National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thick plywood roughly

  1. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  2. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Moran [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  3. Roughness Optimization at High Modes for GDP CHx Microshells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theobald, M.; Dumay, B.; Chicanne, C.; Barnouin, J.; Legaie, O.; Baclet, P.

    2004-03-15

    For the ''Megajoule'' Laser (LMJ) facility of the CEA, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) is the nominal ablator to be used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. These capsules contain the fusible deuterium-tritium mixture to achieve ignition. Coatings are prepared by glow discharge polymerization (GDP) with trans-2-butene and hydrogen. The films properties have been investigated. Laser fusion targets must have optimized characteristics: a diameter of about 2.4 mm for LMJ targets, a thickness up to 175 {mu}m, a sphericity and a thickness concentricity better than 99% and an outer and an inner roughness lower than 20 nm at high modes. The surface finish of these laser fusion targets must be extremely smooth to minimize hydrodynamic instabilities.Movchan and Demchishin, and later Thornton introduced a structure zone model (SZM) based on both evaporated and sputtered metals. They investigated the influence of base temperature and the sputtering gas pressure on structure and properties of thick polycrystalline coatings of nickel, titanium, tungsten, aluminum oxide. An original cross-sectional analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows amorphous materials characterization and permits to make an analogy between the amorphous GDP material and the existing model (SZM). The purpose of this work is to understand the relationship between the deposition parameters, the growing structures and the surface roughness.The coating structure as a function of deposition parameters was first studied on plane silicon substrates and then optimized on PAMS shells. By adjusting the coating parameters, the structures are modified, and in some case, the high modes roughness decreases dramatically.

  4. Surface roughness and interface width scaling of magnetron sputter deposited Ni/Ti multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maidul Haque, S.; Biswas, A.; Tokas, R. B.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Bhattacharya, Debarati

    2013-09-14

    Using an indigenously built r.f. magnetron sputtering system, several single layer Ti and Ni films have been deposited at varying deposition conditions. All the samples have been characterized by Grazing Incidence X-ray Reflectivity (GIXR) and Atomic Force Microscopy to estimate their thickness, density, and roughness and a power law dependence of the surface roughness on the film thickness has been established. Subsequently, at optimized deposition condition of Ti and Ni, four Ni/Ti multilayers of 11-layer, 21-layer, 31-layer, and 51-layer having different bilayer thickness have been deposited. The multilayer samples have been characterized by GIXR and neutron reflectivity measurements and the experimental data have been fitted assuming an appropriate sample structure. A power law correlation between the interface width and bilayer thickness has been observed for the multilayer samples, which was explained in the light of alternate roughening/smoothening of multilayers and assuming that at the interface the growth restarts every time.

  5. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  6. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing PROJECT aPPliCaTiON Construction: Existing homes with unvented cathedralized roofs. Type: Residential Climate Zones: All TEam mEmbERs Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com BASF www.basf.com Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com Honeywell http://honeywell.com Icynene www.icynene.com COdE COmPliaNCE 2012 International Code Council, International Residential Code Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over

  7. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  8. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  9. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  10. ETA-NTP005 Electric Vehicle Rough Ride Course Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NTP005 Revision 2 Effective December 1, 2004 Electric Vehicle Rough Road Course Test ... Appendix A - Electric Vehicle Rough Road Test Data Sheet 15 Appendix B - Vehicle ...

  11. ETA-HITP05 - HICE Vehicle Rough Road Course Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective November 1, 2004 "HICE Vehicle Rough Road Course Test" Prepared by Electric ... Appendices Appendix A - HICEV Rough Road Test Data Sheet 9 Appendix B - Vehicle Metrology ...

  12. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Surface roughness effects on the solar ...

  13. Improvement of the electrical contact resistance at rough interfaces using two dimensional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jianchen; Pan, Chengbin; Lanza, Mario; Li, Heng; Shen, Panpan; Sun, Hui; Duan, Huiling

    2015-12-07

    Reducing the electronic contact resistance at the interfaces of nanostructured materials is a major goal for many kinds of planar and three dimensional devices. In this work, we develop a method to enhance the electronic transport at rough interfaces by inserting a two dimensional flexible and conductive graphene sheet. We observe that an ultra-thin graphene layer with a thickness of 0.35 nm can remarkably reduce the roughness of a sample in a factor of 40%, avoiding the use of thick coatings, leading to a more homogeneous current flow, and extraordinarily increasing the total current compared to the graphene-free counterpart. Due to its simplicity and performance enhancement, this methodology can be of interest to many interface and device designers.

  14. Tensile cracking of a brittle conformal coating on a rough substrate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reedy, Jr., E. D.

    2016-04-07

    This note examines the effect of interfacial roughness on the initiation and growth of channel cracks in a brittle film. A conformal film with cusp-like surface flaws that replicate the substrate roughness is investigated. This type of surface flaw is relatively severe in the sense that stress diverges as the cusp-tip is approached (i.e., there is a power-law stress singularity). For the geometry and range of film properties considered, the analysis suggests that smoothing the substrate could substantially increase the film’s resistance to the formation of the through-the-thickness cracks that precede channel cracking. Furthermore, smoothing the substrate’s surface has amore » relatively modest effect on the film stress needed to propagate a channel crack.« less

  15. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  16. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  17. System for measuring film thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batishko, Charles R.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Peters, Timothy J.; Rasmussen, Donald E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for determining the thicknesses of thin films of materials exhibiting fluorescence in response to exposure to excitation energy from a suitable source of such energy. A section of film is illuminated with a fixed level of excitation energy from a source such as an argon ion laser emitting blue-green light. The amount of fluorescent light produced by the film over a limited area within the section so illuminated is then measured using a detector such as a photomultiplier tube. Since the amount of fluorescent light produced is a function of the thicknesses of thin films, the thickness of a specific film can be determined by comparing the intensity of fluorescent light produced by this film with the intensity of light produced by similar films of known thicknesses in response to the same amount of excitation energy. The preferred embodiment of the invention uses fiber optic probes in measuring the thicknesses of oil films on the operational components of machinery which are ordinarily obscured from view.

  18. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  19. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  20. LTCC Thick Film Process Characterization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Girardi, M. A.; Peterson, K. A.; Vianco, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) technology has proven itself in military/space electronics, wireless communication, microsystems, medical and automotive electronics, and sensors. The use of LTCC for high frequency applications is appealing due to its low losses, design flexibility and packaging and integration capability. Moreover, we summarize the LTCC thick film process including some unconventional process steps such as feature machining in the unfired state and thin film definition of outer layer conductors. The LTCC thick film process was characterized to optimize process yields by focusing on these factors: 1) Print location, 2) Print thickness, 3) Drying of tapes and panels,more » 4) Shrinkage upon firing, and 5) Via topography. Statistical methods were used to analyze critical process and product characteristics in the determination towards that optimization goal.« less

  1. Eddy current thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, Gary J.; Sinclair, Frank; Soskov, Alexander; Buff, James S.

    2015-06-16

    A sheet of a material is disposed in a melt of the material. The sheet is formed using a cooling plate in one instance. An exciting coil and sensing coil are positioned downstream of the cooling plate. The exciting coil and sensing coil use eddy currents to determine a thickness of the solid sheet on top of the melt.

  2. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  3. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  4. ETA-HTP05 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Rough Road Course Test

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Hybrid Electric Vehicle Rough Road Course Test" Prepared by Electric Transportation ... Appendices Appendix A - Electric Vehicle Rough Road Test Data Sheet 11 Appendix B - ...

  5. ANALYZING SURFACE ROUGHNESS DEPENDENCE OF LINEAR RF LOSSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.; Xu, Chen

    2012-09-01

    Topographic structure on Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) surfaces can contribute additional cavity RF losses describable in terms of surface RF reflectivity and absorption indices of wave scattering theory. At isotropic homogeneous extent, Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of roughness is introduced and quantifies the random surface topographic structure. PSD obtained from different surface treatments of niobium, such Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP), Electropolishing (EP), Nano-Mechanical Polishing (NMP) and Barrel Centrifugal Polishing (CBP) are compared. A perturbation model is utilized to calculate the additional rough surface RF losses based on PSD statistical analysis. This model will not consider that superconductor becomes normal conducting at fields higher than transition field. One can calculate the RF power dissipation ratio between rough surface and ideal smooth surface within this field range from linear loss mechanisms.

  6. Effect of Grit Blasting on Substrate Roughness and Coating Adhesion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominic Varacalle; Donna Guillen; Doug Deason; William Rhodaberger; Elliott Sampson

    2006-09-01

    Statistically designed experiments were performed to compare the surface roughnesses produced by grit blasting A36/1020 steel with different abrasives. Grit blast media, blast pressure, and working distance were varied using a Box-type statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. The surface textures produced by four metal grits (HG16, HG18, HG25, and HG40) and three conventional grits (copper slag, coal slag, and chilled iron) were compared. Substrate roughness was measured using surface profilometry and correlated with operating parameters. The HG16 grit produced the highest surface roughness of all the grits tested. Aluminum and zinc-aluminum coatings were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates using a Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) process. Bond strength of the coatings was measured with a portable adhesion tester in accordance with ASTM standard D4541. The coatings on substrates roughened with steel grit exhibit superior bond strength to those on substrates prepared with conventional grit. For aluminum coatings sprayed onto surfaces prepared with the HG16 grit, the bond strength was most influenced by current, spray distance, and spray gun pressure (in that order). The highest bond strength for the zinc-aluminum coatings was attained on surfaces prepared using the metal grits.

  7. Tuning the thickness of electrochemically grafted layers in large area molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluteau, T.; Bessis, C.; Barraud, C. Della Rocca, M. L.; Lafarge, P.; Martin, P.; Lacroix, J.-C.

    2014-09-21

    We have investigated the thickness, the surface roughness, and the transport properties of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) (BTB) thin films grafted on evaporated Au electrodes, thanks to a diazonium-based electro-reduction process. The thickness of the organic film is tuned by varying the number of electrochemical cycles during the growth process. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal the evolution of the thickness in the range of 227 nm. Its variation displays a linear dependence with the number of cycles followed by a saturation attributed to the insulating behavior of the organic films. Both ultrathin (2 nm) and thin (12 and 27 nm) large area BTB-based junctions have then been fabricated using standard CMOS processes and finally electrically characterized. The electronic responses are fully consistent with a tunneling barrier in case of ultrathin BTB film whereas a pronounced rectifying behavior is reported for thicker molecular films.

  8. Influence of interface roughness in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krivas, K. A.; Winge, D. O.; Franckié, M.; Wacker, A.

    2015-09-21

    We use a numerical model based on non-equilibrium Green's functions to investigate the influence of interface roughness (IFR) scattering in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. We confirm that IFR is an important phenomenon that affects both current and gain. The simulations indicate that IFR causes a leakage current that transfers electrons from the upper to the lower laser state. In certain cases, this current can greatly reduce gain. In addition, individual interfaces and their impact on the renormalized single particle energies are studied and shown to give both blue- and red-shifts of the gain spectrum.

  9. Surface and Interface Properties of 1012 Unit Cells Thick Sputter Deposited Epitaxial CeO2Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saraf, L. V.; Wang, C. M.; Engelhard, M. H.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrathin and continuous epitaxial films with relaxed lattice strain can potentially maintain more of its bulk physical and chemical properties and are useful as buffer layers. We study surface, interface, and microstructural properties of ultrathin (?1012 unit cells thick) epitaxial ceria films grown on single crystal YSZ substrates. The out-of -plane and in-plane lattice parameters indicate relaxation in the continuous film due to misfit dislocations seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and substrate roughness of?1-2 unit cells, confirmed by atomic force microscopy and HRTEM. A combination of secondary sputtering, lattice mismatch, substrate roughness, and surface reduction creating secondary phasemorewas likely the cause of surface roughness which should be reduced to a minimum level for effective use of it as buffer layers.less

  10. Surface and Interface Properties of 10–12 Unit Cells Thick Sputter Deposited Epitaxial CeO 2 Films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Saraf, L. V.; Wang, C. M.; Engelhard, M. H.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2008-01-01

    Ulmore » trathin and continuous epitaxial films with relaxed lattice strain can potentially maintain more of its bulk physical and chemical properties and are useful as buffer layers. We study surface, interface, and microstructural properties of ultrathin ( ∼ 10–12 unit cells thick) epitaxial ceria films grown on single crystal YSZ substrates. The out-of -plane and in-plane lattice parameters indicate relaxation in the continuous film due to misfit dislocations seen by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and substrate roughness of ∼ 1-2 unit cells, confirmed by atomic force microscopy and HRTEM. A combination of secondary sputtering, lattice mismatch, substrate roughness, and surface reduction creating secondary phase was likely the cause of surface roughness which should be reduced to a minimum level for effective use of it as buffer layers.« less

  11. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  12. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  13. Thick crystalline films on foreign substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Henry I.; Atwater, Harry A.; Geis, Michael W.

    1986-01-01

    To achieve a uniform texture, large crystalline grains or, in some cases, a single crystalline orientation in a thick (>1 .mu.m) film on a foreign substrate, the film is formed so as to be thin (<1 .mu.m) in a certain section. Zone-melting recrystallization is initiated in the thin section and then extended into the thick section. The method may employ planar constriction patterns of orientation filter patterns.

  14. Thick crystalline films on foreign substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, H.I.; Atwater, H.A.; Geis, M.W.

    1986-03-18

    To achieve a uniform texture, large crystalline grains or, in some cases, a single crystalline orientation in a thick (>1 [mu]m) film on a foreign substrate, the film is formed so as to be thin (<1 [mu]m) in a certain section. Zone-melting recrystallization is initiated in the thin section and then extended into the thick section. The method may employ planar constriction patterns of orientation filter patterns. 2 figs.

  15. Characterization of thick 4H-SiC hot-wall CVD layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, M.J.; Irvine, K.G.; Kordina, O.; Singh, R.; Palmour, J.W.; Carter, C.H. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Epitaxial 4H-SiC layers suitable for high power devices have been grown in a hot-wall chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) system. These layers were subsequently characterized for many parameters important in device development and production. The uniformity of both thickness and doping is presented. Doping trends vs. temperature and growth rate is shown for the p-type dopant used. The n-type dopant drops in concentration with increasing temperature or increasing growth rate. In contrast, the p-type dopant increases in concentration with decreasing temperature or increasing growth rate. A simple descriptive model for this behavior is presented. The outcome from capacitance-voltage and SIMS measurements demonstrate that transitions from n to n{sup {minus}}, or p to p{sup {minus}}, and even n to p levels can be made quickly without adjustment to growth conditions. The ability to produce sharp transitions without process changes avoids degrading the resulting surface morphology or repeatability of the process. Avoiding process changes is particularly important in growth of thick layers since surface roughness tends to increase with layer thickness. Device results from diodes producing two different blocking voltages in excess of 5 kV is also shown. The higher voltage diodes exhibited a breakdown behavior which was near the theoretical limit for the epitaxial layer thickness and doping level grown.

  16. Stranski-Krastanow islanding initiated on the stochastic rough surfaces of the epitaxially strained thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarik Ogurtani, Omer; Celik, Aytac; Emre Oren, Ersin

    2014-06-14

    Quantum dots (QD) have discrete energy spectrum, which can be adjusted over a wide range by tuning composition, density, size, lattice strain, and morphology. These features make quantum dots attractive for the design and fabrication of novel electronic, magnetic and photonic devices and other functional materials used in cutting-edge applications. The formation of QD on epitaxially strained thin film surfaces, known as Stranski-Krastanow (SK) islands, has attracted great attention due to their unique electronic properties. Here, we present a systematic dynamical simulation study for the spontaneous evolution of the SK islands on the stochastically rough surfaces (nucleationless growth). During the development of SK islands through the mass accumulation at randomly selected regions of the film via surface drift-diffusion (induced by the capillary and mismatch stresses) with and/or without growth, one also observes the formation of an extremely thin wetting layer having a thickness of a few Angstroms. Above a certain threshold level of the mismatch strain and/or the size of the patch, the formation of multiple islands separated by shallow wetting layers is also observed as metastable states such as doublets even multiplets. These islands are converted into a distinct SK islands after long annealing times by coalescence through the long range surface diffusion. Extensive computer simulation studies demonstrated that after an initial transient regime, there is a strong quadratic relationship between the height of the SK singlet and the intensity of the lattice mismatch strain (in a wide range of stresses up to 8.5?GPa for germanium thin crystalline films), with the exception at those critical points where the morphological (shape change with necking) transition takes place.

  17. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  18. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J.; Bergren, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  19. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  20. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  1. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  2. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  3. MULTIPLE THICKNESS TIMES DENSITY GAMMA GAGE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherry, N.H.

    1962-07-24

    A device was developed for measuring simultaneously the thicknesses of two dissimilar materials superimposed on each other, such as coating of one material on another. The apparatus utilizes a double gamma radiation source producing radiation in two narrow band energy levels. The different materials attenuate the two bands of energy unequally with the result that a composite signal is received which can be analyzed to separate out the components due to the differing materials and indicate the thickness or densities of the two layers. (AEC)

  4. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  5. Model-Independent Characterization of Charge Diffusion in Thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    absorption length is smaller than the silicon thickness and the diffusion scale is of ... ELECTRIC FIELDS; PHOTONS; PROBABILITY; SILICON; THICKNESS; TRANSPORT Word Cloud More ...

  6. Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program: Issues and Approach Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program: Issues and Approach ...

  7. Numerical simulations examining the relationship between wall-roughness and fluid flow in rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant; Karpyn, Zuleima T.

    2010-07-01

    Understanding how fracture wall-roughness affects fluid flow is important when modeling many subsurface transport problems. Computed tomography scanning provides a unique view of rock fractures, allowing the measurement of fracture wall-roughness, without destroying the initial rock sample. For this computational fluid dynamics study, we used several different methods to obtain three-dimensional meshes of a computed tomography scanned fracture in Berea sandstone. These volumetric meshes had different wall-roughnesses, which we characterized using the Joint Roughness Coefficient and the fractal dimension of the fracture profiles. We then related these macroscopic roughness parameters to the effective flow through the fractures, as determined from Navier-Stokes numerical models. Thus, we used our fracture meshes to develop relationships between the observed roughness properties of the fracture geometries and flow parameters that are of importance for modeling flow through fractures in field scale models. Fractures with high Joint Roughness Coefficients and fractal dimensions were shown to exhibit tortuous flow paths, be poorly characterized by the mean geometric aperture, and have a fracture transmissivity 35 times smaller than the smoother modeled fracture flows.

  8. Influence of pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s performance loss due to roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tangler, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of blade geometric parameters such as pitch, twist, and taper on a blade`s sensitivity to leading edge roughness. The approach began with an evaluation of available test data of performance degradation due to roughness effects for several rotors. In addition to airfoil geometry, this evaluation suggested that a rotor`s sensitivity to roughness was also influenced by the blade geometric parameters. Parametric studies were conducted using the PROP computer code with wind-tunnel airfoil characteristics for smooth and rough surface conditions to quantify the performance loss due to roughness for tapered and twisted blades relative to a constant-chord, non-twisted blade at several blade pitch angles. The results indicate that a constant-chord, non-twisted blade pitched toward stall will have the greatest losses due to roughness. The use of twist, taper, and positive blade pitch angles all help reduce the angle-of-attack distribution along the blade for a given wind speed and the associated performance degradation due to roughness. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  9. A de Sitter tachyon thick braneworld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germn, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Malagn-Morejn, Dagoberto; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel; Rocha, Roldo da E-mail: aha@fis.unam.mx E-mail: rigel@ifm.umich.mx

    2013-02-01

    Among the multiple 5D thick braneworld models that have been proposed in the last years, in order to address several open problems in modern physics, there is a specific one involving a tachyonic bulk scalar field. Delving into this framework, a thick braneworld with a cosmological background induced on the brane is here investigated. The respective field equations derived from the model with a warped 5D geometry are highly non-linear equations, admitting a non-trivial solution for the warp factor and the tachyon scalar field as well, in a de Sitter 4D cosmological background. Moreover, the non-linear tachyonic scalar field, that generates the brane in complicity with warped gravity, has the form of a kink-like configuration. Notwithstanding, the non-linear field equations restricting character does not allow one to easily find thick brane solutions with a decaying warp factor which leads to the localization of 4D gravity and other matter fields. We derive such a thick brane configuration altogether in this tachyon-gravity setup. When analyzing the spectrum of gravity fluctuations in the transverse traceless sector, the 4D gravity is shown to be localized due to the presence of a single zero mode bound state, separated by a continuum of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes by a mass gap. It contrasts with previous results, where there is a KK massive bound excitation providing no clear physical interpretation. The mass gap is determined by the scale of the metric parameter H. Finally, the corrections to Newton's law in this model are computed and shown to decay exponentially. It is in full compliance to corrections reported in previous results (up to a constant factor) within similar braneworlds with induced 4D de Sitter metric, despite the fact that the warp factor and the massive modes have a different form.

  10. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  11. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  12. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  13. Method for preparing a thick film conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagesh, Voddarahalli K.; Fulrath, deceased, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    A method for preparing a thick film conductor which comprises providing surface active glass particles, mixing the surface active glass particles with a thermally decomposable organometallic compound, for example, a silver resinate, and then decomposing the organometallic compound by heating, thereby chemically depositing metal on the glass particles. The glass particle mixture is applied to a suitable substrate either before or after the organometallic compound is thermally decomposed. The resulting system is then fired in an oxidizing atmosphere, providing a microstructure of glass particles substantially uniformly coated with metal.

  14. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  15. Thickness measurement locations of mechanical integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, J.R.; Rivas, N.

    1996-07-01

    This paper will describe the importance of establishing thickness measurement location (TNE) criteria. It will also seek to quantify the frequency of inspections and review the methods for establishing techniques to ensure reliability and repeatability of inspections at TMLs using qualified inspectors. Also discussed will be the most useful way to document the results of an inspection and how to effectively maintain consistency in the mechanical integrity program. It reviews different methods of inspection and uses lessons learned from in-service experience with numerous mechanical projects in the petrochemical industry. The importance of qualified inspectors, quality inspection, electronic data acquisition and electronic data storage will be discussed.

  16. Simulation of surface roughness during the formation of thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanouff, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    The formation of a thermal spray coating was analyzed to identify methods to reduce the surface roughness of the coating. A new methodology was developed which uses a string of equally spaced node points to define the shape of the coating surface and to track the shape change as the thermal spray mass is deposited. This allows the calculation of arbitrary shapes for the coating surface which may be very complex. The model simulates the stochastic deposition of a large number of thermal spray droplets, where experimental data is used for the mass flux distribution on the target surface. This data shows that when the thermal spray mass impinges on the target surface, a large fraction of it (over-spray) splashes off the target and is re-deposited with a small spray angle, resulting in a large coating roughness. This analysis was used in a parameter study to identify methods for reducing the coating roughness. Effect of the shape of the profile for the pre-roughened substrate was found to be small. Decreasing the droplet size by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 13%. Increasing the spray angle for the over-spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 50%, and decreasing the amount of over- spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 51%.

  17. Ferroelectric PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA)-modified sol-gel process Title Ferroelectric PLZT thick films grown by poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vi...

  18. Radiation phantom with humanoid shape and adjustable thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Joerg; Levy, Joshua; Stern, Robin L.; Siantar, Christine Hartmann; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2006-12-19

    A radiation phantom comprising a body with a general humanoid shape and at least a portion having an adjustable thickness. In one embodiment, the portion with an adjustable thickness comprises at least one tissue-equivalent slice.

  19. Large-eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Kenny, W. T.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2015-04-30

    Surface roughness parameters, namely the roughness length and displacement height, are an integral input used to model surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and disregard the governing structural heterogeneity and dynamics. In this study, we use large-eddy simulations to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy-structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction.more » We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but uncovered positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, as well as between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. We generalized our model results into a virtual "biometric" parameterization that relates roughness length and displacement height to canopy height, leaf area index, and gap fraction. Using a decade of wind and canopy-structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-driven biometric parameterization approach in predicting the friction velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared the accuracy of these predictions with the friction-velocity predictions obtained from the common simple approximation related to canopy height, the values calculated with large-eddy simulations of the explicit canopy structure as measured by airborne and ground-based lidar, two other parameterization approaches that utilize varying canopy-structure inputs, and the annual and decadal means of the surface roughness parameters at

  20. Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information ...

  1. Roughness exponent in two-dimensional percolation, Potts model, and clock model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redinz, Jose Arnaldo; Martins, Marcelo Lobato

    2001-06-01

    We present a numerical study of the self-affine profiles obtained from configurations of the q-state Potts (with q=2,3, and 7) and p=10 clock models as well as from the occupation states for site percolation on the square lattice. The first and second order static phase transitions of the Potts model are located by a sharp change in the value of the roughness exponent {alpha} characterizing those profiles. The low temperature phase of the Potts model corresponds to flat ({alpha}{approx_equal}1) profiles, whereas its high temperature phase is associated with rough ({alpha}{approx_equal}0.5) ones. For the p=10 clock model, in addition to the flat (ferromagnetic) and rough (paramagnetic) profiles, an intermediate rough (0.5{lt}{alpha}{lt}1) phase{emdash}associated with a soft spin-wave one{emdash}is observed. Our results for the transition temperatures in the Potts and clock models are in agreement with the static values, showing that this approach is able to detect the phase transitions in these models directly from the spin configurations, without any reference to thermodynamical potentials, order parameters, or response functions. Finally, we show that the roughness exponent {alpha} is insensitive to geometric critical phenomena.

  2. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Robert L.; Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  3. Ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bylenok, Paul J.; Patmos, William M.; Wagner, Thomas A.; Martin, Francis H.

    1992-08-04

    An ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system uses an ultrasonic fsed beam probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of a tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern, and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal and then quantifies the digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of a plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area, e.g. 0.010 inch by 0.010 inch, of tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

  4. Ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bylenok, Paul J.; Patmos, William M.; Wagner, Thomas A.; Martin, Francis H.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic thickness measuring and imaging system uses an ultrasonic fsed beam probe for measuring thickness of an object, such as a wall of a tube, a computer for controlling movement of the probe in a scanning pattern within the tube and processing an analog signal produced by the probe which is proportional to the tube wall thickness in the scanning pattern, and a line scan recorder for producing a record of the tube wall thicknesses measured by the probe in the scanning pattern. The probe is moved in the scanning pattern to sequentially scan circumferentially the interior tube wall at spaced apart adjacent axial locations. The computer processes the analog signal by converting it to a digital signal and then quantifies the digital signal into a multiplicity of thickness points with each falling in one of a plurality of thickness ranges corresponding to one of a plurality of shades of grey. From the multiplicity of quantified thickness points, a line scan recorder connected to the computer generates a pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses with each quantified thickness point thus being obtained from a minute area, e.g. 0.010 inch by 0.010 inch, of tube wall and representing one pixel of the pictorial map. In the pictorial map of tube wall thicknesses, the pixels represent different wall thicknesses having different shades of grey.

  5. Evaluating the Influence of Wall-Roughness on Fracture Transmissivity with CT Scanning and Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant; McIntyre, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    Combining CT imaging of geomaterials with computational fluid dynamics provides substantial benefits to researchers. With simulations, geometric parameters can be varied in systematic ways that are not possible in the lab. This paper details the conversion of micro-CT images of a physical fracture in Berea sandstone to several tractable finite volume meshes. By computationally varying the level of detail captured from the scans we produced several realistic fracture geometries with different degrees of wall-roughness and various geometric properties. Simulations were performed and it was noted that increasing roughness increased the resistance to fluid flow. Also, as the distance between walls was increased the mean aperture approached the effective aperture.

  6. Effect of surface roughness and polymeric additive on nucleate pool boiling at subatmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.K.; Verma, R.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Mahajan, S.P.

    1986-09-01

    This investigation pertains to boiling heat transfer from a submerged flat surface at subatmospheric and atmospheric pressures in the presence of hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) as a polymeric additive in small doses. Boiling was carried out in presence of the additive on smooth and rough aluminium surfaces having effective cavity size within the range as predicted by Hsu model and the pressure was kept in the range of 8 - 100 KN/sq.m (abs). Effects of surface roughness, saturation pressure and polymer concentration on boiling heat transfer were studied and the results were compared with Rohsenow's correlation.

  7. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  8. Variable thickness double-refracting plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadeishi, Tetsuo

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides an A.C., cyclic, current-controlled, phase retardation plate that uses a magnetic clamp to produce stress birefringence. It was developed for an Isotope-Zeeman Atomic Absorption Spectrometer that uses polarization modulation to effect automatic background correction in atomic absorption trace-element measurements. To this end, the phase retardation plate of the invention is a variable thickness, photoelastic, double-refracting plate that is alternately stressed and released by the magnetic clamp selectively to modulate specific components selected from the group consisting of circularly and plane polarized Zeeman components that are produced in a dc magnetic field so that they correspond respectively to Zeeman reference and transmission-probe absorption components. The polarization modulation changes the phase of these polarized Zeeman components, designated as .sigma. reference and .pi. absorption components, so that every half cycle the components change from a transmission mode to a mode in which the .pi. component is blocked and the .sigma. components are transmitted. Thus, the Zeeman absorption component, which corresponds in amplitude to the amount of the trace element to be measured in a sample, is alternately transmitted and blocked by a linear polarizer, while the circularly polarized reference components are continuously transmitted thereby. The result is a sinusoidally varying output light amplitude whose average corresponds to the amount of the trace element present in the sample.

  9. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  10. Large eddy simulations of surface roughness parameter sensitivity to canopy-structure characteristics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurer, K. D.; Bohrer, G.; Ivanov, V. Y.

    2014-11-27

    Surface roughness parameters are at the core of every model representation of the coupling and interactions between land-surface and atmosphere, and are used in every model of surface fluxes. However, most models assume these parameters to be a fixed property of plant functional type and do not vary them in response to spatial or temporal changes to canopy structure. In part, this is due to the difficulty of reducing the complexity of canopy structure and its spatiotemporal dynamic and heterogeneity to less than a handful of parameters describing its effects of atmosphere–surface interactions. In this study we use large-eddy simulationsmore » to explore, in silico, the effects of canopy structure characteristics on surface roughness parameters. We performed a virtual experiment to test the sensitivity of resolved surface roughness to four axes of canopy structure: (1) leaf area index, (2) the vertical profile of leaf density, (3) canopy height, and (4) canopy gap fraction. We found roughness parameters to be highly variable, but were able to find positive relationships between displacement height and maximum canopy height, aerodynamic canopy height and maximum canopy height and leaf area index, and eddy-penetration depth and gap fraction. We also found negative relationships between aerodynamic canopy height and gap fraction, and between eddy-penetration depth and maximum canopy height and leaf area index. Using a decade of wind and canopy structure observations in a site in Michigan, we tested the effectiveness of our model-resolved parameters in predicting the frictional velocity over heterogeneous and disturbed canopies. We compared it with three other semi-empirical models and with a decade of meteorological observations. We found that parameterizations with fixed representations of roughness performed relatively well. Nonetheless, some empirical approaches that incorporate seasonal and inter-annual changes to the canopy structure performed even better than

  11. Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    forces between silica nanoparticles in water. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coating thickness and coverage effects on the forces between silica nanoparticles in water. ...

  12. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    et al., 2004). In addition, we have created contoured crustal thickness maps based on literature cited from the comprehensive Braile et al. (1989) study. These maps provide a...

  13. Electrochemical machining process for forming surface roughness elements on a gas turbine shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Johnson, Robert Alan; Wei, Bin; Wang, Hsin-Pang

    2002-01-01

    The back side recessed cooling surface of a shroud defining in part the hot gas path of a turbine is electrochemically machined to provide surface roughness elements and spaces therebetween to increase the heat transfer coefficient. To accomplish this, an electrode with insulating dielectric portions and non-insulating portions is disposed in opposition to the cooling surface. By passing an electrolyte between the cooling surface and electrode and applying an electrical current between the electrode and a shroud, roughness elements and spaces therebetween are formed in the cooling surface in opposition to the insulating and non-insulating portions of the electrode, hence increasing the surface area and heat transfer coefficient of the shroud.

  14. Surface roughness measurements of beta-layered solid deuterium-tritium in toroidal geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffer, J.K.; Foreman, L.R.; Sanchez, J.J.; Mapoles, E.R.; Sheliak, J.D.

    1996-07-01

    New experiments in a NIF-scale toroidal cylinder have resulted in true shadowgraphs of the DT ice surface. The spectral analysis of the images summed over l-modes 2 through 256 reveal that the surface roughness reaches values just below 1.0 {micro}m at temperatures of 19 K and above. Summing only modes l {ge} 10, the partial surface roughness is below 0.7 {micro}m at 19.5 K. These results indicate that native beta-layering will be sufficient to meet the NIF requirements for DT ice surface finish for both Be and CH ablating shells. The toroidal cylinder incorporates a linear heater along the cylindrical axis to test the concept of surface enhancement due to heat assisted beta-layering in DT. Additionally, with the use of this heater it is possible to symmetrize a pure D{sub 2} layer.

  15. The Effect of Excimer Laser Treatment on the Surface Roughness and Fracture Strength of Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, J.E.

    1998-05-13

    The microelectronics industry requires alumina substrates with exceptionally smooth surfaces and few surface defects to allow successful deposition of metallic films for reliable electronic performance. Irradiation by a 248-nm wavelength excimer laser beam (KrF) at a fluence of 125 mJ/mm{sup 2} and at various angles of incidence is shown to significantly reduce the surface roughness of alumina substrates. However, irradiation also creates a fine particulate deposit of alumina that only partially adheres to the substrate and impedes deposition of metal films. Annealing in air between 1350 C and 1450 C was found to remove the particles by sintering. As-received material showed surface roughness average (R{sub a}) mean values of 457 nm, which was reduced to 60 nm (mean) following irradiation and 71 nm (mean) following irradiation and annealing at 1350 C. Irradiation also produced a decrease in the number and severity of surface defects. The flexural strength and Weibull modulus were both increased by laser irradiation and thermal treatment. Flexural strength went from an as-received value of 450 MPa to 560 MPa following irradiation/sintering, measured at 10% probability of failure. The Weibull modulus was increased from the as-received value of about 9, to about 13 following irradiation/sintering. It was concluded that irradiation at an angle of incidence of 60{degree} from perpendicular was most effective in producing a low surface roughness.

  16. Cement paste surface roughness analysis using coherence scanning interferometry and confocal microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apedo, K.L.; Munzer, C.; He, H.; Montgomery, P.; Serres, N.; Fond, C.; Feugeas, F.

    2015-02-15

    Scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy have been used for several decades to better understand the microstructure of cementitious materials. Very limited work has been performed to date to study the roughness of cementitious materials by optical microscopy such as coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) and chromatic confocal sensing (CCS). The objective of this paper is to better understand how CSI can be used as a tool to analyze surface roughness and topography of cement pastes. Observations from a series of images acquired using this technique on both polished and unpolished samples are described. The results from CSI are compared with those from a STIL confocal microscopy technique (SCM). Comparison between both optical techniques demonstrates the ability of CSI to measure both polished and unpolished cement pastes. - Highlights: • Coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) was used to analyze cement paste surfaces. • The results from the CSI were compared with those from a confocal microscopy. • 3D roughness parameters were obtained using the window resizing method. • Polished and unpolished cement pastes were studied.

  17. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  18. Control for monitoring thickness of high temperature refractory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caines, M.J.

    1982-11-23

    This invention teaches an improved monitoring device for detecting the changes in thickness of high-temperature refractory, the device consists of a probe having at least two electrically conductive generally parallel elements separated by a dielectric material. The probe is implanted or embedded directly in the refractory and is elongated to extend in line with the refractory thickness to be measured. Electrical inputs to the conductive elements provide that either or both the electrical conductance or capacitance can be found, so that charges over lapsed time periods can be compared in order to detect changes in the thickness of the refractory.

  19. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Nancy M.; Johnson, John A.; Tow, David M.; Walter, John B

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a coating adhered to a substrate. An electromagnetic acoustic transducer is used to induce surface waves into the coating. The surface waves have a selected frequency and a fixed wavelength. Interpolation is used to determine the frequency of surface waves that propagate through the coating with the least attenuation. The phase velocity of the surface waves having this frequency is then calculated. The phase velocity is compared to known phase velocity/thickness tables to determine the thickness of the coating.

  20. Effects of roughness and temperature on low-energy hydrogen positive and negative ion reflection from silicon and carbon surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, N.; Kato, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Wada, M.; Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Yamaoka, H.

    2014-02-15

    Angle-resolved energy distribution functions of positive and negative hydrogen ions produced from a rough-finished Si surface under 1 keV proton irradiation have been measured. The corresponding distribution from a crystalline surface and a carbon surface are also measured for comparison. Intensities of positive and negative ions from the rough-finished Si are substantially smaller than those from crystalline Si. The angular distributions of these species are broader for rough surface than the crystalline surface. No significant temperature dependence for positive and negative ion intensities is observed for all samples in the temperature range from 300 to 400 K.

  1. A Simple Empirical Equation to Calculate Cloud Optical Thickness...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and high values of this quantity. With the above evidence in mind, we conclude that the empirical method described here is a useful tool for estimating cloud optical thickness at...

  2. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaNsapphire template Authors: Sundaram, S. 1 ; Puybaret, R. 2 ; El ...

  3. Benefits of the Multiple Echo Technique for Ultrasonic Thickness Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, J.; Vandekamp, R.

    2011-02-10

    Much effort has been put into determining methods to make accurate thickness measurements, especially at elevated temperatures. An accuracy of +/- 0.001 inches is typically noted for commercial ultrasonic thickness gauges and ultrasonic thickness techniques. Codes and standards put limitations on many inspection factors including equipment, calibration tolerance and temperature variations. These factors are important and should be controlled, but unfortunately do not guarantee accurate and repeatable measurements in the field. Most technicians long for a single technique that is best for every situation, unfortunately, there are no 'silver bullets' when it comes to nondestructive testing. This paper will describe and discuss some of the major contributors to measurement error as well as some advantages and limitations of multiple echo techniques and why multiple echo techniques should be more widely utilized for ultrasonic thickness measurements.

  4. Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 pivovar_nrel_kickoff.pdf (1.9 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting PEMFC R&D at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program

  5. Microfluidic devices with thick-film electrochemical detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph; Tian, Baomin; Sahlin, Eskil

    2005-04-12

    An apparatus for conducting a microfluidic process and analysis, including at least one elongated microfluidic channel, fluidic transport means for transport of fluids through the microfluidic channel, and at least one thick-film electrode in fluidic connection with the outlet end of the microfluidic channel. The present invention includes an integrated on-chip combination reaction, separation and thick-film electrochemical detection microsystem, for use in detection of a wide range of analytes, and methods for the use thereof.

  6. Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program: Issues

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Approach | Department of Energy Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program: Issues and Approach Through-thickness Membrane Conductivity Measurement for HTM Program: Issues and Approach DOE HTMWG Meeting, Presented by Kevin Cooper of Scribner Associates, Inc. on September 14, 2006. htmwg_cooper.pdf (566.46 KB) More Documents & Publications Progress and Status on Through-Plane Resistance and Conductivity Measurement of Fuel Cell Membranes High Temperature

  7. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janiszewska, J.M.; Ramsay, R.R.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors experience unsteady aerodynamics when the rotor is yawed, when rotor blades pass through the support tower wake, and when the wind is gusting. An understanding of this unsteady behavior is necessary to assist in the design of new rotor airfoils. The rotors also experience performance degradation due to surface roughness. These surface irregularities are due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. Wind tunnel studies that examine both the steady and unsteady behavior of airfoils can help define pertinent flow phenomena, and the resultant data can also be used to validate analytical computer codes. An S814 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3 X 5 subsonic wind tunnel (3 X 5) under steady flow with both stationary model conditions and pitch oscillations. To study the extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a leading edge grit roughness pattern (LEGR) was used to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from -20{degrees} to +40{degrees}. While the model underwent pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions {+-}5.5{degrees} and {+-}10{degrees}, were used; at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation.

  8. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) 's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Some 23,000 tons of asphalt removed during this summer's UPF site work have been put to use throughout the site. Potholes and gravel roads are now "paved" with the recycled asphalt that has been ground into a material called base course. Unlike gravel, the material tends to rebind into a solid form as it is packed down,

  9. EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

    2011-07-01

    Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that

  10. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quereda, J.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Agrat, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2014-08-04

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  11. Method and system for producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Walton, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for producing a thin film with highly uniform (or highly accurate custom graded) thickness on a flat or graded substrate (such as concave or convex optics), by sweeping the substrate across a vapor deposition source with controlled (and generally, time-varying) velocity. In preferred embodiments, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece that is held stationary while exposed to the source), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of sweep velocity modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a sweep velocity modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a practical method of accurately measuring source flux distribution, and a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal sweep velocity modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. Preferably, the computer implements an algorithm in which many sweep velocity function parameters (for example, the speed at which each substrate spins about its center as it sweeps across the source) can be varied or set to zero.

  12. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, S.L.; Myers, S.C.; Wallace, T.C.; Zandt, G.; Silver, P.G.; Drake, L.

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20{degree}S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70-74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32-38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20{degree}S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16{degree}S, 55-60 km) to south (20{degree}S, 70-74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  14. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  15. Method and apparatus for thickness measurement using microwaves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul [Bedford, MA; Lamar, David A. [West Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The method for measuring the thickness of a material which transmits a detectable amount of microwave radiation includes irradiating the material with coherent microwave radiation tuned over a frequency range. Reflected microwave radiation is detected, the reflected radiation having maxima and minima over the frequency range as a result of coherent interference of microwaves reflected from reflecting surfaces of the material. The thickness of the material is determined from the period of the maxima and minima along with knowledge of the index of refraction of the material.

  16. Quantum rings of non-uniform thickness in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrguez-Prada, F. A.; Garca, L. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    We consider a model of crater-shaped quantum dot in form of a thin layer whose thickness linearly increases with the distance from the axis. We show that one-particle wave equation for the electron confined in such structure can be completely separated in the adiabatic limit when the quantum dot thickness is much smaller than its lateral dimension. Analytical solutions found for this model has been used as base functions for analysing the effect of non-homogeneity on the electronic spectrum in the framework of the exact diagonalization method.

  17. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  18. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2013-08-13

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  19. Light emitting diode with high aspect ratio submicron roughness for light extraction and methods of forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2011-04-26

    The surface morphology of an LED light emitting surface is changed by applying a reactive ion etch (RIE) process to the light emitting surface. High aspect ratio, submicron roughness is formed on the light emitting surface by transferring a thin film metal hard-mask having submicron patterns to the surface prior to applying a reactive ion etch process. The submicron patterns in the metal hard-mask can be formed using a low cost, commercially available nano-patterned template which is transferred to the surface with the mask. After subsequently binding the mask to the surface, the template is removed and the RIE process is applied for time duration sufficient to change the morphology of the surface. The modified surface contains non-symmetric, submicron structures having high aspect ratio which increase the efficiency of the device.

  20. Organic photosensitive cells grown on rough electrode with nano-scale morphology control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-06-07

    An optoelectronic device and a method for fabricating the optoelectronic device includes a first electrode disposed on a substrate, an exposed surface of the first electrode having a root mean square roughness of at least 30 nm and a height variation of at least 200 nm, the first electrode being transparent. A conformal layer of a first organic semiconductor material is deposited onto the first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, the first organic semiconductor material being a small molecule material. A layer of a second organic semiconductor material is deposited over the conformal layer. At least some of the layer of the second organic semiconductor material directly contacts the conformal layer. A second electrode is deposited over the layer of the second organic semiconductor material. The first organic semiconductor material is of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to the second organic semiconductor material, which is of the other material type.

  1. A study of pitch oscillation and roughness on airfoils used for horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorek, G.M.; Hoffmann, M.J.; Ramsay, R.R.; Janiszewska, J.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Under subcontract XF-1-11009-3 the Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an extensive database of empirical aerodynamic data. These data will assist in the development of analytical models and in the design of new airfoils for wind turbines. To accomplish the main objective, airfoil models were designed, built and wind tunnel tested with and without model leading edge grit roughness (LEGR). LEGR simulates surface irregularities due to the accumulation of insect debris, ice, and/or the aging process. This report is a summary of project project activity for Phase III, which encompasses the time period from September 17, 1 993 to September 6, 1 994.

  2. Method and apparatus for conducting variable thickness vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nesslage, G.V.

    1984-08-03

    A method of vapor depositing metal on a substrate in variable thickness comprises conducting the deposition continuously without interruption to avoid formation of grain boundaries. To achieve reduced deposition in specific regions a thin wire or ribbon blocking body is placed between source and substrate to partially block vapors from depositing in the region immediately below.

  3. Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, J.L.

    1996-07-16

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials. 6 figs.

  4. Sensing roller for in-process thickness measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, James L.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for processing materials by sensing roller, in which the sensing roller has a plurality of conductive rings (electrodes) separated by rings of dielectric material. Sensing capacitances or impedances between the electrodes provides information on thicknesses of the materials being processed, location of wires therein, and other like characteristics of the materials.

  5. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial ?-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the ? rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of ?-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thickness until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.

  6. Full tape thickness feature conductors for EMI structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Knudson, Richard T.; Smith, Frank R.; Barner, Gregory

    2014-06-10

    Generally annular full tape thickness conductors are formed in single or multiple tape layers, and then stacked to produce an annular solid conductive wall for enclosing an electromagnetic isolation cavity. The conductors may be formed using punch and fill operations, or by flowing conductor-containing material onto the tape edge surfaces that define the interior sidewalls of the cavity.

  7. Thickness-insensitive selective surface paint. Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, S.W.

    1985-03-01

    Testing and evaluation of passive Trombe/mass wall systems have identified the need for a selective absorber paint that can be applied to concrete, brick, or any storage or absorber surface that does not particularly lend itself to the application of a selective foil. Testing and modeling at Los Alamos have shown the large benefits that can result from the incorporation of selective surfaces into passive systems. The grouting and surface preparation required to prepare a storage wall for application of a selective foil have proven to be a problem area that can be highly labor intensive. Large thermal resistances between a selective foil and the storage mass can also severely degrade the selective absorber benefits. There is a great need for an inexpensive, good performing, paint-type selective coating that can be easily applied to solar absorber elements, that is, applied by merely spraying it on the rough, unprepared surface.

  8. MoS2 Heterojunctions by Thickness Modulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tosun, Mahmut; Fu, Deyi; Desai, Sujay B.; Ko, Changhyun; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Lien, Der-Hsien; Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao; Javey, Ali

    2015-06-30

    In this work, we report lateral heterojunction formation in as-exfoliated MoS2 flakes by thickness modulation. Kelvin probe force microscopy is used to map the surface potential at the monolayer-multilayer heterojunction, and consequently the conduction band offset is extracted. Scanning photocurrent microscopy is performed to investigate the spatial photocurrent response along the length of the device including the source and the drain contacts as well as the monolayer-multilayer junction. The peak photocurrent is measured at the monolayer-multilayer interface, which is attributed to the formation of a type-I heterojunction. Finally, the work presents experimental and theoretical understanding of the band alignment andmore » photoresponse of thickness modulated MoS2 junctions with important implications for exploring novel optoelectronic devices.« less

  9. Method for making thick and/or thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-02

    A method to make thick or thin films a very low cost. The method is generally similar to the conventional tape casting techniques while being more flexible and versatile. The invention involves preparing a slip (solution) of desired material and including solvents such as ethanol and an appropriate dispersant to prevent agglomeration. The slip is then sprayed on a substrate to be coated using an atomizer which spreads the slip in a fine mist. Upon hitting the substrate, the solvent evaporates, leaving a green tape containing the powder and other additives, whereafter the tape may be punctured, cut, and heated for the desired application. The tape thickness can vary from about 1 .mu.m upward.

  10. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject Si-Al-O-N films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500# C. or less.

  11. Turbine blade having a constant thickness airfoil skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2012-10-23

    A turbine blade is provided for a gas turbine comprising: a support structure comprising a base defining a root of the blade and a framework extending radially outwardly from the base, and an outer skin coupled to the support structure framework. The skin has a generally constant thickness along substantially the entire radial extent thereof. The framework and the skin define an airfoil of the blade.

  12. Determination of the effective sample thickness via radiative capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hurst, A. M.; Summers, N. C.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Basunia, M. S.; Escher, J. E.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2015-09-14

    Our procedure for determining the effective thickness of non-uniform irregular-shaped samples via radiative capture is described. In this technique, partial γ-ray production cross sections of a compound nucleus produced in a neutron-capture reaction are measured using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis and compared to their corresponding standardized absolute values. For the low-energy transitions, the measured cross sections are lower than their standard values due to significant photoelectric absorption of the γ rays within the bulk-sample volume itself. Using standard theoretical techniques, the amount of γ-ray self absorption and neutron self shielding can then be calculated by iteratively varying the sample thicknessmore » until the observed cross sections converge with the known standards. The overall attenuation provides a measure of the effective sample thickness illuminated by the neutron beam. This procedure is illustrated through radiative neutron capture using powdered oxide samples comprising enriched 186W and 182W from which their tungsten-equivalent effective thicknesses are deduced to be 0.077(3) mm and 0.042(8) mm, respectively.« less

  13. Hollow cylindrical plasma filament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2013-01-15

    We have explored here a hollow cylindrical laser plasma multifilament waveguide with discontinuous finite thickness cladding, in which the separation between individual filaments is in the range of several millimeters and the waveguide cladding thickness is in the order of the microwave penetration depth. Such parameters give a closer representation of a realistic laser filament waveguide sustained by a long stable propagation of femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. We report how the waveguide losses depend on structural parameters like normalized plasma filament spacing, filament to filament distance or pitch, normal spatial frequency, and radius of the plasma filament. We found that for typical plasma parameters, the proposed waveguide can support guided modes of microwaves in extremely high frequency even with a cladding consisting of only one ring of plasma filaments. The loss of the microwave radiation is mainly caused by tunneling through the discontinuous finite cladding, i.e., confinement loss, and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In addition, the analysis indicates that the propagation loss is fairly large compared with the loss of a plasma waveguide with a continuous infinite thickness cladding, while they are comparable when using a cladding contains more than one ring. Compared to free space propagation, this waveguide still presents a superior microwave transmission to some distance in the order of the filamentation length; thus, the laser plasma filaments waveguide may be a potential channel for transporting pulsed-modulated microwaves if ensuring a long and stable propagation of fs laser pulses.

  14. Barkhausen noise in variable thickness amorphous finemet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puppin, Ezio; Pinotti, Ermanno; Brenna, Massimiliano

    2007-03-15

    We measured the statistical properties of Barkhausen noise in finemet films with nominal composition Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 22.5}B{sub 4} and variable thickness between 25 and 1000 nm. Films have been sputtered on glass substrates and their structure is amorphous. The critical exponents of the power-law distributions for the jumps amplitude show a remarkable stability over the whole thickness range, whereas the other macroscopic magnetic properties undergo strong variations. The value of the critical exponent is about 0.8 between 50 and 500 nm with a small increase up to 1.0 at 1000 nm. These values are similar to those observed with the same experimental technique in other two-dimensional (2D) systems, but definitely smaller with respect to the values observed in truly three-dimensional (3D) systems. Our data therefore indicate that, in the investigated thickness range, the behavior remains typical of 2D systems. The small increase of the critical exponent at 1000 nm might be an indication of a starting transition toward a 3D behavior.

  15. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  16. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    2004-10-01

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  17. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  18. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  19. Surface Roughness Effects on Fluid Transport Through a Natural Rock Fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, D.H.

    2008-04-01

    Fluid flow through rock fractures can be orders of magnitude faster than through the adjacent low-permeability rock. Understanding how fluid moves through these pathways is important for the prediction of sequestered CO2 transport in geologic reservoirs. Reservoir-scale, discrete-fracture simulators use simplified models of flow through fractures to determine transport properties in complex fracture networks. A high level of approximation is required in these reservoir-scale simulations due to the number of fractures within the domain of interest and because of the limited amount of information that can be obtained from geophysical well-logs (Long et al. (1996)). For this study, flow simulations through a CT-scanned fracture were performed to evaluate different fluid transport parameters that are important in geological flow analysis. The ‘roughness’ of the fracture was varied to determine the effect of the bumpy fracture walls on the fluid flow. The permeability and effective aperture were determined for flow under a constant pressure head. The fracture roughness is shown to dramatically reduce the flow through the fracture, and various relations are described.

  20. IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost Estimate Summary (Leveraged NDC Case).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Prescott, Ryan; Dawson, Jericah M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

    2014-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, based on leveraging a fully funded, Sandia executed NDC Modernization project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

  1. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  2. Interpretation of recent seismic data from a frontier hydrocarbon province: western Rough Creek graben, southern Illinois and western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertagne, A.J.; Pisasale, E.T.; Leising, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The northern basement fault of the Rough Creek graben is seismically discernible and has surface expression in the Rough Creek fault zone. The southern basement fault is not clearly defined seismically, but can be inferred from shallow faulting and gravity data. This fault is roughly coincident with the Pennyrile fault zone. Extensional faults that formed the rift boundaries were the sites of late-stage compressional and extensional tectonics. Flower structures observed along the graben boundaries probably indicate post-Pennsylvanian wrench faulting. The basement within the graben plunges north-northwest, with the lowest point occurring south of the Rough Creek fault zone. Pre-Knox sediments thicken to approximately 12,000 in this area. The Knox Megagroup thickens toward the Mississippi Embayment, ranging from 4800 ft (southeastern graben area) to more than 7000 ft (west end of graben). Upper Ordovician to Devonian units also display westward thickening. The top of the Meramecian, New Albany, Maquoketa, and the base of the Knox generate continuous, high-amplitude seismic reflections due to large impedance contrasts between clastic and carbonate units. Shallow oil and gas production (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) is present in this area. However, deep horizons (Knox, Lower Cambrian) remain relatively untested. Potential hydrocarbon traps in the pre-Knox sequence observed on seismic include fault blocks and updip pinch-outs.

  3. Quantifying the effect of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehranian, A.; Ay, M. R.; Alam, N. Riyahi; Zaidi, H.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The accurate prediction of x-ray spectra under typical conditions encountered in clinical x-ray examination procedures and the assessment of factors influencing them has been a long-standing goal of the diagnostic radiology and medical physics communities. In this work, the influence of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra is evaluated using MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: An image-based modeling method was used to create realistic models from surface-cracked anodes. An in-house computer program was written to model the geometric pattern of cracks and irregularities from digital images of focal track surface in order to define the modeled anodes into MCNP input file. To consider average roughness and mean crack depth into the models, the surface of anodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. It was found that the average roughness (R{sub a}) in the most aged tube studied is about 50 {mu}m. The correctness of MCNP4C in simulating diagnostic x-ray spectra was thoroughly verified by calling its Gaussian energy broadening card and comparing the simulated spectra with experimentally measured ones. The assessment of anode roughness involved the comparison of simulated spectra in deteriorated anodes with those simulated in perfectly plain anodes considered as reference. From these comparisons, the variations in output intensity, half value layer (HVL), heel effect, and patient dose were studied. Results: An intensity loss of 4.5% and 16.8% was predicted for anodes aged by 5 and 50 {mu}m deep cracks (50 kVp, 6 deg. target angle, and 2.5 mm Al total filtration). The variations in HVL were not significant as the spectra were not hardened by more than 2.5%; however, the trend for this variation was to increase with roughness. By deploying several point detector tallies along the anode-cathode direction and averaging exposure over them, it was found that for a 6 deg. anode, roughened by 50 {mu}m deep

  4. Effects of grit roughness and pitch oscillations on the S809 airfoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsay, R.F.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-01

    An S809 airfoil model was tested in The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory (OSU/AARL) 3{times}5 subsonic wind tunnel (3{times}5) under steady flow and stationary model conditions, and also with the model undergoing pitch oscillations. To study the possible extent of performance loss due to surface roughness, a standard grit pattern (LEGR) was developed to simulate leading edge contamination. After baseline cases were completed, the LEGR was applied for both steady state and model pitch oscillation cases. The Reynolds numbers for steady state conditions were 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.5 million, while the angle of attack ranged from {minus}20, to +40 {degrees}. With the model undergoing pitch oscillations, data were acquired at Reynolds numbers of 0.75, 1, 1.25, and 1.4 million, at frequencies of 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 Hz. Two sine wave forcing functions were used; {plus_minus} 5.5{degrees} and {plus_minus} 10{degrees}, at mean angles of attack of 8{degrees}, 14{degrees}, and 20{degrees}. For purposes herein, any reference to unsteady conditions means the model was in pitch oscillation about the quarter chord. In general, the unsteady maximum lift coefficient was from 4% to 86% higher than the steady state maximum lift coefficient, and variation in the quarter chord pitching moment coefficient magnitude was from {minus}83% to 195% relative to steady state values at high angles of attack. These findings indicate the importance of considering the unsteady flow behavior occurring in wind turbine operation to obtain accurate load estimates.

  5. DYNAMIC DELAMINATION IN THROUGH-THICKNESS REINFORCED DCB SPECIMEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Bridged crack models using beam theory formulation have proved to be effective in the modeling of quasistatic delamination crack growth in through thickness reinforced structures. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation in these structures with the beam theory formulation. Steady state crack propagation characteristics unique to the dynamic case are first identified. Dynamic crack propagation and the energetics of steady state dynamic crack growth for a Double Cantilever beam (DCB) configuration loaded with a flying wedge is examined next. We find that steady state crack growth is attainable for this loading configuration provided certain conditions are satisfied.

  6. Perfect electromagnetic absorption at one-atom-thick scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Sucheng; Duan, Qian; Li, Shuo; Yin, Qiang; Lu, Weixin; Li, Liang; Hou, Bo; Gu, Bangming; Wen, Weijia

    2015-11-02

    We experimentally demonstrate that perfect electromagnetic absorption can be realized in the one-atom thick graphene. Employing coherent illumination in the waveguide system, the absorbance of the unpatterned graphene monolayer is observed to be greater than 94% over the microwave X-band, 7–13 GHz, and to achieve a full absorption, >99% in experiment, at ∼8.3 GHz. In addition, the absorption characteristic manifests equivalently a wide range of incident angle. The experimental results agree very well with the theoretical calculations. Our work accomplishes the broadband, wide-angle, high-performance absorption in the thinnest material with simple configuration.

  7. Tape casting and partial melting of Bi-2212 thick films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhl, D.; Lang, T.; Heeb, B.

    1994-12-31

    To produce Bi-2212 thick films with high critical current densities tape casting and partial melting is a promising fabrication method. Bi-2212 powder and organic additives were mixed into a slurry and tape casted onto glass by the doctor blade tape casting process. The films were cut from the green tape and partially molten on Ag foils during heat treatment. We obtained almost single-phase and well-textured films over the whole thickness of 20 {mu}m. The orientation of the (a,b)-plane of the grains were parallel to the substrate with a misalignment of less than 6{degrees}. At 77K/OT a critical current density of 15`000 A/cm{sup 2} was reached in films of the dimension 1cm x 2cm x 20{mu}m (1{mu}V/cm criterion, resistively measured). At 4K/OT the highest value was 350`000 A/cm{sup 2} (1nV/cm criterion, magnetically measured).

  8. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  9. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  10. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  11. Alternatives to lumber and plywood in home construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, E.

    1993-04-01

    The diminished supply and unstable price of lumber is compelling designers, builders, and developers to explore alternative materials for residential construction. The report discusses several commercially available alternative materials or building systems that may be used in framing and sheathing, including: engineered wood products; laminated fiberboard that can be used for sheathing walls; light-gauge structural steel components for floors, walls and roof systems; foam core structure sandwich panels for walls and roofs; and a variety of concrete and concrete block systems, many of which include insulation material.

  12. Atomic intermixing and interface roughness in short-period InAs/GaSb superlattices for infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashuach, Y.; Lakin, E.; Kaufmann, Y.; Saguy, C.; Zolotoyabko, E.

    2014-09-28

    A set of advanced characterization methods, including high-resolution X-ray diffraction (measurements and simulations), cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy, and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy is applied to quantify the interface roughness and atomic intermixing (in both cation and anion sub-lattices) in short period (6–7 nm) InAs/GaSb superlattices intended for mid-wavelength (M) and long-wavelength (L) infrared detectors. The undesired atomic intermixing and interface roughness in the L-samples were found to be considerably lower than in the M-samples. In all specimens, anion intermixing is much higher than that in the cation sub-lattice. Possible origins of these findings are discussed.

  13. Wall-slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds: Effect of flow channel geometry and roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Sanetrnik, Daniel [Dept. of Production Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nm. T.G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zln, Czech Republic and Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovc (Czech Republic); Paravanova, Gordana [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Nad Ovcrnou 3685, 760 01 Zln (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    The paper deals with the rheological behavior of highly filled compounds proceeded via powder injection molding (PIM) and applied in many sectors of industry (automotive, medicine, electronic or military). Online rheometer equipped with slit dies varying in surface roughness and dimensions was applied to investigate the wall-slip as a rheological phenomenon, which can be considered as a parameter indicating the separation of compound components (polymer binder and metallic powder) during high shear rates when injection molded.

  14. Thickness dependence of hydrogen permeability for Ni-BaCe{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Thickness dependence of hydrogen permeability for Ni-BaCesub 0.8Ysub 0.2Osub 3-delta. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness dependence of ...

  15. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  16. Composition and thickness of the southern Altiplano crust, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zandt, G.; Velasco, A.A. ); Beck, S.L. )

    1994-11-01

    Slant stacking of broadband seismograms recorded in the western United States for two 1993 intermediate-depth earthquakes that occurred near the Bolvia-Argentina-Chile borders reveals small but clear precursors to both the compressional (P) wave and shear (S) wave depth phases. We interpret and model these precursors as underside reflections from the thickened Andean Altiplano crust. We model the crustal structure of the Altiplano with a grid-search technique to match the timing and amplitudes of the depth phases and precursors in the waveforms of both the P wave and S wave. Our best-fit model has an average crust velocity of 5.9-6.0 km/s, a crustal V[sub p]/V[sub s] of 1.6, a crustal thickness of 75-80 km, and a high-velocity (V[sub p] = 8.4 km/s), high-V[sub p]/V[sub s] (1.9) mantle wedge. Assuming isotropy, the low V[sub p]/V[sub s] ratio of 1.6 for the crust corresponds to an anomalously low Poisson's ratio of 0.18. Such a low value, in conjunction with the low average V[sub p] estimate, is consistent only with a felsic composition and high upper-crustal temperatures. The finding of a thick felsic crust overlying a high-velocity mantle supports models of Altiplano uplift due predominantly to crustal shortening as opposed to mafic magmatic addition and is inconsistent with recent mantle delamination. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Neutron skin thickness and neutron star equations of state: a strong relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menezes, D. P.; Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Watanabe de Moraes, M. M.; Providencia, C.

    2007-10-26

    A density dependent hadronic model and a common parametrization of the non-linear Walecka model are used to obtain the lead neutron skin thickness through its proton and neutron density profiles. The neutron skin thickness is known to reflect the equation of state properties. A direct correlation between the neutron skin thickness and the slope of the symmetry energy is found.

  18. Method and system using power modulation and velocity modulation producing sputtered thin films with sub-angstrom thickness uniformity or custom thickness gradients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montcalm, Claude; Folta, James Allen; Walton, Christopher Charles

    2003-12-23

    A method and system for determining a source flux modulation recipe for achieving a selected thickness profile of a film to be deposited (e.g., with highly uniform or highly accurate custom graded thickness) over a flat or curved substrate (such as concave or convex optics) by exposing the substrate to a vapor deposition source operated with time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the source is operated with time-varying power applied thereto during each sweep of the substrate to achieve the time-varying flux distribution as a function of time. Preferably, the method includes the steps of measuring the source flux distribution (using a test piece held stationary while exposed to the source with the source operated at each of a number of different applied power levels), calculating a set of predicted film thickness profiles, each film thickness profile assuming the measured flux distribution and a different one of a set of source flux modulation recipes, and determining from the predicted film thickness profiles a source flux modulation recipe which is adequate to achieve a predetermined thickness profile. Aspects of the invention include a computer-implemented method employing a graphical user interface to facilitate convenient selection of an optimal or nearly optimal source flux modulation recipe to achieve a desired thickness profile on a substrate. The method enables precise modulation of the deposition flux to which a substrate is exposed to provide a desired coating thickness distribution.

  19. On the improvement of photovoltaic action of ZnO/P3HT:PCBM by controlling roughness of window layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geethu, R. Menon, M. R. Rajesh Kartha, C. Sudha Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2014-04-24

    Polymer solar cells with configuration ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PCBM/Ag were fabricated using cost effective chemical spray pyrolysis and spin coating techniques. When surface of ZnO layer was modified with a second layer so as to increase the roughness, considerable improvement in cell parameters were observed. Optimum conditions for the required roughness were identified and changes in cell parameters with variation in surface roughness were studied. Major enhancements were observed in the open circuit voltage and in the cell efficiency.

  20. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, W. S. Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H.; Zhang, J.; Luo, J. K.; Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB

    2014-02-15

    Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  1. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

  2. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body.

  3. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1992-09-15

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

  4. Thick-Restart Laczos Method for Symmetric Eigenvalue Problems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    This software package implements the thick-restart Lanczos method. It can be used on either a single address space machine or distributed parallel machine. The user can choose to implement or use a matrix-vector multiplication routine in any form convenient. Most of the arithmetic computations in the software are done through calls to BLAS and LAPACK. The software is written in Fortran 90. Because Fortran 90 offers many utility functions such functions such as dynamic memorymore » management, timing functions, random number generator and so on, the program is easily portable to different machines without modifying the source code. It can also be easily accessed from other language such as C or C-+. Since the software is highly modularized, it is relatively easy to adopt it for different type of situations. For example if the eigenvalue problem may have some symmetry and only a portion of the physical domain is discretized, then the dot-product routine needs to be modified. In this software, this modification is limited to one subroutine. It also can be instructed to write checkpoint files so that it can be restarted at a later time.« less

  5. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  6. Thick Concrete Specimen Construction, Testing, and Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A.; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations. A preliminary report detailed some of the challenges associated with thick reinforced concrete sections and prioritized conceptual designs of specimens that could be fabricated to represent NPP concrete structures for using in NDE evaluation comparisons. This led to the construction of the concrete specimen presented in this report, which has sufficient reinforcement density and cross-sectional size to represent an NPP containment wall. Details on how a suitably thick concrete specimen was constructed are presented, including the construction materials, final nominal design schematic, as well as formwork and rigging required to safely meet the desired dimensions of the concrete structure. The report also details the type and methods of forming the concrete specimen as well as information on how the rebar and simulated defects were embedded. Details on how the resulting specimen was transported, safely anchored, and marked to allow access for systematic comparative NDE testing of defects in a representative NPP containment wall concrete specimen are also given. Data collection using the MIRA Ultrasonic NDE equipment and

  7. Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G.; Relland, J.

    2014-01-29

    In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

  8. Fatigue response of repaired thick aluminum panels with bondline flaws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.S.

    1999-03-01

    This research investigated the fatigue response of precracked 558 x 177.8 x 6.35 mm (22.0 x 7.0 x 0.25 in) 2024-T351 aluminum panels repaired with single-sided partially bonded, unidirectional, eighteen ply boron/epoxy reinforcements. Disbonds were introduced into the bondline of each repair during the adhesion process using teflon inserts. Five different disbond configurations, with varying disbond locations and sizes, were tested. Each repaired panel was subjected to constant amplitude cyclic fatigue loading with a maximum stress of 120MPa. Results from the different configurations were compared against one another and against repaired panels with no debonds to assess the effect of disbonds on repair life. Results from the experimentation showed that even in the case of very large disbonds (20% of total bond area), the bonded repairs significantly extended the lives of the cracked panels. Disbond configurations with disbonds located away from the crack in the aluminum panel, performed comparably to the repaired panel with no disbonds. Disbond configurations with disbonds covering the crack in the aluminum panel yielded slightly lower lives than those obtained from repaired panels with no disbonds. Cyclic fatigue loading caused no increase in size of the artificially induced disbonds. Cyclic disbond growth was observed in the immediate vicinity of the crack. Finite element analysis using the Three Layer Technique was performed to assess the ability of current modeling techniques in predicting the life of cracked thick aluminum panels repaired with composite patches. Results from the finite element analysis were shown to very closely match experimental data.

  9. Effect of Ru thickness on spin pumping in Ru/Py bilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Nilamani; Singh, M. Sanjoy; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K. Muduli, P. K.

    2015-05-07

    We report the effect of Ru thickness (t{sub Ru}) on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line-width of Ru(t{sub Ru})/Py(23?nm) bilayer samples grown on Si(100)/SiO{sub 2} substrates at room temperature by magnetron sputtering. The FMR line-width is found to vary linearly with frequency for all thicknesses of Ru, indicating intrinsic origin of damping. For Ru thicknesses below 15?nm, Gilbert-damping parameter, ? is almost constant. We ascribe this behavior to spin back flow that is operative for Ru thicknesses lower than the spin diffusion length in Ru, ?{sub sd}. For thicknesses >15?nm (>?{sub sd}), the damping constant increases with Ru thickness, indicating spin pumping from Py into Ru.

  10. SU-E-T-319: The Effect of Slice Thickness On IMRT Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, S; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of volume estimated of a treatment planning system is investigated in this study. In addition, the effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning is also studied. Methods: The accuracy in volume determination was investigated using a water phantom containing various objects with known volumes ranging from 1100cm{sup 3}. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (110 mm). The CT data sets were sent to Eclipse TPS for contour delineation and volume calculation. The effect of slice thickness on IMRT planning was studied using a commercial phantom containing four different shaped objects. The phantom was scanned with different slice thickness (15 mm). IMRT plans were generated for the different CT datasets to calculate TCP, homogeneity (HI) and conformity indices (CI). Results: The variability of volumes with CT slice thickness was significant especially for small volume structures. The minimum and maximum error in the volume estimation is in the range of ?2.3% to 92%. On the other hand, with increasing slice thickness, the PTV mean dose and TCP values decreases. Maximum variation of ?5% was observed in mean dose and ?2% in TCP with slice thickness change from 15 mm. The relative decrease in target volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose is ?5% slice thickness change from 15 mm. HI increases up to 163% and CI decreases by 4% between 15 mm slice thickness change, producing highly inhomogeneous and least conformal plan. Conclusion: Accuracy of volume estimation is dependent on CT slice thickness and the contouring algorithm in a TPS. During TPS commissioning and for all clinical protocols, evaluation of volume should be included to provide the limit of accuracy in DVH calculation. A smaller slice thickness provides superior dosimetry with improved TCP values. Thus, the smallest possible slice thickness should be used for IMRT planning.

  11. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  12. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    2010-12-15

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  13. Riser Difference Evaluation from Ultrasonic Wall Thickness Inspection of Thirteen Double-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weier, Dennis R.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2010-03-15

    PNNL has performed an analysis of ultrasonic thickness measurements taken on Hanford's double-shell tanks (DSTs) approximately eight years apart. The analysis was performed to determine whether significant differences exist between ultrasonic thickness measurements made in two opposite risers in Hanford DSTs that have been examined twice.

  14. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  15. Enhancing through thickness thermal conductivity of ultra-thin composite laminates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramani, K.; Vaidyanathan, A.

    1994-12-31

    The materials used in electronic applications have specific requirements for stiffness, thermal conductivity, and electromagnetic shielding making the choice of materials used very important. Electronic components are very sensitive to heat, hence the heat dissipation or cooling of the various components is necessary to prevent failure. Thus, any material used in the electronic industry must have a high thermal conductivity in addition to a specified thermal expansion, stiffness and strength properties. The purpose of this project was to design and manufacture composite panels which would conduct heat from an electronic chip attached to the top surface to a cooling liquid flowing at its lower surface. To maximize the heat conducted from the chip to the cooling liquid, the composite must have a high through thickness thermal conductivity. Further, design restrictions on the thickness of the composite panel had to be taken into account. It was found that the presence of excess resin adversely affects the conductivity of a woven fabric composite due to which the through thickness conductivity of the 400 {micro}m thick panel was better than the 500 {micro}m thick panel. The through thickness conductivity of the panel with short fibers alone was better than that of the woven cloth panel. The finite element model developed for a priori prediction of the through thickness thermal conductivity of the composite panels is a very powerful tool that can save enormous prototyping times an associates coats.

  16. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high Z substrate for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, D. Roquemore, A. L.; Jaworski, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Miller, J.; Creely, A.; Raman, P.; Ruzic, D.

    2014-11-15

    Rutherford backscattering of energetic particles can be used to determine the thickness of a coating of a low-Z material over a heavier substrate. Simulations indicate that 5 MeV alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles between 0.5 and 15??m thick. Using a 0.1?mCi source, a thickness measurement can be accomplished in 2 h of counting. This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1?mg/cm{sup 2} thick) on a high-Z substrate, such as Be on W, B on Mo, or Li on Mo. By inserting a source and detector on a moveable probe, this technique could be used to provide an in situ measurement of the thickness of Li coating on NSTX-U Mo tiles. A test stand with an alpha source and an annular solid-state detector was used to investigate the measurable range of low-Z material thicknesses on Mo tiles.

  17. Prediction of the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy using computational intelligence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehlaghi, Vahab; Taghipour, Mostafa; Haghparast, Abbas; Roshani, Gholam Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas; Shayesteh, Sajjad Pashootan; Adineh-Vand, Ayoub; Karimi, Gholam Reza

    2015-04-01

    In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are investigated to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in radiation therapy. In the proposed models, the input parameters are field size (S), off-axis distance, and relative dose (D/D{sub 0}), and the output is the thickness of the compensator. The obtained results show that the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are useful, reliable, and cheap tools to predict the thickness of the compensator filter in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Propellant of Different Thickness for Laser Micro Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Cai; Long Li; Yu Du; Tang Zhiping; Hu Xiaojun

    2010-05-06

    The thickness of propellant is an important experimental parameter under T-mode, which has a direct impact on the performance of the laser Micro propulsion. In this paper, the prolusion performance of four propellants with different thickness is measured respectively, the experimental results show that the momentum coupling coefficient C{sub m} rises with the increase of thickness, while the specific impulse I{sub sp} falls on the contrary. The same trend for I{sub sp} also has been obtained from the simulated result by the Discrete Element Program (DEM).

  19. Correlation of CsK2Sb photocathode lifetime with antimony thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, M. A.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    CsK2Sb photocathodes with quantum efficiency on the order of 10% at 532 nm, and lifetime greater than 90 days at low voltage, were successfully manufactured via co-deposition of alkali species emanating from an effusion source. Photocathodes were characterized as a function of antimony layer thickness and alkali consumption, inside a vacuum chamber that was initially baked, but frequently vented without re-baking. Photocathode lifetime measured at low voltage is correlated with the antimony layer thickness. Photocathodes manufactured with comparatively thick antimony layers exhibited the best lifetime. We speculate that the antimony layer serves as a reservoir, or sponge, for the alkali.

  20. ORIGIN OF CHEMICAL AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    We adopt a scenario in which the Galactic thick disk was formed by minor merging between the first generation of the Galactic thin disk (FGTD) and a dwarf galaxy about {approx}9 Gyr ago and thereby investigate chemical and dynamical properties of the Galactic thick disk. In this scenario, the dynamical properties of the thick disk have long been influenced both by the mass growth of the second generation of the Galactic thin disk (i.e., the present thin disk) and by its non-axisymmetric structures. On the other hand, the early star formation history and chemical evolution of the thin disk was influenced by the remaining gas of the thick disk. Based on N-body simulations and chemical evolution models, we investigate the radial metallicity gradient, structural and kinematical properties, and detailed chemical abundance patterns of the thick disk. Our numerical simulations show that the ancient minor merger event can significantly flatten the original radial metallicity gradient of the FGTD, in particular, in the outer part, and also can be responsible for migration of inner metal-rich stars into the outer part (R > 10 kpc). The simulations show that the central region of the thick disk can develop a bar due to dynamical effects of a separate bar in the thin disk. Whether or not rotational velocities (V{sub {phi}}) can correlate with metallicities ([Fe/H]) for the simulated thick disks depends on the initial metallicity gradients of the FGTDs. The simulated orbital eccentricity distributions in the thick disk for models with higher mass ratios ({approx}0.2) and lower orbital eccentricities ({approx}0.5) of minor mergers are in good agreement with the corresponding observations. The simulated V{sub {phi}}-|z| relation of the thick disk in models with low orbital inclination angles of mergers are also in good agreement with the latest observational results. The vertical metallicity gradient of the simulated thick disk is rather flat or very weakly negative in the solar

  1. Analytical studies on the impact of using repeated-rib roughness in LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) decay heat removal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obot, N.T.; Tessier, J.H.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to determine the effects of roughness on the thermal performance of Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) decay heat removal systems for a range of possible design configurations and operating conditions. The ranges covered for relative rib height (e/D/sub h/), relative pitch (p/e) and flow attack angle were 0.026--0.103, 5--20 and 0--90 degrees, successively. The heat flux was varied between 1.1 and 21.5 kW/m/sup 2/ (0.1 and 2.0 kW/ft/sup 2/). Calculations were made for three cases: smooth duct with no ribs, ribs on both the guard vessel and collector wall, and ribs on the collector wall only. The results indicate that significant benefits, amounting to nearly two-fold reductions in guard vessel and collector wall temperatures, can be realized by placing repeated ribs on both the guard vessel and the collector wall. The magnitudes of the reduction in the reactor vessel temperature are considerably smaller. In general, the level of improvement, be it with respect to temperature or heat flux, is only mildly affected by changes in rib height or pitch but exhibits greater sensitivity to the assumed value for the system form loss. When the ribs are placed only on the collector wall, the heat removal capability is substantially reduced.

  2. Local changes of work function near rough features on Cu surfaces operated under high external electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djurabekova, Flyura Ruzibaev, Avaz; Parviainen, Stefan; Holmstrm, Eero; Hakala, Mikko

    2013-12-28

    Metal surfaces operated under high electric fields produce sparks even if they are held in ultra high vacuum. In spite of extensive research on the topic of vacuum arcs, the mystery of vacuum arc origin still remains unresolved. The indications that the sparking rates depend on the material motivate the research on surface response to extremely high external electric fields. In this work by means of density-functional theory calculations we analyze the redistribution of electron density on (100) Cu surfaces due to self-adatoms and in presence of high electric fields from ?1?V/nm up to ?2?V/nm (?1 to ?2 GV/m, respectively). We also calculate the partial charge induced by the external field on a single adatom and a cluster of two adatoms in order to obtain reliable information on charge redistribution on surface atoms, which can serve as a benchmarking quantity for the assessment of the electric field effects on metal surfaces by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we investigate the modifications of work function around rough surface features, such as step edges and self-adatoms.

  3. Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2003-10-03

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.

  4. In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 PPPL- 5042 In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High Z Substrate for Tokamaks D. Mueller, A.L. Roquemore, M. Jaworski, C.H. Skinner, J. Miller, A. Creely, ...

  5. Metaporous layer to overcome the thickness constraint for broadband sound absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2015-05-07

    The sound absorption of a porous layer is affected by its thickness, especially in a low-frequency range. If a hard-backed porous layer contains periodical arrangements of rigid partitions that are coordinated parallel and perpendicular to the direction of incoming sound waves, the lower bound of the effective sound absorption can be lowered much more and the overall absorption performance enhanced. The consequence of rigid partitioning in a porous layer is to make the first thickness resonance mode in the layer appear at much lower frequencies compared to that in the original homogeneous porous layer with the same thickness. Moreover, appropriate partitioning yields multiple thickness resonances with higher absorption peaks through impedance matching. The physics of the partitioned porous layer, or the metaporous layer, is theoretically investigated in this study.

  6. Pump-Intensity- and Shell-Thickness-Dependent Evolution ofPhotolumine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Pump-Intensity- and Shell-Thickness-Dependent Evolution of Photoluminescence Blinking in Individual CoreShell CdSeCdS Nanocrystals Citation Details In-Document ...

  7. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said ...

  8. On-Line Measurement of Lubricant Film Thickness Using Ultrasonic Reflection Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drinkwater, B.W.; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.; Harper, P.

    2004-02-26

    The ultrasonic reflectivity of a lubricant layer between two solid bodies depends on the ultrasonic frequency, the acoustic properties of the liquid and solid, and the layer thickness. In this paper, ultrasonic reflectivity measurements are used as a method for determining the thickness of lubricating films in bearing systems. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the outside of a bearing shell such that the wave is focused on the lubricant film layer. For a particular lubricant film the reflected pulse is processed to give a reflection coefficient spectrum. The lubricant film thickness is then obtained from either the layer stiffness or the resonant frequency. The method has been validated using static fluid wedges and the elastohydrodynamic film formed between a ball sliding on a flat. Film thickness values in the range 50-500 nm were recorded which agreed well with theoretical film formation predictions.

  9. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    After optical excitation, we observe periodic modulations of the photoelectron spectrum as a function of pump-probe delay for 1-unit-cell, 3-unit-cell, and 60-unit-cell thick FeSe ...

  10. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but themore » strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.« less

  11. In situ measurement of low-Z material coating thickness on high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an sup 241Am source can be used to measure the thickness of a Li coating on Mo tiles ... This technique could be used to measure any thin, low-Z material coating (up to 1 mg...

  12. Microsystems enabled photovoltaics 14.9% efficient 14μm thick...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microsystems enabled photovoltaics: 14.9% efficient 14 mm thick crystalline silicon solar cell Jose L. Cruz-Campa a,b,n , Murat Okandan a , Paul J. Resnick a , Peggy Clews a , ...

  13. Influences of Peat, Surface and Subsurface Water, and Snow on Active Layer Thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L; Harp, Dylan; Wilson, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but themore » strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.« less

  14. Coupled escape probability for an asymmetric spherical case: Modeling optically thick comets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersch, Alan M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2014-05-20

    We have adapted Coupled Escape Probability, a new exact method of solving radiative transfer problems, for use in asymmetrical spherical situations. Our model is intended specifically for use in modeling optically thick cometary comae, although not limited to such use. This method enables the accurate modeling of comets' spectra even in the potentially optically thick regions nearest the nucleus, such as those seen in Deep Impact observations of 9P/Tempel 1 and EPOXI observations of 103P/Hartley 2.

  15. Thick adherent dielectric films on plastic substrates and method for depositing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickboldt, Paul; Ellingboe, Albert R.; Theiss, Steven D.; Smith, Patrick M.

    2002-01-01

    Thick adherent dielectric films deposited on plastic substrates for use as a thermal barrier layer to protect the plastic substrates from high temperatures which, for example, occur during laser annealing of layers subsequently deposited on the dielectric films. It is desirable that the barrier layer has properties including: a thickness of 1 .mu.m or greater, adheres to a plastic substrate, does not lift-off when cycled in temperature, has few or no cracks and does not crack when subjected to bending, resistant to lift-off when submersed in fluids, electrically insulating and preferably transparent. The thick barrier layer may be composed, for example, of a variety of dielectrics and certain metal oxides, and may be deposited on a variety of plastic substrates by various known deposition techniques. The key to the method of forming the thick barrier layer on the plastic substrate is maintaining the substrate cool during deposition of the barrier layer. Cooling of the substrate maybe accomplished by the use of a cooling chuck on which the plastic substrate is positioned, and by directing cooling gas, such as He, Ar and N.sub.2, between the plastic substrate and the cooling chucks. Thick adherent dielectric films up to about 5 .mu.m have been deposited on plastic substrates which include the above-referenced properties, and which enable the plastic substrates to withstand laser processing temperatures applied to materials deposited on the dielectric films.

  16. Thickness and UV irradiation effects on the gas sensing properties of Te thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manouchehrian, M.; Larijani, M.M.; Elahi, S.M.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Tellurium thin films were prepared by thermal evaporation technique. • Tellurium thin films showed excellent gas-sensing properties to H{sub 2}S at room temperature. • Tellurium showed a remarkably enhanced response to H{sub 2}S gas under UV irradiation. • The reason of the enhanced response by UV irradiation was discussed. - Abstract: In this research, tellurium thin films were investigated for use as hydrogen sulfide gas sensors. To this end, a tellurium thin film has been deposited on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates by thermal evaporation, and the influence of thickness on the sensitivity of the tellurium thin film for measuring H{sub 2}S gas is studied. XRD patterns indicate that as the thickness increases, the crystallization improves. Observing the images obtained by SEM, it is seen that the grain size increases as the thickness increases. Studying the effect of thickness on H{sub 2}S gas measurement, it became obvious that as the thickness increases, the sensitivity decreases and the response and recovery times increase. To improve the response and recovery times of the tellurium thin film for measuring H{sub 2}S gas, the influence of UV radiation while measuring H{sub 2}S gas was also investigated. The results indicate that the response and recovery times strongly decrease using UV radiation.

  17. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  18. Anisotropic fibrous thermal insulator of relatively thick cross section and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Carl D.; Ardary, Zane L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an anisotropic thermal insulator formed of carbon-bonded organic or inorganic fibers and having a thickness or cross section greater than about 3 centimeters. Delaminations and deleterious internal stresses generated during binder curing and carbonizing operations employed in the fabrication of thick fibrous insulation of thicknesses greater than 3 centimeters are essentially obviated by the method of the present invention. A slurry of fibers, thermosetting resin binder and water is vacuum molded into the selected insulator configuration with the total thickness of the molded slurry being less than about 3 centimeters, the binder is thermoset to join the fibers together at their nexaes, and then the binder is carbonized to form the carbon bond. A second slurry of the fibers, binder and water is then applied over the carbonized body with the vacuum molding, binder thermosetting and carbonizing steps being repeated to form a layered insulator with the binder providing a carbon bond between the layers. The molding, thermosetting and carbonizing steps may be repeated with additional slurries until the thermal insulator is of the desired final thickness. An additional feature of the present invention is provided by incorporating opacifying materials in any of the desired layers so as to provide different insulating properties at various temperatures. Concentration and/or type of additive can be varied from layer-to-layer.

  19. Optical spectroscopy of sputtered nanometer-thick yttrium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubisova-Liskova, Eva Visnovsky, Stefan; Chang, Houchen; Wu, Mingzhong

    2015-05-07

    Nanometer (nm)-thick yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films present interest for spintronics. This work employs spectral ellipsometry and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) spectra to characterize nm-thick YIG films grown on single-crystal Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12} substrates by magnetron sputtering. The thickness (t) of the films ranges between 10 nm and 40 nm. Independent on t, the polar MOKE hysteresis loops saturate in the field of about 1.8 kOe, consistent with the saturation magnetization in bulk YIG (4πM{sub s} ≈ 1.75 kG). The MOKE spectrum measured at photon energies between 1.3 eV and 4.5 eV on the 38-nm-thick film agrees with that measured on single-crystal YIG bulk materials. The MOKE spectrum of the 12-nm-thick film still preserves the structure of the bulk YIG but its amplitude at lower photon energies is modified due to the fact that the radiation penetration depth exceeds 20 nm. The t dependence of the MOKE amplitude is consistent with MOKE calculations. The results indicate that the films are stoichiometric, strain free, without Fe{sup 2+}, and preserve bulk YIG properties down to t ≈ 10 nm.

  20. Method and apparatus for ultrasonic characterization through the thickness direction of a moving web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Theodore; Hall, Maclin S.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the caliper and/or the ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web of material using ultrasonic pulses generated by a rotatable wheel ultrasound apparatus. The apparatus includes a first liquid-filled tire and either a second liquid-filled tire forming a nip or a rotatable cylinder that supports a thin moving web of material such as a moving web of paper and forms a nip with the first liquid-filled tire. The components of ultrasonic transit time through the tires and fluid held within the tires may be resolved and separately employed to determine the separate contributions of the two tire thicknesses and the two fluid paths to the total path length that lies between two ultrasonic transducer surfaces contained within the tires in support of caliper measurements. The present invention provides the benefit of obtaining a transit time and caliper measurement at any point in time as a specimen passes through the nip of rotating tires and eliminates inaccuracies arising from nonuniform tire circumferential thickness by accurately retaining point-to-point specimen transit time and caliper variation information, rather than an average obtained through one or more tire rotations. Morever, ultrasonic transit time through the thickness direction of a moving web may be determined independent of small variations in the wheel axle spacing, tire thickness, and liquid and tire temperatures.

  1. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO? ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li., Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemorerange hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.less

  2. Handbook for electron beam welding of 8-inch thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Charles M.

    1980-08-01

    Purpose of this handbook is to provide a detailed procedure for electron beam welding 8 in. thick SA387 Grade 22 Class 2. Adherence to the procedure will allow others to produce electron beam welds in 8 in. thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo. A justification or description of the effects of alterations of the welding procedure is not included in this report. These effects, along with a metallographic characterization and the mechanical properties produced by the welding procedure, etc., are described in report DOE/10244-10, Electron Beam Welding of 8-in. thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, Final Report under Contract DE-AC05-77OR10244.

  3. Investigation of damage behavior of thermally sprayed coatings depending on coating thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crostack, H.A.; Beller, U.

    1995-12-31

    In order to increase the lifetime of components used for diesel engines or gas turbines surfaces are coated by ceramics. In recent years it succeeded in spraying thermal barrier coatings based on zirconia up to a thickness of a few millimeters. A comparison of the damage behavior between yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings with different thickness will be presented. The coatings are produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. The thickness is varied from 0.5 mm up to 2 mm. In order to characterize the mechanical as well as the damage processes different methods of destructive testing (tensile, bending, and loading test) are applied. Additionally, non-destructive testing methods were used to investigate the damage processes on micro structural level. The results will be discussed according to the microstructure.

  4. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO₃ films, deposited epitaxially on TiO₂-terminated SrTiO₃ (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variablemore » range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.« less

  5. Effects of Active Layer Thickness and Thermal Annealing on Polythiophene: Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, L.; Tang, C.W.; Chen, S.H.

    2010-08-10

    The effect of thermal annealing on photovoltaic devices comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) with thicknesses up to 1200 nm was investigated. Without thermal annealing, the efficiency of the as-prepared devices decreased with increasing active layer thickness, reflecting largely a reduction in the short-circuit current density and an inverse photocurrent spectral response. Thermal annealing of the full devices was found to substantially recover thick-film device efficiencies while reducing the thin-film device efficiencies. The profound variations in photovoltaic characteristics were interpreted in terms of vertical phase separation in the P3HT:PCBM blend film and Li+ diffusion from the LiF/Al contact.

  6. Estimation of thickness, complex bulk permittivity and surface conductivity using interdigital dielectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaretsky, M.C.; Li, P.; Melcher, J.R. . Lab. for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems)

    1989-12-01

    Based on theoretical techniques for deducing continuum parameters from the gain-phase response of interdigital electrodes, experiments are described that demonstrate the use of 50 {mu}m or 1 mm wavelength interdigitated electrodes for the absolute measurement of (1) the thickness and voidage of a layer formed by the sedimentation of 41 {mu}m particles in transformer oil (2) the thickness and high frequency bulk permittivity of plasma deposited bromobenzene and vacuum deposited parylene, the former {ital in-situ} (3) the complex permittivity of transformer oil without and with a parylene passivation layer to prevent the adsorption of water (4) the dispersion of oil impregnated paper having a finite thickness and (5) the surface conductivity due to adsorption of water on a silicon dioxide substrate. The frequency range for (3--5) is 0.005 Hz to 10 kHz. Difficulties, apparently due to charging effects on the integrated circuitry, are discussed.

  7. Thickness of surficial sediment at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Ackerman, D.J.

    1996-06-01

    Thickness of surficial sediment was determined from natural-gamma logs in 333 wells at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in eastern Idaho to provide reconnaissance data for future site-characterization studies. Surficial sediment, which is defined as the unconsolidated clay, silt, sand, and gravel that overlie the uppermost basalt flow at each well, ranges in thickness from 0 feet in seven wells drilled through basalt outcrops east of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to 313 feet in well Site 14 southeast of the Big Lost River sinks. Surficial sediment includes alluvial, lacustrine, eolian, and colluvial deposits that generally accumulated during the past 200 thousand years. Additional thickness data, not included in this report, are available from numerous auger holes and foundation borings at and near most facilities.

  8. Physicochemical controls on absorbed water film thickness in unsaturated geological media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, T.

    2011-06-14

    Adsorbed water films commonly coat mineral surfaces in unsaturated soils and rocks, reducing flow and transport rates. Therefore, it is important to understand how adsorbed film thickness depends on matric potential, surface chemistry, and solution chemistry. Here, the problem of adsorbed water film thickness is examined through combining capillary scaling with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Novel aspects of this analysis include determining capillary influences on film thicknesses, and incorporating solution chemistry-dependent electrostatic potential at air-water interfaces. Capillary analysis of monodisperse packings of spherical grains provided estimated ranges of matric potentials where adsorbed films are stable, and showed that pendular rings within drained porous media retain most of the 'residual' water except under very low matric potentials. Within drained pores, capillary contributions to thinning of adsorbed films on spherical grains are shown to be small, such that DLVO calculations for flat surfaces are suitable approximations. Hamaker constants of common soil minerals were obtained to determine ranges of the dispersion component to matric potential-dependent film thickness. The pressure component associated with electrical double layer forces was estimated using the compression and linear superposition approximations. The pH-dependent electrical double layer pressure component is the dominant contribution to film thicknesses at intermediate values of matric potential, especially in lower ionic strength solutions (< 10 mol m{sup -3}) on surfaces with higher magnitude electrostatic potentials (more negative than - 50 mV). Adsorbed water films are predicted to usually range in thickness from 1 to 20 nm in drained pores and fractures of unsaturated environments.

  9. Tuning thermoelectricity in a Bi2Se3 topological insulator via varied film thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Minghua; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Yong; Huang, Huaqing; Zang, Yunyi; Liu, Chang; Duan, Wenhui; Gan, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; et al

    2016-01-12

    We report thermoelectric transport studies on Bi2Se3 topological insulator thin films with varied thickness grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric power factor decrease systematically with the reduction of film thickness. These experimental observations can be explained quantitatively by theoretical calculations based on realistic electronic band structure of the Bi2Se3 thin films. Lastly, this work illustrates the crucial role played by the topological surface states on the thermoelectric transport of topological insulators, and sheds new light on further improvement of their thermoelectric performance.

  10. Resistive switching in a few nanometers thick tantalum oxide film formed by a metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Takeo; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-04-27

    Resistive switching in a Cu/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Pt structure that consisted of a few nanometer-thick Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was demonstrated. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film with thicknesses of 25?nm was formed with a combination of Ta metal film deposition and neutral oxygen particle irradiation at room temperature. The device exhibited a bipolar resistive switching with a threshold voltage of 0.2?V and multilevel switching operation.

  11. Aqueous Synthesis of Zinc Blende CdTe/CdS Magic-Core/Thick-Shell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tetrahedral Shaped Nanocrystals with Emission Tunable to Near-Infrared Aqueous Synthesis of Zinc Blende CdTe/CdS Magic-Core/Thick-Shell Tetrahedral Shaped Nanocrystals with Emission Tunable to Near-Infrared Authors: Deng, Z., Schulz, O., Lin, S., Ding, B., Liu, X., Wei, X., Ros, R., Liu, Y., Yan, H., and Francis, M. Title: Aqueous Synthesis of Zinc Blende CdTe/CdS Magic-Core/Thick-Shell Tetrahedral Shaped Nanocrystals with Emission Tunable to Near-Infrared Source: Journal of the American

  12. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, David A.

    1982-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of minute hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinman, D.A.

    1980-05-30

    Method and apparatus for determining diameter and wall thickness of hollow microspheres or shells wherein terminal velocities of shells traveling in fluid-filled conduits of differing diameters are measured. A wall-effect factor is determined as a ratio of the terminal velocities, and shell outside diameter may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of wall-effect factor. For shells of known outside diameter, wall thickness may then be ascertained as a predetermined empirical function of terminal velocity in either conduit.

  14. Application of the eddy current method to high speed thickness measurement

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Application of the eddy current method to high speed thickness measurement Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of the eddy current method to high speed thickness measurement Authors: Crowe, J C ; Libby, H L ; Skorpik, J R Publication Date: 1973-10-31 OSTI Identifier: 4438737 Report Number(s): BNWL-SA--4579; CONF-730451--1 Resource Type: Technical Report Resource Relation: Other Information: Orig. Receipt Date: 31-DEC-73 Research Org:

  15. High-pressure structure made of rings with peripheral weldments of reduced thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leventry, Samuel C.

    1988-01-01

    A high-pressure structure having a circular cylindrical metal shell made of metal rings joined together by weldments and which have peripheral areas of reduced shell thickness at the weldments which permit a reduction in the amount of weld metal deposited while still maintaining sufficient circumferential or hoop stress strength.

  16. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T.

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  17. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250[degrees]C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  18. Temperature effects on failure thickness and deflagration-to-detonation transition in PBX 9502 and TATB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay, B.W.; McAfee, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) behavior of TATB has been investigated at high temperatures and severe confinement. comparison is made to other common explosives under similar confinement. TATB did not DDT under these conditions. The failure thickness of PBX 9502 at 250{degrees}C has also been determined. Two mm appears to be the limiting value at this temperature.

  19. CFD-DEM study of effect of bed thickness for bubbling fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingwen, Li; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Garg, Rahul; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2011-10-01

    The effect of bed thickness in rectangular fluidized beds is investigated through the CFD–DEM simulations of small-scale systems. Numerical results are compared for bubbling fluidized beds of various bed thicknesses with respect to particle packing, bed expansion, bubble behavior, solids velocities, and particle kinetic energy. Good two-dimensional (2D) flow behavior is observed in the bed having a thickness of up to 20 particle diameters. However, a strong three-dimensional (3D) flow behavior is observed in beds with a thickness of 40 particle diameters, indicating the transition from 2D flow to 3D flow within the range of 20–40 particle diameters. Comparison of velocity profiles near the walls and at the center of the bed shows significant impact of the front and back walls on the flow hydrodynamics of pseudo-2D fluidized beds. Hence, for quantitative comparison with experiments in pseudo-2D columns, the effect of walls has to be accounted for in numerical simulations.

  20. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality.

  1. Thickness independent reduced forming voltage in oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2} based resistive switching memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharath, S. U. Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.; Bertaud, T.; Walczyk, C.; Calka, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-18

    The conducting filament forming voltage of stoichiometric hafnium oxide based resistive switching layers increases linearly with layer thickness. Using strongly reduced oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films grown on polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) substrates, the thickness dependence of the forming voltage is strongly suppressed. Instead, an almost constant forming voltage of about 3?V is observed up to 200?nm layer thickness. This effect suggests that filament formation and switching occurs for all samples in an oxidized HfO{sub 2} surface layer of a few nanometer thickness while the highly oxygen deficient thin film itself merely serves as a oxygen vacancy reservoir.

  2. Effects of catalyst film thickness on plasma-enhanced carbon nanotube growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, S.; Cantoro, M.; Kleinsorge, B.; Casiraghi, C.; Parvez, A.; Robertson, J.; Ducati, C.

    2005-08-01

    A systematic study is presented of the influence of catalyst film thickness on carbon nanostructures grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition from acetylene and ammonia mixtures. We show that reducing the Fe/Co catalyst film thickness below 3 nm causes a transition from larger diameter (>40 nm), bamboolike carbon nanofibers to small diameter ({approx}5 nm) multiwalled nanotubes with two to five walls. This is accompanied by a more than 50 times faster growth rate and a faster catalyst poisoning. Thin Ni catalyst films only trigger such a growth transition when pretreated with an ammonia plasma. We observe a limited correlation between this growth transition and the coarsening of the catalyst film before deposition. For a growth temperature of {<=}550 deg. C, all catalysts showed mainly a tip growth regime and a similar activity on untreated silicon, oxidized silicon, and silicon nitride support.

  3. Neutron-skin thickness from the study of the anti-analog giant dipole resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Stuhl, L.; Csatlos, M.; Algora, A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The {gamma}-decay of the anti-analog of the giant dipole resonance (AGDR) to the isobaric analog state has been measured following the p({sup 124}Sn,n) reaction at a beam energy of 600 MeV/nucleon. The energy of the transition was also calculated with state-of-the-art self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RPA) and turned out to be very sensitive to the neutronskin thickness ({Delta}R{sub pn}). By comparing the theoretical results with the measured one, the {Delta}R{sub pn} value for {sup 124}Sn was deduced to be 0.21 {+-} 0.07 fm, which agrees well with the previous results. The present method offers new possibilities for measuring the neutron-skin thicknesses of very exotic isotopes.

  4. Hard x-ray nanofocusing by refractive lenses of constant thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiboth, F. Scholz, M.; Patommel, J.; Hoppe, R.; Wittwer, F.; Reinhardt, J.; Seidel, J.; Knaut, M.; Jahn, A.; Richter, K.; Bartha, J. W.; Falkenberg, G.; Schroer, C. G.

    2014-09-29

    In order to focus light or x rays, the thickness of a refractive lens is typically varied over its aperture. Here, we present a refractive x-ray lens made of lamellae of constant thickness, the refractive lamellar lens. Refractive power is created by a specific bending of the lamellae rather than by a concave lens profile. This very special design has the technological advantage that materials like sapphire or diamond can be used to make lenses by coating techniques. A first lens prototype focused x rays with a photon energy E = 15.25 keV to a lateral beam size of 164 nm × 296 nm full width at half maximum.

  5. Fermion resonances on a thick brane with a piecewise warp factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Haitao; Liu Yuxiao; Zhao Zhenhua; Guo Heng

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the problems of resonances of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermions on a single scalar constructed thick brane with a piecewise warp factor matching smoothly. The distance between two boundaries and the other parameters are determined by one free parameter through three junction conditions. For the generalized Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{sup k{Psi}} with odd k=1,3,5,..., the mass eigenvalue m, width {Gamma}, lifetime {tau}, and maximal probability P{sub max} of fermion resonances are obtained. Our numerical calculations show that the brane without internal structure also favors the appearance of resonant states for both left- and right-handed fermions. The scalar-fermion coupling and the thickness of the brane influence the resonant behaviors of the massive KK fermions.

  6. Thick, low-stress films, and coated substrates formed therefrom, and methods for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Knoll, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    Stress-induced deformation, and the damage resulting therefrom, increases with film thickness. The overcoming of excessive stress by the use of the Si-Al-N film material of the present invention, permits the formation of thick films that are necessary for certain of the above described applications. The most likely use for the subject film materials, other than their specialized views as an optical film, is for microelectronic packaging of components on silicon substrates. In general, the subject films have excellent adherence to the underlying substrate, a high degree of hardness and durability, and are excellent insulators. Prior art elevated temperature deposition processes cannot meet the microelectronic packaging temperature formation constraints. The process of the present invention is conducted under non-elevated temperature conditions, typically 500.degree. C. or less.

  7. Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph; Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy; Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence; Schotsch, Margaret Jones; Rajan, Rajiv; Wei, Bin

    2002-01-01

    A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

  8. Evaluation of Cadmium-Free Thick Film Materials on Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. H. Perdieu

    2009-09-01

    A new cadmium-free material system was successfully evaluated for the fabrication of thick film hybrid microcircuits at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). The characterization involved screen printing, drying and firing two groups of resistor networks which were made using the current material system and the cadmium-free material system. Electrical, environmental and adhesion tests were performed on both groups to determine the more suitable material system. Additionally, untrimmed test coupons were evaluated to further characterize the new materials. The cadmiumfree material system did as well or better than the current material system. Therefore, the new cadmium-free material system was approved for use on production thick film product.

  9. Method for rapid, controllable growth and thickness, of epitaxial silicon films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qi; Stradins, Paul; Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M.

    2009-10-13

    A method of producing epitaxial silicon films on a c-Si wafer substrate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition by controlling the rate of silicon deposition in a temperature range that spans the transition from a monohydride to a hydrogen free silicon surface in a vacuum, to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness is disclosed. The method includes placing a c-Si substrate in a HWCVD reactor chamber. The method also includes supplying a gas containing silicon at a sufficient rate into the reaction chamber to interact with the substrate to deposit a layer containing silicon thereon at a predefined growth rate to obtain phase-pure epitaxial silicon film of increased thickness.

  10. Ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite thick films for energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Paritosh; Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, B. P.; Singh, V. N.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-08-15

    We have successfully fabricated large area free standing polyvinylidene fluoride -Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PVDF-PZT) ferroelectric polymer-ceramic composite (wt% 8020, respectively) thick films with an average diameter (d) ?0.1 meter and thickness (t) ?50 ?m. Inclusion of PZT in PVDF matrix significantly enhanced dielectric constant (from 10 to 25 at 5 kHz) and energy storage capacity (from 11 to 14 J/cm{sup 3}, using polarization loops), respectively, and almost similar leakage current and mechanical strength. Microstructural analysis revealed the presence of ? and ? crystalline phases and homogeneous distribution of PZT crystals in PVDF matrix. It was also found that apart from the microcrystals, well defined naturally developed PZT nanocrystals were embedded in PVDF matrix. The observed energy density indicates immense potential in PVDF-PZT composites for possible applications as green energy and power density electronic elements.

  11. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Scott Painter; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Dylan Harp; Adam Atchley

    2016-04-21

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication currently in review [4/2016]. The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used to simulate thermal hydrological conditions across varied environmental conditions for an ensemble of 1D models of Arctic permafrost. The thickness of organic soil is varied from 2 to 40cm, snow depth is varied from approximately 0 to 1.2 meters, water table depth was varied from -51cm below the soil surface to 31 cm above the soil surface. A total of 15,960 ensemble members are included. Data produced includes the third and fourth simulation year: active layer thickness, time of deepest thaw depth, temperature of the unfrozen soil, and unfrozen liquid saturation, for each ensemble member. Input files used to run the ensemble are also included.

  12. Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

  13. Quasi-Rayleigh waves in butt-welded thick steel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamas, Tuncay E-mail: victorg@sc.edu Giurgiutiu, Victor E-mail: victorg@sc.edu Lin, Bin E-mail: victorg@sc.edu

    2015-03-31

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental analyses of weld guided surface acoustic waves (SAW) through the guided wave propagation (GWP) analyses. The GWP analyses have been carried out by utilizing piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for in situ structural inspection of a thick steel plate with butt weld as the weld bead is ground flush. Ultrasonic techniques are commonly used for validation of welded structures in many in-situ monitoring applications, e.g. in off-shore structures, in nuclear and pressure vessel industries and in a range of naval applications. PWAS is recently employed in such ultrasonic applications as a resonator as well as a transducer. Quasi-Rayleigh waves a.k.a. SAW can be generated in relatively thick isotropic elastic plate having the same phase velocity as Rayleigh waves whereas Rayleigh waves are a high frequency approximation of the first symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) Lamb wave modes. As the frequency becomes very high the S0 and the A0 wave speeds coalesce, and both have the same value. This value is exactly the Rayleigh wave speed and becomes constant along the frequency i.e. Rayleigh waves are non-dispersive guided surface acoustic waves. The study is followed with weld-GWP tests through the pitch-catch method along the butt weld line. The tuning curves of quasi-Rayleigh wave are determined to show the tuning and trapping effect of the weld bead that has higher thickness than the adjacent plates on producing a dominant quasi-Rayleigh wave mode. The significant usage of the weld tuned and guided quasi-Rayleigh wave mode is essentially discussed for the applications in the in-situ inspection of relatively thick structures with butt weld such as naval offshore structures. The paper ends with summary, conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  14. Explanation of the limiting thickness observed in low-temperature silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiesen, Jack; Branz, Howard M.; Crandall, Richard S.

    2000-11-27

    Solution of the partial differential equation for diffusion of mobile atoms during solid film growth demonstrates that the observed phase transition in low-temperature silicon epitaxy is triggered by supersaturation of the growing layer with hydrogen. The limiting thickness of the epitaxial layer, h{sub epi}, is completely determined by measurable quantities: the flux of hydrogen, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient, and the layer growth rate. Our model accounts for the observed Arrhenius and growth rate dependence of h{sub epi}.

  15. Density determination of nano-layers depending to the thickness by non-destructive method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gacem, A.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2013-12-16

    Non-destructive tests used to characterize and observe the state of the solids near the surface or at depth, without damaging them or damaging them. Density is frequently used to follow the variations of the physical structure of the samples, as well as in the calculation of quantity of material required to fill a given volume, and it is also used to determine the homogeneity of a sample. However, the measurement of the acoustic properties (density, elastic constants,…) of a thin film whose thickness is smaller than several atomic layers is not easy to perform. For that reason, we expose in this work the effects of the thicknesses of thin films on the evolution of the density, where several samples are analyzed. The samples selected structures are thin films deposited on substrates, these coatings have thicknesses varying from a few atomic layers to ten or so micrometers and can change the properties of the substrate on which they are deposited. To do so, we considered a great number of layers (Cr, Al, SiO{sub 2}, ZnO, Cu, AlN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC) deposited on different substrates (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu and Quartz). It is first shown that the density exhibits a dispersive behaviour. Such a behaviour is characterized by an initial increase (or decrease) followed by a saturated region. Further investigations of these dependences led to the determination of a semi-empirical universal relations, ρ=f(h/λ{sub T}), for all the investigated layer/substrate combination. Such expression could be of great importance in the density prediction of even layers thicknesses.

  16. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  17. Method of manufacturing hollow members having uniform wall thickness through use of ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.; Downs, Raymond L.; Henderson, Timothy M.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing a hollow structure of uniform wall thickness comprising the steps of selecting or forming a precursor having one wall surface of desired geometry, treating a portion of the precursor consisting of the one wall surface and a uniform depth of material beneath the wall surface to increase resistance to ablation, and then removing by ablation and discarding the remaining or untreated portion of the precursor.

  18. MULTIPLICITY OF NOVA ENVELOPE SOLUTIONS AND OCCURRENCE OF OPTICALLY THICK WINDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko; Hachisu, Izumi E-mail: hachisu@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-07-10

    We revisit the occurrence condition of optically thick winds reported by Kato in 1985 and Kato and Hachisu in 1989 who mathematically examined nova envelope solutions with an old opacity and found that optically thick winds are accelerated only in massive white dwarfs (WDs) of {approx}>0.9 M{sub sun}. With the OPAL opacity we find that the optically thick wind occurs for {approx}>0.6 M{sub sun} WDs and that the occurrence of winds depends not only on the WD mass but also on the ignition mass. When the ignition mass is larger than a critical value, winds are suppressed by a density-inversion layer. Such a static solution can be realized in WDs of mass {approx}0.6-0.7 M{sub sun}. We propose that sequences consisting only of static solutions correspond to slow evolutions in symbiotic novae like PU Vul because PU Vul shows no indication of strong winds in a long-lasted flat peak followed by a very slow decline in its light curve.

  19. Assessment of the single-pass thick-seam longwall mining method. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, R.F.J.; Douglas, W.J.

    1982-04-01

    The objectives of the project are a review of the foreign experiences in longwall mining of thick seams, an evaluation of the US thick seam reserves, a mine design, equipment specifications, and an economic study for longwall mining in a single pass up to 16 feet in US conditions. The review of foreign experience shows a steady increase in the maximum height of extraction with several examples in the range of 13 to 15 feet. Longwall face equipment is available up to an 18 feet height of extraction, based upon shields support and shearer loader. There are important reserves of thick coal seams which can be mined by a longwall in a single pass (125 billion tons). In US conditions, a retreating face with a 16 foot height of extraction and a double entry system, driven 10 feet high, are proposed. The face stability can be improved by using a two bench face cut in good geological conditions. The economic study compares longwall mining with the room-and-pillar method. Longwall mining 16 feet high coal in a single pass can compete advantageously with room-and-pillar mining. 74 figures, 14 tables.

  20. The effect of mix on capsule yields as a function of shell thickness and gas fill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, P. A.

    2014-06-15

    An investigation of direct drive capsules with different shell thicknesses and gas fills was conducted to examine the amount of shock induced (Richtmyer-Meshkov) mix versus Rayleigh-Taylor mix from deceleration of the implosion. The RAGE (Eulerian) code with a turbulent mix model was used to model these capsules for neutron yields along with time-dependent mix amounts. The amount of Richtmyer-Meshkov induced mix from the shock breaking out of the shell is about 0.1 μg (0.15 μm of shell material), while the Rayleigh-Taylor mix is of order 1 μg and determines the mixed simulation yield. The simulations were able to calculate a yield over mix (YOM) ratio (experiment/mix simulation) between 0.5 and 1.0 for capsules with shell thicknesses ranging from 7.5 to 20 μm and with gas fills between 3.8 and 20 atm of D{sub 2} or DT. The simulated burn averaged T{sub ion} values typically lie with 0.5 keV of the data, which is within the measurement error. For capsules with shell thicknesses >25 μm, the YOM values drop to 0.10 ± 0.05, suggesting that some unmodeled effect needs to be accounted for in the thickest capsules.

  1. Dielectric sheet thickness variation and disbond detection in mulitlayered composites using an extremely sensitive microwave approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, S.; Zoughi, R.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate thickness measurement and thickness variation detection of dielectric sheets such as plastics, paper, ceramics, and rubber are important practical issues. Detection of a very thin or initiating disbond in multilayered dielectric composites, representing the earliest stage of its existence, is also very important. The use of an open ended rectangular waveguide sensor has proved to be a useful and capable approach for these purposes. The usefulness of this approach stems from the fact that two measurement parameters, the standoff distance and the frequency of operation, may be theoretically optimized and experimentally confirmed, rendering very sensitive dielectric sheet thickness variation and disbond detection. To further enhance the sensitivity of this microwave methodology, a third optimization parameter, a backgap distance, is artificially produced by placing a conducting plate behind the material under inspection. The presence of a backgap distance, properly located behind a dielectric sheet in concert with the proper choice of the operating frequency and the standoff distance, results in extremely sensitive measurements. Theoretical predictions, as well as experimental results in the frequency range of 8 to 40 GHz, indicating the utility of this approach are presented in this paper.s

  2. Weakly nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a finite-thickness fluid layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L. F. Ye, W. H. Liu, Jie; He, X. T.; Guo, H. Y.; Wu, J. F. Zhang, W. Y.

    2014-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear (WN) model has been developed for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a finite-thickness incompressible fluid layer (slab). We derive the coupling evolution equations for perturbations on the (upper) “linearly stable” and (lower) “linearly unstable” interfaces of the slab. Expressions of temporal evolutions of the amplitudes of the perturbation first three harmonics on the upper and lower interfaces are obtained. The classical feedthrough (interface coupling) solution obtained by Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London A 201, 192 (1950)] is readily recovered by the first-order results. Our third-order model can depict the WN perturbation growth and the saturation of linear (exponential) growth of the perturbation fundamental mode on both interfaces. The dependence of the WN perturbation growth and the slab distortion on the normalized layer thickness (kd) is analytically investigated via the third-order solutions. Comparison is made with Jacobs-Catton's formula [J. W. Jacobs and I. Catton, J. Fluid Mech. 187, 329 (1988)] of the position of the “linearly unstable” interface. Using a reduced formula, the saturation amplitude of linear growth of the perturbation fundamental mode is studied. It is found that the finite-thickness effects play a dominant role in the WN evolution of the slab, especially when kd < 1. Thus, it should be included in applications where the interface coupling effects are important, such as inertial confinement fusion implosions and supernova explosions.

  3. Electroplated L1{sub 0} CoPt thick-film permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oniku, Ololade D. Qi, Bin; Arnold, David P.

    2014-05-07

    The fabrication and magnetic characterization of 15-?m-thick electroplated L1{sub 0} CoPt hard magnets with good magnetic properties is reported in this paper. Experimental study of the dependence of the magnets' properties on annealing temperature reveals that an intrinsic coercivity H{sub ci}?=??800?kA/m (10 kOe), squareness >0.8, and energy product of >150?kJ/m{sup 3} are obtained for photolithographically patterned structures (250??m??2?mm stripes; 15??m thickness) electroplated on silicon substrates and annealed in hydrogen forming gas at 700?C. Scanning electron microscopy is used to inspect the morphology of both the as-deposited and annealed magnetic layers, and X-ray Diffractometer analysis on the magnets annealed at 700?C confirm a phase transformation to an ordered L1{sub 0} CoPt structure, with a minor phase of hcp Co. These thick films are intended for microsystems/MEMS applications.

  4. Effect of Substrate Thickness on Oxide Scale Spallation for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of the ferritic substrate's thickness on the delamination/spallation of the oxide scale was investigated experimentally and numerically. At the high-temperature oxidation environment of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a combination of growth stress with thermal stresses may lead to scale delamination/buckling and eventual spallation during SOFC stack cooling, even leading to serious degradation of cell performance. The growth stress is induced by the growth of the oxide scale on the scale/substrate interface, and thermal stress is induced by a mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide scale and the substrate. The numerical results show that the interfacial shear stresses, which are the driving force of scale delamination between the oxide scale and the ferritic substrate, increase with the growth of the oxide scale and also with the thickness of the ferritic substrate; i.e., the thick ferritic substrate can easily lead to scale delamination and spallation. Experimental observation confirmed the predicted results of the delamination and spallation of the oxide scale on the ferritic substrate.

  5. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figus, Cristiana Quochi, Francesco Artizzu, Flavia Saba, Michele Marongiu, Daniela Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni; Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  6. A reliable control system for measurement on film thickness in copper chemical mechanical planarization system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongkai; Qu, Zilian; Zhao, Qian; Tian, Fangxin; Zhao, Dewen; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2013-12-15

    In recent years, a variety of film thickness measurement techniques for copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) are subsequently proposed. In this paper, the eddy-current technique is used. In the control system of the CMP tool developed in the State Key Laboratory of Tribology, there are in situ module and off-line module for measurement subsystem. The in situ module can get the thickness of copper film on wafer surface in real time, and accurately judge when the CMP process should stop. This is called end-point detection. The off-line module is used for multi-points measurement after CMP process, in order to know the thickness of remained copper film. The whole control system is structured with two levels, and the physical connection between the upper and the lower is achieved by the industrial Ethernet. The process flow includes calibration and measurement, and there are different algorithms for two modules. In the process of software development, C++ is chosen as the programming language, in combination with Qt OpenSource to design two modules’ GUI and OPC technology to implement the communication between the two levels. In addition, the drawing function is developed relying on Matlab, enriching the software functions of the off-line module. The result shows that the control system is running stably after repeated tests and practical operations for a long time.

  7. Dynamic mask for producing uniform or graded-thickness thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-06-13

    A method for producing single layer or multilayer films with high thickness uniformity or thickness gradients. The method utilizes a moving mask which blocks some of the flux from a sputter target or evaporation source before it deposits on a substrate. The velocity and position of the mask is computer controlled to precisely tailor the film thickness distribution. The method is applicable to any type of vapor deposition system, but is particularly useful for ion beam sputter deposition and evaporation deposition; and enables a high degree of uniformity for ion beam deposition, even for near-normal incidence of deposition species, which may be critical for producing low-defect multilayer coatings, such as required for masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The mask can have a variety of shapes, from a simple solid paddle shape to a larger mask with a shaped hole through which the flux passes. The motion of the mask can be linear or rotational, and the mask can be moved to make single or multiple passes in front of the substrate per layer, and can pass completely or partially across the substrate.

  8. Electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices controlled by the thickness of paraelectric layer in a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, D. C.; Lin, S. P.; Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue Xiong, W. M.; Wang, Biao

    2014-10-15

    As functions of the paraelectric layer thickness, misfit strain and temperature, the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices are investigated using a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau thermodynamic model. Ferroelectric phase transition driven by the relative thickness of the superlattice is found to dramatically impact the electrocaloric response. Near the phase transition temperature, the magnitude of the electrocaloric effect is maximized and shifted to lower temperatures by increasing the relative thickness of paraelectric layer. Theoretical calculations also imply that the electrocaloric effect of the superlattices depends not only on the relative thickness of paraelectric layer but also on misfit strain. Furthermore, control of the relative thickness of paraelectric layer and the misfit strain can change availably both the magnitude and the temperature sensitivity of the electrocaloric effect, which suggests that ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices may be promising candidates for use in cooling devices in a wide temperature range.

  9. Wide-angle imaging LIDAR (WAIL): a ground-based instrument for monitoring the thickness and density of optically thick clouds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Ho, Cheng,

    2001-01-01

    Traditional lidar provides little information on dense clouds beyond the range to their base (ceilometry), due to their extreme opacity. At most optical wavelengths, however, laser photons are not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, and thus eventually escape the cloud via multiple scattering, producing distinctive extended space- and time-dependent patterns which are, in essence, the cloud's radiative Green functions. These Green functions, essentially 'movies' of the time evolution of the spatial distribution of escaping light, are the primary data products of a new type of lidar: Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). WAIL data can be used to infer both optical depth and physical thickness of clouds, and hence the cloud liquid water content. The instrumental challenge is to accommodate a radiance field varying over many orders of magnitude and changing over widely varying time-scales. Our implementation uses a high-speed microchannel plate/crossed delay line imaging detector system with a 60-degree full-angle field of view, and a 532 nm doubled Nd:YAG laser. Nighttime field experiments testing various solutions to this problem show excellent agreement with diffusion theory, and retrievals yield plausible values for the optical and geometrical parameters of the observed cloud decks.

  10. DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed

  11. Sensitivity of the electric dipole polarizability to the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Agrawal, B. K.; Colo, G.; Nazarewicz, W.; Paar, N.; Piekarewicz, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vretenar, D.

    2012-10-20

    The static dipole polarizability, {alpha}{sub D}, in {sup 208}Pb has been recently measured with highresolution via proton inelastic scattering at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) [1]. This observable is thought to be intimately connected with the neutron skin thickness, r{sub skin}, of the same nucleus and, more fundamentally, it is believed to be associated with the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of r{sub skin} on {alpha}{sub D} in {sup 208}Pb is investigated and discussed on the basis of a large and representative set of relativistic and non-relativistic nuclear energy density functionals (EDF) [2].

  12. Asymptotic solution of light transport problems in optically thick luminescent media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin-Biryol, Derya Ilan, Boaz

    2014-06-15

    We study light transport in optically thick luminescent random media. Using radiative transport theory for luminescent media and applying asymptotic and computational methods, a corrected diffusion approximation is derived with the associated boundary conditions and boundary layer solution. The accuracy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, the reduced system models accurately the effect of reabsorption. The impacts of varying the Stokes shift and using experimentally measured luminescence data are explored in detail. The results of this study have application to the design of luminescent solar concentrators, fluorescence medical imaging, and optical cooling using anti-Stokes fluorescence.

  13. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  14. Layer thickness dependence of current induced effective fields in ferromagnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawaguchi, M. Moriyama, T.; Ono, T.; Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.

    2015-05-07

    We report the relation between current induced effective fields and ferromagnetic layer thickness. Hall measurements with rotating magnetic field show that the transverse and perpendicular effective fields have linear relations to the inverse of the magnetic moment m per area S. The results imply that both of these effective fields may originate from spin angular momentum transferring. However, the non-zero intercept of the transverse field at m/S = 0 implies that magnetization independent effects, such as Rashba effect, may contribute to transverse field.

  15. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?C. At 800?C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  16. Formation of Thick, Large-Area Nanoparticle Superlatices in Lithographically Defined Geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akey, A.; Yang, L.; Lu, C.; Herman, I.P.

    2010-03-31

    Superlattices of colloidal nanocrystals hold the promise of new nanomaterials with tunable properties. The positioning and size of these structures are often poorly controlled after self-assembly from the solution phase, making studies of their properties difficult. We report the fabrication of {approx}100 layer thick, three-dimensional superlattices on a substrate with controlled lateral placement. This novel fabrication technique generates long-range order over the micrometer scale and controlled placement by employing lithographic patterning and microfluidic flow. Keywords: Nanoparticles; superlattice; self assembly; microfluidics; ordered array.

  17. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a semiconductor wafer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodoer F.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring thicknesses of semiconductor wafers, comprising: housing means for supporting a wafer in a light-tight environment; a light source mounted to the housing at one side of the wafer to emit light of a predetermined wavelength to normally impinge the wafer; a light detector supported at a predetermined distance from a side of the wafer opposite the side on which a light source impinges and adapted to receive light transmitted through the wafer; and means for measuring the transmitted light.

  18. High-speed non-contact measuring apparatus for gauging the thickness of moving sheet material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grann, Eric B.; Holcomb, David E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical measurement apparatus is provided for measuring the thickness of a moving sheet material (18). The apparatus has a pair of optical measurement systems (21, 31) attached to opposing surfaces (14, 16) of a rigid support structure (10). A pair of high-power laser diodes (20,30) and a pair of photodetector arrays (22,32) are attached to the opposing surfaces. Light emitted from the laser diodes is reflected off of the sheet material surfaces (17, 19) and received by the respective photodetector arrays. An associated method for implementing the apparatus is also provided.

  19. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a semiconductor wafer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-07

    Apparatus for measuring thicknesses of semiconductor wafers is discussed, comprising: housing means for supporting a wafer in a light-tight environment; a light source mounted to the housing at one side of the wafer to emit light of a predetermined wavelength to normally impinge the wafer; a light detector supported at a predetermined distance from a side of the wafer opposite the side on which a light source impinges and adapted to receive light transmitted through the wafer; and means for measuring the transmitted light. 4 figs.

  20. Remote Spectroscopic Sounding of Liquid Water Path in Thick Clouds in Winter Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Spectroscopic Sounding of Liquid Water Path in Thick Clouds in Winter Conditions S. V. Dvoryashin and G. S. Golitsyn A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia The liquid water path (LWP) in mixed clouds is restored based on remote measurements of spectral brightness of a cloudy layer in the spectral range 2.15-2.35µm. The results of spectroscopic sounding of dense clouds sounding are presented. Introduction Since the 1980s, in A. M. Obukhov

  1. Liquid film thickness inside the high pressure swirl injectors: Real scale measurement and evaluation of analytical equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Seoksu; Bae, Choongsik; Abo-Serie, Essam

    2010-02-15

    Liquid film thickness inside two swirl injectors for direct injection (DI) gasoline engines was measured at different injection pressure conditions ranging from 2.0 to 7.0 MPa and then previous analytical and empirical equations were examined from the experimental results. Based on the evaluation, a new equation for the liquid film thickness inside the swirl injectors was introduced. A direct photography using two real scale transparent nozzles and a pulsed light source was employed to measure the liquid film thickness inside the swirl injectors. The error in the liquid film thickness measurement, generated from different refractive indices among transparent nozzle, fuel and air, was estimated and corrected based on the geometric optics. Two injectors which have different nozzle diameter and nozzle length were applied to introduce a more general empirical equation for the liquid film thickness inside the pressure swirl injectors. The results showed that the liquid film thickness remains constant at the injection pressures for direct injection gasoline engines while the ratio of nozzle length to nozzle diameter (L/D) shows significant effect on the liquid film thickness. The previously introduced analytical and empirical equations for relatively low injection pressure swirl injectors overestimated the effect of injection pressure at the operating range of high pressure swirl injectors and, in addition, the effect of L/D ratio and swirler geometry was rarely considered. A new empirical equation was suggested based on the experimental results by taking into account the effects of fuel properties, nozzle diameter, nozzle length and swirler geometry. (author)

  2. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of Thick Corrosion Layers on 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Castelli; P Persans; W Strohmayer; V Parkinson

    2006-03-23

    Corrosion resistant structural materials of both iron and nickel based alloys are used in the electric power industry for the construction of the coolant loops of both conventional and nuclear power generating stations. These materials, in the presence of high temperature (e.g. 287 C), high pH (e.g. 10.0 {at} 20 C) water with dissolved hydrogen will oxidize and form corrosion films that are double metal oxides (or spinels) of the form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}. This work describes optical reflectivity techniques that have been developed to study the growth of these films in situ. The optical technique uses a dual-beam specular reflection spectrometer to measure the spectrum of reflected light in small angle (i.e. < 15{sup o}) scatter. The reflection spectra are then calibrated using a set of corrosion coupons with corrosion films that are well known. Results are compared with models based on multilayer reflection and Mie scattering from a particle size distribution. Surface roughness is found to be the dominant cause of reduced reflection as the films grow.

  3. The effect of specimen strength and thickness on cracking susceptibility during the Sigmajig weldability test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippold, J.C.; Shademan, S.S.; Baeslack, W.A. III

    1996-03-01

    The effects of yield strength and specimen thickness on the threshold stress for solidification cracking using the Sigmajig weldability test have been determined for A-286 stainless steel. An increase in test specimen yield strength results in a decrease in the threshold stress for cracking. This decrease is attributed in part to a decrease in the width of the plastically deformed weld zone as the yield strength increases, which enhances strain localization in this region and promotes solidification cracking. Over a range of yield strengths, an increase in specimen thickness generally results in higher threshold stress for cracking, which are attributed to an increased inherent restraint. The relationship between weld pool shape, the solidification grain and the fracture stress during transverse loading has been investigated by performing hot-ductility tests of weld fusion zone specimens. The hot-ductility behavior of specimens produced from welds exhibiting elliptical and teardrop-shaped weld pools is comparable. However, specimens produced from welds that exhibit a teardrop-shaped weld pool fracture along the fusion zone centerline above the nil-ductility temperature, whereas specimens produced from welds that exhibit an elliptical-shaped weld pool fracture in the partially melted zone. A correlation was observed between the fracture stress measured by hot-ductility testing and threshold stresses measured using the Sigmajig test.

  4. OPTICALLY THICK H I DOMINANT IN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION TO ''DARK GAS''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, Y.; Torii, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Okamoto, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Tachihara, K.; Sano, H.; Onishi, T.

    2015-01-01

    Dark gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) is believed to not be detectable either in CO or H I radio emission, but it is detectable by other means including γ rays, dust emission, and extinction traced outside the Galactic plane at |b| > 5°. In these analyses, the 21 cm H I emission is usually assumed to be completely optically thin. We have reanalyzed the H I emission from the whole sky at |b| > 15° by considering temperature stratification in the ISM inferred from the Planck/IRAS analysis of the dust properties. The results indicate that the H I emission is saturated with an optical depth ranging from 0.5 to 3 for 85% of the local H I gas. This optically thick H I is characterized by spin temperature in the range 10 K-60 K, significantly lower than previously postulated in the literature, whereas such low temperature is consistent with emission/absorption measurements of the cool H I toward radio continuum sources. The distribution and the column density of the H I are consistent with those of the dark gas suggested by γ rays, and it is possible that the dark gas in the Galaxy is dominated by optically thick cold H I gas. This result implies that the average density of H I is 2-2.5 times higher than that derived on the optically thin assumption in the local ISM.

  5. Thickness-dependent electronlattice equilibration in laser-excited thin bismuth films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Li, R. K.; Reid, A. H.; Weathersby, S. P.; Quirin, F.; Chase, T.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Fry, A.; Hartmann, N.; et al

    2015-11-19

    Electronphonon coupling processes determine electronic transport properties of materials and are responsible for the transfer of electronic excess energy to the lattice. With decreasing device dimensions an understanding of these processes in nanoscale materials is becoming increasingly important. We use time-resolved electron diffraction to directly study energy relaxation in thin bismuth films after optical excitation. Precise measurements of the transient DebyeWaller-effect for various film thicknesses and over an extended range of excitation fluences allow to separate different contributions to the incoherent lattice response. While phonon softening in the electronically excited state is responsible for an immediate increase of the r.m.s.moreatomic displacement within a few hundred fs, 'ordinary' electronphonon coupling leads to subsequent heating of the material on a few ps time-scale. Moreover, the data reveal distinct changes in the energy transfer dynamics which becomes faster for stronger excitation and smaller film thickness, respectively. The latter effect is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons to phonons in the substrate.less

  6. The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaton, R.K. |

    1994-10-01

    The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  7. Thickness-dependent structural arrangement in nano-confined imidazolium-based ionic liquid films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rouha, Michael; Cummings, Peter T.

    2014-12-24

    Here we report that a fundamental understanding of interfacial processes in nano-confined ionic liquids is crucial to increase the performance of modern energy storage devices. It is well-known that interfaces between electrodes and ionic liquids exhibit structures distinct from that of the bulk liquid. Following the recent interest in these systems, we studied the structure of thin ionic liquid films confined in flexible uncharged carbon nano-pores by using fully-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the interfacial ions self-assemble into a closely-packed chequerboard-like pattern, formed by both cations and anions in direct contact with the pore wall, and that withinmore » this structure we find changes dependent on the thickness of the confined films. At low coverages a dense layer is formed in which both the imidazolium-ring and its alkyl-tail lie parallel to the pore wall. With increasing coverage the alkyl-chains reorient perpendicular to the surface, making space for additional ions until a densified highly ordered layer is formed. This wall-induced self-patterning into interfacial layers with significantly higher than bulk density is consistent with recent experimental and theoretical studies of similar systems. Lastly, this work reveals additional molecular-level details on the effect of the film-thickness on the structure and density of the ionic liquid.« less

  8. Spectrum and light curve of a supernova shock breakout through a thick Wolf-Rayet wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-06-20

    Wolf-Rayet stars are known to eject winds. Thus, when a Wolf-Rayet star explodes as a supernova, a fast (≳ 40, 000 km s{sup –1}) shock is expected to be driven through a wind. We study the signal expected from a fast supernova shock propagating through an optically thick wind and find that the electrons behind the shock driven into the wind are efficiently cooled by inverse Compton over soft photons that were deposited by the radiation-mediated shock that crossed the star. Therefore, the bolometric luminosity is comparable to the kinetic energy flux through the shock, and the spectrum is found to be a power law, whose slope and frequency range depend on the number flux of soft photons available for cooling. Wolf-Rayet supernovae that explode through a thick wind have a high flux of soft photons, producing a flat spectrum, νF {sub ν} = Const, in the X-ray range of 0.1 ≲ T ≲ 50 keV. As the shock expands into an optically thin wind, the soft photons are no longer able to cool the shock that plows through the wind, and the bulk of the emission takes the form of a standard core-collapse supernova (without a wind). However, a small fraction of the soft photons is upscattered by the shocked wind and produces a transient unique X-ray signature.

  9. Fluid Phase Lipid Areas and Bilayer Thicknesses of Commonly Used Phosphatidylcholines as a Function of Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucerka, Norbert; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Katsaras, John

    2011-01-01

    The structural parameters of fluid phase bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholines with fully saturated, mixed, and branched fatty acid chains, at several temperatures, have been determined by simultaneously analyzing small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. Bilayer parameters, such as area per lipid and overall bilayer thickness have been obtained in conjunction with intrabilayer structural parameters (e.g. hydrocarbon region thickness). The results have allowed us to assess the effect of temperature and hydrocarbon chain composition on bilayer structure. For example, we found that for all lipids there is, not surprisingly, an increase in fatty acid chain trans-gauche isomerization with increasing temperature. Moreover, this increase in trans-gauche isomerization scales with fatty acid chain length in mixed chain lipids. However, in the case of lipids with saturated fatty acid chains, trans-gauche isomerization is increasingly tempered by attractive chain-chain van der Waals interactions with increasing chain length. Finally, our results confirm a strong dependence of lipid chain dynamics as a function of double bond position along fatty acid chains.

  10. A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

    2002-04-25

    We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

  11. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  12. a-Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}:H thin films with subnanometer surface roughness for biological applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera-Celis, Jos Reyes-Betanzo, Claudia Itzmoyotl-Toxqui, Adrin; Ordua-Daz, Abdu Prez-Coyotl, Ana

    2015-09-15

    The characterization of a-Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}:H thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with high hydrogen dilution for biological applications is addressed. A root mean square roughness less than 1?nm was measured via atomic force microscopy for an area of 25??m{sup 2}. Structural analysis was done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the middle infrared region. It was found that under the deposition conditions, the formation of SiC bonds is promoted. Electrical dark conductivity measurements were performed to evaluate the effect of high hydrogen dilution and to find the relation between carrier transport properties and the structural arrangement. Conductivities of the order of 10{sup ?7} to 10{sup ?9} S/cm at room temperature for methanesilane gas flow ratio from 0.35 to 0.85 were achieved, respectively. UV-visible spectra were used to obtain the optical band gap and the Tauc parameter. Optical band gap as wide as 3.55?eV was achieved in the regime of high carbon incorporation. Accordingly, deposition under low power density and high hydrogen dilution reduces the roughness, improves the structure of the network, and stabilizes the film properties as a greater percentage of carbon is incorporated. The biofunctionalization of a-Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}:H surfaces with NH{sub 2}-terminated self-assembled monolayers was obtained through silanization with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. This knowledge opens a window for the inclusion of these a-Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}:H thin films in devices such as biosensors.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Thick Low-Cost, High-Power Lithium-Ion Electrodes via Aqueous Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thick low-cost,...

  14. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  15. Layer thickness and period as design parameters to tailor pyroelectric properties in ferroelectric superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misirlioglu, I. B.; Alpay, S. P.

    2014-10-27

    We theoretically examine the pyroelectric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices as a function of layer thickness and configuration using non-linear thermodynamics coupled with electrostatic and electromechanical interactions between layers. We specifically study PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices. The pyroelectric properties of such constructs consisting of relatively thin repeating units are shown to exceed the pyroelectric response of monolithic PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} films. This is related to periodic internal electric fields generated due to the polarization mismatch between layers that allows tailoring of the shift in the transition temperature. Our results indicate that higher and electric field sensitive pyroresponse can be achieved from layer-by-layer engineered ferroelectric heterostructures.

  16. Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

  17. Optical Resonance in a Narrow Slit in a Thick Metallic Screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takakura, Y.

    2001-06-11

    Interaction of TM-polarized waves with a subwavelength thick metallic slit has been analyzed. A Fabry-Perot-like behavior is reported. The resonance peaks, however, have very low magnitude and a systematic shift towards longer wavelengths is observed. The slit being narrow, this shift can be interpreted as the result of an aperture effect. Spectral transmission from a periodic array of such slits features the same peaks with a high increase in their magnitude, confirming that a grating acts as an amplifier of those resonances. Such a mechanism might explain the enhancement of the transmission observed in recent experiments [T.W. Ebbesen, H.J. Lezec, H.F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P.A. Wolff, Nature (London) 391, 667 (1998)].

  18. Spray shadowing for stress relief and mechanical locking in thick protective coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollis, Kendall; Bartram, Brian

    2007-05-22

    A method for applying a protective coating on an article, comprising the following steps: selecting an article with a surface for applying a coating thickness; creating undercut grooves on the article, where the grooves depend beneath the surface to a bottom portion with the grooves having an upper width on the surface and a lower width on the bottom portion connected by side walls, where at least one of the side walls connects the upper width and the lower width to form an undercut angle with the surface less than 90.degree.; and, applying the protective coating onto the article to fill the undercut grooves and cover the surface, thereby forming weak paths within the protective coating.

  19. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  20. Effects of annealing temperature on morphology and thickness of samarium electrodeposited thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sims, Nathan J.; Stracener, Daniel W.; Boll, Rose Ann; Burns, Jonathan D.; Myhre, Kristian G.

    2016-05-17

    Electroplated depositions of Sm were prepared using a vertical well-type electrodeposition unit with an aqueous ammonium acetate electrolyte system, with an average deposition yield just over 87%. The depositions were analyzed for morphology and thickness by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical composition by energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after firing. The depositions were fired at 125–700 °C, while varying the heating rate from 0.5 to 10 °C/min in either an oxidizing or reducing atmosphere. A heating rate of 10 °C/min was slow enough to prevent disruption of the deposition morphology during firing.more » Furthermore, a gas sweep enhanced the removal of any organic substituents, with an oxidizing environment being more advantageous than a reducing environment.« less

  1. Direct detection of x-rays for protein crystallography employing a thick, large area CCD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Muzaffer; McKay, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for directly determining the crystalline structure of a protein crystal. The crystal is irradiated by a finely collimated x-ray beam. The interaction of the x-ray beam with the crystal produces scattered x-rays. These scattered x-rays are detected by means of a large area, thick CCD which is capable of measuring a significant number of scattered x-rays which impact its surface. The CCD is capable of detecting the position of impact of the scattered x-ray on the surface of the CCD and the quantity of scattered x-rays which impact the same cell or pixel. This data is then processed in real-time and the processed data is outputted to produce a image of the structure of the crystal. If this crystal is a protein the molecular structure of the protein can be determined from the data received.

  2. Method and apparatus for monitoring the thickness of a coal rib during rib formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowrey, Gary L.; Ganoe, Carl W.; Monaghan, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for monitoring the position of a mining machine cutting a new entry in a coal seam relative to an adjacent, previously cut entry to determine the distance between a near face of the adjacent previously cut entry and a new face adjacent thereto of a new entry being cut by the mining machine which together define the thickness of a coal rib being formed between the new entry and the adjacent previously cut entry during the new entry-cutting operation. The monitoring apparatus; includes a transmit antenna mounted on the mining machine and spaced inwardly from the new face of the coal rib for transmitting radio energy towards the coal rib so that one portion of the radio energy is reflected by the new face which is defined at an air-coal interface between the new entry and the coal rib and another portion of the radio energy is reflected by the near face of the coal rib which is defined at an air-coal interface between the coal rib and the adjacent previously cut entry. A receive antenna mounted on the mining machine and spaced inwardly of the new face of the coal rib receives the one portion of the radio energy reflected by the new face and also receives the another portion of the radio energy reflected by the near face. A processor determines a first elapsed time period equal to the time required for the one portion of the radio energy reflected by the new face to travel between the transmit antenna and the receive antenna and also determines a second elapsed time period equal to the time required for the another portion of the radio energy reflected by the near face to travel between the transmit antenna and the receive antenna and thereafter calculates the thickness of the coal rib being formed as a function of the difference between the first and second elapsed time periods.

  3. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness

  4. THE THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF OXYGEN PERMEABILITY IN SOL-GEL DERIVED CGO-COFE2O4 THIN FILMS ON POROUS CERAMIC SUBSTRATES: A SPUTTERED BLOCKING LAYER FOR THICKNESS CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K

    2009-01-08

    Mixed conductive oxides are a topic of interest for applications in oxygen separation membranes as well as use in producing hydrogen fuel through the partial oxidation of methane. The oxygen flux through the membrane is governed both by the oxygen ionic conductivity as well as the material's electronic conductivity; composite membranes like Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} (CGO)-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) use gadolinium doped ceria oxides as the ionic conducting material combined with cobalt iron spinel which serves as the electronic conductor. In this study we employ {approx} 50 nm sputtered CeO{sub 2} layers on the surface of porous CGO ceramic substrates which serve as solution 'blocking' layers during the thin film fabrication process facilitating the control of film thickness. Films with thickness of {approx} 2 and 4 microns were prepared by depositing 40 and 95 separate sol-gel layers respectively. Oxygen flux measurements indicated that the permeation increased with decreasing membrane thickness; thin film membrane with thickness on the micron level showed flux values an order of magnitude greater (0.03 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2} s) at 800 C as compared to 1mm thick bulk ceramic membranes (0.003 {micro}mol/cm{sup 2}).

  5. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  6. Technology Solutions Case Study: Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. In this project, Building Science Corporation investigated rain and built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  7. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  8. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  9. Fabrication of TiO{sub 2} Thick Film for Photocatalyst from Commercial TiO{sub 2} Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asteti, S. Fuji; Syarif, D. Gustaman

    2008-03-17

    Photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} thick film ceramics made of commercial TiO{sub 2} powder has been studied. The TiO{sub 2} powder was nano sized one that was derived from dried TiO{sub 2} suspension. The TiO{sub 2} suspension was made by pouring some blended commercial TiO{sub 2} powder into some amount of water. The paste of TiO{sub 2} was made by mixing the nano sized TiO{sub 2} powder with organic vehicle and glass frit. The paste was spread on a glass substrate. The paste was dried at 100 deg. C and heated at different temperatures (400 deg. C and 500 deg. C) for 60 minutes to produce thick film ceramics. The photocatalytic activity of these films was evaluated by measuring the concentration of a solution of methylene blue where the thick films were inside after being illuminated by UV light at various periods of times. The initial concentration of the methylene blue solution was 5 ppm. Structural analyses were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The XRD analyses showed that the produced thick film ceramic had mainly crystal structure of anatase. According to the photocatalytical data, it was known that the produced thick film ceramics were photocatalyst which were capable of decomposing an organic compound such as the methylene blue.

  10. Critical thickness and strain relaxation in molecular beam epitaxy-grown SrTiO{sub 3} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Tianqi; Ganguly, Koustav; Marshall, Patrick; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat

    2013-11-18

    We report on the study of the critical thickness and the strain relaxation in epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} film grown on (La{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 0.7})(Al{sub 0.65}Ta{sub 0.35})O{sub 3} (001) (LSAT) substrate using the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach. No change in the film's lattice parameter (both the in-plane and the out-of-plane) was observed up to a film thickness of 180 nm, which is in sharp contrast to the theoretical critical thickness of ∼12 nm calculated using the equilibrium theory of strain relaxation. For film thicknesses greater than 180 nm, the out-of-plane lattice parameter was found to decrease hyperbolically in an excellent agreement with the relaxation via forming misfit dislocations. Possible mechanisms are discussed by which the elastic strain energy can be accommodated prior to forming misfit dislocations leading to such anomalously large critical thickness.

  11. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-12-31

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness {sigma}{sub mns} as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage {sigma}{sub mns} of 1.3 {+-} 0.3 {micro}m for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of {sigma}{sub mns} on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered {sigma}{sub mns} to 1.0 {+-} 0.05 {micro}m.

  12. Thickness-dependent metal-insulator transition in epitaxial SrRuO3 ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xuan; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Su, Dong; Zhou, Shengqiang; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2015-01-06

    Transport characteristics of ultrathin SrRuO? films, deposited epitaxially on TiO?-terminated SrTiO? (001) single-crystal substrates, were studied as a function of film thickness. Evolution from a metallic to an insulating behavior is observed as the film thickness decreases from 20 to 4 unit cells. In films thicker than 4 unit cells, the transport behavior obeys the Drude low temperature conductivity with quantum corrections, which can be attributed to weak localization. Fitting the data with 2-dimensional localization model indicates that electron-phonon collisions are the main inelastic relaxation mechanism. In the film of 4 unit cells in thickness, the transport behavior follows variable range hopping model, indicating a strongly localized state. As a result, magnetoresistance measurements reveal a likely magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axis along the out-of-plane direction.

  13. Thickness determination of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride films by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, P. Sutter, E.

    2014-09-01

    We assess scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for thickness measurements on few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), the layered dielectric of choice for integration with graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Observations on h-BN islands with large, atomically flat terraces show that the secondary electron intensity in SEM reflects monolayer height changes in films up to least 10 atomic layers thickness. From a quantitative analysis of AES data, the energy-dependent electron escape depth in h-BN films is deduced. The results show that AES is suitable for absolute thickness measurements of few-layer h-BN of 1 to 6 layers.

  14. Current longwall ventilation problems and implications for thick seam longwalls. Final technical report. [133 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify, analyze and suggest solutions to ventilation problems of the following mining systems proposed for use in western thick seams; multiple lift longwall; single pass longwall with face height in the range of 12 to 19 feet; longwall sublevel caving. To reach this objective, background information on the regulations and ventilation practices relevant to the three methods was reviewed. This was followed by an identification of ventilation problems including the sources and quantities of methane emissions, respirable coal dust, self ignition and self heating. The problems were then analyzed to determine the probability of occurrence, the cause of the problem, and its consequences. Having analyzed these problems, solutions were described to the problems. The major finding of this effort was that, while certain ventilation difficulties can be isolated peculiar to these three moethods, in general, seam specific conditions have a larger role in determining the success of ventilation than does the method used. The major difficulties to be faced by these novel methods are the same as those to be faced by conventional longwalls. Research efforts should proceed on that basis.

  15. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  16. Dynamic Response of a Pulse-Heated, Thick-Walled, Hollow Sphere: Validation of Code Numerics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canaan, R.E.

    2000-01-19

    Volumetric pulse heating of a thick-walled hollow sphere is numerically investigated. The primary objective is to validate a variety of LLNL 30 hydrocodes for modeling the dynamic behavior of fissile/fissionable metals subject to rapid ''fission-heating'' transients. The 30 codes tested include both DYNA3D and NIKE3D, as well as the ''ASCI'' code, ALE3D. The codes are compared ''head-to-head'' and are benchmarked against a 1D finite difference solution to the problem that is derived from basic principles. Three pulse-heating transients are examined with full-width-half-maximum pulse durations of 41{micro}s, 85{micro}s, and 140{micro}s, respectively. These three transients produce a significant range of dynamic responses in the thermo-elastic regime. We present results for dynamic radial displacements and stresses for each pulse, and also discuss which code features/options worked best for these types of calculations. In general, the code results are in excellent agreement for the simple system considered. Validation of code numerics in simple systems is a key first step toward future application of the codes in more complicated geometries (U).

  17. More pieces of the puzzle: chemistry and substructures in the galactic thick disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helmi, Amina; Williams, Mary; Freeman, K. C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; De Silva, G. E-mail: mary@aip.de

    2014-08-20

    We present a study of the chemical abundances of solar neighborhood stars associated with dynamical structures in the Milky Way's (thick) disk. These stars were identified as an overdensity in the eccentricity range 0.3 < ε < 0.5 in the Copenhagen-Geneva Survey by Helmi et al. We find that stars with these dynamical characteristics do not constitute a homogeneous population. A relatively sharp transition in dynamical and chemical properties appears to occur at a metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ –0.4. Stars with [Fe/H] > –0.4 have mostly lower eccentricities, smaller vertical velocity dispersions, are α-enhanced, and define a rather narrow sequence in [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H], clearly distinct from that of the thin disk. Stars with [Fe/H] < –0.4 have a range of eccentricities, are hotter vertically, and depict a larger spread in [α/Fe]. We also found tentative evidence of a substructure possibly associated with the disruption of a metal-rich star cluster. The differences between these populations of stars is also present in, e.g., [Zn/Fe], [Ni/Fe], and [SmII/Fe], suggesting a real physical distinction.

  18. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almansouri, Hani; Clayton, Dwight A; Kisner, Roger A; Polsky, Yarom; Bouman, Charlie; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  19. Temperature effects on nanostructure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, the properties of mechanically stable single-nanoparticle (NP)-thick membranes have largely been studied at room temperature. How these membranes soften as nanoparticle ligands disorder with increasing temperature is unknown. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to probe the temperature dependence of the mechanical and nanostructural properties of nanoparticle membranes made of 6 nm diameter Au nanoparticles coated with dodecanethiol ligands and terminated with either methyl (CH3) or carboxyl (COOH) terminal groups. For methyl-terminated ligands, interactions along the alkane chain provide mechanical stiffness, with a Young's modulus of 1.7 GPa at 300 K. For carboxyl-terminated chains, end-group interactions are significant,more » producing stiffer membranes at all temperatures, with a Young's modulus of 3.8 GPa at 300 K. For both end-group types, membrane stiffness is reduced to zero at about 400 K. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of membranes at 300 K that have been annealed at 400 K are comparable to samples that do not undergo thermal annealing.« less

  20. Temperature effects on nanostructure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, the properties of mechanically stable single-nanoparticle (NP)-thick membranes have largely been studied at room temperature. How these membranes soften as nanoparticle ligands disorder with increasing temperature is unknown. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to probe the temperature dependence of the mechanical and nanostructural properties of nanoparticle membranes made of 6 nm diameter Au nanoparticles coated with dodecanethiol ligands and terminated with either methyl (CH3) or carboxyl (COOH) terminal groups. For methyl-terminated ligands, interactions along the alkane chain provide mechanical stiffness, with a Young's modulus of 1.7 GPa at 300 K. For carboxyl-terminated chains, end-group interactions are significant, producing stiffer membranes at all temperatures, with a Young's modulus of 3.8 GPa at 300 K. For both end-group types, membrane stiffness is reduced to zero at about 400 K. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of membranes at 300 K that have been annealed at 400 K are comparable to samples that do not undergo thermal annealing.

  1. SN 2008D: A WOLF-RAYET EXPLOSION THROUGH A THICK WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-06-10

    Supernova (SN) 2008D/XRT 080109 is considered to be the only direct detection of a shock breakout from a regular SN to date. While a breakout interpretation was favored by several papers, inconsistencies remain between the observations and current SN shock breakout theory. Most notably, the duration of the luminous X-ray pulse is considerably longer than expected for a spherical breakout through the surface of a type Ibc SN progenitor, and the X-ray radiation features, mainly its flat spectrum and its luminosity evolution, are enigmatic. We apply a recently developed theoretical model for the observed radiation from a Wolf-Rayet SN exploding through a thick wind and show that it naturally explains all of the observed features of SN 2008D X-ray emission, including the energetics, the spectrum, and the detailed luminosity evolution. We find that the inferred progenitor and SN parameters are typical for an exploding Wolf-Rayet. A comparison of the wind density found at the breakout radius and the density at much larger radii, as inferred by late radio observations, suggests an enhanced mass-loss rate taking effect about 10 days prior to the SN explosion. This finding joins accumulating evidence for a possible late phase in the stellar evolution of massive stars, involving vigorous mass loss a short time before the SN explosion.

  2. Exploration Of Activity Measurements And Equilibrium Checks For Sediment Dating Using Thick-Window Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Gladkis, Laura G.; Timmers, Heiko; Fitzsimmons, Kathryn E.; Reynolds, Eva M.

    2011-06-01

    Activity measurements on sediment samples for trapped-charge geological dating using gamma-ray spectroscopy are an important verification of the field-site dose rate determination. Furthermore gamma-ray spectroscopy can check if the natural decay series are in secular equilibrium which is a crucial assumption in such dating. Typically the activities of leading members of the Thorium and Uranium decay series are measured, which requires Germanium detectors with thin windows and good energy resolution in order to effectively detect the associated low energy gamma-rays. Such equipment is not always readily available. The potential of conventional Germanium detectors with thick entrance window has been explored towards routine gamma-ray spectroscopy of sediment samples using higher energy gamma-rays. Alternative isotopes, such as Ac-228 and Pb-212 for the Thorium series, and Pa-234m, Ra-226 and Bi-214 for the Uranium series, have been measured in order to determine the mass-specific activity for the respective series and possibly provide a check of secular equilibrium. In addition to measurements of the K-40 activity, with the alternative approach, the activities of both decay series can be accurately determined. The secular equilibrium condition may be tested for the Thorium series. Measurement accuracy for Pa-234m is, however, not sufficient to permit also a reliable check of equilibrium for the Uranium series.

  3. Mechanical properties of Pb-free solder alloys on thick film hybrid microcircuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, C.L.; Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.; Hosking, F.M.

    1998-03-10

    The technology drivers of the electronics industry continue to be systems miniaturization and reliability, in addition to addressing a variety of important environmental issues. Although the Sn-Pb eutectic alloy is widely used as a joining material in the electronics industry, it has drawn environmental concern due to its Pb content. The solder acts both as an electrical and mechanical connection within the different packaging levels in an electronic device. New Pb-free solders are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The alloys are based on the Sn-Ag alloy, having Bi and Au additions. Prototype hybrid microcircuit (HMC) test vehicles have been assembled to evaluate Pb-free solders for Au-Pt-Pd thick film soldering. The test components consist of a variety of dummy chip capacitors and leadless ceramic chip carriers (LCCC`s). The mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. The reflow profiles and the solid state intermetallic formation reaction will also be presented. Improved solder joint manufacturability and increased fatigue resistance solder alloys are the goals of these materials.

  4. In situ measurement of the bonded film thickness of Z-Tetraol lubricant on magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Lei; Li Feng

    2010-10-15

    Currently, the bonded film thickness of perfluoropolyether lubricant on top of magnetic recording media is measured by a two-step process. First, the media disk has to be rinsed thoroughly using a fluorocarbon solvent (for instance, Vetrel) to remove the mobile lubricant. Second, the thickness of the remaining lubricant on the media surface which is regarded as the bonded lubricant thickness is then measured either by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. As the total lubricant thickness approaches single molecular dimension ({approx}10 A), current methods face tremendous challenge on the accuracy and sensitivity of the measurement. We studied the spectral characteristics responding to the lubricant bonding with the carbon overcoat by the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra and proposed to use the peak area ratio (C{sub 3}H{sub 2}F/C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}) to characterize the bonded Z-Tetraol lubricant that produces a direct bonded lubricant thickness measurement without the need to remove the mobile lubricant with a solvent. After taking the background signal of disks prior to bonding by UV irradiation into account, this method becomes independent of the total lubricant thickness as well as shows good correlation linearity (R{sup 2{approx}}87%) with the current FTIR method for the ratio of C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}.

  5. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Ye; Dwyer, Christian; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-12-31

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). At greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive negative contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive positive contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive positive chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. As a result, implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.

  6. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Ye; Dwyer, Christian; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-12-31

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5λ (λ is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). Atmore » greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. As a result, implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.« less

  7. Ligand-Thickness Effect Leads to Enhanced Preference for Large Anions in Alkali Metal Extraction by Crown Ethers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1999-07-11

    Jean-Marie Lehn (Nobel laureate, 1987) suggested ligand thickness to be an important consideration in the design of host molecules for cation recognition. We have recently expanded the role of this simple ligand property by demonstrating a case in which ligand thickness contributes significantly to anion discrimination. It was found that in the extraction of sodium nitrate and perchlorate by a simple crown ether, bis(t-octylbenzo)-14-crown-4 (BOB 14C4), the normal preference for perchlorate is almost completely lost when the complex cation has the open-face sandwich vs. the sandwich structure.

  8. Influence of the thickness of a crystal on the electrical characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklyarchuk, V.; Fochuk, p.; Rarenko, I.; Zakharuk, Z.; Sklyarchuk, O. F.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; James, R. B.

    2015-08-01

    We studied the electrical characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te detectors with rectifying contacts and varying thicknesses, and established that their geometrical dimensions affect the measured electrical properties. We found that the maximum value of the operating-bias voltage and the electric field in the detector for acceptable values of the dark current can be achieved when the crystal has an optimum thickness. This finding is due to the combined effect of generation-recombination in the space-charge region and space-charge limited currents (SCLC).

  9. Pulsed-N{sub 2} assisted growth of 5-20 nm thick β-W films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasimham, Avyaya J.; Green, Avery; Matyi, Richard J.; Khare, Prasanna; Vo, Tuan; Diebold, Alain; LaBella, Vincent P.

    2015-11-15

    A technique to deposit 5-20 nm thick β-phase W using a 2-second periodic pulse of 1 sccm-N{sub 2} gas on Si(001) and SiN(5 nm)/Si(001) substrates is reported. Resistivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray reflectivity were utilized to determine phase, bonding and thickness, respectively. X-ray diffraction patterns were utilized to determine the crystal structure, lattice constant and crystal size using the LeBail method. The flow rate of Nitrogen gas (continuous vs. pulsing) had significant impact upon the crystallinity and formation of β-phase W.

  10. Study of a prototype high quantum efficiency thick scintillation crystal video-electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun

    2006-08-15

    Image quality in portal imaging suffers significantly from the loss in contrast and spatial resolution that results from the excessive Compton scatter associated with megavoltage x rays. In addition, portal image quality is further reduced due to the poor quantum efficiency (QE) of current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Commercial video-camera-based EPIDs or VEPIDs that utilize a thin phosphor screen in conjunction with a metal buildup plate to convert the incident x rays to light suffer from reduced light production due to low QE (<2% for Eastman Kodak Lanex Fast-B). Flat-panel EPIDs that utilize the same luminescent screen along with an a-Si:H photodiode array provide improved image quality compared to VEPIDs, but they are expensive and can be susceptible to radiation damage to the peripheral electronics. In this article, we present a prototype VEPID system for high quality portal imaging at sub-monitor-unit (subMU) exposures based on a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) that acts as a high QE luminescent screen. The prototype TSC system utilizes a 12 mm thick transparent CsI(Tl) (thallium-activated cesium iodide) scintillator for QE=0.24, resulting in significantly higher light production compared to commercial phosphor screens. The 25x25 cm{sup 2} CsI(Tl) screen is coupled to a high spatial and contrast resolution Video-Optics plumbicon-tube camera system (1240x1024 pixels, 250 {mu}m pixel width at isocenter, 12-bit ADC). As a proof-of-principle prototype, the TSC system with user-controlled camera target integration was adapted for use in an existing clinical gantry (Siemens BEAMVIEW{sup PLUS}) with the capability for online intratreatment fluoroscopy. Measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) were conducted to characterize the TSC spatial resolution. The measured MTF along with measurements of the TSC noise power spectrum (NPS) were used to determine the system detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A theoretical expression of DQE(0) was

  11. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Laser Interferometry. During full penetration welding of thick sections, root defects can form, which result in unacceptable weld quality. A study was undertaken to determine the competing forces in root defect formation by independently changing the weight forces and surface tension forces. The weight force was altered by changing the plate thickness, and the surface tension force was altered by changing the surface condition at the bottom surface. Root defects do depend on these two forces. This research is contained in Mitigation of Root Defect in Laser and Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding. Validation of the hybrid laser-arc model is necessary to properly model heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in Alloy 690 hybrid welds. Therefore, the developed model was validated for low carbon steel. Temperatures calculated by the model were included into a microstructural model in order to calculate the phase fractions. Process maps were developed for the selection of welding parameters to avoid martensite formation. This research is contained in Fusion Zone Microstructure in Full Penetration Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Low Alloy Steel. Alloy 690 suffers from ductility dip cracking, a form of hot cracking. This type of cracking inhibits the use of multipass welding to join Alloy 690. Our partners at ORNL performed some hot ductility testing with Alloy 690 samples using digital image correlation. The results of this work is contained in the report Summary of 690 ductility dip cracking testing using Gleeble and digital image correlation. Macro-porosity is a limiting factor in the widespread deployment of laser and hybrid laser-arc welding for construction and repair of nuclear power plant components. Keyhole instability and fluctuation results in the formation of large bubbles, which become trapped at the advancing solid- liquid interface as pores. Laser and hybrid laser-arc welds were fabricated for a range of conditions. Porosity levels in the welds were measured in X

  12. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with amore » nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.« less

  13. Ligand structure and mechanical properties of single-nanoparticle thick membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salerno, Kenneth Michael; Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-06-16

    We believe that the high mechanical stiffness of single-nanoparticle-thick membranes is the result of the local structure of ligand coatings that mediate interactions between nanoparticles. These ligand structures are not directly observable experimentally. We use molecular dynamics simulations to observe variations in ligand structure and simultaneously measure variations in membrane mechanical properties. We have shown previously that ligand end group has a large impact on ligand structure and membrane mechanical properties. Here we introduce and apply quantitative molecular structure measures to these membranes and extend analysis to multiple nanoparticle core sizes and ligand lengths. Simulations of nanoparticle membranes with a nanoparticle core diameter of 4 or 6 nm, a ligand length of 11 or 17 methylenes, and either carboxyl (COOH) or methyl (CH3) ligand end groups are presented. In carboxyl-terminated ligand systems, structure and interactions are dominated by an end-to-end orientation of ligands. In methyl-terminated ligand systems large ordered ligand structures form, but nanoparticle interactions are dominated by disordered, partially interdigitated ligands. Core size and ligand length also affect both ligand arrangement within the membrane and the membrane's macroscopic mechanical response, but are secondary to the role of the ligand end group. Additionally, the particular end group (COOH or CH3) alters the nature of how ligand length, in turn, affects the membrane properties. The effect of core size does not depend on the ligand end group, with larger cores always leading to stiffer membranes. Asymmetry in the stress and ligand density is observed in membranes during preparation at a water-vapor interface, with the stress asymmetry persisting in all membranes after drying.

  14. CORONAL THICK TARGET HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS AND RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Lim, Daye; Choe, G. S.; Kim, Kap-Sung; Jang, Minhwan

    2013-05-20

    A distinctive class of hard X-ray (HXR) sources located in the corona was recently found, which implies that the collisionally thick target model (CTTM) applies even to the corona. We investigated whether this idea can be independently verified by microwave radiations which have been known as the best companion to HXRs. This study is conducted on the GOES M2.3 class flare which occurred on 2002 September 9 and was observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Owens Valley Solar Array. Interpreting the observed energy-dependent variation of HXR source size under the CTTM, the coronal density should be as high as 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} over a distance of up to 12''. To explain the cutoff feature of the microwave spectrum at 3 GHz, however, we require a density no higher than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Additional constraints must be placed on the temperature and magnetic field of the coronal source in order to reproduce the microwave spectrum as a whole. First, a spectral feature called the Razin suppression requires a magnetic field in a range of 250-350 G along with high viewing angles around 75 Degree-Sign . Second, to avoid excess fluxes at high frequencies due to the free-free emission that was not observed, we need a high temperature {>=}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K. These two microwave spectral features, Razin suppression and free-free emissions, become more significant at regions of high thermal plasma density and are essential for validating and determining additional parameters of the coronal HXR sources.

  15. The effect of continuous H2S exposure on the performance of thick palladium-copper alloy membranes (book chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, B.H.; Cugini, A.V.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Morreale, B.D.; Enick, R.M.

    2007-03-01

    Membranes fabricated from Pd-Cu alloys containing 80, 60, and 53wt%Pd, as well as pure Pd, were exposed to flowing 1000 ppm H2S in H2 over the temperature range of 350 to 900C using three approaches to verify NETL's previously reported transient H2S exposure results. 100 um thick braze-mounted foils failed prior to 600C due to apparent sulfur attack at the braze. 1000 um thick welded membranes demonstrated similar trends as found using the transient method in that hydrogen flux through the Pd-Cu alloys with fcc structure was not significantly degraded by H2S exposure. However, both of these experimental methods suffered from possible disadvantages. The transient method had limited H2S availability and limited exposure duration, and in the 1000 um steady-state test, bulk diffusion limitations could mask effects resulting from H2S exposure. Preliminary results obtained using an alternative membrane mounting method and test protocol for steady-state testing of 100 um thick Pd and 80wt%Pd-Cu foils at 350C showed that significant flux losses occurred on exposure to flowing 1000 ppm H2S in H2, contrary to the earlier studies. Characterization showed that relatively thick sulfide layers had developed on the membrane surfaces during the 120 hours of exposure.

  16. Thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold of indium-tin oxide films at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Haifeng; Huang Zhimeng; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei; Huang Lixian; Li Yanglong; Luo Yongquan; Wang Weiping; Zhao Xiangjie

    2011-12-01

    Laser-induced-damage characteristics of commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO) films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering deposition on K9 glass substrates as a function of the film thickness have been studied at 1064 nm with a 10 ns laser pulse in the 1-on-1 mode, and the various mechanisms for thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold (LIDT) of the film have been discussed in detail. It is observed that laser-damage-resistance of ITO film shows dramatic thickness effect with the LIDT of the 50-nm ITO film 7.6 times as large as the value of 300 nm film, and the effect of depressed carrier density by decreasing the film thickness is demonstrated to be the primary reason. Our experiment findings indicate that searching transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film with low carrier density and high carrier mobility is an efficient technique to improve the laser-damage-resistance of TCO films based on maintaining their well electric conductivity.

  17. Impact of polymer film thickness and cavity size on polymer flow during embossing : towards process design rules for nanoimprint lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; King, William P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Rowland, Harry D.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents continuum simulations of polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The simulations capture the underlying physics of polymer flow from the nanometer to millimeter length scale and examine geometry and thermophysical process quantities affecting cavity filling. Variations in embossing tool geometry and polymer film thickness during viscous flow distinguish different flow driving mechanisms. Three parameters can predict polymer deformation mode: cavity width to polymer thickness ratio, polymer supply ratio, and Capillary number. The ratio of cavity width to initial polymer film thickness determines vertically or laterally dominant deformation. The ratio of indenter width to residual film thickness measures polymer supply beneath the indenter which determines Stokes or squeeze flow. The local geometry ratios can predict a fill time based on laminar flow between plates, Stokes flow, or squeeze flow. Characteristic NIL capillary number based on geometry-dependent fill time distinguishes between capillary or viscous driven flows. The three parameters predict filling modes observed in published studies of NIL deformation over nanometer to millimeter length scales. The work seeks to establish process design rules for NIL and to provide tools for the rational design of NIL master templates, resist polymers, and process parameters.

  18. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  19. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    locations where measurements were collected, the optical thickness of the domain, the amount of sign

  20. Rotational Augmentation on a 2.3 MW Rotor Blade with Thick Flatback Airfoil Cross-Sections: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Siegel, K.; Singh, M.; Medina, P.

    2013-01-01

    Rotational augmentation was analyzed for a 2.3 MW wind turbine, which was equipped with thick flatback airfoils at inboard radial locations and extensively instrumented for acquisition of time varying surface pressures. Mean aerodynamic force and surface pressure data were extracted from an extensive field test database, subject to stringent criteria for wind inflow and turbine operating conditions. Analyses of these data showed pronounced amplification of aerodynamic forces and significant enhancements to surface pressures in response to rotational influences, relative to two-dimensional, stationary conditions. Rotational augmentation occurrence and intensity in the current effort was found to be consistent with that observed in previous research. Notably, elevated airfoil thickness and flatback design did not impede rotational augmentation.

  1. The Dependence of the Strength and Thickness of Field-Aligned Currents on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay R.; Wing, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Sheared plasma flows at the low-latitude boundary layer correlate well with early afternoon auroral arcs and #12;eld-aligned currents [Sonnerup, 1980; Lundin and Evans, 1985]. We present a simple analytic model that relates solar wind and ionospheric parameters to the strength and thickness of field-aligned currents in a region of sheared velocity, such as the low latitude boundary layer. We compare the predictions of the model with DMSP observations and #12;nd remarkably good scaling of the currents with solar wind and ionospheric parameters. The sheared boundary layer thickness is inferred to be around 3000km consistent with observational studies. The analytic model provides a simple way to organize data and to infer boundary layer structures from ionospheric data.

  2. CONSTRAINTS ON COMPTON-THICK WINDS FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS: CAN WE SEE THE INNER DISK?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2012-11-01

    Strong evidence is emerging that winds can be driven from the central regions of accretion disks in both active galactic nuclei and Galactic black hole binaries. Direct evidence for highly ionized, Compton-thin inner-disk winds comes from observations of blueshifted (v {approx} 0.05-0.1c) iron-K X-ray absorption lines. However, it has been suggested that the inner regions of black hole accretion disks can also drive Compton-thick winds-such winds would enshroud the inner disk, preventing us from seeing direct signatures of the accretion disk (i.e., the photospheric thermal emission, or the Doppler/gravitationally broadened iron K{alpha} line). Here, we show that, provided the source is sub-Eddington, the well-established wind-driving mechanisms fail to launch a Compton-thick wind from the inner disk. For the accelerated region of the wind to be Compton-thick, the momentum carried in the wind must exceed the available photon momentum by a factor of at least 2/{lambda}, where {lambda} is the Eddington ratio of the source, ruling out radiative acceleration unless the source is very close to the Eddington limit. Compton-thick winds also carry large mass fluxes, and a consideration of the connections between the wind and the disk shows this to be incompatible with magneto-centrifugal driving. Finally, thermal driving of the wind is ruled out on the basis of the large Compton radii that typify black hole systems. In the absence of some new acceleration mechanisms, we conclude that the inner regions of sub-Eddington accretion disks around black holes are indeed naked.

  3. Optical monitor for real time thickness change measurements via lateral-translation induced phase-stepping interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rushford, Michael C.

    2002-01-01

    An optical monitoring instrument monitors etch depth and etch rate for controlling a wet-etching process. The instrument provides means for viewing through the back side of a thick optic onto a nearly index-matched interface. Optical baffling and the application of a photoresist mask minimize spurious reflections to allow for monitoring with extremely weak signals. A Wollaston prism enables linear translation for phase stepping.

  4. MODELING THE Fe K LINE PROFILES IN TYPE I ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH A COMPTON-THICK DISK WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatum, M. M.; Turner, T. J.; Sim, S. A.; Miller, L.; Reeves, J. N.; Patrick, A. R.; Long, K. S.

    2012-06-20

    We have modeled a small sample of Seyfert galaxies that were previously identified as having simple X-ray spectra with little intrinsic absorption. The sources in this sample all contain moderately broad components of Fe K-shell emission and are ideal candidates for testing the applicability of a Compton-thick accretion disk wind model to active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission components. Viewing angles through the wind allow the observer to see the absorption signature of the gas, whereas face-on viewing angles allow the observer to see the scattered light from the wind. We find that the Fe K emission line profiles are well described with a model of a Compton-thick accretion disk wind of solar abundances, arising tens to hundreds of gravitational radii from the central black hole. Further, the fits require a neutral component of Fe K{alpha} emission that is too narrow to arise from the inner part of the wind, and likely comes from a more distant reprocessing region. Our study demonstrates that a Compton-thick wind can have a profound effect on the observed X-ray spectrum of an AGN, even when the system is not viewed through the flow.

  5. Unit-cell thick BaTiO{sub 3} blocks octahedral tilt propagation across oxide heterointerface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, Daisuke Aso, Ryotaro; Kurata, Hiroki; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2014-05-14

    We fabricated SrRuO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3}/GdScO{sub 3} heterostructures in which the BaTiO{sub 3} layer is one unit cell thick by pulsed laser deposition and elucidated how the BaTiO{sub 3} layer influences structural and magneto-transport properties of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer through octahedral connections across the heterointerface. Our X-ray-diffraction-based structural characterizations show that while an epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown directly on a GdScO{sub 3} substrate is in the monoclinic phase with RuO{sub 6} octahedral tilts, a one-unit-cell-thick BaTiO{sub 3} layer inserted between SrRuO{sub 3} and GdScO{sub 3} stabilizes the tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer with largely reduced RuO{sub 6} tilts. Our high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy observations provide an atomic-level view of the octahedral connections across the heterostructure and reveal that the BaTiO{sub 3} layer only one unit cell thick is thick enough to stabilize the RuO{sub 6}-TiO{sub 6} octahedral connections with negligible in-plane oxygen atomic displacements. This results in no octahedral tilts propagating into the SrRuO{sub 3} layer and leads to the formation of a tetragonal SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The magneto-transport property characterizations also reveal a strong impact of the octahedral connections modified by the inserted BaTiO{sub 3} layer on the spin-orbit interaction of the SrRuO{sub 3} layer. The SrRuO{sub 3} layer on BaTiO{sub 3}/ GdScO{sub 3} has in-plane magnetic anisotropy. This is in contrast to the magnetic anisotropy of the monoclinic SrRuO{sub 3} films on the GdScO{sub 3} substrate, in which the easy axis is ?45 to the film surface normal. Our results demonstrate that the one-unit-cell-thick layer of BaTiO{sub 3} can control and manipulate the interfacial octahedral connection closely linked to the structure-property relationship of heterostructures.

  6. Focusing of dipole radiation by a negative index chiral layer. 1. A thick layer as compared with the wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzatov, D V; Klimov, V V

    2014-09-30

    We have derived and investigated the analytical expressions for the fields of scattered radiation of an electric dipole source by a chiral (bi-isotropic) layer with arbitrary permittivity and permeability and arbitrary thickness. It is shown that in the negativeindex chiral layer the focus spot of dipole radiation is split due to excitation of right- and left-hand circularly polarised waves. The conditions are found under which the waves with one of the polarisations can be suppressed, which leads to a substantial improvement of the focusing properties of the chiral layer. (metamaterials)

  7. Laser-ultrasound spectroscopy apparatus and method with detection of shear resonances for measuring anisotropy, thickness, and other properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levesque, Daniel; Moreau, Andre; Dubois, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Bussiere, Jean; Lord, Martin; Padioleau, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting shear resonances includes structure and steps for applying a radiation pulse from a pulsed source of radiation to an object to generate elastic waves therein, optically detecting the elastic waves generated in the object, and analyzing the elastic waves optically detected in the object. These shear resonances, alone or in combination with other information, may be used in the present invention to improve thickness measurement accuracy and to determine geometrical, microstructural, and physical properties of the object. At least one shear resonance in the object is detected with the elastic waves optically detected in the object. Preferably, laser-ultrasound spectroscopy is utilized to detect the shear resonances.

  8. Annealing temperature and barrier thickness effect on the structural and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals/SiO₂ superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Vidrier, J. Hernández, S.; López-Conesa, L.; Peiró, F.; Garrido, B.; Hiller, D.; Gutsch, S.; Zacharias, M.; Estradé, S.

    2014-10-07

    The effect of the annealing temperature and the SiO₂ barrier thickness of silicon nanocrystal (NC)/SiO₂ superlattices (SLs) on their structural and optical properties is investigated. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the SL structure is maintained for annealing temperatures up to 1150 °C, with no variation on the nanostructure morphology for different SiO₂ barrier thicknesses. Nevertheless, annealing temperatures as high as 1250 °C promote diffusion of Si atoms into the SiO₂ barrier layers, which produces larger Si NCs and the loss of the NC size control expected from the SL approach. Complementary Raman scattering measurements corroborated these results for all the SiO₂ and Si-rich oxynitride layer thicknesses. In addition, we observed an increasing crystalline fraction up to 1250 °C, which is related to a decreasing contribution of the suboxide transition layer between Si NCs and the SiO₂ matrix due to the formation of larger NCs. Finally, photoluminescence measurements revealed that the emission of the superlattices exhibits a Gaussian-like lineshape with a maximum intensity after annealing at 1150 °C, indicating a high crystalline degree in good agreement with Raman results. Samples submitted to higher annealing temperatures display a progressive emission broadening, together with an increase in the central emission wavelength. Both effects are related to a progressive broadening of the size distribution with a larger mean size, in agreement with TEM observations. On the other hand, whereas the morphology of the Si NCs is unaffected by the SiO₂ barrier thickness, the emission properties are slightly modified. These observed modifications in the emission lineshape allow monitoring the precipitation process of Si NCs in a direct non-destructive way. All these experimental results evidence that an annealing temperature of 1150 °C and 1-nm SiO₂ barrier can be reached whilst preserving the SL structure, being

  9. Photochemistry in terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. III. Photochemistry and thermochemistry in thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Renyu; Seager, Sara

    2014-03-20

    Some super Earths and mini Neptunes will likely have thick atmospheres that are not H{sub 2}-dominated. We have developed a photochemistry-thermochemistry kinetic-transport model for exploring the compositions of thick atmospheres on super Earths and mini Neptunes, applicable for both H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres and non-H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. Using this model to study thick atmospheres for wide ranges of temperatures and elemental abundances, we classify them into hydrogen-rich atmospheres, water-rich atmospheres, oxygen-rich atmospheres, and hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres. We find that carbon has to be in the form of CO{sub 2} rather than CH{sub 4} or CO in a H{sub 2}-depleted water-dominated thick atmosphere and that the preferred loss of light elements from an oxygen-poor carbon-rich atmosphere leads to the formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons (C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). We apply our self-consistent atmosphere models to compute spectra and diagnostic features for known transiting low-mass exoplanets GJ 1214 b, HD 97658 b, and 55 Cnc e. For GJ 1214 b, we find that (1) C{sub 2}H{sub 2} features at 1.0 and 1.5 ?m in transmission and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} features at 9-14 ?m in thermal emission are diagnostic for hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres; (2) a detection of water-vapor features and a confirmation of the nonexistence of methane features would provide sufficient evidence for a water-dominated atmosphere. In general, our simulations show that chemical stability has to be taken into account when interpreting the spectrum of a super Earth/mini Neptune. Water-dominated atmospheres only exist for carbon to oxygen ratios much lower than the solar ratio, suggesting that this kind of atmospheres could be rare.

  10. Strain-relaxation and critical thickness of epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Tricia L; Jiang, Lu; Park, Sungkyun; Egami, Takeshi; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-08

    We report the thickness-dependent strain-relaxation behavior and the associated impacts upon the superconductivity in epitaxial La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films grown on different substrates, which provide a range of strain. We have found that the critical thickness for the onset of superconductivity in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films is associated with the finite thickness effect and epitaxial strain. In particular, thin films with tensile strain greater than ~0.25% revealed no superconductivity. We attribute this phenomenon to the inherent formation of oxygen vacancies that can be minimized via strain relaxation.

  11. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palneedi, Haribabu; Maurya, Deepam; Priya, Shashank; Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young; Kang, Suk-Joong L.; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Ryu, Jungho

    2015-07-06

    A highly dense, 4 μm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices.

  12. Bell-Plesset effects in Rayleigh-Taylor instability of finite-thickness spherical and cylindrical shells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Schmit, P. F.

    2015-12-28

    Bell-Plesset (BP) effects account for the influence of global convergence or divergence of the fluid flow on the evolution of the interfacial perturbations embedded in the flow. The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in radiation-driven spherical capsules and magnetically-driven cylindrical liners necessarily includes a significant contribution from BP effects due to the time dependence of the radius, velocity, and acceleration of the unstable surfaces or interfaces. An analytical model is presented that, for an ideal incompressible fluid and small perturbation amplitudes, exactly evaluates the BP effects in finite-thickness shells through acceleration and deceleration phases. The time-dependent dispersion equations determining themore » “instantaneous growth rate” are derived. It is demonstrated that by integrating this approximate growth rate over time, one can accurately evaluate the number of perturbation e-foldings during the inward acceleration phase of the implosion. As a result, in the limit of small shell thickness, exact thin-shell perturbationequations and approximate thin-shell dispersion equations are obtained, generalizing the earlier results [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962); E. Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1429 (1972); A. B. Bud'ko et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1159 (1990)].« less

  13. THE RADIAL METALLICITY GRADIENTS IN THE MILKY WAY THICK DISK AS FOSSIL SIGNATURES OF A PRIMORDIAL CHEMICAL DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curir, A.; Serra, A. L.; Spagna, A.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Re Fiorentin, P.; Diaferio, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter we examine the evolution of the radial metallicity gradient induced by secular processes, in the disk of an N-body Milky Way-like galaxy. We assign a [Fe/H] value to each particle of the simulation according to an initial, cosmologically motivated, radial chemical distribution and let the disk dynamically evolve for ∼6 Gyr. This direct approach allows us to take into account only the effects of dynamical evolution and to gauge how and to what extent they affect the initial chemical conditions. The initial [Fe/H] distribution increases with R in the inner disk up to R ≈ 10 kpc and decreases for larger R. We find that the initial chemical profile does not undergo major transformations after ∼6 Gyr of dynamical evolution. The final radial chemical gradients predicted by the model in the solar neighborhood are positive and of the same order as those recently observed in the Milky Way thick disk. We conclude that (1) the spatial chemical imprint at the time of disk formation is not washed out by secular dynamical processes and (2) the observed radial gradient may be the dynamical relic of a thick disk originated from a stellar population showing a positive chemical radial gradient in the inner regions.

  14. Bell-Plesset effects in Rayleigh-Taylor instability of finite-thickness spherical and cylindrical shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Schmit, P. F.

    2015-12-28

    Bell-Plesset (BP) effects account for the influence of global convergence or divergence of the fluid flow on the evolution of the interfacial perturbations embedded in the flow. The development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in radiation-driven spherical capsules and magnetically-driven cylindrical liners necessarily includes a significant contribution from BP effects due to the time dependence of the radius, velocity, and acceleration of the unstable surfaces or interfaces. An analytical model is presented that, for an ideal incompressible fluid and small perturbation amplitudes, exactly evaluates the BP effects in finite-thickness shells through acceleration and deceleration phases. The time-dependent dispersion equations determining the “instantaneous growth rate” are derived. It is demonstrated that by integrating this approximate growth rate over time, one can accurately evaluate the number of perturbation e-foldings during the inward acceleration phase of the implosion. As a result, in the limit of small shell thickness, exact thin-shell perturbationequations and approximate thin-shell dispersion equations are obtained, generalizing the earlier results [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962); E. Ott, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1429 (1972); A. B. Bud'ko et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1159 (1990)].

  15. Outdoor Testing of GaInP2/GaAs Tandem Cells with Top Cell Thickness Varied

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Emergy, K. E.; Friedman, D. J.; Ottoson, L.; Young, M. S.; Ward, J. S.; Kramer, C. M.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we measure the performance of GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells under direct beam sunlight outdoors in order to quantify their sensitivity to both spectral variation and GaInP2 top-cell thickness. A set of cells with five different top-cell thicknesses was mounted on a two-axis tracker with the incident sunlight collimated to exclude all except the direct beam. Current-voltage (I-V) curves were taken throughout the course of several days, along with measurements of the direct solar spectrum. Our two major conclusions are: (1) GaInP2/GaAs tandem cells designed for either the ASTM G-173 direct (G-173D) spectrum or the "air mass 1.5 global" (AM1.5G) spectrum perform the best, and (2) cells can be characterized indoors and modeled using outdoor spectra with the same result. These results are equally valid for GaInP2/GaAs/Ge triple-junction cells.

  16. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  17. Reduced Cu(InGa)Se2 Thickness in Solar Cells Using a Superstrate Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-03-30

    This project by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Delaware sought to develop the technology and underlying science to enable reduced cost of Cu(InGa)Se2 manufacturing by reducing the thickness of the Cu(InGa)Se2 absorber layer by half compared to typical production. The approach to achieve this was to use the superstrate cell configuration in which light is incident on the cell through the glass. This structure facilitates optical enhancement approaches needed to achieve high efficiency with Cu(InGa)Se2 thicknesses less than 1 µm. The primary objective was to demonstrate a Cu(InGa)Se2 cell with absorber thickness 0.5 - 0.7 µm and 17% efficiency, along with a quantitative loss analysis to define a pathway to 20% efficiency. Additional objectives were the development of stable TCO and buffer layers or contact layers to withstand the Cu(InGa)Se2 deposition temperature and of advanced optical enhancement methods. The underlying fundamental science needed to effectively transition these outcomes to large scale was addressed by extensive materials and device characterization and by development of comprehensive optical models. Two different superstrate configurations have been investigated. A frontwall cell is illuminated through the glass to the primary front junction of the device. This configuration has been used for previous efforts on superstrate Cu(InGa)Se2 but performance has been limited by interdiffusion or reaction with CdS or other buffer layers. In this project, several approaches to overcome these limitations were explored using CdS, ZnO and ZnSe buffer layers. In each case, mechanisms that limit device performance were identified using detailed characterization of the materials and junctions. Due to the junction formation difficulties, efforts were concentrated on a new backwall configuration in which light

  18. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  19. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Project InformatIon: Project name: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Partners: Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com The Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com James Hardie Building Products www.jameshardie.com Building component: Building envelope component application: New and/or retrofit; Single and/or multifamily Year research conducted: 2011 through 2012 applicable climate Zone(s): All The

  20. Influence of compensator thickness, field size, and off-axis distance on the effective attenuation coefficient of a cerrobend compensator for intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghparast, Abbas; Hashemi, Bijan; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can be performed by using compensators. To make a compensator for an IMRT practice, it is required to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient (?{sub eff}) of its material, which is affected by various factors. We studied the effect of the variation of the most important factors on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} of the cerrobend compensator for 6-MV photon beams, including the field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis distance. Experimental measurements were carried out at 100 cm source-to-surface distance and 10 cm depth for the 6-MV photon beams of an Elekta linac using various field size, compensator thickness, and off-axis settings. The field sizes investigated ranged from 4 4 to 25 25 cm{sup 2} and the cerrobend compensator thicknesses from 0.56 cm. For a fixed compensator thickness, variation of the ?{sub eff} with the field size ranged from 3.76.8%, with the highest value attributed to the largest compensator thickness. At the reference field size of 10 10 cm{sup 2}, the ?{sub eff} varied by 16.5% when the compensator thickness was increased from 0.56 cm. However, the variation of the ?{sub eff} with the off-axis distance was only 0.99% at this field size, whereas for the largest field size, it was more significant. Our results indicated that the compensator thickness and field size have the most significant effect on the calculation of the compensator ?{sub eff} for the 6-MV photon beam. Therefore, it is recommended to consider these parameters when calculating the compensator thickness for an IMRT practice designed for these beams. The off-axis distance had a significant effect on the calculation of the ?{sub eff} only for the largest field size. Hence, it is recommended to consider the effect of this parameter only for field sizes larger than 25 25 cm{sup 2}.

  1. FRAM isotopic analysis of uranium in thick-walled containers using high energy gamma rays and planar HPGe detectors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Thomas E.; Hypes, P. A.; Vo, Duc T.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the use of the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software to make the first reported measurements on thick-walled UF{sub 6} cylinders using small planar HPGe detectors of the type in common use at the IAEA. Heretofore, planar detector isotopic analysis measurements on uranium have used the 100-keV region and can be defeated by 10 mm of steel absorber. The analysis of planar detector measurements through 13-16 mm of steel shows that FRAM can successfully carry out these measurements and analysis in the 120-1024 keV energy range, a range previously thought to be the sole province of more efficient coaxial detectors. This paper describes the measurement conditions and results and also compares the results to other FRAM measurements with coaxial HPGe detectors. The technique of gamma-ray isotopic analysis of arbitrary samples is desirable for measuring the isotopic composition of uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders because it does not require calibration with standards or knowledge of the cylinder wall thickness. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses the MGAU (Multi Group Analysis Uranium) uranium isotopic analysis software with planar high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to measure the isotopic composition of uranium. Measurements on UF{sub 6} cylinders with 13-16-mm thick steel walls are usually unsuccessful because of the strong absorption of the 89-100 keV gamma rays and x-rays that MGAU requires for the measurement. This paper describes the use of the Los Alamos FRAM isotopic analysis software to make these measurements on UF{sub 6} cylinders. Uranium measurements with FRAM typically cover the energy range from 120-1001 keV and can easily be made through the walls of UF{sub 6} cylinders. While these measurements are usually performed with efficient coaxial HPGe detectors, this paper reports the first successful measurements using small planar HPGe detectors of the type in common use at the IAEA.

  2. Effect of antiferromagnetic layer thickness on exchange bias, training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic antidot arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, W. J.; Liu, W. Feng, J. N.; Zhang, Z. D.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, C. J.

    2014-04-07

    The effect of antiferromagnetic (AFM) layer on exchange bias (EB), training effect, and magnetotransport properties in ferromagnetic (FM) /AFM nanoscale antidot arrays and sheet films Ag(10 nm)/Co(8 nm)/NiO(t{sub NiO})/Ag(5 nm) at 10 K is studied. The AFM layer thickness dependence of the EB field shows a peak at t{sub NiO} = 2 nm that is explained by using the random field model. The misalignment of magnetic moments in the three-dimensional antidot arrays causes smaller decrease of EB field compared with that in the sheet films for training effect. The anomalous magnetotransport properties, in particular positive magnetoresistance (MR) for antidot arrays but negative MR for sheet films are found. The training effect and magnetotransport properties are strongly affected by the three-dimensional spin-alignment effects in the antidot arrays.

  3. Temperature dependent DC electrical conductivity studies of ZnO nanoparticle thick films prepared by simple solution combustion method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naveen, C. S. Jayanna, H. S. Lamani, Ashok R. Rajeeva, M. P.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanoparticles of different size were prepared by varying the molar ratio of glycine and zinc nitrate hexahydrate as fuel and oxidizer (F/O = 0.8, 1.11, 1.7) by simple solution combustion method. Powder samples were characterized by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer, Scanning electron microscope (SEM). DC electrical conductivity measurements at room temperature and in the temperature range of 313-673K were carried out for the prepared thick films and it was found to increase with increase of temperature which confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. Activation energies were calculated and it was found that, F/O molar ratio 1.7 has low E{sub AL} (Low temperature activation energy) and high E{sub AH} (High temperature activation energy) compared to other samples.

  4. Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Powell, V.; Ibrahim, E.; Ferer, M.; Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

  5. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W; Kang, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  6. Electrochemical characteristics of samaria-doped ceria infiltrated strontium-doped LaMnO3 cathodes with varied thickness for yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong Ding; Mingyang Gonga; Chunchuan Xu; Nicholas Baxter; Yihong Li; John Zondlo; Kirk Gerdes; Xingbo Liu

    2010-11-09

    Samaria-doped ceria (SDC) infiltrated into strontium-doped LaMnO3 (LSM) cathodes with varied cathode thickness on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were investigated via symmetrical cell, half cell, and full cell configurations. The results of the symmetrical cells showed that the interfacial polarization resistance (RP) decreased with increasing electrode thickness up to?30#2;m, and further increases in the thickness of the cathode did not cause significant variation of electrode performance. At 800 ?C, the minimum RP was around 0.05#2;cm2. The impedance spectra indicated that three main electrochemical processes existed, possibly corresponding to the oxygen ion incorporation, surface diffusion of oxygen species and oxygen adsorption and dissociation. The DC polarization on the half cells and characterization of the full cells also demonstrated a similar correlation between the electrode performance and the electrode thickness. The peak power densities of the single cells with the 10, 30, and 50-#2;m thick electrodes were 0.63, 1.16 and 1.11Wcm?2, respectively. The exchange current densities under moderate polarization are calculated and possible rate-determining steps are discussed.

  7. Thickness-dependent blue shift in the excitonic peak of conformally grown ZnO:Al on ion-beam fabricated self-organized Si ripples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, T.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.; Nandy, S.; Satpati, B.; Saini, C. P.; Kanjilal, A.

    2015-09-14

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films of thicknesses 5,10, 15, 20, and 30 nm were deposited on 500 eV argon ion-beam fabricated nanoscale self-organized rippled-Si substrates at room temperature and are compared with similar films deposited on pristine-Si substrates (without ripples). It is observed that morphology of self-organized AZO films is driven by the underlying substrate morphology. For instance, for pristine-Si substrates, a granular morphology evolves for all AZO films. On the other hand, for rippled-Si substrates, morphologies having chain-like arrangement (anisotropic in nature) are observed up to a thickness of 20 nm, while a granular morphology evolves (isotropic in nature) for 30 nm-thick film. Photoluminescence studies reveal that excitonic peaks corresponding to 5–15 nm-thick AZO films, grown on rippled-Si templates, show a blue shift of 8 nm and 3 nm, respectively, whereas the peak shift is negligible for 20-nm thick film (with respect to their pristine counter parts). The observed blue shifts are substantiated by diffuse reflectance study and attributed to quantum confinement effect, associated with the size of the AZO grains and their spatial arrangements driven by the anisotropic morphology of underlying rippled-Si templates. The present findings will be useful for making tunable AZO-based light-emitting devices.

  8. Metallographic autopsies of full-scale ITER prototype cable-in-conduit conductors after full cyclic testing in SULTAN: III. The importance of strand surface roughness in long twist pitch conductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanabria, Charlie; Lee, Peter J.; Starch, William; Devred, Arnaud; Larbalestier, David C.

    2016-05-31

    As part of the ITER conductor qualification process, 3 m long Cable-in-Conduit Conductors (CICCs) were tested at the SULTAN facility under conditions simulating ITER operation so as to establish the current sharing temperature, Tcs, as a function of multiple full Lorentz force loading cycles. After a comprehensive evaluation of both the Toroidal Field (TF) and the Central Solenoid (CS) conductors, it was found that Tcs degradation was common in long twist pitch TF conductors while short twist pitch CS conductors showed some Tcs increase. However, one kind of TF conductors containing superconducting strand fabricated by the Bochvar Institute of Inorganicmore » Materials (VNIINM) avoided Tcs degradation despite having long twist pitch. In our earlier metallographic autopsies of long and short twist pitch CS conductors, we observed a substantially greater transverse strand movement under Lorentz force loading for long twist pitch conductors, while short twist pitch conductors had negligible transverse movement. With help from the literature, we concluded that the transverse movement was not the source of Tcs degradation but rather an increase of the compressive strain in the Nb3Sn filaments possibly induced by longitudinal movement of the wires. Like all TF conductors this TF VNIINM conductor showed large transverse motions under Lorentz force loading, but Tcs actually increased, as in all short twist pitch CS conductors. We here propose that the high surface roughness of the VNIINM strand may be responsible for the suppression of the compressive strain enhancement (characteristic of long twist pitch conductors). Furthermore, it appears that increasing strand surface roughness could improve the performance of long twist pitch CICCs.« less

  9. Mo layer thickness requirement on the ion source back plate for the HNB and DNB ion sources in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M. J.; Hemsworth, R.; Boilson, D.; De Esch, H. P. L.

    2015-04-08

    All the inner surfaces of the ion sources and the upstream surface of the plasma grid of the ITER neutral beam ion sources are proposed to be coated with molybdenum. This is done to avoid sputtering of the base material (Cu or CuCrZr) by the ions in the source plasma (D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, D{sub 3}{sup +} or H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}). The sputtering of Mo by the ions in the source plasma is low compared to that from Cu, and the threshold energy for sputtering ∼80 eV) is high compared to the energy of the ions in the source. However the D{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and D{sup +}, H{sup +} ions backstreaming from the accelerators will have energies that substantially exceed that threshold and it is important that the Mo layer is not eroded such that the base material is exposed to the source plasma. In the case of the HNB, the backstreaming ion power is calculated to be in the order of ∼1 MW, and the average energy of the backstreaming ions is calculated to be ∼300 keV. The ion sources in the HNB beam lines, 40 A 1 MeV D and 46 A 870 keV H beams, are supposed to operate for a period of 2 x 10{sup 7} s. For the DNB, 60 A 100 keV H beams, the corresponding number is 1.4 × 10{sup 6} s considering a beam duty cycle of 3s ON/20s OFF with 5 Hz modulation. The Mo layer on the ion source back plate should be thick enough to survive this operational time. Thickness estimation has been carried out taking into account the sputtering yields (atoms/ion), the energy spectrum of the backstreaming ions and the estimated profiles on the ion source back plate.

  10. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore » the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  11. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methaneair chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methaneair mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmorethe boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.less

  12. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Khler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  13. Experimental Data of Neutron Yields from Thick Targets Bombarded by 100 to 800 MeV / Nucleon Heavy Ions.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-05-15

    Version 02 The recent experimental data by the authors listed above are summarized in this paper on differential neutron yields in energy and angle produced by 100, 155 and 180 MeV/nucleon He, 100, 155, 180 and 400 MeV/nucleon C, 100, 180, 400 MeV/nucleon Ne, 400MeV/nucleon Ar, Xe and Fe, 272 and 435MeV/nucleon Nb and 800 MeV/nucleon Si ions stopping in thick targets of C, Al, Cu, Pb and Nb. The paper referenced above is availablemore » on the RSICC web site. The numerical values of the data, which were used to plot figures in References 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8 of this paper, are available for download at no charge. To get access to the data, complete a RSICC registration form and order form. Both are available by clicking on "Ordering" from the RSICC web pages. You will be contacted with details about how to proceed.« less

  14. In situ determination of lithium ion cathode/electrolyte thickness and composition as a function of charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baggetto, Loic; Browning, Jim; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Keum, Jong Kahk; Wood III, David L; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report the first experimental in situ determination of the thickness and estimated composition of a condensed electrode/electrolyte interface at various states of charge for the high voltage Li-ion cathode LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 by exploiting the power of neutron reflectometry.1 Understanding the electrode/electrolyte interface is critical to developing an understanding of interfacial reactions needed to model transport phenomena and predict more stable electrolytes for electrochemical cells.2,3 However, developing the ability to control interfacial reactions in electrochemical cells is arguably one of the most critical challenges confronting researchers focused on energy storage and conversion reactions as well as liquid phase reactions such as photocatalysts and biomass conversion.2 For example, in electrochemical energy storage systems, such as batteries, the reactions between a solid electrode and a liquid electrolyte can lead to the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), which directly mediates the stability, durability and safety of the cell. Controlling these interfacial reactions is essential to developing new, durable, and higher energy storage systems needed in the future.

  15. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall on the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.

  16. Direct determination of solid-electrolyte interphase thickness and composition as a function of state of charge on a silicon anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M.; Doucet, Mathieu; Baldwin, J. K.; Sacci, Robert L.; Fears, Tyler M.; Wang, Yongqiang; Browning, Jim

    2015-08-17

    Using neutron reflectometry we have determined the thickness and chemistry of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer grown on a silicon anode as a function of state of charge and during cycling. We show the chemistry of this SEI layer becomes more LiF like with increasing lithiation and more Li-C-O-F like with delithiation. More importantly the SEI layer thickness appears to increase (about 250 ) as the electrode becomes less lithiated and thins to 180 with increasing Li content (Li3.7Si). We attribute this breathing to the continual consumption of electrolyte with cycling.

  17. Temperature and epi thickness dependence of the heavy ion induced latchup threshold for a CMOS/epi 16K static RAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.S.; Nichols, D.K.; Coss, J.R.; Price, W.E.; Binder, D.

    1987-12-01

    Data have been obtained with krypton and xenon ions for the latchup threshold vs. temperature of four different versions of a Harris CMOS/epi 16K static RAM. These special versions of the HM6516 RAM have 12-micron, 9-micron, 7-micron and 5-micron epi thicknesses, as grown. The test data showed a marked improvement in latchup resistance with decreasing epi thickness and with decreasing temperature over the range of 25/sup 0/C (operating chip ambient) to 100/sup 0/C.s.

  18. Direct determination of solid-electrolyte interphase thickness and composition as a function of state of charge on a silicon anode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veith, Gabriel M.; Doucet, Mathieu; Baldwin, J. K.; Sacci, Robert L.; Fears, Tyler M.; Wang, Yongqiang; Browning, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Using neutron reflectometry we have determined the thickness and chemistry of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer grown on a silicon anode as a function of state of charge and during cycling. We show the chemistry of this SEI layer becomes more LiF like with increasing lithiation and more Li-C-O-F like with delithiation. More importantly the SEI layer thickness appears to increase (about 250 ) as the electrode becomes less lithiated and thins to 180 with increasing Li content (Li3.7Si). We attribute this breathing to the continual consumption of electrolyte with cycling.

  19. Direct determination of solid-electrolyte interphase thickness and composition as a function of state of charge on a silicon anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M.; Doucet, Mathieu; Baldwin, J. K.; Sacci, Robert L.; Fears, Tyler M.; Wang, Yongqiang; Browning, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Using neutron reflectometry we have determined the thickness and chemistry of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer grown on a silicon anode as a function of state of charge and during cycling. We show the chemistry of this SEI layer becomes more LiF like with increasing lithiation and more Li-C-O-F like with delithiation. More importantly the SEI layer thickness appears to increase (about 250 ) as the electrode becomes less lithiated and thins to 180 with increasing Li content (Li3.7Si). We attribute this breathing to the continual consumption of electrolyte with cycling.

  20. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Nagle, Scott K.; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Robinson, Terry E.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo{sup TM}, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  1. EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-09-10

    Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

  2. Tunability of conduction at the LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface: Thickness and compositional studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breckenfeld, E.; Bronn, N.; Mason, N.; Martin, L. W.

    2014-09-22

    The role of chemistry, film thickness, and oxygen pressure in influencing the electrical and thermal transport properties of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerfaces is explored. Unit-cell precise growth was accomplished for films between 3 and 160 unit cells thick using reflection high-energy electron diffraction-assisted pulsed-laser deposition. Subsequent temperature-dependent studies of electrical resistivity reveal three important observations: (1) by tuning the laser fluence, we can systematically tune the interfacial conductance in a step-wise manner in this system, (2) all films exhibit a critical thickness of 34 unit cells for the onset of conduction, and (3) the nature of the conductance is highly influenced by the stoichiometry of the LaAlO{sub 3} film with La-deficient samples showing dramatic changes with thickness, while stoichiometric and La-excess films show little dependence. Time-domain thermoreflectance studies show a diminished interfacial thermal conductance for the La-deficient films when compared to La-excess and stoichiometric films, suggesting that the interfacial conductance is more influenced by extrinsic factors such as oxygen deficiency.

  3. Thicknesses, densities, and calculated thermal resistances for loose-fill rock wool installed in two attic sections of a manufactured house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1986-02-01

    The effect of vibrations due to manufacturing and transport on the thickness, density, and calculated thermal resistance (R-value) of loose-fill rock wool insulation installed in two manufactured home units has been determined. Thickness and density measurements on blown attic insulation were made after installation, at the end of the manufacturing process, and after the units were towed 265 miles. These measurements were used to calculate R-values for the attic insulation. The end sections of the two units showed an overall insulation thickness decrease of about 16% and an average R-value change from 31.2 to 28.8 ft/sup 2/ x h x /sup 0/F/Btu. An estimated R-value greater than 30 ft/sup 2/ x h x /sup 0/F/Btu resulted from averaging the end and middle sections of the two units. The effect of reduced thickness along the edges of the attic space was not included in the estimate.

  4. Structural phase diagram for ultra-thin epitaxial Fe 3 O 4  / MgO(0 0 1) films: thickness and oxygen pressure dependence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alraddadi, S.; Hines, W.; Yilmaz, T.; Gu, G. D.; Sinkovic, B.

    2016-02-19

    A systematic investigation of the thickness and oxygen pressure dependence for the structural properties of ultra-thin epitaxial magnetite (Fe3O4) films has been carried out; for such films, the structural properties generally differ from those for the bulk when the thickness ≤10 nm. Iron oxide ultra-thin films with thicknesses varying from 3 nm to 20 nm were grown on MgO (001) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy under different oxygen pressures ranging from 1 × 10-7 torr to 1 × 10-5 torr. The crystallographic and electronic structures of the films were characterized using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopymore » (XPS), respectively. Moreover, the quality of the epitaxial Fe3O4 ultra-thin films was judged by magnetic measurements of the Verwey transition, along with complementary XPS spectra. We observed that under the same growth conditions the stoichiometry of ultra-thin films under 10 nm transforms from the Fe3O4 phase to the FeO phase. In this work, a phase diagram based on thickness and oxygen pressure has been constructed to explain the structural phase transformation. It was found that high-quality magnetite films with thicknesses ≤20 nm formed within a narrow range of oxygen pressure. An optimal and controlled growth process is a crucial requirement for the accurate study of the magnetic and electronic properties for ultra-thin Fe3O4 films. Furthermore, these results are significant because they may indicate a general trend in the growth of other oxide films, which has not been previously observed or considered.« less

  5. Surface Orbital 'Roughness' in Colossal Magnetoresistive Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    containing a mixed-valence of Mn3+ and Mn4+, known as manganites, represent an ideal system to address the role of the surface, because all the relevant degrees of freedom -...

  6. A Rough Road Leads To The Stars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    then at 210 minutes before launch the flight unit was mounted into the spacecraft. The ground control unit was placed inside a temperature controlled cabinet, in which the...

  7. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  8. Effects of substrate temperature and Cu underlayer thickness on the formation of SmCo{sub 5}(0001) epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2010-05-15

    SmCo{sub 5}(0001) epitaxial thin films were prepared on Cu(111) underlayers heteroepitaxially grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) single-crystal substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The effects of substrate temperature and Cu underlayer thickness on the crystallographic properties of SmCo{sub 5}(0001) epitaxial films were investigated. The Cu atoms of underlayer diffuse into the SmCo{sub 5} film and substitute the Co sites in SmCo{sub 5} structure forming an alloy compound of Sm(Co,Cu){sub 5}. The ordered phase formation is enhanced with increasing the substrate temperature and with increasing the Cu underlayer thickness. The Cu atom diffusion into the SmCo{sub 5} film is assisting the formation of Sm(Co,Cu){sub 5} ordered phase.

  9. Illumination angle and layer thickness influence on the photo current generation in organic solar cells: A combined simulative and experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mescher, Jan Mertens, Adrian; Egel, Amos; Kettlitz, Siegfried W.; Colsmann, Alexander; Lemmer, Uli

    2015-07-15

    In most future organic photovoltaic applications, such as fixed roof installations, facade or clothing integration, the solar cells will face the sun under varying angles. By a combined simulative and experimental study, we investigate the mutual interdependencies of the angle of light incidence, the absorber layer thickness and the photon harvesting efficiency within a typical organic photovoltaic device. For thin absorber layers, we find a steady decrease of the effective photocurrent towards increasing angles. For 90-140 nm thick absorber layers, however, we observe an effective photocurrent enhancement, exhibiting a maximum yield at angles of incidence of about 50°. Both effects mainly originate from the angle-dependent spatial broadening of the optical interference pattern inside the solar cell and a shift of the absorption maximum away from the metal electrode.

  10. Thick-target neutron, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production for protons below 12 MeV on nickel and carbon beam-stops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.; Wilson, W.B.

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear model calculations using the GNASH code are described for protons below 12 MeV incident on nickel and carbon isotopes, for beam stop design in the Los Alamos Accelerator Production of Tritium Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project. The GNASH calculations apply Hauser-Feshbach and preequilibrium reaction theories and can make use of pre-calculated direct reaction cross sections to low-lying residual nucleus states. From calculated thin target cross sections, thick target 6.7 MeV and 12 MeV proton-induced production of neutrons, gamma rays, and radionuclides are determined. Emission spectra of the secondary neutrons and gamma rays are also determined. The model calculations are validated through comparisons with experimental thin- and thick-target measurements. The results of this work are being utilized as source terms in MCNP analyses for LEDA.

  11. Co-electrospinning fabrication and photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} core/sheath nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Houbao Du, Pingfan; Song, Lixin; Xiong, Jie Yang, Junjie; Xing, Tonghai; Liu, Xin; Wu, Rongrong; Wang, Minchao; Shao, Xiaoli

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: The coresheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers were fabricated by co-electrospinning technique. The catalytic property of nanofibers with different sheath thickness was studied. The potential methods of improving catalytic efficiency are suggested. - Abstract: In this paper, core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers with tunable sheath thickness were directly fabricated via a facile co-electrospinning technique with subsequent calcination at 500 C. The morphologies and structures of core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers were characterized by TGA, FESEM, TEM, FTIR, XPS and BET. It was found that the 1D core/sheath nanofibers are made up of anataserutile TiO{sub 2} core and amorphous SiO{sub 2} sheath. The influences of SiO{sub 2} sheath and its thickness on the photoreactivity were evaluated by observing photo-degradation of methylene blue aqueous solution under the irradiation of UV light. Compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanofibers, the core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers performed a better catalytic performance. That was attributed to not only efficient separation of holeelectron pairs resulting from the formation of heterojunction but also larger surface area and surface silanol group which will be useful to provide higher capacity for oxygen adsorption to generate more hydroxyl radicals. And the optimized core/sheath TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} nanofibers with a sheath thickness of 37 nm exhibited the best photocatalytic performance.

  12. Electric-Field Modulation of Curie Temperature in (Ga, Mn)As Field-Effect Transistor Structures with Varying Channel Thickness and Mn Compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishitani, Y.; Endo, M.; Chiba, D.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2010-01-04

    We have investigated the change of T{sub C} of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga, Mn)As by changing hole concentration p. The field effect transistor structure was utilized to change p. The relation T{sub C}propor top{sup 0.2} is obtained for three samples, despite the difference of their Mn composition and thickness, indicating that the relation holds over 2 decades of p.

  13. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 μm to a modest 0.50 μm over an underlying 0.10-μm intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 μm/3 μm) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85oC and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  14. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp-Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 {micro}m to a modest 0.50 {micro}m over an underlying 0.10-{micro}m intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 {micro}m/3 {micro}m) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85 C and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of 10?nm thick piezoelectric AlN films with high c-axis orientation for miniaturized nanoelectromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaghloul, Usama; Piazza, Gianluca

    2014-06-23

    The scaling of piezoelectric nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is challenged by the synthesis of ultrathin and high quality piezoelectric films on very thin electrodes. We report the synthesis and characterization of the thinnest piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) films (10?nm) ever deposited on ultrathin platinum layers (25?nm) using reactive sputtering. X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and fast Fourier transform analyses confirmed the proper crystal orientation, fine columnar texture, and the continuous lattice structure within individual grains in the deposited AlN nanometer thick films. The average extracted d{sub 31} piezoelectric coefficient for the synthesized films is ?1.73 pC/N, which is comparable to the reported values for micron thick and highly c-axis oriented AlN films. The 10?nm AlN films were employed to demonstrate two different types of optimized piezoelectric nanoactuators. The unimorph actuators exhibit vertical displacements as large as 1.1??m at 0.7?V for 25??m long and 30?nm thick beams. These results have a great potential to realize miniaturized NEMS relays with extremely low voltage, high frequency resonators, and ultrasensitive sensors.

  16. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  17. STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF THE STELLAR HALOS AND THICK DISKS OF THE MILKY WAY BASED ON CALIBRATION STARS FROM SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DR7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carollo, Daniela; Norris, John E.; Freeman, Ken C.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Chiba, Masashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.a E-mail: beers@pa.msu.ed E-mail: chiba@astr.tohoku.ac.j E-mail: crockosi@ucolick.or

    2010-03-20

    The structure and kinematics of the recognized stellar components of the Milky Way are explored, based on well-determined atmospheric parameters and kinematic quantities for 32360 'calibration stars' from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first extension, SDSS-II, which included the sub-survey Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). Full space motions for a sub-sample of 16,920 stars, exploring a local volume within 4 kpc of the Sun, are used to derive velocity ellipsoids for the inner- and outer-halo components of the Galaxy, as well as for the canonical thick-disk and proposed metal-weak thick-disk (MWTD) populations. This new sample of calibration stars represents an increase of 60% relative to the numbers used in a previous analysis. We first examine the question of whether the data require the presence of at least a two-component halo in order to account for the rotational behavior of likely halo stars in the local volume, and whether more than two components are needed. We also address the question of whether the proposed MWTD is kinematically and chemically distinct from the canonical thick disk, and point out that the Galactocentric rotational velocity inferred for the MWTD, as well as its mean metallicity, appear quite similar to the values derived previously for the Monoceros stream, suggesting a possible association between these structures. In addition, we consider the fractions of each component required to understand the nature of the observed kinematic behavior of the stellar populations of the Galaxy as a function of distance from the plane. Scale lengths and scale heights for the thick-disk and MWTD components are determined. Spatial density profiles for the inner- and outer-halo populations are inferred from a Jeans theorem analysis. The full set of calibration stars (including those outside the local volume) is used to test for the expected changes in the observed stellar metallicity distribution function

  18. Absorption enhancement through Fabry-Prot resonant modes in a 430?nm thick InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behaghel, B.; Tamaki, R.; Watanabe, K.; Sodabanlu, H.; Vandamme, N.; Dupuis, C.; Bardou, N.; Cattoni, A.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Collin, S.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-02-23

    We study light management in a 430?nm-thick GaAs p-i-n single junction solar cell with 10 pairs of InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The epitaxial layer transfer on a gold mirror improves light absorption and increases the external quantum efficiency below GaAs bandgap by a factor of four through the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances. We show a good agreement with optical simulation and achieve around 10% conversion efficiency. We demonstrate numerically that this promising result can be further improved by anti-reflection layers. This study paves the way to very thin MQWs solar cells.

  19. Pull strength evaluation of Sn-Pb solder joints made to Au-Pt-Pd and Au thick film structures on low-temperature co-fired ceramic -final report for the MC4652 crypto-coded switch (W80).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Fernando; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.

    2006-06-01

    A study was performed that examined the microstructure and mechanical properties of 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) solder joints made to thick film layers on low-temperature co-fired (LTCC) substrates. The thick film layers were combinations of the Dupont{trademark} 4596 (Au-Pt-Pd) conductor and Dupont{trademark} 5742 (Au) conductor, the latter having been deposited between the 4596 layer and LTCC substrate. Single (1x) and triple (3x) thicknesses of the 4596 layer were evaluated. Three footprint sizes were evaluated of the 5742 thick film. The solder joints exhibited excellent solderability of both the copper (Cu) lead and thick film surface. In all test sample configurations, the 5742 thick film prevented side wall cracking of the vias. The pull strengths were in the range of 3.4-4.0 lbs, which were only slightly lower than historical values for alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates. General (qualitative) observations: (a) The pull strength was maximized when the total number of thick film layers was between two and three. Fewer that two layers did not develop as strong of a bond at the thick film/LTCC interface; more than three layers and of increased footprint area, developed higher residual stresses at the thick film/LTCC interface and in the underlying LTCC material that weakened the joint. (b) Minimizing the area of the weaker 4596/LTCC interface (e.g., larger 5742 area) improved pull strength. Specific observations: (a) In the presence of vias and the need for the 3x 4596 thick film, the preferred 4596:5742 ratio was 1.0:0.5. (b) For those LTCC components that require the 3x 4596 layer, but do not have vias, it is preferred to refrain from using the 5742 layer. (c) In the absence of vias, the highest strength was realized with a 1x thick 5742 layer, a 1x thick 4596 layer, and a footprint ratio of 1.0:1.0.

  20. Correlation between Pd metal thickness and thermally stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy features in [Co/Pd]{sub n} multilayers at annealing temperatures up to 500 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Gwang Guk; Lee, Ja Bin; Yang, Seung Mo; Yoon, Kap Soo; Kim, Jae Hong; Chung, Woo Seong; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-02-15

    We examine highly stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) features of [Co/Pd]{sub 10} multilayers (MLs) versus Pd thickness at various ex-situ annealing temperatures. Thermally stable PMA characteristics were observed up to 500 °C, confirming the suitability of these systems for industrial applications at this temperature. Experimental observations suggest that the choice of equivalent Co and Pd layer thicknesses in a ML configuration ensures thermally stable PMA features, even at higher annealing temperatures. X-ray diffraction patterns and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images were obtained to determine thickness, post-annealing PMA behavior, and to explore the structural features that govern these findings.

  1. Thickness dependent hierarchical meso/nano scale morphologies of a metal-containing block copolymer thin film induced by hybrid annealing and their pattern transfer abilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, M.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe dewetting phenomena in organic (polystyrene, PS)/inorganic (polyferrocenyldimethylsilane, PFS) block copolymer thin films. Mesoscale dendritic structures are induced when the spin-cast thin film of this polymer is subjected to so-called hybrid annealing, which involves both thermal and solvent annealing. We show that the development and arrangement of these mesoscale dendritic structures depends on the initial film thickness in addition to the annealing time. Importantly, there are two criteria that must be fulfilled to achieve these mesoscale morphologies: (i) the film has to be subjected to hybrid annealing, i.e. either only thermal or only solvent annealing does not produce any notable mesostructures and (ii) both PS and PFS blocks must be present during the thermal and solvent annealing procedures; if one of the blocks, for instance PS, is removed before annealing then there is no mesostructure. Various possible mechanisms for the formation of these structures are discussed and results indicate that the PFS block dominates the structure formation. We also observe a ring- or worm-like nanostructure which develops only when the film is subjected to hybrid annealing at a particular film thickness. Apart from these results, here we demonstrate that mesoscale structures can be successfully transferred onto underlying substrates.

  2. Hall and Seebeck measurements estimate the thickness of a (buried) carrier system: Identifying interface electrons in In-doped SnO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadogianni, Alexandra; Bierwagen, Oliver; White, Mark E.; Speck, James S.; Galazka, Zbigniew

    2015-12-21

    We propose a simple method based on the combination of Hall and Seebeck measurements to estimate the thickness of a carrier system within a semiconductor film. As an example, this method can distinguish “bulk” carriers, with homogeneous depth distribution, from “sheet” carriers, that are accumulated within a thin layer. The thickness of the carrier system is calculated as the ratio of the integral sheet carrier concentration, extracted from Hall measurements, to the volume carrier concentration, derived from the measured Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. For rutile SnO{sub 2}, the necessary relation of Seebeck coefficient to volume electron concentration in the range of 3 × 10{sup 17} to 3 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} has been experimentally obtained from a set of single crystalline thin films doped with varying Sb-doping concentrations and unintentionally doped bulk samples, and is given as a “calibration curve.” Using this calibration curve, our method demonstrates the presence of interface electrons in homogeneously deep-acceptor (In) doped SnO{sub 2} films on sapphire substrates.

  3. Analysis of gamma-ray spectra from foils activated in a range-thick lead target by 800-MeV protons. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, C.E.; Mullins, D.H.

    1995-06-12

    Approximately 400 gamma-ray spectra have been analyzed to obtain the types and quantities of radioisotopes produced when 800-MeV protons interact with a range-thick lead target. These spectra were obtained from the radioactive decay of product isotopes in lead disks placed at various depths and radial positions within the target. These spectra were analyzed with the computer code HYPERMET and the photopeak areas were reduced to nuclei produced per incident proton per cubic centimeter of material. Product nuclei ranged from atomic mass 160 to mass 206 and over a range of half lives from a few minutes to several weeks. The results of this analysis have been outlined in this report and transmitted on computer disk to Los Alamos National Laboratory. The consistency of these analyses have been confirmed by a comparison of photopeak areas obtained at LANL with the computer code GAMANAL with those from HYPERMET for two gamma-ray spectra. Also, the nuclear production per proton per cm{sub 3} obtained from these two spectra analyzed both at LANL and at EKU have been found to agree to within the statistical accuracy of the peak-fitting programs. This analysis of these 400 gamma-ray spectra has determined the nuclear production per incident proton per cm{sub 3} at five regularly-spaced radial positions and depths up to 40 cm into a range-thick lead target.

  4. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  5. Effect of thickness on the stress and magnetoelectric coupling in bilayered Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn; Li, Zheng; Wang, Jianjun; Nan, Cewen E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn; He, Hongcai

    2015-01-28

    Magnetoelectric bilayered Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3}-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(PZT-CFO) films with different PZT thicknesses were grown on (111)Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates using chemical solution spin-coating. Structural characterization by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy shows pure phases and well-defined interfaces between the PZT and CFO films. The CFO-PZT-substrate structure effectively alleviates the substrate clamping effect for the CFO layer, showing appreciable magnetoelectric responses in the composite films. Both the direct magnetoelectric effect and the magnetic field-induced Raman shifts in the A{sub 1}(TO{sub 1}) soft mode of PZT demonstrate the magnetic-mechanical-electric coupling in the films. The results also indicate that with a constant CFO layer thickness, the thickness of the PZT layer plays an important role in the stress relaxation and strong magnetoelectric coupling. The coupling could be further enhanced by increasing the CFO thickness, optimizing the volume (thickness) fraction of the PZT thickness, and releasing the clamping effect from the substrate.

  6. Plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth and effect of varying buffer thickness on the formation of ultra-thin In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructure on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, Subhra; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-02-23

    This work reports on the detailed plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of ultra-thin In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructures on Si(111) substrate with three different buffer thickness (600?nm, 400?nm, and 200?nm). Growth through critical optimization of growth conditions is followed by the investigation of impact of varying buffer thickness on the formation of ultra-thin 1.5?nm, In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N1.25?nm, GaN1.5?nm, In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N heterostructure, in terms of threading dislocation (TD) density. Analysis reveals a drastic reduction of TD density from the order 10{sup 10?}cm{sup ?2} to 10{sup 8?}cm{sup ?2} with increasing buffer thickness resulting smooth ultra-thin active region for thick buffer structure. Increasing strain with decreasing buffer thickness is studied through reciprocal space mapping analysis. Surface morphology through atomic force microscopy analysis also supports our study by observing an increase of pits and root mean square value (0.89?nm, 1.2?nm, and 1.45?nm) with decreasing buffer thickness which are resulted due to the internal strain and TDs.

  7. Glued Langmuir-Blodgett bilayers from calix[n]arenes: Influence of calix[n]arene size on ionic cross-linking, film thickness, and permeation selectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Minghui; Janout, Vaclav; Regen, Steven L.

    2010-07-12

    A homologous series of calix[4]arene-, calix[5]arene- and calix[6]arene-based surfactants, containing pendant trimethylammonium and n-hexadecyl groups, have been compared with respect to their ability (i) to undergo ionic crosslinking at the air/water interface, (ii) to incorporate poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) bilayers, and (iii) to act as barriers towards He, N2 and CO2 when assembled into crosslinked LB bilayers. As these calix[n]arenes increase in size, their ability to undergo ionic crosslinking has been found to increase, the thickness of corresponding glued LB bilayers has been found to decrease, and their barrier properties and permeation selectivities have been found to increase. Inmore » conclusion, the likely origin for these effects and the probable mechanism by which He, N2 and CO2 cross these ultrathin films are discussed.« less

  8. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  9. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  10. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL-STI-IGM-LTCM, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  11. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared to the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).

  12. Elucidating hydrogen oxidation/evolution kinetics in base and acid by enhanced activities at the optimized Pt shell thickness on the Ru core

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Elbert, Katherine; Hu, Jue; Ma, Zhong; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Guangyu; An, Wei; Liu, Ping; Isaacs, Hugh S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Wang, Jia X.

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen oxidation and evolution on Pt in acid are facile processes, while in alkaline electrolytes, they are 2 orders of magnitude slower. Thus, developing catalysts that are more active than Pt for these two reactions is important for advancing the performance of anion exchange membrane fuel cells and water electrolyzers. Herein, we detail a 4-fold enhancement of Pt mass activity that we achieved using single-crystalline Ru@Pt core–shell nanoparticles with two-monolayer-thick Pt shells, which doubles the activity on Pt–Ru alloy nanocatalysts. For Pt specific activity, the two- and one-monolayer-thick Pt shells exhibited enhancement factors of 3.1 and 2.3, respectively, compared tomore » the Pt nanocatalysts in base, differing considerably from the values of 1 and 0.4, respectively, in acid. To explain such behavior and the orders of magnitude difference in activity on going from acid to base, we performed kinetic analyses of polarization curves over a wide range of potential from –250 to 250 mV using the dual-pathway kinetic equation. From acid to base, the activation free energies increase the most for the Volmer reaction, resulting in a switch of the rate-determining step from the Tafel to the Volmer reaction, and a shift to a weaker optimal hydrogen binding energy. Furthermore, the much higher activation barrier for the Volmer reaction in base than in acid is ascribed to one or both of the two catalyst-insensitive factors: slower transport of OH– than H+ in water and a stronger O–H bond in water molecules (HO–H) than in hydrated protons (H2O–H+).« less

  13. Nano-crystalline thin and nano-particulate thick TiO{sub 2} layer: Cost effective sequential deposition and study on dye sensitized solar cell characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, P.; Sengupta, D.; Kasinadhuni, U.; Mondal, B.; Mukherjee, K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thin TiO{sub 2} layer is deposited on conducting substrate using sol–gel based dip coating. • TiO{sub 2} nano-particles are synthesized using hydrothermal route. • Thick TiO{sub 2} particulate layer is deposited on prepared thin layer. • Dye sensitized solar cells are made using thin and thick layer based photo-anode. • Introduction of thin layer in particulate photo-anode improves the cell efficiency. - Abstract: A compact thin TiO{sub 2} passivation layer is introduced between the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nano-particulate layer and the conducting glass substrate to prepare photo-anode for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). In order to understand the effect of passivation layer, other two DSSCs are also developed separately using TiO{sub 2} nano-particulate and compact thin film based photo-anodes. Nano-particles are prepared using hydrothermal synthesis route and the compact passivation layer is prepared by simply dip coating the precursor sol prepared through wet chemical route. The TiO{sub 2} compact layer and the nano-particles are characterised in terms of their micro-structural features and phase formation behavior. It is found that introduction of a compact TiO{sub 2} layer in between the mesoporous TiO{sub 2} nano-particulate layer and the conducting substrate improves the solar to electric conversion efficiency of the fabricated cell. The dense thin passivation layer is supposed to enhance the photo-excited electron transfer and prevent the recombination of photo-excited electrons.

  14. EVIDENCE AGAINST AN EDGE-ON DISK AROUND THE EXTRASOLAR PLANET, 2MASS 1207 b AND A NEW THICK-CLOUD EXPLANATION FOR ITS UNDERLUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Szucs, Laszlo; Apai, Daniel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Biller, Beth A.

    2011-05-10

    Since the discovery of the first directly imaged, planetary-mass object, 2MASS 1207 b, several works have sought to explain a disparity between its observed temperature and luminosity. Given its known age, distance, and spectral type, 2MASS 1207 b is underluminous by a factor of {approx}10 ({approx}2.5 mag) when compared to standard models of brown-dwarf/giant-planet evolution. In this paper, we study three possible sources of 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. First, we investigate Mohanty et al.'s hypothesis that a near edge-on disk, comprising large, gray-extincting grains, might be responsible for 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. After radiative transfer modeling, we conclude that the hypothesis is unlikely due to the lack of variability seen in multi-epoch photometry and unnecessary due to the increasing sample of underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets that cannot be explained by an edge-on disk. Next, we test the analogous possibility that a spherical shell of dust could explain 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. Models containing enough dust to create {approx}2.5 mag of extinction, placed at reasonable radii, are ruled out by our new Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 {mu}m photometric upper limit for 2MASS 1207 b. Finally, we investigate the possibility that 2MASS 1207 b is intrinsically cooler than the commonly used AMES-DUSTY fits to its spectrum, and thus it is not, in fact, underluminous. New, thick-cloud model grids by Madhusudhan et al. fit 2MASS 1207 b's 1-10 {mu}m spectral energy distribution well, but they do not quite fit its near-infrared spectrum. However, we suggest that with some 'tuning', they might be capable of simultaneously reproducing 2MASS 1207 b's spectral shape and luminosity. In this case, the whole class of young, underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets might be explained by atmospheres that are able to suspend thick, dusty clouds in their photospheres at temperatures lower than field brown dwarfs.

  15. Nonlinear optical absorption tuning in Bi{sub 3.15}Nd{sub 0.85}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} ferroelectric thin films by thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S.; Zhong, X. L. E-mail: jbwang@xtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. B. E-mail: jbwang@xtu.edu.cn; Song, H. J.; Tan, C. B.; Li, B.; Cheng, G. H.; Liu, X.

    2015-04-06

    The tunability of nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption in Bi{sub 3.15}Nd{sub 0.85}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BNT) ferroelectric thin films was investigated through the open aperture Z-scan method with femtosecond laser pulses at the wavelength of 800 nm. NLO absorption responses of the BNT films were observed to be highly sensitive to the film thickness. As the film thickness increases from 106.8 to 139.7 nm, the NLO absorption changes from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA). When the film thickness further increases to 312.9 nm, the RSA effect is enhanced. A band-gap-related competition between the ground-state excitation and the two-photon absorption is responsible for the absorption switching behavior. Such a tunable NLO absorption can widen the photonic application of the BNT thin films.

  16. Work function variation of MoS{sub 2} atomic layers grown with chemical vapor deposition: The effects of thickness and the adsorption of water/oxygen molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Park, Jeong Young E-mail: jeongypark@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jinhwan; Hwang, C. C.; Lee, Changgu E-mail: jeongypark@kaist.ac.kr

    2015-06-22

    The electrical properties of two-dimensional atomic sheets exhibit remarkable dependences on layer thickness and surface chemistry. Here, we investigated the variation of the work function properties of MoS{sub 2} films prepared with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on SiO{sub 2} substrates with the number of film layers. Wafer-scale CVD MoS{sub 2} films with 2, 4, and 12 layers were fabricated on SiO{sub 2}, and their properties were evaluated by using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. In accordance with our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results, our Kelvin probe force microscopy investigation found that the surface potential of the MoS{sub 2} films increases by ∼0.15 eV when the number of layers is increased from 2 to 12. Photoemission spectroscopy (PES) with in-situ annealing under ultra high vacuum conditions was used to directly demonstrate that this work function shift is associated with the screening effects of oxygen or water molecules adsorbed on the film surface. After annealing, it was found with PES that the surface potential decreases by ∼0.2 eV upon the removal of the adsorbed layers, which confirms that adsorbed species have a role in the variation in the work function.

  17. Reconstruction 3-dimensional image from 2-dimensional image of status optical coherence tomography (OCT) for analysis of changes in retinal thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinilhaq,; Widita, Rena [Department of Physics, Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Optical Coherence Tomography is often used in medical image acquisition to diagnose that change due easy to use and low price. Unfortunately, this type of examination produces a two-dimensional retinal image of the point of acquisition. Therefore, this study developed a method that combines and reconstruct 2-dimensional retinal images into three-dimensional images to display volumetric macular accurately. The system is built with three main stages: data acquisition, data extraction and 3-dimensional reconstruction. At data acquisition step, Optical Coherence Tomography produced six *.jpg images of each patient were further extracted with MATLAB 2010a software into six one-dimensional arrays. The six arrays are combined into a 3-dimensional matrix using a kriging interpolation method with SURFER9 resulting 3-dimensional graphics of macula. Finally, system provides three-dimensional color graphs based on the data distribution normal macula. The reconstruction system which has been designed produces three-dimensional images with size of 481 481 h (retinal thickness) pixels.

  18. Methods and costs of thin-seam mining. Final report, 25 September 1977-24 January 1979. [Thin seam in association with a thick seam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, T.E.; Fidler, E.L.

    1981-02-01

    This report defines the state of the art (circa 1978) in removing thin coal seams associated with vastly thicker seams found in the surface coal mines of the western United States. New techniques are evaluated and an innovative method and machine is proposed. Western states resource recovery regulations are addressed and representative mining operations are examined. Thin seam recovery is investigated through its effect on (1) overburden removal, (2) conventional seam extraction methods, and (3) innovative techniques. Equations and graphs are used to accommodate the variable stratigraphic positions in the mining sequence on which thin seams occur. Industrial concern and agency regulations provided the impetus for this study of total resource recovery. The results are a compendium of thin seam removal methods and costs. The work explains how the mining industry recovers thin coal seams in western surface mines where extremely thick seams naturally hold the most attention. It explains what new developments imply and where to look for new improvements and their probable adaptability.

  19. Measurement of neutron spectra generated from bombardment of 4 to 24 MeV protons on a thick {sup 9}Be target and estimation of neutron yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P. E-mail: tripathy@barc.gov.in; Sunil, C.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Sharma, S. C.; Ramjilal,; Ninawe, N. G.; Gupta, A. K.

    2014-06-15

    A systematic study on the measurement of neutron spectra emitted from the interaction of protons of various energies with a thick beryllium target has been carried out. The measurements were carried out in the forward direction (at 0 with respect to the direction of protons) using CR-39 detectors. The doses were estimated using the in-house image analyzing program autoTRAK-n, which works on the principle of luminosity variation in and around the track boundaries. A total of six different proton energies starting from 4 MeV to 24 MeV with an energy gap of 4 MeV were chosen for the study of the neutron yields and the estimation of doses. Nearly, 92% of the recoil tracks developed after chemical etching were circular in nature, but the size distributions of the recoil tracks were not found to be linearly dependent on the projectile energy. The neutron yield and dose values were found to be increasing linearly with increasing projectile energies. The response of CR-39 detector was also investigated at different beam currents at two different proton energies. A linear increase of neutron yield with beam current was observed.

  20. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  1. Dependence of inverse-spin Hall effect and spin-rectified voltage on tantalum thickness in Ta/CoFeB bilayer structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-19

    Ta-layer thickness (t{sub Ta}) dependence of the measured DC voltage V from the inverse-spin Hall effect (ISHE) in Ta/CoFeB bilayer structure is experimentally investigated using the ferromagnetic resonance in the TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The ISHE signals excluding the spin-rectified effect (SRE) were separated from the fitted curve of V against t{sub Ta}. For t{sub Ta} ≈ λ{sub Ta} (Ta-spin diffusion length = 2.7 nm), the deviation in ISHE voltage V{sub ISH} between the experimental and theoretical values is significantly increased because of the large SRE contribution, which also results in a large deviation in the spin Hall angle θ{sub SH} (from 10% to 40%). However, when t{sub Ta} ≫ λ{sub Ta}, the V{sub ISH} values are consistent with theoretical values because the SRE terms become negligible, which subsequently improves the accuracy of the obtained θ{sub SH} within 4% deviation. The results will provide an outline for an accurate estimation of the θ{sub SH} for materials with small λ value, which would be useful for utilizing the spin Hall effect in a 3-terminal spintronic devices in which magnetization can be controlled by in-plane current.

  2. Influence of dosing sequence and film thickness on structure and resistivity of Al-ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Evan B. Lad, Robert J.

    2014-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited onto amorphous silica substrates using an atomic layer deposition process with diethyl zinc (DEZ), trimethyl aluminum (TMA), and deionized water at 200 °C. Three different Al doping sequences were used at a ZnO:Al ratio of 11:1 within the films. A minimum film resistivity of 1.6 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm was produced using sequential dosing of DEZ, TMA, DEZ, followed by H{sub 2}O for the Al doping step. This “ZAZW” sequence yielded an AZO film resistivity that is independent of film thickness, crystallographic texture, and grain size, as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD). A pseudo-Voigt analysis method yields values for grain sizes that are smaller than those calculated using other XRD methods. Anisotropic grain sizes or variations in crystallographic texture have minimal influence on film resistivity, which suggests that factors other than film texture, such as intragrain scattering, may be important in influencing film resistivity.

  3. Population studies. XIII. A new analysis of the Bidelman-Macconnell 'weak-metal' stars - confirmation of metal-poor stars in the thick disk of the galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beers, Timothy C.; Norris, John E.; Placco, Vinicius M.; Lee, Young Sun; Rossi, Silvia; Carollo, Daniela; Masseron, Thomas E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: youngsun@cnu.ac.kr E-mail: daniela.carollo@mq.edu.au

    2014-10-10

    A new set of very high signal-to-noise (S/N > 100/1), medium-resolution (R ∼ 3000) optical spectra have been obtained for 302 of the candidate 'weak-metal' stars selected by Bidelman and MacConnell. We use these data to calibrate the recently developed generalization of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Exploration and Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) Stellar Parameter Pipeline, and obtain estimates of the atmospheric parameters (T {sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H]) for these non-Sloan Digital Sky Survey/SEGUE data; we also obtain estimates of [C/Fe]. The new abundance measurements are shown to be consistent with available high-resolution spectroscopic determinations, and represent a substantial improvement over the accuracies obtained from the previous photometric estimates reported in Paper I of this series. The apparent offset in the photometric abundances of the giants in this sample noted by several authors is confirmed by our new spectroscopy; no such effect is found for the dwarfs. The presence of a metal-weak thick-disk (MWTD) population is clearly supported by these new abundance data. Some 25% of the stars with metallicities –1.8 < [Fe/H] ≤–0.8 exhibit orbital eccentricities e < 0.4, yet are clearly separated from members of the inner-halo population with similar metallicities by their location in a Lindblad energy versus angular momentum diagram. A comparison is made with recent results for a similar-size sample of Radial Velocity Experiment stars from Ruchti et al. We conclude, based on both of these samples, that the MWTD is real, and must be accounted for in discussions of the formation and evolution of the disk system of the Milky Way.

  4. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4, 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.

  5. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Measurements on Platinum Electrocatalysts Utilizing Rotating Disk Electrode Technique: II. Influence of Ink Formulation, Catalyst Layer Uniformity and Thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Zack, Jason W.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2015-09-17

    Platinum electrocatalysts supported on high surface area and Vulcan carbon blacks (Pt/HSC, Pt/V) were characterized in rotating disk electrode (RDE) setups for electrochemical area (ECA) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) area specific activity (SA) and mass specific activity (MA) at 0.9 V. Films fabricated using several ink formulations and film-drying techniques were characterized for a statistically significant number of independent samples. The highest quality Pt/HSC films exhibited MA 870 ± 91 mA/mgPt and SA 864 ± 56 μA/cm2 Pt while Pt/V had MA 706 ± 42 mA/mgPt and SA 1120 ± 70 μA/cm2 Pt when measured in 0.1 M HClO4,more » 20 mV/s, 100 kPa O2 and 23±2°C. An enhancement factor of 2.8 in themeasured SA was observable on eliminating Nafion ionomer and employing extremely thin, uniform films (~4.5 μg/cm2 Pt) of Pt/HSC. The ECA for Pt/HSC (99 ± 7 m2/gPt) and Pt/V (65 ± 5 m2/gPt) were statistically invariant and insensitive to film uniformity/thickness/fabrication technique; accordingly, enhancements in MA are wholly attributable to increases in SA. Impedance measurements coupled with scanning electron microscopy were used to de-convolute the losses within the catalyst layer and ascribed to the catalyst layer resistance, oxygen diffusion, and sulfonate anion adsorption/blocking. The ramifications of these results for proton exchange membrane fuel cells have also been examined.« less

  6. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes Building Science Corporation’s research into spray polyurethane foams in residential roofs, performing hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs.

  7. Controlling the crystallite size and influence of the film thickness on the optical and electrical characteristics of nanocrystalline Cu{sub 2}S films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafea, M. Abdel; Farag, A.A.M.; Roushdy, N.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modification of the preparation technique in order to deposit nanostructure Cu{sub 2}S thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling the crystallite size of the prepared films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study the surface morphology, optical and electrical characteristics of Cu{sub 2}S films. -- Abstract: In this work, Cu{sub 2}S nanocrystalline films have been successfully prepared using dip-coating technique. The stoichiometry and the structural characteristics of the prepared films were characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The surface morphology of the deposited Cu{sub 2}S film was studied using both the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the atomic force microscopy (AFM). The SEM and AFM images indicate that the prepared Cu{sub 2}S films are characterized by a well-dispersed and highly dense with spherical like-shaped aggregates of size in the nano scale. The optical absorption measurements indicate that the Cu{sub 2}S nanoparticles have a direct band gap of 2.92 eV. The dispersion and absorption parameters such as the dispersion energy, oscillating energy, real and imaginary dielectric constants and dissipation factor were calculated within a wide wavelength range of the spectrum that indicates the suitability of the deposited films as solar absorber using this technique. The dark electrical resistivity ({rho}) measurements were carried out at different temperatures in the range 312-440 K. These results confirm the semiconducting characteristic of the prepared Cu{sub 2}S films. Moreover, two activation energies were obtained that indicate the presence of two dominating conduction mechanisms in these temperature ranges. The bulk electrical resistivity ({rho}{sub B}) and the mean free path (l{sub 0}) of charge carriers were estimated from the resistivity-thickness dependence. The heterojunction device of n-ZnCdS/p-Cu{sub 2}S behaves good

  8. Thickness dependence of magnetoelectric response for composites of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films on CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing Zhu, Kongjun; Wu, Xia; Deng, Chaoyong; Peng, Renci; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-08-15

    Using chemical solution spin-coating we grew Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films of different thicknesses on highly dense CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ceramics. X-ray diffraction revealed no other phases except Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In many of these samples we observed typical ferroelectric hysteresis loops, butterfly-shaped piezoelectric strains, and the magnetic-field-dependent magnetostriction. These behaviors caused appreciable magnetoelectric responses based on magnetic-mechanical-electric coupling. Our results indicated that the thickness of the Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} film was important in obtaining strong magnetoelectric coupling.

  9. Effect of spacer layer thickness on multi-stacked InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs (311)B substrate for application to intermediate band solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Narahara, Kohei; Okada, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Hideharu; Kita, Takashi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the properties of multi-stacked layers of self-organized In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs (311)B grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We found that a high degree of in-plane ordering of QDs structure with a six-fold symmetry was maintained though the growth has been performed at a higher growth rate than the conventional conditions. The dependence of photoluminescence characteristics on spacer layer thickness showed an increasing degree of electronic coupling between the stacked QDs for thinner spacer layers. The external quantum efficiency for an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell (QDSC) with a thin spacer layer thickness increased in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. Furthermore, a photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature for the InGaAs/GaAs QDSC with a spacer layer thickness of 15 nm.

  10. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  11. File:Wind rough example.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this file. Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. If the file has been modified from...

  12. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The model is then used to compute the reflectance of shingles with a mixture of different colored granules, when the reflectances of the corresponding mono-color shingles are ...

  13. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  14. Hungry fungi seek rough diet, root out environmental pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, J.

    1993-12-01

    The US Navy asked biochemist Stephen Aust to determine whether a common fungus could destroy 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, a highly explosive compound popularly known as TNT. The reason white rot fungus apparently can be used to attack nearly any organic contaminant, lies in the organisms' evolution in response to a nearly infinite variety of trees and lignin. White rot fungus, evolved to degrade wood, and not every tree is the same. Environmental pollutants are very similar. Some environmental pollutants are very insoluble. Aust emphasizes that using white rot fungi in environmental treatment is not an off-the-shelf technology. Applications and remediation techniques in most cases will be site-specific success will require prior, accurate calculation of the fungi's nutrient demands, contaminant types and concentrations, local conditions, and economic considerations. Most work with white rot fungi to date has been at the laboratory scale. Experiments indicated that the fungus can indeed degrade TNT to carbon dioxide.

  15. Rough and Ready Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Map Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleRoughandReadyBiomassFacility&oldid398020" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  16. Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes with Two-Dimensional Rib Roughness

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-24

    A commonly used internal enhancement for single-phase forced-convective turbulent flow applications is tranverse and/or near tranverse ribs. These enhanced surfaces consist of a uniform inside diameter with periodic and discrete disruption of ribs. Enhanced tubes of this type are made by an extrusion process and are used in some condensers and evaporators in refrigeration systems. Tubes of this type fall into an enhancement category called separation and reattachment that has been identified as one ofmore » the most energy efficient. Lacking are prediction methods that are mechanistic based that can be used to calculate the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factors for tubes with this enhancement type. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor for enhanced tubes with tranverse, rectangular ribs with a spacing exceeding the reattachment length. The input quantities are the enhancement height, spacing, and the width. The Nusselt number and friction factor are calculated for a specific Reynolds number or for a range of Reynolds numbers. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods. The manufacturers of refrigeration heat exchangers and enhanced tube suppliers are potential users of this software.« less

  17. Impact of Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P. W. Heck 2 , R. F. Arduini 3 , R. Palikonda 3 , J. K. Ayers 3 , M. M. Khaiyer 3 , P. Yang 4 , Y. Xie 4 3 Science Systems & Applications, Inc. Hampton, VA 1 NASA Langley Research...

  18. Enhanced Tissue Adhesion by Increased Porosity and Surface Roughness...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Sponsoring Org: SC USDOE - Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like ...

  19. Critical thickness for strain relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (x ≤ 0.17) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Ge(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Qian; Dong, Yuan; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Tok, Eng Soon

    2015-06-08

    We investigated the critical thickness (h{sub c}) for plastic relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} films with various Sn mole fraction x (x ≤ 0.17) and different thicknesses were grown on Ge(001). The strain relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} films and the h{sub c} were investigated by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping. It demonstrates that the measured h{sub c} values of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers are as much as an order of magnitude larger than that predicted by the Matthews and Blakeslee (M-B) model. The People and Bean (P-B) model was also used to predict the h{sub c} values in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x}/Ge system. The measured h{sub c} values for various Sn content follow the trend, but slightly larger than that predicted by the P-B model.

  20. The impact of monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate on the thermal stability of photoluminescence of coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dot hetero-structure with quaternary capping of InAlGaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, A.; Verma, U.; Halder, N.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2012-03-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupled InAs/GaAs MQDs with (In{sub 0.21}Al{sub 0.21}Ga{sub 0.58}As + GaAs) caps are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monolayer coverage, barrier thickness and growth rate of the dots are the factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL peaks for the samples are within 1.1-1.3 {mu}m; significant for IBSCs and lasers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NPTP (non-resonant multi-phonon assisted tunneling process) effect on FWHM of PL. -- Abstract: The self-assembled InAs/GaAs MQDs are widely investigated for their potential application in optoelectronic devices like lasers and photovoltaics. We have explored the effect of QD growth rate and structural parameters like capping layer thickness on the morphology and optical properties of the MQD heterostructures overgrown with a combination capping of InAlGaAs and GaAs. The growth rate of the seed layers in the MQD samples is also varied to investigate its effect in the vertical stacking of the islands. The change in the morphology and the optical properties of the samples due to variation in growth and structural parameters are explained by the presence of strain in the QD structures, which arises due to lattice mismatch.

  1. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  2. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Sheathing | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. ...

  3. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  4. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Double Bending Linear (10 Cantilever) Linear (10 Double Bending) Cladding Attachment ... Compression Strut Function of fastener tension and insulation compression Measured ...

  5. Thickness, humidity, and polarization dependent ferroelectric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Neumayer, Sabine M. ; Rodriguez, Brian J., E-mail: brian.rodriguez@ucd.ie 1 ; Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, ...

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A

    2015-01-01

    Materials issues are a key concern for the existing nuclear reactor fleet in the United States as material degradation can lead to increased maintenance, increased downtime, and increased risk. Extending reactor life to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of both known and new forms of degradation. A multitude of concrete-based structures are typically part of a light water reactor plant to provide foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. The size and complexity of nuclear power plant containment structures and the heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. This paper examines the benefits of using time-frequency analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT). By using wavelet packet decomposition, the original ultrasound signals are decomposed into various frequency bands that facilitates highly selective analysis of the signal’s frequency content and can be visualized using the familiar SAFT image reconstruction algorithm.

  7. H I, CO, and Planck/IRAS dust properties in the high latitude cloud complex, MBM 53, 54, 55 and HLCG 92 – 35. Possible evidence for an optically thick H I envelope around the CO clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, Yasuo; Okamoto, Ryuji; Kaji, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Torii, Kazufumi; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Okuda, Takeshi; Ohama, Akio; Kuroda, Yutaka; Kuwahara, Toshihisa; Dickey, John M.

    2014-11-20

    We present an analysis of the H I and CO gas in conjunction with the Planck/IRAS submillimeter/far-infrared dust properties toward the most outstanding high latitude clouds MBM 53, 54, 55 and HLCG 92 – 35 at b = –30° to – 45°. The CO emission, dust opacity at 353 GHz (τ{sub 353}), and dust temperature (T {sub d}) show generally good spatial correspondence. On the other hand, the correspondence between the H I emission and the dust properties is less clear than in CO. The integrated H I intensity W{sub H} {sub I} and τ{sub 353} show a large scatter with a correlation coefficient of ∼0.6 for a T {sub d} range from 16 K to 22 K. We find, however, that W{sub H} {sub I} and τ{sub 353} show better correlation for smaller ranges of T {sub d} every 0.5 K, generally with a correlation coefficient of 0.7-0.9. We set up a hypothesis that the H I gas associated with the highest T {sub d} ≥ 21.5 K is optically thin, whereas the H I emission is generally optically thick for T {sub d} lower than 21.5 K. We have determined a relationship for the optically thin H I gas between atomic hydrogen column density and τ{sub 353}, N{sub H} {sub I} (cm{sup −2})=(1.5×10{sup 26})⋅τ{sub 353}, under the assumption that the dust properties are uniform and we have applied this to estimate N{sub H} {sub I} from τ{sub 353} for the whole cloud. N{sub H} {sub I} was then used to solve for T {sub s} and τ{sub H} {sub I} over the region. The result shows that the H I is dominated by optically thick gas having a low spin temperature of 20-40 K and a density of 40-160 cm{sup –3}. The H I envelope has a total mass of ∼1.2 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}, an order of magnitude larger than that of the CO clouds. The H I envelope properties derived by this method do not rule out a mixture of H I and H{sub 2} in the dark gas, but we present indirect evidence that most of the gas mass is in the atomic state.

  8. Ground-state energy trends in single and multilayered coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dots capped with InGaAs layers: Effects of InGaAs layer thickness and annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.; Ghosh, K.; Jejurikar, S.; Mishra, A.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Investigation of ground state energy in single and multi-layered InAs/GaAs QD. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) prevents the formation of non-radiative. Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) is responsible for high activation energy. Significant deviation from the Varshni model, E(T) = E ? ?T{sup 2}/T + ?. - Abstract: Vertically coupled, multilayered InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) covered with thin InGaAs strain-reducing layers (SRLs) are in demand for various technological applications. We investigated low temperature photoluminescence of single and multilayered structures in which the SRL thickness was varied. The SRL layer was responsible for high activation energies. Deviation of experimental data from the Varshni (1967) model, E(T) = E ? ? T{sup 2}/T + ?, suggests that the InAs-layered QDs have properties different from those in bulk material. Anomalous ground-state peak linewidths (FWHM), especially for annealed multilayer structures, were observed. A ground-state peak blue-shift with a broadened linewidth was also observed. Loss of intensity was detected in samples annealed at 800 C. Presence of SRLs prevents formation of non-radiative centers under high temperature annealing. The results indicate the potential importance of such structures in optoelectronic applications.

  9. Dependency of tunneling magneto-resistance on Fe insertion-layer thickness in Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2}/MgO-based magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chae, Kyo-Suk; Park, Jea-Gun

    2015-04-21

    For Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2}/MgO-based perpendicular magnetic tunneling junctions spin valves with [Co/Pd]{sub n}-synthetic-antiferromagnetic (SyAF) layers, the tunneling-magneto-resistance (TMR) ratio strongly depends on the nanoscale Fe insertion-layer thickness (t{sub Fe}) between the Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2} pinned layer and MgO tunneling barrier. The TMR ratio rapidly increased as t{sub Fe} increased up to 0.4 nm by improving the crystalline linearity of a MgO tunneling barrier and by suppressing the diffusion of Pd atoms from a [Co/Pd]{sub n}-SyAF. However, it abruptly decreased by further increasing t{sub Fe} in transferring interfacial-perpendicular magnetic anisotropy into the IMA characteristic of the Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 6}B{sub 2} pinned layer. Thus, the TMR ratio peaked at t{sub Fe} = 0.4 nm: i.e., 120% at 29 Ωμm{sup 2}.

  10. Influence of O-Co-O layer thickness on the thermal conductivity of Na{sub x}Co{sub 2}O{sub 4} studied by positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, H. Q.; Zhao, B.; Zhang, T.; Li, X. F.; He, H. F.; Chen, Z. Q.; Su, X. L.; Tang, X. F.

    2015-07-21

    Nominal stoichiometric Na{sub x}Co{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0) polycrystals were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. They were further pressed into pellets by the spark plasma sintering. The crystal structure and morphology of Na{sub x}Co{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy measurements. Good crystallinity and layered structures were observed for all the samples. Positron annihilation measurements were performed for Na{sub x}Co{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a function of Na content. Two lifetime components are resolved. τ{sub 1} is attributed mainly to positron annihilation in the O-Co-O layers and shifts to Na layers only in the H3 phase. The second lifetime τ{sub 2} is due to positron annihilation in vacancy clusters which may exist in the Na layers or grain boundary region. The size of vacancy clusters grow larger but their concentration decreases with increasing Na content in the range of 1.0 < x < 1.8. The thickness of O-Co-O layer also shows continuous increase with increasing Na content, which is reflected by the increase of τ{sub 1}. The thermal conductivity κ, on the other hand, shows systematic decrease with increasing Na content. This suggests that the increasing spacing of O-Co-O layer could effectively reduce the thermal conductivity of Na{sub x}Co{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  11. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Gnther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ? 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ?0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  12. Effect of the spin-twist structure on the spin-wave dynamics in Fe{sub 55}Pt{sub 45}/Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} exchange coupled bi-layers with varying Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Semanti; Barman, Saswati Barman, Anjan; Hellwig, Olav

    2014-05-07

    We have investigated optically induced ultrafast magnetization dynamics of a series of Fe{sub 55}Pt{sub 45}/Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} exchange spring bi-layers with varying Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thickness. Rich spin-wave spectra are observed; whose frequency shows a strong dependence on the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} layer thickness. Micromagnetic simulations based on a simplified magnetic microstructure were able to reproduce the experimental data qualitatively. The spin twist structure introduced in the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} layer gives rise to new modes in the composite system as opposed to the bare Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} films.

  13. Smooth electrode and method of fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Kennerly, Stacey Joy (Albany, NY); Aimi, Marco Francesco (Niskayuna, NY)

    2012-08-14

    A smooth electrode is provided. The smooth electrode includes at least one metal layer having thickness greater than about 1 micron; wherein an average surface roughness of the smooth electrode is less than about 10 nm.

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Overview of Biomass Energy and Economic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Lumber and plywood * Pulp & paper * Wood pellets * District energy * Greenhouses * Biochar ... A tree or a forest? * Clean cellulosic biomass: Hog fuel, wood pallets, wood pellets fall ...

  15. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Read more about it. Dec 29, 2015 at 1:00 am Blog archive April 2016 (12) March 2016 (28) February 2016 (21) January 2016 (21) December 2015 (18) November 2015 (11) October 2015 ...

  16. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with recycled asphalt | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA's systems administrators keep the computers running For Systems Administrator (SysAdmin) Day, meet some of the men & women keeping NNSA going. Thanks for all you do! Michelle Swinkels, Senior Systems and Network Technologist at NNSA's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory What excites you about your work for NNSA? I'... NNSA innovation fuels space exploration Today, in accordance with a 1971 Presidential proclamation, the United States commemorates the first human setting foot on the

  17. Strain-induced reduction of surface roughness dominated spin relaxation in MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osintsev, Dmitri; Stanojevic, Zlatan; Baumgartner, Oskar; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2013-12-04

    Semiconductor spintronics is a rapidly developing field with large impact on microelectronics. Using spin may help to reduce power consumption and increase computational speed. Silicon is perfectly suited for spin-based applications. It is characterized by a weak spin-orbit interaction which should result in a long spin lifetime. However, recent experiments indicate the lifetime is greatly reduced in gated structures. Thus, understanding the peculiarities of the spin-orbit effects on the subband structure and details of the spin propagation in surface layers and thin silicon films is urgently needed. We investigate the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction to the equivalent valley splitting and calculate the spin relaxation matrix elements by using a perturbative k ⋅p approach. We demonstrate that applying uniaxial stress along the [110] direction may considerably suppress electron spin relaxation in silicon surface layers and thin films.

  18. Effects of Atomic Scale Roughness at Metal/insulator Interfaces on Metal Work Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Sanliang; Watkins, M. B.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2013-09-26

    We evaluate the performance of different van der Waals (vdW) corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods in predicting the structure of perfect interfaces between the LiF(001), MgO(001), NiO(001) films on the Ag(001) surface and the resulting work function shift of Ag(001). The results demonstrate that including the van der Waals interaction is important for obtaining accurate interface structures and the metal work function shift. The work function shift results from a subtle interplay of several effects strongly affected by even small changes in the interface geometry. This makes the accuracy of theoretical methods insufficient for predicting the shift values better than within 0.2 eV. Most of the existing van der Waals corrected functionals are not particularly suited for studying metal/insulator interfaces. The lack of accurate experimental data on the interface geometries and surface rumpling of insulators hampers the calibration of existing and novel density functionals.

  19. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  20. Atomic-Level Measurements of Rough Surfaces | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Every material interacts with the world through its surface, whether it is via the catalyst used to clean the emissions from your car, formation of rust on bridges used in the ...

  1. A framework for modeling the detailed optical response of thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Paris U., VI-VII ; Claver, Chuck ; NOAO, Tucson ; Doherty, Peter ; Harvard U., Phys. ... Part. Phys. ; Stubbs, Christopher ; Harvard U., Phys. Dept. less Publication Date: ...

  2. Origin of thickness dependence of structural phase transition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA Materials ... Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, ...

  3. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Feb. 2013 Interpret data in context of regional and local geology Initial interpretation completed - analysis ongoing Ongoing 12 | US DOE ...

  4. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, J.S.

    1981-01-07

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprisng: (1) a movable grinding surface; (2) a specimen holder; (3) a dislacing means for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another; and (4) at least three means for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  5. Optimized ECR plasma apparatus with varied microwave window thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Lee A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design.

  6. Optimized ECR plasma apparatus with varied microwave window thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, L.A.

    1995-11-14

    The present invention describes a technique to control the radial profile of microwave power in an ECR plasma discharge. In order to provide for a uniform plasma density to a specimen, uniform energy absorption by the plasma is desired. By controlling the radial profile of the microwave power transmitted through the microwave window of a reactor, the profile of the transmitted energy to the plasma can be controlled in order to have uniform energy absorption by the plasma. An advantage of controlling the profile using the window transmission characteristics is that variations to the radial profile of microwave power can be made without changing the microwave coupler or reactor design. 9 figs.

  7. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    meeting held in Denver, Colorado. collaborativeprojectchilepeer2013.pdf (916.09 KB) ... Systems, Hawaii & Maui Validation of Innovation Exploration Technologies for Newberry ...

  8. Utica play, thickness map of the Point Pleasant formation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

  9. Utica play, thickness map of the Utica formation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

  10. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; Machorro, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments: Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.

  11. Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...ivovarnrelkickoff.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting PEMFC R&D at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program

  12. Study of hypervelocity projectile impact on thick metal plates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roy, Shawoon K.; Trabia, Mohamed; O’Toole, Brendan; Hixson, Robert S.; Becker, Steven; Pena, Michael T.; Jennings, Richard; Somasoundaram, Deepak; Matthes, Melissa; Daykin, Edward P.; et al

    2016-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme pressure and shock waves in impacted targets that undergo severe localized deformation within a few microseconds. These impact experiments pose unique challenges in terms of obtaining accurate measurements. Similarly, simulating these experiments is not straightforward. This paper proposed an approach to experimentally measure the velocity of the back surface of an A36 steel plate impacted by a projectile. All experiments used a combination of a two-stage light-gas gun and the photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) technique. The experimental data were used to benchmark and verify computational studies. Two different finite-element methods were used to simulate the experiments:more » Lagrangian-based smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and Eulerian-based hydrocode. Both codes used the Johnson-Cook material model and the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state. Experiments and simulations were compared based on the physical damage area and the back surface velocity. Finally, the results of this study showed that the proposed simulation approaches could be used to reduce the need for expensive experiments.« less

  13. Waterflooding a thick, heterogeneous reservoir in the Los Angeles basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, A.R.; Lucidi, N.A.; Maloney, T.R.; Patterson, D.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The history of waterflooding the Vickers East pool is presented. The role of clean injection water in improving oil recovery, the development of an effective waterflood pattern, and the techniques used to optimize vertical coverage of water-injection wells are discussed in terms of completion, downhole equipment, and stimulation. An extensive realignment project involving an active drilling program is currently under way in the Vickers East pool.

  14. Interface and thickness dependent domain switching and stability...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, ...

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation of Thick Concrete Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A; Barker, Alan M; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Albright, Austin P; Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond 60 years [1]. Since many important safety structures in an NPP are constructed of concrete, inspection techniques must be developed and tested to evaluate the internal condition. In-service containment structures generally do not allow for the destructive measures necessary to validate the accuracy of these inspection techniques. This creates a need for comparative testing of the various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) measurement techniques on concrete specimens with known material properties, voids, internal microstructure flaws, and reinforcement locations.

  16. 3-dimensional control over lamella orientation and order in thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Soft Matter; Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4 Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry Research Org: Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National ...

  17. Automatic grinding apparatus to control uniform specimen thicknesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is directed to a new and improved grinding apparatus comprising (1) a movable grinding surface, (2) a specimen holder, (3) a displacing device for moving the holder and/or grinding surface toward one another, and (4) at least three devices for limiting displacement of the holder to the grinding surface.

  18. A framework for modeling the detailed optical response of thick...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO, INST, OPTICS Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View ...

  19. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  20. Diamonds in the rough: a strong case for the inclusion of weak-intensity X-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jimin; Wing, Richard A.

    2014-05-01

    Here, new evidence is provided to show that the inclusion of weak-intensity, high-resolution X-ray diffraction data helps to improve the quality of experimental phases by imposing proper constraints on electron-density models during noncrystallographic symmetry averaging. Overwhelming evidence exists to show that the inclusion of weak-intensity, high-resolution X-ray diffraction data helps improve the refinement of atomic models by imposing strong constraints on individual and overall temperature B factors and thus the quality of crystal structures. Some researchers consider these data to be of little value and opt to discard them during data processing, particularly at medium and low resolution, at which individual B factors of atomic models cannot be refined. Here, new evidence is provided to show that the inclusion of these data helps to improve the quality of experimental phases by imposing proper constraints on electron-density models during noncrystallographic symmetry (NCS) averaging. Using electron-density correlation coefficients as criteria, the resolution of data has successfully been extended from 3.1 to 2.5 Å resolution with redundancy-independent merging R factors from below 100% to about 310%. It is further demonstrated that phase information can be fully extracted from observed amplitudes through de novo NCS averaging. Averaging starts with uniform density inside double-shelled spherical masks and NCS matrices that are derived from bound heavy-atom clusters at the vertices of cuboctahedrally symmetric protein particles.

  1. Growth mechanism and optical properties of Ti thin films deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einollahzadeh-Samadi, Motahareh; Dariani, Reza S.

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a detailed study of the influence of the thickness on the morphological and optical properties of titanium (Ti) thin films deposited onto rough fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by d.c. magnetron sputtering is carried out. The films were characterized by several methods for composition, crystallinity, morphology, and optical properties. Regardless of the deposition time, all the studied Ti films of 400, 1500, 2000, and 2500?nm in thickness were single crystalline in the ?-Ti phase and also very similar to each other with respect to composition. Using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, the authors analyzed the roughness evolution of the Ti films characteristics as a function of the film thickness. By applying the dynamic scaling theory to the AFM images, a steady growth roughness exponent ??=?0.72??0.02 and a dynamic growth roughness exponent ??=?0.22??0.02 were determined. The value of ? and ? are consistent with nonlinear growth model incorporating random deposition with surface diffusion. Finally, measuring the reflection spectra of the samples by a spectrophotometer in the spectral range of 3001100?nm allowed us to investigate the optical properties. The authors observed the increments of the reflection of Ti films with thickness, which by employing the effective medium approximation theory showed an increase in thickness followed by an increase in the volume fraction of metal.

  2. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Attic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Terminology Air Barrier Material (ABM) --- A does not allow air to pass throu plywoodOSB, foam board, duc lumber. Backing --- Any material that s be sprayed so as to provide an ...

  3. DOE Tour of Zero: The Vista Palm Drive by Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    single-story structure, hip-roof design, and bottom course of asphalt shingles are tar glued as well as nailed to the CDX plywood sheathing to make for a wind- and...

  4. Radiant Barriers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    points to make at least a 1.0 inch (2.5 cm) air space between it and the bottom of the roof. Foil-faced plywood or oriented strand board sheathing is also available. Note that...

  5. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  6. Microcutting characteristics on the single crystal diamond tool with edge radius using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jeong-Du; Moon, Chan-Hong

    1995-12-31

    Ultraprecision metal cutting (UPMC) technology which makes possible submicrometer form accuracy and manometer roughness is developed to reach the 1nm nominal (undeformed) thickness of cut. At this thickness level, a few of atom`s layers should be considered. In this paper using the Molecuar Dynamics simulation, the phenomena of microcutting with a subnanometer chip thickness, the cutting mechanism for tool edge configuration to consider the sharp edge and round edge tool, the cut material and cutting speed are evaluated. Cutting mechanism of subnanometer depth of cut is evaluated.

  7. The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Alexander, D.M. ; Durham U. ; Ballantyne, D.R. ; Georgia Tech., Atlanta ; Bauer, F.E. ; Chile U., Catolica Space Sci. Inst., Boulder ; Boggs, S.E. ; UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. ...

  8. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. ... Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY MATSCI; ...

  9. In-situ Measurement of Low-Z Material Coating Thickness on High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Mueller, D 1 ; Roquemore, A L 1 ; Jaworski, M 1 ; Skinner, C H 1 ; Miller, J 1 ; Creely, A 1 ; Raman, P 2 ; Ruzic, D 2 + Show Author Affiliations PPPL ...

  10. Compression of 1-mm-thick M9763 cellular silicone foam under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 42 ...

  11. and Chandra: a Fully Compton-Thick AGN Arevalo, P.; /Chile U...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    College Park Caltech, JPL ESA, Madrid Concepcion U. Yale Ctr. Astron. Astrophys. NASA, Goddard Astrophysics,ASTRO, GRQC Astrophysics,ASTRO, GRQC Abstract Not Provided http:...

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. Insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. Although the approach has proven effective, there is resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly. In this project, researchers from Building Science Corporation, a Building America team, investigated these issues to better understand the mechanics behind this method of cladding attachment

  13. LaAlO{sub 3} thickness window for electronically controlled magnetism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of Publication: ... ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY; CAPACITANCE; CARRIER DENSITY; FERROMAGNETISM; LANTHANUM ...

  14. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; COATINGS; INDIUM PHOSPHIDES; ...

  15. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J.

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50?cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5?cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3?cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10??m copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  16. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, M.A. Jr.; Wolansky, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The water-bearing units of the intermediate aquifer consist of discontinuous sand, gravel, shell, and limestone and dolomite beds in the Tamiami Formation of late Miocene age and the Hawthorn Formation of middle Miocene age. Within parts of Polk, Manatee, Hardee, De Soto, Sarasota, and Charlotte Counties, sand and clay beds within the Tampa Limestone that are hydraulically connected to the Hawthorn Formation are also included in the intermediate aquifer. 15 refs.

  17. The NuSTAR View of Nearby Compton-thick Active Galactic Nuclei...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept. ; Brandt, W.N. ; Pennsylvania U. Penn State U., University Park, IGC ; Brightman, M. ; Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE Denmark, Tech. U. ; Christensen, F.E. ; Craig, W.W. ...

  18. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; COATINGS; INDIUM PHOSPHIDES; MICROSCOPY; OXIDATION; ...

  19. Utica play, thickness map of the combined Utica - Point Pleasant interval

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

  20. Thickness-dependent electronic structure in ultrathin LaNiO 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal ... Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email ...

  1. Compression of 1-mm-thick M9763 cellular silicone foam under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Small, W. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States) Publication Date: 2014-11-13 OSTI ...

  2. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS 2 field...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Nanotechnology (Print) Additional Journal Information: Journal Name: Nanotechnology (Print); Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: ...

  3. The nature thickness pipe element testing method to validate the application of LBB conception

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilchenko, G.S.; Artemyev, V.I.; Merinov, G.N.

    1997-04-01

    To validate the application of leak before break analysis to the VVER-1000 reactor, a procedure for testing a large-scale specimen on electrohydraulic machinery was developed. Steel pipe with a circular weld and stainless cladding inside was manufactured and large-scale longitudinal cross-sections were cut. The remaining parts of the weld after cut out were used to determination standard tensile mechanical properties, critical temperature of brittlness and for manufacture of compact specimens. Experimental mechanical properties of the weld are summarized.

  4. NuSTAR Unveils a Compton-thick Type 2 Quasar in Mrk 34 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Astrophysics,ASTRO,...

  5. Numerical simulations of optically thick accretion onto a black hole. II. Rotating flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Olejar, Ally; Anninos, Peter

    2014-11-20

    In this paper, we report on recent upgrades to our general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics code, Cosmos++, including the development of a new primitive inversion scheme and a hybrid implicit-explicit solver with a more general M {sub 1} closure relation for the radiation equations. The new hybrid solver helps stabilize the treatment of the radiation source terms, while the new closure allows for a much broader range of optical depths to be considered. These changes allow us to expand by orders of magnitude the range of temperatures, opacities, and mass accretion rates, and move a step closer toward our goal of performing global simulations of radiation-pressure-dominated black hole accretion disks. In this work, we test and validate the new method against an array of problems. We also demonstrate its ability to handle super-Eddington, quasi-spherical accretion. Even with just a single proof-of-principle simulation, we already see tantalizing hints of the interesting phenomenology associated with the coupling of radiation and gas in super-Eddington accretion flows.

  6. Improved Spatial Resolution in Thick, Fully-Depleted CCDs withEnhanced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10.5 microm pixel back-illuminated p-channel CCD developed for the SuperNovaAcceleration Probe (SNAP), a proposed satellite-based experiment designed to study dark energy. ...

  7. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, Joseph; Baker, Peter

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  8. Measure Guideline: Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, Joseph; Baker, Peter

    2015-04-01

    This measure guideline provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-½ inches and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  9. Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity in varying thicknesses of wood and steel cargo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P; Descalle, M; Hall, J; Manatt, D; Mauger, J; Norman, E; Petersen, D; Prussin, S

    2006-10-05

    The influence of incident neutron attenuation on signal strengths in the Nuclear Car Wash has been observed experimentally for both wood and steel-pipe mock cargos. Measured decay curves are presented for {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-rays and thermalized neutrons following neutron-induced fission of HEU through varying irradiation lengths. Error rates are extracted for delayed-{gamma} and delayed-n signals integrated to 30 seconds, assuming Gaussian distributions for the active background. The extrapolation to a field system of 1 mA deuterium current and to a 5 kg sample size is discussed.

  10. Effect of fins and repeated-rib roughness on the performance characteristics of a reactor vessel air cooling system for LMFBR shutdown heat removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, F.B.; Chawla, T.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Tessier, J.H.; Webb, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a totally passive cooling system for shutdown heat removal that rejects heat from the reactor vessel by radiation to the guard vessel and from the guard vessel to a circulating air stream driven by natural convection is a key feature of the US Department of Energy's liquid-metal reactor advanced design study concepts. General Electric refers to the system as the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) and Rockwell International as the Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (RACS). The circulating air stream is contained in the annular passage formed with guard vessel wall and the duct wall surrounding the guard vessel. Specifically, the RVACS/RACS is designed to assure adequate cooling of the reactor vessel under abnormal operational conditions associated with loss of heat removal through the normal heat transport path via the steam generator system or the DRACS, if available. To enhance the heat transfer, longitudinal radial fins or repeated ribs can be attached to the duct wall and/or the guard vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to summarize the status of the analytical work on the development of an optimum design configuration for the RVACS/RACS.

  11. Impact of growth and annealing conditions on the parameters of Ge/Si(001) relaxed layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yurasov, D. V.; Bobrov, A. I.; Daniltsev, V. M.; Novikov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Skorokhodov, E. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yunin, P. A.

    2015-11-15

    Influence of the Ge layer thickness and annealing conditions on the parameters of relaxed Ge/Si(001) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy via two-stage growth is investigated. The dependences of the threading dislocation density and surface roughness on the Ge layer thickness, annealing temperature and time, and the presence of a hydrogen atmosphere are obtained. As a result of optimization of the growth and annealing conditions, relaxed Ge/Si(001) layers which are thinner than 1 μm with a low threading dislocation density on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup –2} and a root mean square roughness of less than 1 nm are obtained.

  12. Method of the cementing of material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konovalov, Y.G.; Shutov, G.M.; Khanenya, G.P.; Dyatko, E.K.; Buben, K.K.

    1990-10-30

    Invention relates to woodworking industry and concerns method of cementing of materials of foam plastic with duralumin, glued plywood, etc. Known methods of cementing of materials by effect of electromagnetic field of superhigh frequencies are unproductive and do not make it possible to cement parts on the plane. Target of invention - acceleration of process of cementing of planar, including of complex configuration, parts and assemblies from wood, foam plastic, duralumin, glued plywood and other materials. For this material is cemented under the effect of directed electromagnetic field of superhigh frequency in the range 01-50 GHz, the specific power of 0.5-15 W/cm3.

  13. (U) Analysis of shock-initiated PBX-9501 through porous CeO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, David A.; Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2015-07-24

    The attenuation properties of an impact initiated PBX-9501 explosive through several thicknesses of CeO2 powder is investigated. The CeO2 is at an initial porous density of 4.0 g/cm3 , roughly 55 % of theoretical maximum density. Measurements of the input (into the powder) and propagated (through the powder) wave profiles are measured using optical velocimetry. Results show a reduction of the average wave speed, CX, and peak steady-state material velocity, uP , with increasing powder thickness from 1.5 - 5.0 mm.

  14. Rugged calorimeter with a fast rise time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurtry, W.M.; Dolce, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    An intrinsic 1-mil-thick gold foil calorimeter has been developed which rises to 95% of the energy deposited in less than 2 microseconds. This calorimeter is very rugged, and can withstand rough handling without damage. The time constant is long, in the millisecond range, because of its unique construction. Use of this calorimeter has produced 100% data recovery, and agreement with true deposition to less than 10%.

  15. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  16. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  17. Diagnosis and therapy for a recalcitrant parylene coater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; Rowen, J.T.

    1987-07-01

    An in-house built parylene coater produced coatings whose thicknesses varied 50% at the 1-..mu..m level, whose surfaces were rough and flapjacklike, and whose cross sections looked like foam. This paper details the product response to various equipment and operational changes. The systematic analysis showed that a balance of vacuum pressure and pyrolysis temperature is needed to produce good-quality coatings.

  18. Simulation and Modeling of Self-Assembled Monolayers of Carboxylic Acid Thiols on Flat and Nanoparticle Gold Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Techane, Sirnegeda D.; Baer, Donald R.; Castner, David G.

    2011-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of the 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid self-assembled monolayer (C16 COOH-SAM) layer thickness on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was performed using simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS measurements of C16 COOH SAMs on flat gold surfaces were made at 9 different photoelectron take-off angles (5o to 85o in 5o increments), corrected using geometric weighting factors and then summed together to approximate spherical AuNPs. The SAM thickness and relative surface roughness (RSA) in SESSA were optimized to determine the best agreement between simulated and experimental surface composition. Based on the glancing angle results, it was found that inclusion of a hydrocarbon contamination layer on top the C16 COOH-SAM was necessary to improve the agreement between the SESSA and XPS results. For the 16 COOH-SAMs on flat Au surfaces, using a SAM thickness of 1.1Å/CH2 group, an RSA of 1.05 and a 1.5Å CH2-contamination overlayer (total film thickness = 21.5Å) for the SESSA calculations provided the best agreement with the experimental XPS data. After applying the appropriate geometric corrections and summing the SESSA flat surface compositions, the best fit results for the 16 COOH-SAM thickness and surface roughness on the AuNPs were determined to be 0.9Å/CH2 group and 1.06 RSA with a 1.5Å CH2-contamination overlayer (total film thickness = 18.5Å). The three angstrom difference in SAM thickness between the flat Au and AuNP surfaces suggests the alkyl chains of the SAM are slightly more tilted or disordered on the AuNP surfaces.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Promethean Homes — Gross-Shepard Residence, Charlottesville, VA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This is the first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home for this builder, who earned a Custom Builder honor in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. The home included rigid mineral wool board insulation over house wrap and plywood on the 2x6 advanced framed walls, achieving HERS 33 without PV.

  20. Study of NbC thin films for soft X-ray multilayer applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Amol E-mail: rrcat.amol@gmail.com; Modi, Mohammed H.; Lodha, G. S.; Rajput, Parasmani; Jha, S. N.

    2015-06-24

    Compound materials are being used in soft x-ray and Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optics applications. Structural properties of compound materials changes drastically when ultrathin films are formed from bulk material. Structural properties need to be investigated to determine the suitability of compound materials in soft x-ray multilayer applications. In the present study Niobium carbide (NbC) thin films were deposited using ion beam sputtering of an NbC target on Si (100) substrate. Thickness roughness and film mass density was determined from the X-ray reflectivity (XRR) data. XRR data revealed that the film mass density was increasing with increase in film thickness. For 500Ǻ thick film, mass density of 6.85 g/cm{sup 3}, close to bulk density was found. Rms roughness for all the films was less than 10Å. Local structure of NbC thin films was determined from EXAFS measurements. The EXAFS data showed an increase in Nb-C and Nb-(C)-Nb peak ratio approaches towards bulk NbC with increasing thickness of NbC. From the present study, NbC thin films were found suitable for actual use in soft x-ray multilayer applications.

  1. Growth evolution of AlN films on silicon (111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhou, Shizhong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2015-05-14

    AlN films with various thicknesses have been grown on Si(111) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface morphology and structural property of the as-grown AlN films have been investigated carefully to comprehensively explore the epitaxial behavior. The ∼2 nm-thick AlN film initially grown on Si substrate exhibits an atomically flat surface with a root-mean-square surface roughness of 0.23 nm. As the thickness increases, AlN grains gradually grow larger, causing a relatively rough surface. The surface morphology of ∼120 nm-thick AlN film indicates that AlN islands coalesce together and eventually form AlN layers. The decreasing growth rate from 240 to 180 nm/h is a direct evidence that the growth mode of AlN films grown on Si substrates by PLD changes from the islands growth to the layer growth. The evolution of AlN films throughout the growth is studied deeply, and its corresponding growth mechanism is hence proposed. These results are instructional for the growth of high-quality nitride films on Si substrates by PLD, and of great interest for the fabrication of AlN-based devices.

  2. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry growth studies on the Al-doped ZnO films deposited by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2008-02-01

    In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was applied to study the pyramidlike and pillarlike growth of Al doped ZnO (AZO) films deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition for transparent conductive oxide applications. Real time SE studies in the visible region allowed discerning between the two growth modes by addressing the time evolution of the bulk and surface roughness layer thickness. While the pillarlike mode is characterized by a constant growth rate, a slower rate in the initial stage (up to 150-200 nm film thickness), compared to the bulk, is observed for the growth of pyramidlike AZO films. The two modes differ also in terms of surface roughness development: a saturation behavior is observed for film thickness above 150-200 nm in the case of the pyramidlike films, while a slow linear increase with film thickness characterizes the pillarlike mode. By extending the SE analysis of the AZO films to the near infrared region, valuable information about the in grain properties could be extracted: excellent in grain mobility values, i.e., larger than 100 and 50 cm{sup 2}/V s, are determined for the pyramidlike and pillarlike AZO layers, respectively. The comparison between the outcome of the in situ real time SE studies and the ex situ electrical and chemical characterization highlights the limitations in the electron transport occurring in both types of films and allows one to address routes toward further improvement in AZO conductivity.

  3. Powder-in-tube and thick-film methods of fabricating high temperature superconductors having enhanced biaxial texture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-11-11

    A method for forming an electronically active biaxially textured article includes the steps of providing a substrate having a single crystal metal or metal alloy surface, deforming the substrate to form an elongated substrate surface having biaxial texture and depositing an epitaxial electronically active layer on the biaxially textured surface. The method can include at least one annealing step after the deforming step to produce the biaxially textured substrate surface. The invention can be used to form improved biaxially textured articles, such as superconducting wire and tape articles having improved J.sub.c values.

  4. Electrostatic generator/motor having rotors of varying thickness and a central stator electrically connected together into two groups

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2010-11-16

    A sub-module consists of a set of two outer sets of stationary fan-blade-shaped sectors. These outer sectors include conductive material and are maintained at ground potential in several examples. Located midway between them is a set of stationary sector plates with each plate being electrically insulated from the others. An example provides that the inner sector plates are connected together alternately, forming two groups of parallel-connected condensers that are then separately connected, through high charging circuit resistances, to a source of DC potential with respect to ground, with an additional connecting lead being provided for each group to connect their output as an AC output to a load. These same leads can he used, when connected to a driver circuit, to produce motor action.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Thick Low-Cost, High-Power Lithium-Ion Electrodes via Aqueous Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  6. Epitaxial patterning of nanometer-thick Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    our fabrication process is compatible with conventional sputtering and liftoff, and does not require aggressive ion milling which may be detrimental to the oxide thin films. ...

  7. Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and thickness of carbon and oxide layers on EUV reflective surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinowski, Michael E.

    2005-01-25

    The characteristics of radiation that is reflected from carbon deposits and oxidation formations on highly reflective surfaces such as Mo/Si mirrors can be quantified and employed to detect and measure the presence of such impurities on optics. Specifically, it has been shown that carbon deposits on a Mo/Si multilayer mirror decreases the intensity of reflected HeNe laser (632.8 nm) light. In contrast, oxide layers formed on the mirror should cause an increase in HeNe power reflection. Both static measurements and real-time monitoring of carbon and oxide surface impurities on optical elements in lithography tools should be achievable.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Towards Solventless Processing of Thick Electron-Beam (EB) Cured LIB Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  9. NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in fuel cell membrane electrode assembly research and development. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center and the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  10. Computed and measured responses of a thick-walled hollow cylinder of salt subjected to both homogeneous and inhomogeneous loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, H.S.; Wawersik, W.R.

    1989-06-01

    The present evaluations are based on comparisons of measurements on the hollow cylinders with predictions from three different constitutive models for rock salt. The three models are (1) an elastic power-law secondary creep (ESC) model, (2) a revision of the ESC (RESC) model with greatly reduced elastic moduli but unchanged creep parameters, and (3) a unified creep plasticity (UCP) model. The ESC model produced the predictions that differed from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in situ measurements by the factor-of-three or more. The modulus reductions in the RESC model are empirical adjustments that produced matching closures and closure rates with the WIPP measurements collected over less than five years. The UCP model yielded closures that were substantially higher than the ESC predictions but still less than the in situ measurements. At the same time, the UCP model produced closure rates in good agreement with the data. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Lattice accommodation of epitaxial Bi(111) films on Si(001) studied with SPA-LEED and AFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jnawali, G.; Hattab, H.; Krenzer, B.; Horn von Hoegen, M.

    2006-11-15

    The growth of Bi on a Si(001) surface is studied in situ by spot profile analyzing low-energy electron diffraction and ex situ by atomic force microscopy. A continuous epitaxial Bi(111) film with a thickness of 6 nm is grown at 150 K in a bilayer growth mode. During annealing to 450 K the lattice mismatch between Si(001) and Bi(111) is accommodated by a periodic interfacial misfit dislocation array. On this relaxed template, Bi(111) films can be grown to any desired thickness. Such films are composed of twinned and 90 deg. rotated micrometer sized Bi(111) crystallites with a roughness of less than 0.6 nm for a 30 nm thick film.

  12. Nonlinear electron dynamics of gold ultrathin films induced by intense terahertz waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minami, Yasuo Takeda, Jun; Katayama, Ikufumi; Dao, Thang Duy; Nagao, Tadaaki; Kitajima, Masahiro

    2014-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear electron dynamics of polycrystalline gold (Au) ultrathin films with thicknesses ranging from 1.4 to 5.8?nm were investigated via transmittance terahertz (THz) spectroscopy with intense electric field transients. We prepared ultrathin films with low surface roughness formed on a Si(7??7) reconstructed surface, leading to the observation of monotonic decrease in THz transmittance with respect to film thickness. Furthermore, at all tested thicknesses, the transmittance decreased nonlinearly by 10%30% with the application if high-intensity THz electric fields. Based on a Drude-model analysis, we found a significant decrease in the damping constant induced by the THz electric field, indicating that electrons are driven beyond the polycrystalline grain boundaries in Au thin films, and consequently leading to the suppression of the electronboundary scattering rate.

  13. Spin-filtering effect of thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier on tunneling magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sungjung; Jung, K. Y.; Jun, K. I.; Shin, K. H.; Kim, D. S.; Hong, J. K.; Rhie, K. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr; Lee, B. C. E-mail: krhie@korea.ac.kr

    2014-04-14

    Tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) dependence on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier thickness was investigated for CoFe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). MTJs with very thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers were grown by inserting an amorphous FeZr buffer layer whose role is only to reduce the roughness of bottom electrode. The TMR decreased as the thickness of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer was reduced. The results are analyzed with the dependence of the spin-filtering effect on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thickness. It was found that a simple model of separating sp- and d-like electrons does not work, and it may suggest that the tunneling electrons are in rather hybridized state.

  14. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan L.

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  15. Evolution of the electrical and structural properties during the growth of Al doped ZnO films by remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volintiru, I.; Creatore, M.; Kniknie, B. J.; Spee, C. I. M. A.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2007-08-15

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films were deposited by means of remote plasma-enhanced metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from oxygen/diethylzinc/trimethylaluminum mixtures. The electrical, structural (crystallinity and morphology), and chemical properties of the deposited films were investigated using Hall, four point probe, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron recoil detection (ERD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), respectively. We found that the working pressure plays an important role in controlling the sheet resistance R{sub s} and roughness development during film growth. At 1.5 mbar the AZO films are highly conductive (R{sub s}<6 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness above 1200 nm) and very rough (>4% of the film thickness), however, they are characterized by a large sheet resistance gradient with increasing film thickness. By decreasing the pressure from 1.5 to 0.38 mbar, the gradient is significantly reduced and the films become smoother, but the sheet resistance increases (R{sub s}{approx_equal}100 {omega}/{open_square} for a film thickness of 1000 nm). The sheet resistance gradient and the surface roughness development correlate with the grain size evolution, as determined from the AFM and SEM analyses, indicating the transition from pyramid-like at 1.5 mbar to pillar-like growth mode at 0.38 mbar. The change in plasma chemistry/growth precursors caused by the variation in pressure leads to different concentration and activation efficiency of Al dopant in the zinc oxide films. On the basis of the experimental evidence, a valid route for further improving the conductivity of the AZO film is found, i.e., increasing the grain size at the initial stage of film growth.

  16. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  17. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  18. Surface Quality of Ti-6%Al-4%V ELI When Machined Using CVD-Carbide Tools at High Cutting Speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gusri, A. I.; Che Hassan, C. H.; Jaharah, A. G.; Yasir, A.; Zaid, Y.; Yanuar, B.

    2011-01-17

    Machining of Ti-6Al-4V ELI becomes more interested topic due to extremely weight-to-strength ratio and resistance to corrosion at elevated temperature. Quality of machined surface is presented by surface roughness, surface texture and damages of microstructure of titanium alloys. The turning parameters evaluated are cutting speed of 55-95 m/min, feed rate of 0.15-0.35 mm/rev, depth of cut of 0.10-0.20 mm and tool grade of CVD carbide tools. The results show the trend lines of surface roughness value are higher at the initial machining and the surface texture profile has a strong correlation with the feed rate. At the machining condition of cutting speed of 95 m/min, feed rate of 0.35 mm/rev and depth of cut of 0.10 mm produced the with layer with thickness of 2.0 {mu}m.

  19. Comment on A study of vertical and in-plane electron mobility due to interface roughness scattering at low temperature in InAs-GaSb superlattices [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szmulowicz, F.

    2014-04-14

    The purpose of this comment is to point out that the paper by Safa, Asgari, and Faraone [J. Appl. Phys. 114, 053712 (2013)] (SAF) on electronic transport in superlattices contains a number of errors in physics and execution. By dealing with a finite number of periods and forcing the wave function to be zero at the upper and lower boundaries of the superlattice stack, SAF have turned the system into a quantum well for which the momentum along the growth axis is not a good quantum number, so that the bands in the growth direction are flat and the corresponding carrier velocities and vertical mobilities are zero. A number of other errors allow the authors to get nonzero results and to reach conclusions that qualitatively mirror those of Szmulowicz, Haugan, Elhamri, and Brown [Phys. Rev. B 84, 155307 (2011)].

  20. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternatives 3A/5A/6A/6B/7A/9A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).