityJournal of Superconductivity, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1992 Magnetic Penetration Depth Measurements in Cuprate Superconductors Steven M. AnlageI and Dong-Ho Wut Received 16 April 1992 We examine recent results

  17. Determination of aerosol optical depth using a Micro Total Ozone Spectrometer II (MICROTOPS II) sunphotometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy, the Office of Educational Program, the National Science Foundation and the Louis Stokes Alliances solar radiation. These effects are quantified by the aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is the exponential decrease in solar radiation, due to the presence of aerosols. We performed the retrievals of AOD

  18. Plumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfillan, Stuart

    to be added to the CO2 at the time of injec- tion. This will marginally increase the cost of storagePlumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and Migration, Utah Mark storage of fluid CO2 in porous subsurface rock will re- quire the ability to track, and identify

  19. Seepage from a special class of a curved channel with drainage layer at shallow depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    solution corresponding to the water table below the top of the drainage layer has also been deduced from is below the top of the drainage layer then the seepage is much more than that in homogeneous medium with drainage layer at shallow depth, Water Resour. Res., 45, W09423, doi:10.1029/2009WR007899. 1. Introduction

  20. Changes in auditory sensitivity with depth in a free-diving California sea lion (Zalophus californianus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichmuth, Colleen

    of sound energy, because of the air water barrier at the tympanic membrane, where theoretically, almost tanks, and may not accurately represent the auditory functioning of free-ranging animals, especially if hearing sensitivity changes with water depth. Underwater auditory thresholds were determined

  1. Photoacoustic frequency-domain depth profilometry of surface-layer inhomogeneities: Application to laser processed steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    (laser or electron beam), modulated at a certain frequency is focused onto the sample surface and Optodmronic Diagnostics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Uniuerxity of Toronto, Toronto with a variable depth range, compared to conventional tech- niques. In this family of methods a beam of energy

  2. hlternatiomd Journal of Thermophysics. Vol. 15, No. 6. 1994 Depth Profilometry of Near-Surface Inhomogeneities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    (laser or electron beam) modulated at a certain frequency is focused onto the sample surface and obtaining arbitrary diffusivity depth profiles from the laser beam-intensity modulation frequency dependence Properties, June 19-24, 1994, Boulder, Colorado, U.S.A. 2Photothermal and Optoelectronic Diagnostics

  3. Sea Depth Measurement with Restricted Floating Sensors Zheng Yang, Mo Li, and Yunhao Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yunhao

    the harbor for several days. Monitoring sea depth costs this harbor more than 18 million US dollars per year. The amount of silta- tion in H. H. Harbor is affected by many factors, among which tide and wind blow variable nature of wind brings more incidental and intensive effects. For example, records show that strong

  4. A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies at the Tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, K. Shafer

    A New Theory for the Atmospheric Energy Spectrum: Depth-Limited Temperature Anomalies Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 Communicated by Andrew J. Majda, June- bations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cas- cade of energy with a slope of -3 at large

  5. Effects of induced flow on the depths of active back-arc basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlins, Robynn Lee

    1993-01-01

    The depth of active back-arc basins, younger than 10 Ma is correlated to the angle of subduction, in that the deepest basins are associated with steep angles of subduction, and the shallowest to small angles of subduction. A two-dimensional comer...

  6. An in-depth study of forest products industries in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An in-depth study of forest products industries in the Pacific Northwest Tendayi Mhlanga, World. Current state of the forest products industry. Production outlook. #12; The PNW refers to the forested% of US energy needs. Sources of biomass are; round-wood, mill residues, logging or woods residue, urban

  7. RESEARCH PAPER Focal depths and mechanisms of Tohoku-Oki aftershocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritsema, Jeroen

    RESEARCH PAPER Focal depths and mechanisms of Tohoku-Oki aftershocks from teleseismic P wave mechanisms Coseismic stress change 1 Introduction The Japan Trench is one of the great earthquake generating regions in the world. Due to the fast convergence between the Pacific and Eurasian plates (De

  8. 1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd both depth and time. So they directly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd both depth and time. So they directly observe the evolution of both238 (1996). 8. Rose-Petruck, C. et al. Nature 398, 310312 (1999). 9. Maris, H. Sci. Am. 278, 8689 (1998|VOL398|25MARCH1999|www.nature.com 285 Olfaction Good reception in fruitfly antennae Yitzhak Pilpel

  9. Control of pore fluid pressure on depth of emplacement of magmatic sills: An experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    Control of pore fluid pressure on depth of emplacement of magmatic sills: An experimental approach Available online 24 March 2010 Keywords: Sill emplacement Hydraulic fracturing Pore fluid pressure Physical pressure. We first theoretically show that, in anisotropic media, the higher the pore fluid pressure

  10. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

  11. Calculated and Mapped Depths of Closure Along the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Calculated and Mapped Depths of Closure Along the U.S. Coastlines Using WIS Hindcast Data Katherine the seaward extent of sediment transport Tool will aid coastal planners and engineers in designing coastal using wave tank and field data Inner DOC Marks seaward extent of the littoral zone, which

  12. Water wave packets over variable depth R. H. J. Grimshaw and S. Y. Annenkov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water wave packets over variable depth R. H. J. Grimshaw and S. Y. Annenkov Department to describe how a water wave packet will deform and eventually be destroyed as it propagates shoreward from deep to shallow water. It is well-known that in the framework of the usual nonlinear Schrodinger

  13. The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexey

    The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh, we examine the interannual variability of the monsoon rains of Bangladesh, an area greatly affected of Bengal storm surge. For the twentieth century, we found Bangladesh monsoon rainfall (BMR

  14. Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Stress evolution of the San Andreas fault system: Recurrence interval versus locking depth Bridget by stress that has accumulated in the upper locked portion of the crust. The present-day stress accumulation rate on any given fault segment is fairly well resolved by current geodetic measurements. Model stress

  15. High-Level Fusion of Depth and Intensity for Pedestrian Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    High-Level Fusion of Depth and Intensity for Pedestrian Classification Marcus Rohrbach1,3 , Markus. This paper presents a novel approach to pedestrian classi- fication which involves a high-level fusion pedestrians and non-pedestrians. We refrain from the construction of a joint feature space, but instead employ

  16. Logic depth and power consumption in self-timed circuits: A case-study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boemo, Eduardo

    Logic depth and power consumption in self-timed circuits: A case-study Eduardo Boemo J. Herrera to two-phase self- timed pipelines; and second, the increment of data path power consumption://www.etsit.upm.es Abstract.- In this paper the non-linear relationship between power consumption and throughput in two

  17. Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions high-resolution remote sensing video and surface elevation records from fixed, in-situ wave gages. Wave phase speeds are extracted from the remote sensing data using a feature tracking technique, and local

  18. Depth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    to significantly enhance our ability to locate geothermal systems and monitor active volcanoes. 2010 Elsevier BDepth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet studies, the depth of the hydrothermal system is always required, but rarely known via traditional

  19. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  20. Wave runup and reflection from coastal structures in depth-limited conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Joel Robert

    1998-01-01

    An experimental hydrodynamic study was undertaken to phics. investigate the effects of depth-limited conditions on wave sunup and reflection from coastal structures. The tests were carried out in a two-dimensional wave flume with a mild 1 235 slope...

  1. Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

  2. CHARACTERISATION OF AGED HDPE PIPES FROM DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION: INVESTIGATION OF CRACK DEPTH BY NOL RING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    BY NOL RING TESTS UNDER CREEP LOADING C. Devilliers 1), 2), 3) , L. Laiarinandrasana 1) , B. Fayolle 2. KEYWORDS HDPE pipes, Nol Ring creep test, ageing effects, fracture mechanism, crack depth ratio, aged layer loading than a monotonic tensile loading. It is to be noticed that the Nol Ring test subjected to a creep

  3. Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1 R. S. Maheskumar,1 J. R effective radius (re) increased with distance above cloud base (D). Warm rain became detectable, i.e., rain water content >0.01 g/Kg, at the tops of growing convective clouds when re exceeded 12 mm. The re

  4. An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5732E An in-depth Analysis of Space Heating Energy Use in Office Buildings Author(s), Hung Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH than 7 trillion Joules of site energy annually [USDOE]. Analyzing building space heating performance

  5. Characterization of late Campanian and Maastrichtian planktonic foraminiferal depth habitats and vital activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and vital activities based on stable isotopes Sigal Abramovich a; , Gerta Keller a , Doris Stuben b the deeper thermocline layer during cool climatic intervals. Two distinct types of `vital effect' mechanisms reserved. Keywords: late Cretaceous; planktonic foraminifera; stable isotopes; depth habitats; vital e

  6. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  7. Making the Most of Using Depth Reasoning to Label Line Drawings of Engineering Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    the automated production of solid models from line drawings which show the visible edges of polyhedral objectsMaking the Most of Using Depth Reasoning to Label Line Drawings of Engineering Objects P. A. C freehand sketches would benefit designers. A subgoal is to take a single line drawing (with hidden lines

  8. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean effect produces precipitation at midday in the Andean valleys and in the afternoon in the high mountains the main source of melting energy. INDEX TERMS: 3354 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Precipitation

  9. Thickness independent reduced forming voltage in oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2} based resistive switching memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharath, S. U. Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.; Bertaud, T.; Walczyk, C.; Calka, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-18

    The conducting filament forming voltage of stoichiometric hafnium oxide based resistive switching layers increases linearly with layer thickness. Using strongly reduced oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films grown on polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) substrates, the thickness dependence of the forming voltage is strongly suppressed. Instead, an almost constant forming voltage of about 3?V is observed up to 200?nm layer thickness. This effect suggests that filament formation and switching occurs for all samples in an oxidized HfO{sub 2} surface layer of a few nanometer thickness while the highly oxygen deficient thin film itself merely serves as a oxygen vacancy reservoir.

  10. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality.

  11. Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

  12. A Thickness of Stellar Disks of Edge-on Galaxies and Position of Their Truncation Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Zasov; D. V. Bizyaev

    2002-12-13

    The relationship between the geometrical properties of stellar disks (a flatness and truncation radius) and the disk kinematics are considered for edge-on galaxies. It is shown that the observed thickness of the disks and the approximate constancy of their thickness along the radius well agrees with the condition of their marginal local gravitational stability. As a consequence, those galaxies whose disks are thinner should harbor more massive dark haloes. The correlation between the de-projeced central brightness of the disks and their flatness is found (the low surface brightness disks tend to be the thinniest ones). We also show that positions of observed photometrically determined truncation radii $R_{cut}$ for the stellar disks support the idea of marginal local gravitational stability of gaseous protodisks at $R =R_{cut}$, and hence the steepening of photometric profiles may be a result of too inefficient star formation beyond $R_{cut}$.

  13. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom, and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Kennewick, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Menomonee Falls, WI)

    1992-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the Si-Al-N film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500.degree. C. or less.

  14. Fabrication and Test of Pixelated CZT Detectors with Different Pixel Pitches and Thicknesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Li; A. Garson; P. Dowkontt; J. Martin; M. Beilicke; I. Jung; M. Groza; A. Burger; G. De Geronimo; H. Krawczynski; .; .; .; .

    2008-11-19

    The main methods grown Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals with high yield and excellent homogeneity are Modified Horizontal Bridgman (MHB) and High Pressure Bridgman (HPB) processes, respectively. In this contribution, the readout system based on two 32-channel NCI-ASICs for pixellated CZT detector arrays has been developed and tested. The CZT detectors supplied by Orbotech (MHB) and eV products (HPB) are tested by NCI-ASIC readout system. The CZT detectors have an array of 8x8 or 11x11 pixel anodes fabricated on the anode surface with the area up to 2 cm x2 cm and the thickness of CZT detectors ranges from 0.5 cm to 1 cm. Energy spectra resolution and electron mobility-lifetime products of 8x8 pixels CZT detector with different thicknesses have been investigated.

  15. Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

  16. Ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite thick films for energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Paritosh; Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, B. P.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-15

    We have successfully fabricated large area free standing polyvinylidene fluoride -Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PVDF-PZT) ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite (wt% 8020, respectively) thick films with an average diameter (d) ?0.1 meter and thickness (t) ?50 ?m. Inclusion of PZT in PVDF matrix significantly enhanced dielectric constant (from 10 to 25 at 5 kHz) and energy storage capacity (from 11 to 14 J/cm{sup 3}, using polarization loops), respectively, and almost similar leakage current and mechanical strength. Microstructural analysis revealed the presence of ? and ? crystalline phases and homogeneous distribution of PZT crystals in PVDF matrix. It was also found that apart from the microcrystals, well defined naturally developed PZT nanocrystals were embedded in PVDF matrix. The observed energy density indicates immense potential in PVDF-PZT composites for possible applications as green energy and power density electronic elements.

  17. Plasmonic finite-thickness metal-semiconductor-metal waveguide as ultra-compact modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babicheva, Viktoriia E; Lavrinenko, Andrei V

    2013-01-01

    We propose a plasmonic modulator with semiconductor gain material for optoelectronic integrated circuits. We analyze properties of a finite-thickness metal-semiconductor-metal (F-MSM) waveguide to be utilized as an ultra-compact and fast plasmonic modulator. The InP-based semiconductor core allows electrical control of signal propagation. By pumping the core we can vary the gain level and thus the transmittance of the whole system. The study of the device was made using both analytical approaches for planar two-dimensional case as well as numerical simulations for finite-width waveguides. We analyze the eigenmodes of the F-MSM waveguide, propagation constant, confinement factor, Purcell factor, absorption coefficient, and extinction ratio of the structure. We show that using thin metal layers instead of thick ones we can obtain higher extinction ratio of the device.

  18. Effects of catalyst film thickness on plasma-enhanced carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, S.; Cantoro, M.; Kleinsorge, B.; Casiraghi, C.; Parvez, A.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.

    2005-08-01

    A systematic study is presented of the influence of catalyst film thickness on carbon nanostructures grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition from acetylene and ammonia mixtures. We show that reducing the Fe/Co catalyst film thickness below 3 nm causes a transition from larger diameter (>40 nm), bamboolike carbon nanofibers to small diameter ({approx}5 nm) multiwalled nanotubes with two to five walls. This is accompanied by a more than 50 times faster growth rate and a faster catalyst poisoning. Thin Ni catalyst films only trigger such a growth transition when pretreated with an ammonia plasma. We observe a limited correlation between this growth transition and the coarsening of the catalyst film before deposition. For a growth temperature of {<=}550 deg. C, all catalysts showed mainly a tip growth regime and a similar activity on untreated silicon, oxidized silicon, and silicon nitride support.

  19. Development of low frequencies, insulating thick diaphragms for power MEMS applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formosa, Fabien; Favrelire, Hugues; 10.1016/j.sna.2012.09.018

    2013-01-01

    Major challenges of micro thermal machines are the thermal insulation and mechanical tolerance in the case of sliding piston. Switching from piston to membrane in microengines can alleviate the latest and lead to planar architectures. However, the thermal isolation would call for very thick structures which are associated to too high resonant frequencies which are detrimental to the engine performances. A thermal and mechanical compromise is to be made. On the contrary, based on fluid structure interaction, using an incompressible fluid contained in a cavity sealed by deformable diaphragm it would be possible to design a thick, low frequency insulating diaphragm. The design involves a simple planar geometry that is easy to manufacture with standard microelectronics methods. An analytical fluid structure model is proposed and theoretically validated. Experimental structures are realized and tested. The model is in agreement with the experimental results. A dimensionless model is proposed to design hybrid fluid...

  20. Has a thick neutron skin in ${}^{208}$Pb been ruled out?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattoyev, F J

    2013-01-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) has provided the first model-independent evidence in favor of a neutron-rich skin in ${}^{208}$Pb. Although the error bars are large, the reported large central value of 0.33\\,fm is particularly intriguing. To test whether such a thick neutron-skin in ${}^{208}$Pb is already incompatible with laboratory experiments or astrophysical observations, we employ relativistic models with neutron-skin thickness in ${}^{208}$Pb ranging from 0.16 to 0.33 fm to compute ground state properties of finite nuclei, their collective monopole and dipole response, and mass-{\\sl vs}-radius relations for neutron stars. No compelling reason was found to rule out models with large neutron skins in ${}^{208}$Pb from the set of observables considered in this work.

  1. Method for rapid, controllable growth and thickness, of epitaxial silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi (Littleton, CO); Stradins, Paul (Golden, CO); Teplin, Charles (Boulder, CO); Branz, Howard M. (Boulder, CO)

    2009-10-13

    A method of producing epitaxial silicon films on a c-Si wafer substrate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition by controlling the rate of silicon deposition in a temperature range that spans the transition from a monohydride to a hydrogen free silicon surface in a vacuum, to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness is disclosed. The method includes placing a c-Si substrate in a HWCVD reactor chamber. The method also includes supplying a gas containing silicon at a sufficient rate into the reaction chamber to interact with the substrate to deposit a layer containing silicon thereon at a predefined growth rate to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness.

  2. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  3. Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

  4. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  5. Depth-gradient analysis of the Colony Creek Cycle (late Pennsylvanian) of north Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Noel Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Chairman of Advisory Coamittee: Dr. Thomas E. Yancey Late Pennsylvanian depositional cycles consisting of transgres- sive and regressive sequences, and containing thin limestones overlain by thick shales which are in turn overlain by sandstones and... and the Colorado River valley, and has a similar vertical stratigra- phic succession of lithologies in both areas. This succession consists of 1) a thin transgressive limestone, 2) phosphatic dark shale, 3) gray shales with abundant fossils, 4) mixed shale...

  6. Using seismic refraction to assess geothermal potential: an updated view of crustal thickness in the Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , heat flow can be higher, and the potential for geothermal energy may be greater. In addition, crustalUsing seismic refraction to assess geothermal potential: an updated view of crustal thickness, Great Basin, crustal thickness, geothermal potential, Battle Mountain, Walker Lane, Nevada, geophysics

  7. Thickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV-and PF-based polymer light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Sue

    the thickness-dependent optical properties of single layer polymer light emitting diodes for two materials, poly the electronic and optical properties of these materials in light emitting diode LED structures.2 OurThickness-dependent changes in the optical properties of PPV- and PF-based polymer light emitting

  8. Abstract--In this paper, the propagation characteristics of an enhanced-thickness magnetic nanoparticle thin film are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    nanoparticle thin film are investigated on high resistivity silicon substrate (10,000 ohm-cm) for the first time up to 60 GHz. Contrary to other thin films, this nanoparticle thin film can achieve a thickness up to several hundred nanometers, even to micron. The enhanced thickness of this thin film is achieved

  9. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  10. The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, P. A.

    2014-06-15

    An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1??g (0.15??m of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1??g and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20??m and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20?atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5?keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25??m, the YOM values drop to 0.10??0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

  11. Improved gas sensing and dielectric properties of Fe doped hydroxyapatite thick films: Effect of molar concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mene, Ravindra U. [PDEA's, Annasaheb Waghire College of Science, Arts and Commerce, Otur 412409, M.S. (India); School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mahabole, Megha P. [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India); Mohite, K.C. [Haribhai. V. Desai College, Pune 411002, M.S. (India); Khairnar, Rajendra S., E-mail: rskhairnarsps@gmail.com [School of Physical Sciences, Swami Ramanand Teerth Marathwada University, Nanded 431606, M.S. (India)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: We report improved gas sensing and dielectric characteristics of Fe ion exchanged HAp films. Fe doped HAp film shows maximum gas response at relatively lower temperature. Response and gas uptake capacity of sensors is improved for appropriate amount of Fe ions in HAp matrix. Fe-HAp films exhibit remarkable improvement in dielectric properties compared to pure HAp. Fe doped HAp films show significant improvement in gas sensing as well as in dielectric properties. - Abstract: In the present work Fe doped hydroxyapatite (Fe-HAp) thick films has been successfully utilized to improve the gas sensing as well as its dielectric properties. Initially, HAp nano powder is synthesized by chemical precipitation process and later on Fe ions are doped in HAp by ion exchange process. Structural and morphological modifications are observed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The sensing parameters such as operating temperature, response/recovery time and gas uptake capacity are experimentally determined. The Fe-HAp (0.05 M) film shows improved CO and CO{sub 2} gas sensing capacity at lower operating temperature compared to pure HAp. Moreover, variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss for pure and Fe-HAp thick films are studied as a function of frequency in the range of 10 Hz1 MHz. The study reveals that Fe doped HAp thick films improve the sensing and dielectric characteristics as compared to pure HAp.

  12. The existence of warm and optically thick dissipative coronae above accretion disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rozanska, A; Belmont, R; Czerny, B; Petrucci, P -O

    2015-01-01

    In the past years, several observations of AGN and X-ray binaries have suggested the existence of a warm T around 0.5-1 keV and optically thick, \\tau ~ 10-20, corona covering the inner parts of the accretion disk. These properties are directly derived from spectral fitting in UV to soft-X-rays using Comptonization models. However, whether such a medium can be both in radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium with an accretion disk is still uncertain. We investigate the properties of such warm, optically thick coronae and put constraints on their existence. We solve the radiative transfer equation for grey atmosphere analytically in a pure scattering medium, including local dissipation as an additional heating term in the warm corona. The temperature profile of the warm corona is calculated assuming it is cooled by Compton scattering, with the underlying dissipative disk providing photons to the corona. Our analytic calculations show that a dissipative thick, (\\tau_{cor} ~ 10-12) corona on the top of a standard ac...

  13. Thickness effect on the structural and electrical properties of poly-SiGe films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asafa, T.B., E-mail: asafa@kfupm.edu.sa [KACST-Intel Consortium Center of Excellence in Nano-manufacturing Applications, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Witvrouw, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schneider, D. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Material and Beam Technology, Winterbergstrasse 28, Dresden (Germany); Moussa, A. [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tabet, N.; Said, S.A.M. [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Stress and Young's modulus of poly-SiGe film are linked to the grain columnar structure. The above properties remain unchanged for poly-SiGe films thicker than 40 nm. The point of transition is close to the electron mean free path for SiGe. Both the resistivity and Hall mobility follow a similar trend. - Abstract: As lateral dimensions of electromechanical devices are scaled down to length scales comparable to electron mean free paths, the influence of thickness effect on their properties becomes sine qua non. This paper presents a detailed study of thickness effect on the Young's modulus, residual stress, resistivity and Hall mobility of ultrathin poly-Si{sub 11}Ge{sub 89} films deposited by low pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Young's moduli for the films thicker than ?40 nm are close to the bulk value (135 GPa) while those of the thinner films are much lower. The reduction in resistivity and subsequent improved Hall mobility as thickness increases are discussed in light of surface morphology which is evident from atomic microscopy images. The near constant values of Young's modulus, resistivity and Hall mobility for the films thicker than ?40 nm are attributed to the columnar grain structure as confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy images.

  14. Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

  15. MULTIPLICITY OF NOVA ENVELOPE SOLUTIONS AND OCCURRENCE OF OPTICALLY THICK WINDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi E-mail: hachisu@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-07-10

    We revisit the occurrence condition of optically thick winds reported by Kato in 1985 and Kato and Hachisu in 1989 who mathematically examined nova envelope solutions with an old opacity and found that optically thick winds are accelerated only in massive white dwarfs (WDs) of {approx}>0.9 M{sub sun}. With the OPAL opacity we find that the optically thick wind occurs for {approx}>0.6 M{sub sun} WDs and that the occurrence of winds depends not only on the WD mass but also on the ignition mass. When the ignition mass is larger than a critical value, winds are suppressed by a density-inversion layer. Such a static solution can be realized in WDs of mass {approx}0.6-0.7 M{sub sun}. We propose that sequences consisting only of static solutions correspond to slow evolutions in symbiotic novae like PU Vul because PU Vul shows no indication of strong winds in a long-lasted flat peak followed by a very slow decline in its light curve.

  16. Electroplated L1{sub 0} CoPt thick-film permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oniku, Ololade D. Qi, Bin; Arnold, David P.

    2014-05-07

    The fabrication and magnetic characterization of 15-?m-thick electroplated L1{sub 0} CoPt hard magnets with good magnetic properties is reported in this paper. Experimental study of the dependence of the magnets' properties on annealing temperature reveals that an intrinsic coercivity H{sub ci}?=??800?kA/m (10 kOe), squareness >0.8, and energy product of >150?kJ/m{sup 3} are obtained for photolithographically patterned structures (250??m??2?mm stripes; 15??m thickness) electroplated on silicon substrates and annealed in hydrogen forming gas at 700?C. Scanning electron microscopy is used to inspect the morphology of both the as-deposited and annealed magnetic layers, and X-ray Diffractometer analysis on the magnets annealed at 700?C confirm a phase transformation to an ordered L1{sub 0} CoPt structure, with a minor phase of hcp Co. These thick films are intended for microsystems/MEMS applications.

  17. Where fast weathering creates thin regolith and slow weathering creates thick regolith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lebedeva, Marina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Pavich, Milan [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Parkinson, D. Y. [Advanced Light Source, LBNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2012-01-01

    Weathering disaggregates rock into regolith the fractured or granular earthmaterial that sustains life on the continental land surface. Here, we investigate what controls the depth of regolith formed on ridges of two rock compositions with similar initial porosities in Virginia (USA).A priori, we predicted that the regolith on diabasewould be thicker than on granite because the dominant mineral (feldspar) in the diabase weathers faster than its granitic counterpart. However, weathering advanced 20deeper into the granite than the diabase. The 20-thicker regolith is attributed mainly to connected micron-sized pores, microfractures formed around oxidizing biotite at 20m depth, and the lower iron (Fe) content in the felsic rock. Such porosity allows pervasive advection and deep oxidation in the granite. These observations may explainwhy regolithworldwide is thicker on felsic compared tomafic rock under similar conditions. To understand regolith formationwill require better understanding of such deep oxidation reactions and how they impact fluid flow during weathering.

  18. Wake angle for surface gravity waves on a finite depth fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pethiyagoda, Ravindra; Moroney, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Linear water wave theory suggests that wave patterns caused by a steadily moving disturbance are contained within a wedge whose half-angle depends on the depth-based Froude number $F_H$. For the problem of flow past an axisymmetric pressure distribution in a finite-depth channel, we report on the apparent angle of the wake, which is the angle of maximum peaks. For moderately deep channels, the dependence of the apparent wake angle on the Froude number is very different to the wedge angle, and varies smoothly as $F_H$ passes through the critical value $F_H=1$. For shallow water, the two angles tend to follow each other more closely, which leads to very large apparent wake angles for certain regimes.

  19. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  20. UnB Universidade de Braslia FT/ENC-Faculdade de Tecnologia / Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental PTARH Programa de Ps-graduao em Tecnologia Ambiental e Recursos Hdricos Edital 01/2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    UnB Universidade de Braslia FT/ENC- Faculdade de Tecnologia / Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental PTARH Programa de Ps-graduao em Tecnologia Ambiental e Recursos Hdricos Edital 01/2015 1 UNIVERSIDADE DE BRASLIA PROGRAMA DE PS-GRADUAO EM TECNOLOGIA AMBIENTAL E RECURSOS HDRICOS EDITAL N1

  1. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  2. Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Mark

    Brain Tissue Depth (mm) LightPowerDensity(mW/mm2 ) Power Meter Tissue block Bare Fiber = 12 = 6 with the beveled cannula over CeA. d) Chart indicating estimated light power density seen at various distances from the fiber tip in mouse brain tissue when the light power density seen at the fiber tip was 7 mW (~99 mW/mm2

  3. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2001); P. 897903, 4 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Depth-domain velocity analysis in VTI media using surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    velocity models needed for depth migration. Here, we demonstrate that P-wave reflection data can for depth imaging (such as prestack depth migration) arises mostly in laterally heteroge- neous media. StillGEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2001); P. 897903, 4 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Depth-domain velocity

  4. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  5. American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine, and Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    1 American Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida Public Opinion on Global Warming in the American States: An In-Depth Study of Florida, Maine warming has been happening What might have caused global warming Whether global warming

  6. Topographic, meteorologic, and canopy controls on the scaling characteristics of the spatial distribution of snow depth fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramrez, Jorge A.

    distribution of snow depth fields Ernesto Trujillo,1 Jorge A. Ramirez,1 and Kelly J. Elder2 Received 5 July, LIDAR snow depths, bare ground elevations (topography), and elevations filtered to the top of vegetation (topography + vegetation) in five 1-km2 areas are used to determine whether the spatial distribution of snow

  7. Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier, Edouard Auvinet, Jean Meunier, Max Mignotte and Jacques A. de Guise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    Depth Energy Image for Gait Symmetry Quantification Caroline Rougier, Edouard Auvinet, Jean Meunier concept of Depth Energy Image is introduced to better visualize gait asymmetry problems. Then a simple), Universit´e de Montr´eal, Montr´eal, Canada rougierc,auvinet,meunier,mignotte@iro.umontreal.ca J.A. de Guise

  8. Pre-Stack Depth Migration and Attribute Analysis of 3-D Time-Lapse P-wave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pre-Stack Depth Migration and Attribute Analysis of 3-D Time-Lapse P-wave Data Vacuum Field, New the application of Pre-Stack Depth Migration (PSDM) and innovative window-based attribute analysis applied to 4-D seismic data. The data were acquired in Central Vacuum Unit, Lea County, New Mexico by the Reservoir

  9. Airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and columnar water vapor during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    Airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and columnar water vapor during to within 0.0040.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/ sky radiometer located on Cabras Dynamics: Remote sensing; KEYWORDS: PRIDE, airborne Sun photometer, aerosol optical depth, columnar water

  10. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,P.; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; ,

    2005-10-07

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  11. Liquid film thickness inside the high pressure swirl injectors: Real scale measurement and evaluation of analytical equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Seoksu; Bae, Choongsik; Abo-Serie, Essam

    2010-02-15

    Liquid film thickness inside two swirl injectors for direct injection (DI) gasoline engines was measured at different injection pressure conditions ranging from 2.0 to 7.0 MPa and then previous analytical and empirical equations were examined from the experimental results. Based on the evaluation, a new equation for the liquid film thickness inside the swirl injectors was introduced. A direct photography using two real scale transparent nozzles and a pulsed light source was employed to measure the liquid film thickness inside the swirl injectors. The error in the liquid film thickness measurement, generated from different refractive indices among transparent nozzle, fuel and air, was estimated and corrected based on the geometric optics. Two injectors which have different nozzle diameter and nozzle length were applied to introduce a more general empirical equation for the liquid film thickness inside the pressure swirl injectors. The results showed that the liquid film thickness remains constant at the injection pressures for direct injection gasoline engines while the ratio of nozzle length to nozzle diameter (L/D) shows significant effect on the liquid film thickness. The previously introduced analytical and empirical equations for relatively low injection pressure swirl injectors overestimated the effect of injection pressure at the operating range of high pressure swirl injectors and, in addition, the effect of L/D ratio and swirler geometry was rarely considered. A new empirical equation was suggested based on the experimental results by taking into account the effects of fuel properties, nozzle diameter, nozzle length and swirler geometry. (author)

  12. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

  13. Harmonic QPOs and Thick Accretion Disk Oscillations in BL Lac Object AO 0235+164

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Liu; G. Zhao; Xue-Bing Wu

    2006-06-27

    Periodic outbursts are observed in many AGNs and usually explained with a supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) scenario. However, multiple periods are observed in some AGNs and cannot be explained with it. Here we analyze the periodicity of the radio light curves of AO 0235+164 at multi-frequencies and report the discovery of six QPOs in integer ratio 1:2:3:4:5:6 of QPO frequencies, of which the second with period $P_2 = (5.46 \\pm 0.47) {\\rm yr}$ is the strongest. We fit the radio light curves and show that the initial phases of six QPOs have zero or $\\pi$ differences relative to each other. We suggest a harmonic relationship of QPOs. The centroid frequency, relative strength, harmonic relationship and relative initial phases of QPOs are independent of radio frequency. The harmonic QPOs are likely due to the quasi-periodic injection of plasma from an oscillating accretion disk into the jet. We estimate the supermassive black hole mass $M_{\\rm BH} \\simeq (4.72\\pm 2.04) \\times 10^8 M_\\odot$ and the accretion rate $\\dot{m}\\simeq 0.007$. With the knowledge of accretion disk, it implies that the inner region of accretion disk of AO 0235+164 is a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. The oscillation accretion is due to the p-mode oscillation of the thick disk probably excited by a SMBHB. The theoretical predications of fundamental oscillation frequency and the harmonics are well consistent with the observations. Harmonic QPOs would be absent when the thick disk becomes geometrically thin due to the increase of accretion rate. We discuss the observations of AO 0235+164 basing on the SMBHB-thick disk oscillation scenario.

  14. Testing and analysis to determine the shell thickness required to prevent puncture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Radloff, H.D.; Eifert, E.J.

    1998-05-01

    Type B radioactive material packages are required to withstand a hypothetical puncture accident of a free fall from a height of one meter onto a 15 cm diameter mild steel puncture probe. For many packages it is desirable to have this accident event not result in puncture or tearing of the outer shell of the package. The wall thickness necessary to prevent this has historically been determined by test or the use of empirical relations. This technique generally results in overly conservative designs, but the degree of conservatism is uncertain. The use of modem finite element codes to determine package response to puncture accidents can result in designs that are both safe and economical. The work reported in this paper is aimed at developing a method to analytically determine the wall thickness required to prevent puncture. For designers and regulators to have confidence in this analytical method, however, it must be benchmarked against test results. A series of tests has been conducted with differing shell thicknesses, shell materials of mild steel and stainless steel, and shell backing materials of lead, foam, and air. The results of these tests have been compared with pre-test analytical predictions of the response obtained from the nonlinear transient dynamic finite element program PRONTO-2D. From this comparison it can be seen that the finite element method can accurately predict the response of packages to puncture accidents. This implies that an analytical technique based on the finite element method can be used to design packages having known response and margin of safety against tearing of the outer shell. In addition, the analytical technique can accurately predict the deformed shape of the package following the test. This may be important for subsequent calculations, such as external dose and heat input during a thermal event.

  15. Critical Thickness for Itinerant Ferromagnetism in Ultrathin Films of SrRuO_3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Jing

    2010-04-05

    Ultrathin films of the itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO{sub 3} were studied using transport and magneto-optic polar Kerr effect. We find that below 4 monolayers the films become insulating and their magnetic character changes as they loose their simple ferromagnetic behavior. We observe a strong reduction in the magnetic moment which for 3 monolayers and below lies in the plane of the film. Exchange-bias behavior is observed below the critical thickness, and may point to induced antiferromagnetism in contact with ferromagnetic regions.

  16. Thick target measurement of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Phair, L; Bleuel, D; Norman, E B; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Stoyer, M

    2009-02-06

    The thick-target yield for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction has been measured for E{sub beam} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using both an activation measurement and online {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The results of the two measurements agree. From the measured yield a reaction rate is deduced that is smaller than statistical model calculations. This implies a smaller {sup 44}Ti production in supernova compared to recently measured {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction rates.

  17. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treece, G. M.; Gee, A. H.

    2014-12-05

    for CBM v2 in eq. (4) by using eq. (1) to simulate the CT data variation c(x) through ideal cortices, i.e. with perfectly constant density and no pores, surrounded by material which is also at a constant (but lower) density. These cortices were blurred... are shown in Fig. 4. 3.2. Comparing HRpQCT and QCT data Moving on from simulations, we examined data from a study ethically approved by the Medical University of 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 500 1000 1500 thickness (mm) de ns ity (H U) yb y m raw data model fit...

  18. The Compton-thick AGN in the GPS radio source OQ+208

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Guainazzi; C. Stanghellini; P. Grandi

    2002-08-30

    We report in this paper the ASCA discovery of the first radio-loud Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) covered by a Compton-thick X-ray absorber, in the GigaHertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio source OQ+208. It represents one of the few available direct measurements of dense matter in the nuclear environment of this class of sources, which may provide the confining medium to the radio-emitting region if GPS sources are indeed "frustrated" classical radio doubles. The perspective of future studies with XEUS are discussed.

  19. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  20. Formation of Thick, Large-Area Nanoparticle Superlatices in Lithographically Defined Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akey, A.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.; Herman, I.P.

    2010-03-31

    Superlattices of colloidal nanocrystals hold the promise of new nanomaterials with tunable properties. The positioning and size of these structures are often poorly controlled after self-assembly from the solution phase, making studies of their properties difficult. We report the fabrication of {approx}100 layer thick, three-dimensional superlattices on a substrate with controlled lateral placement. This novel fabrication technique generates long-range order over the micrometer scale and controlled placement by employing lithographic patterning and microfluidic flow. Keywords: Nanoparticles; superlattice; self assembly; microfluidics; ordered array.

  1. Pure geometric thick $f(R)$-branes: stability and localization of gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    We study two exactly solvable five-dimensional thick brane world models in pure metric $f(R)$ gravity. Working in the Einstein frame, we show that these solutions are stable against small linear perturbations, including the tensor, vector, and scalar modes. For both models, the corresponding gravitational zero mode is localized on the brane, which leads to the four-dimensional Newton's law; while the massive modes are nonlocalized and they only contribute a small correction to the Newton's law at a large distance.

  2. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a semiconductor wafer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-07

    Apparatus for measuring thicknesses of semiconductor wafers is discussed, comprising: housing means for supporting a wafer in a light-tight environment; a light source mounted to the housing at one side of the wafer to emit light of a predetermined wavelength to normally impinge the wafer; a light detector supported at a predetermined distance from a side of the wafer opposite the side on which a light source impinges and adapted to receive light transmitted through the wafer; and means for measuring the transmitted light. 4 figs.

  3. Cooperative emission of a pulse train in an optically thick scattering medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwong, C C; Delande, D; Pierrat, R; Wilkowski, D

    2015-01-01

    An optically thick cold atomic cloud emits a coherent flash of light in the forward direction when the phase of an incident probe field is abruptly changed. Due to cooperativity, the duration of this phenomena can be much shorter than the excited lifetime of a single atom and, surprisingly, it weakly depends on the temperature of the gas and on the probe frequency. Repeating periodically the abrupt change of the incident field phase, we generate a forward transmitted train of pulses with short repetition time. It is even possible to quench single atom fluorescence, transferring almost completely the incident power into the pulse train with a high intensity contrast.

  4. Effective Diffusion-Medium Thickness for Simplified Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2008-07-30

    In this manuscript, conformal mapping is applied to a rib/channel domain of a polymer-electrolyte-fuel-cell diffusion medium. The analysis leads to the calculation of an effective diffusion-medium thickness, which can subsequently be used in 1-D simulations to account for the average rib/channel 2-D geometric effect. Extensions of the analysis to anisotropic and multilayer diffusion media are also given. Both equations and figures show the impact on a given variable at the catalyst layer of having a combined conducting/nonconducting boundary across from it.

  5. Asymptotic solution of light transport problems in optically thick luminescent media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin-Biryol, Derya Ilan, Boaz

    2014-06-15

    We study light transport in optically thick luminescent random media. Using radiative transport theory for luminescent media and applying asymptotic and computational methods, a corrected diffusion approximation is derived with the associated boundary conditions and boundary layer solution. The accuracy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, the reduced system models accurately the effect of reabsorption. The impacts of varying the Stokes shift and using experimentally measured luminescence data are explored in detail. The results of this study have application to the design of luminescent solar concentrators, fluorescence medical imaging, and optical cooling using anti-Stokes fluorescence.

  6. High-speed non-contact measuring apparatus for gauging the thickness of moving sheet material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grann, Eric B. (San Ramon, CA); Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An optical measurement apparatus is provided for measuring the thickness of a moving sheet material (18). The apparatus has a pair of optical measurement systems (21, 31) attached to opposing surfaces (14, 16) of a rigid support structure (10). A pair of high-power laser diodes (20,30) and a pair of photodetector arrays (22,32) are attached to the opposing surfaces. Light emitted from the laser diodes is reflected off of the sheet material surfaces (17, 19) and received by the respective photodetector arrays. An associated method for implementing the apparatus is also provided.

  7. Sensitivity of the electric dipole polarizability to the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Agrawal, B. K.; Colo, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Paar, N.; Piekarewicz, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    The static dipole polarizability, {alpha}{sub D}, in {sup 208}Pb has been recently measured with highresolution via proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) [1]. This observable is thought to be intimately connected with the neutron skin thickness, r{sub skin}, of the same nucleus and, more fundamentally, it is believed to be associated with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of r{sub skin} on {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb is investigated and discussed on the basis of a large and representative set of relativistic and non-relativistic nuclear energy density functionals (EDF) [2].

  8. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decaysArticle) | SciTech ConnectPatent: Thick-shell

  9. Effects of ultrasound and sodium lauryl sulfate on the transdermal delivery of hydrophilic permeants: Comparative in vitro studies with full-thickness and split-thickness pig and human skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Jennifer E.

    The simultaneous application of ultrasound and the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (referred to as US/SLS) to skin enhances transdermal drug delivery (TDD) in a synergistic mechanical and chemical manner. Since full-thickness ...

  10. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, Anders J. Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-? dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025?nm/min (3.95??10{sup ?2}?amu/atom in ion) for 6?keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  11. Results of Hg speciation testing on tanks 30, 32, and 37 depth samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-11-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The twelfth shipment of samples was designated to include 3H evaporator system Tank 30, 32, and 37 depth samples. The Tank 30 depth sample (HTF-30-15-70) was taken at 190 inches from the tank bottom and the Tank 32 depth sample (HTF-32-15-68) was taken at 89 inches from the tank bottom and both were shipped to SRNL on June 29, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottles. The Tank 37 surface sample (HTF-37-15-94) was taken around 253.4 inches from the tank bottom and shipped to SRNL on July 21, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottle. All samples were placed in the SRNL Shielded Cells and left unopened until intermediate dilutions were made on July 24, 2015 using 1.00 mL of sample diluted to 100.00 mL with deionized H2O. A 30 mL Teflon bottle was rinsed twice with the diluted tank sample and then filled leaving as little headspace as possible. It was immediately removed from the Shielded Cells and transferred to refrigerated storage where it remained at 4 C until final dilutions were made on October 20. A second portion of the cells diluted tank sample was poured into a shielded polyethylene bottle and transferred to Analytical Development for radiochemical analysis data needed for Hazardous Material Transportation calculations.

  12. Initial activity of reduced chromia/alumina catalyst in n-butane dehydrogenation monitored by on-line FT-IR gas analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakuli, A.; Kytoekivi, A.; Suntola, T.

    1996-06-01

    The initial activity of chromia/alumina catalyst (13 wt% Cr) in n-butane dehydrogenation was studied in a flow reactor at 853 K. The initial activity was determined by on-line FT-IR gas analysis, which enabled sampling of the gaseous product mixture at a time resolution of seconds. The catalysts were processed in repeated cycles of oxidation, reduction, and dehydrogenation using n-butane, methane, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide as reducing agents. With n-butane, methane, and hydrogen and dehydrogenation activity was associated with Cr{sup 3+} species apparently formed in the reduction of high-valence Cr species. The catalyst reduced with carbon monoxide at 853 K showed poor initial selectivity for butenes and, relative to the other catalysts. Simultaneous data relating the initial activity, coke content, and some of the physicochemical properties of the catalyst indicated that the surfaces of all catalysts were modified to some extent by the successive reaction cycles. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-31

    Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

  14. Implementation plan for the demonstration of a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ solar hot water system for the textile industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hester, J.C.; Beasley, D.E.; Rogers, W.A. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    An analysis of textile processes was conducted to determine their applicability to integration into a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ collector field and into a waste heat recovery system. Various processes in a typical carpet finishing plant, a typical cotton/cotton blend finishing plant, and a typical 100% synthetic fabric pressurized beck finishing plant are analyzed. The flat-plate, evacuated tube, and parabolic concentrator are discussed and evaluated. Evaluations of direct heat exchange, closed cycle enhanced recovery, and open cycle enhanced heat recovery techniques as applied to textile processes are presented. Conceptual designs are discussed that use a solar array to produce hot water and use standard boilers to produce process steam and to augment the hot water output when insolation values are insufficient to meet process demands. Conceptual designs and cost estimates are presented for: process water systems with evacuated tube solar collectors; process water system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; feedwater system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; templifier and direct exchange waste heat recovery system; direct heat recovery systems; integrated system using enhanced heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery, evacuated tube solar collectors and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; and integrated system using enhanced heat recovery, evacuated tube collectors, and concentrating-tracking source collectors. An economic evaluation of the systems is presented using the rate of return method. Results and recommendations are summarized. (MCW)

  15. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010 6:00Depth

  16. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010Depth Profile

  17. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting | Department|DepartmentalDay 49, 2010Depth

  18. GIOVE - A New Detector Setup for High Sensitivity Germanium Spectroscopy At Shallow Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerd Heusser; Marc Weber; Janina Hakenmller; Matthias Laubenstein; Manfred Lindner; Werner Maneschg; Hardy Simgen; Dominik Stolzenburg; Herbert Strecker

    2015-07-13

    We report on the development and construction of the high-purity germanium spectrometer setup GIOVE (Germanium Inner Outer Veto), recently built and now operated at the shallow underground laboratory of the Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Kernphysik, Heidelberg. Particular attention was paid to the design of a novel passive and active shield, aiming at efficient rejection of environmental and muon induced radiation backgrounds. The achieved sensitivity level of <100 {\\mu}Bq/kg for primordial radionuclides from U and Th in typical {\\gamma} ray sample screening measurements is unique among instruments located at comparably shallow depths and can compete with instruments at far deeper underground sites.

  19. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDe novoEmergencyHanford SiteDeployingDepth

  20. In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergyDepartment ofJanuary 19, 2013 |EnergyInIn-Depth: