Sample records for thermostats roofs water

  1. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  2. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .Sc. Research Scientist VTT, Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems... roofs in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

  3. A Generalized Battery Model of a Collection of Thermostatically Controlled Loads for Providing Ancillary Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    . Residential Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs) such as air conditioner, heat pump, water heater, and re

  4. The analysis of water use and water status of plants in a fluid-roof solar greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heathman, Gary Claude

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Soil Science THE ANALYSIS OF WATER USE AND WATER STATUS OF PLANTS IN A FLL'ID-ROOF SOLAR GREENHOUSE A Thesis by GARY CLAUDE HEATHMAN Approved as to style and content by: arrman o ommrttee ea o epart nt... em er Mem r May, 1981 ABSTRACT The Analysis of Water Use And Water Status of Plants in a Fluid-roof Solar Greenhouse. (May 1981) Gary Claude Heathman, B. S. , Texas A8;M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. H. M. van Bavel...

  5. Green Roof Water Harvesting and Recycling Effects on Soil and Water Chemistry and Plant Physiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminack, Kirk Dickison

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    lost must eventually be replaced, leading to increased maintenance costs. A growing medium that holds its structure and does not lose much organic matter through time is desirable. Media loss should be minimized to keep runoff pollution from the roof... to a minimum (Aitkenhead-Peterson et al. 2011a; Gregoire and Clausen 2011). Sediments that leave a green roof can contain pollutants and nutrients along with it thereby adding to the nutrient and pollutant load (U.S.EPA 2011). Plant species...

  6. Roof Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The roof of a Federal building is a common placement for a number of renewable energy technologies, so they should be addressed anytime a roof renovation is undertaken, including roof-mounted...

  7. he skies open and water gushes off roofs, down gutters and into drains. Heavy rain quickly overwhelms the drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    T he skies open and water gushes off roofs, down gutters and into drains. Heavy rain quickly risk heavy rain will cause flooding. Even if this isn't possible, water can be held in underground overwhelms the drainage network; before long, water backs up and starts creeping towards buildings. In cities

  8. Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

  9. White Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Steven Chu discusses the benefits of switching to white roofs and light colored pavements.

  10. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  11. Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

  12. Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential thermostats play a key role in controlling heating and cooling systems. Occupants often find the controls of programmable thermostats confusing, sometimes leading to higher heating consumption than when the buildings are controlled manually. A high degree of usability is vital to a programmable thermostat's effectiveness because, unlike a more efficient heating system, occupants must engage in specific actions after installation to obtain energy savings. We developed a procedure for measuring the usability of thermostats and tested this methodology with 31 subjects on five thermostats. The procedure requires first identifying representative tasks associated with the device and then testing the subjects ability to accomplish those tasks. The procedure was able to demonstrate the subjects wide ability to accomplish tasks and the influence of a device's usability on success rates. A metric based on the time to accomplish the tasks and the fraction of subjects actually completing the tasks captured the key aspects of each thermostat's usability. The procedure was recently adopted by the Energy Star Program for its thermostat specification. The approach appears suitable for quantifying usability of controls in other products, such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.

  13. Thermostats | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScienceThe43068 - Energy InnovationThermostats

  14. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermostats, including scheduling, control of humidity andremote control and energy use scheduling. Anticipator: This

  15. Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

  16. 2009 Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winners | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ceramic bead roof coating; installing fixed-set point light set-back thermostats; upgrading energy management controls; repairing natural gas leaks; and establishing a new...

  17. Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

  18. Hamiltonian for a restricted isoenergetic thermostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. P. Dettmann

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations often use mechanisms called thermostats to regulate the temperature. A Hamiltonian is presented for the case of the isoenergetic (constant internal energy) thermostat corresponding to a tunable isokinetic (constant kinetic energy) thermostat, for which a Hamiltonian has recently been given.

  19. From thermostatics -- to the thermokinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A Etkin

    2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Present-day thermodynamics has long outgrown the initial frames of the heat-engine theory and transmuted into a rather general macroscopic method for studying kinetics of various transfer processes in their inseparable connection with the thermal form of motion. However its primary notions and mathematical instrument as before based on concepts of thermostatics, to wich time, speed and productivity of processes are alien, and on the equations transitory in case of irreversible processes in inequalities. It is offered essentially other approach at wich the thermostatics equations follow from thermokinetics of spatially non-uniform systems.

  20. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  1. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Peffer, Therese; Pritoni, Marco; Aragon, Cecilia

    2010-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the history of thermostats to better understand the context and legacy regarding the development of this important tool, as well as thermostats' relationships to heating, cooling, and other environmental controls. We analyze the architecture, interfaces, and modes of interaction used by different types of thermostats. For over sixty years, home thermostats have translated occupants' temperature preferences into heating and cooling system operations. In this position of an intermediary, the millions of residential thermostats control almost half of household energy use, which corresponds to about 10percent of the nation's total energy use. Thermostats are currently undergoing rapid development in response to emerging technologies, new consumer and utility demands, and declining manufacturing costs. Energy-efficient homes require more careful balancing of comfort, energy consumption, and health. At the same time, new capabilities will be added to thermostats, including scheduling, control of humidity and ventilation, responsiveness to dynamic electricity prices, and the ability to join communication networks inside homes. Recent studies have found that as many as 50percent of residential programmable thermostats are in permanent"hold" status. Other evaluations found that homes with programmable thermostats consumed more energy than those relying on manual thermostats. Occupants find thermostats cryptic and baffling to operate because manufacturers often rely on obscure, and sometimes even contradictory, terms, symbols, procedures, and icons. It appears that many people are unable to fully exploit even the basic features in today's programmable thermostats, such as setting heating and cooling schedules. It is important that people can easily, reliably, and confidently operate thermostats in their homes so as to remain comfortable while minimizing energy use.

  2. Self drying roofs: What! No dripping!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many roofs are replaced because water accumulates in portions of the roofing system.These accumulations can cause dripping, accelerated membrane failure, poor thermal performance, the threat of structural decay, and the depreciation of building assets. Traditionally, the roofing industry has been concerned with controlling the inflow of water into the roof. An example of this strategy would be the development of a more reliable membrane. However, roof membranes inevitably leak. For this reason, the roof design strategy of the future must be concerned with controlling water outflow. The requirements of this type of roof system are described. Under normal operating conditions (no leaks), the total moisture content of a self-drying roof system shall not increase with time and condensation shall not occur under the membrane during winter uptake. Moisture vapor movement by convection must be eliminated and the flow of water by gravity through imperfections in the roof system must be controlled. After a leak has occurred, no condensation on the upper surface of the deck shall be tolerated and the water introduced by the leak must be dissipated to the building interior in a minimum amount of time. Finite difference computer modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. The impact of deck and insulation permeance, climate, leaks, and wintertime water uptake are simulated. A database of simulations is qualitatively described; this database will be used in future work to produce a simplified means of assessing the design parameters of a self-drying roof system.

  3. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  4. Cool Roofs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar presented by Blaise Stoltenberg and Kosol Kiatreungwattana of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory about roofs designed to maintain a lower roof temperature than traditional roofs in order to reduce energy bills.

  5. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan K.; Walker, Iain

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of a literature review, a workshop, and many meetings with demand response and thermostat researchers and implementers. The information obtained from these resources was used to identify key issues of thermostat performance from both energy savings and peak demand perspectives. A research plan was developed to address these issues and activities have already begun to pursue the research agenda.

  6. Cesium heat-pipe thermostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, F.; Song, D.; Sheng, K.; Wu, J. [Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement, 100095, Beijing (China)] [Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement, 100095, Beijing (China); Yi, X. [China National South Aviation industry CO., LTD., 412002, Hunan (China)] [China National South Aviation industry CO., LTD., 412002, Hunan (China); Yu, Z. [Dalian Jinzhou Institute of Measurement and Testing, 116100, Liaoning (China)] [Dalian Jinzhou Institute of Measurement and Testing, 116100, Liaoning (China)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors report a newly developed Cesium Heat-Pipe Thermostat (Cs HPT) with the operation range of 400 °C to 800 °C. The working medium is cesium (Cs) of 99.98% purity and contains no radioisotope. A Cs filing device is developed which can prevent Cs being in contact with air. The structural material is stainless steel. A 5000 h test has been made to confirm the compatibility between cesium and stainless steel. The Cs HPT has several thermometer wells of 220mm depth with different diameters for different sizes of thermometers. The temperature uniformity of the Cs HPT is 0.06 °C to 0.20 °C. A precise temperature controller is used to ensure the temperature fluctuation within ±0.03 °C. The size of Cs HPT is 380mm×320mm×280mm with foot wheels for easy moving. The thermostat has been successfully used for the calibration of industrial platinum resistance thermometers and thermocouples.

  7. On thermostats and entropy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henk van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

    2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between the rate of entropy production and the rate of phase space contraction for thermostatted systems in nonequilibrium steady states is discussed for a simple model of heat flow in a Lorentz gas, previously described by Spohn and Lebowitz. It is easy to show that for the model discussed here the two rates are not connected, since the rate of entropy production is non-zero and positive, while the overall rate of phase space contraction is zero. This is consistent with conclusions reached by other workers. Fractal structures appear in the phase space for this model and their properties are discussed. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this and related work for understanding the role of chaotic dynamics and special initial conditions for an explanation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

  8. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remoteand cooling systems. Future thermostats may reside in PCs, digital picture frames, or other kinds of remote

  9. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  10. Water heater control module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

  11. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  12. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  13. Energy 101: Cool Roofs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

  14. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  15. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    , and water harvesting through them, such as asphalt and con- systems or cisterns. This new fact sheet crete and improve the water quality of runoff from new residential and commercial developments by using stormwater including the use of permeable pave- (sufaces that do not allow water to filter ments, green roofs

  16. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under the offset unit's solar panel, the hf formula (16) wasdrop below the angle unit's solar panel at night time. D u rfor both the units, the solar panel covered roof was a heat

  17. What Do You Set Your Thermostat to? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Greatest Energy Concerns for Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? Contact Us E-mail: Webmaster Online: Facebook iconconnecttwitter.png Twitter...

  18. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Roof air conditioning load is reduced by 85% to 90%. The cooler roof also protects and extends roof life. My presentation today will cover an old, square foot, and generally speaking, it will old technique -- one that has been gaining in show a...

  19. Aggregate Flexibility of Thermostatically Controlled Loads He Haoa, Borhan M. Sanandajib, Kameshwar Poollac, and Tyrone L. Vincentd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    (TCLs) such as air conditioners, heat pumps, water heaters, and refrigera- to&E, aggregate residential air conditioners for peak load shaving and emergency load management [6]. Because services such as frequency regulation or load-following. Residential Thermostatically Controlled Loads

  20. Modeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kundu, S. [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Hiskens, I. [UNIV OF MICHIGAN

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As the penetration of intermittent energy sources grows substantially, loads will be required to play an increasingly important role in compensating the fast time-scale fluctuations in generated power. Recent numerical modeling of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analytical models that satisfactorily quantify the aggregate power consumption of a group of TCLs are desired to enable controller design. We develop such a model for the aggregate power response of a homogeneous population of TCLs to uniform variation of all TCL setpoints. A linearized model of the response is derived, and a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) has been designed. Using the TCL setpoint as the control input, the LQR enables aggregate power to track reference signals that exhibit step, ramp and sinusoidal variations. Although much of the work assumes a homogeneous population of TCLs with deterministic dynamics, we also propose a method for probing the dynamics of systems where load characteristics are not well known.

  1. A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter D. Ditlevsen

    2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

  2. Hygrothermal Performance of West Coast Wood Deck Roofing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B [ORNL; Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of roofing assemblies are necessary in order to understand and adequately predict actual the hygrothermal performance. At the request of GAF, simulations have been setup to verify the difference in performance between white and black roofing membrane colors in relation to critical moisture accumulation for traditional low slope wood deck roofing systems typically deployed in various western U.S. Climate Zones. The performance of these roof assemblies has been simulated in the hygrothermal calculation tool of WUFI, from which the result was evaluated based on a defined criterion for moisture safety. The criterion was defined as the maximum accepted water content for wood materials and the highest acceptable moisture accumulation rate in relation to the risk of rot. Based on the criterion, the roof assemblies were certified as being either safe, risky or assumed to fail. The roof assemblies were simulated in different western climates, with varying insulation thicknesses, two different types of wooden decking, applied with varying interior moisture load and with either a high or low solar absorptivity at the roof surface (black or white surface color). The results show that the performance of the studied roof assemblies differs with regard to all of the varying parameters, especially the climate and the indoor moisture load.

  3. Kansas City Power and Light- Energy Optimizer Programmable Thermostat Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers a free Honeywell programmable thermostat, worth $300, and free installation to qualifying customers to manage energy usage. Only residential and small...

  4. Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Levinson, Ronnen; Graveline,Stanley; Foley, Kevin; Delgado, Ana H.; Paroli, Ralph M.

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Aging and weathering can reduce the solar reflectance of cool roofing materials. This paper summarizes laboratory measurements of the solar spectral reflectance of unweathered, weathered, and cleaned samples collected from single-ply roofing membranes at various sites across the United States. Fifteen samples were examined in each of the following six conditions: unweathered; weathered; weathered and brushed; weathered, brushed and then rinsed with water; weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, and then washed with soap and water; and weathered, brushed, rinsed with water, washed with soap and water, and then washed with an algaecide. Another 25 samples from 25 roofs across the United States and Canada were measured in their unweathered state, weathered, and weathered and wiped. We document reduction in reflectivity resulted from various soiling mechanisms and provide data on the effectiveness of various cleaning approaches. Results indicate that although the majority of samples after being washed with detergent could be brought to within 90% of their unweathered reflectivity, in some instances an algaecide was required to restore this level of reflectivity.

  5. Roofs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia BlueRiverwoods,RockRipple,Rollingwood, Texas: Energy|RomeRoofs

  6. Energy saving potential of various roof technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

  7. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally recognized that as much as 60% of the air conditioning load in a building is generated by solar heat from the roof. This paper on SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION is presented in slide form, tracing the history of 'nature's way...

  8. One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce...

  9. Rain on the Roof-Evaporative Spray Roof Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, L. R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes evaporative spray roof cooling systems, their components, performance and applications in various climates and building types. The evolution of this indirect evaporative cooling technique is discussed. Psychrometric and sol...

  10. Sustainable roofs with real energy savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Advanced Energy Efficient Roof System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jane Davidson

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption in buildings represents 40 percent of primary U.S. energy consumption, split almost equally between residential (22%) and commercial (18%) buildings.1 Space heating (31%) and cooling (12%) account for approximately 9 quadrillion Btu. Improvements in the building envelope can have a significant impact on reducing energy consumption. Thermal losses (or gains) from the roof make up 14 percent of the building component energy load. Infiltration through the building envelope, including the roof, accounts for an additional 28 percent of the heating loads and 16 percent of the cooling loads. These figures provide a strong incentive to develop and implement more energy efficient roof systems. The roof is perhaps the most challenging component of the building envelope to change for many reasons. The engineered roof truss, which has been around since 1956, is relatively low cost and is the industry standard. The roof has multiple functions. A typical wood frame home lasts a long time. Building codes vary across the country. Customer and trade acceptance of new building products and materials may impede market penetration. The energy savings of a new roof system must be balanced with other requirements such as first and life-cycle costs, durability, appearance, and ease of construction. Conventional residential roof construction utilizes closely spaced roof trusses supporting a layer of sheathing and roofing materials. Gypsum board is typically attached to the lower chord of the trusses forming the finished ceiling for the occupied space. Often in warmer climates, the HVAC system and ducts are placed in the unconditioned and otherwise unusable attic. High temperature differentials and leaky ducts result in thermal losses. Penetrations through the ceilings are notoriously difficult to seal and lead to moisture and air infiltration. These issues all contribute to greater energy use and have led builders to consider construction of a conditioned attic. The options considered to date are not ideal. One approach is to insulate between the trusses at the roof plane. The construction process is time consuming and costs more than conventional attic construction. Moreover, the problems of air infiltration and thermal bridges across the insulation remain. Another approach is to use structurally insulated panels (SIPs), but conventional SIPs are unlikely to be the ultimate solution because an additional underlying support structure is required except for short spans. In addition, wood spline and metal locking joints can result in thermal bridges and gaps in the foam. This study undertook a more innovative approach to roof construction. The goal was to design and evaluate a modular energy efficient panelized roof system with the following attributes: (1) a conditioned and clear attic space for HVAC equipment and additional finished area in the attic; (2) manufactured panels that provide structure, insulation, and accommodate a variety of roofing materials; (3) panels that require support only at the ends; (4) optimal energy performance by minimizing thermal bridging and air infiltration; (5) minimal risk of moisture problems; (6) minimum 50-year life; (7) applicable to a range of house styles, climates and conditions; (8) easy erection in the field; (9) the option to incorporate factory-installed solar systems into the panel; and (10) lowest possible cost. A nationwide market study shows there is a defined market opportunity for such a panelized roof system with production and semi-custom builders in the United States. Senior personnel at top builders expressed interest in the performance attributes and indicate long-term opportunity exists if the system can deliver a clear value proposition. Specifically, builders are interested in (1) reducing construction cycle time (cost) and (2) offering increased energy efficiency to the homebuyer. Additional living space under the roof panels is another low-cost asset identified as part of the study. The market potential is enhanced through construction activity levels in target marke

  12. Solar Roof Cooling by Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, G. V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLAR ROOF COOLING BY EVAPORATION Fanjet Evaporative Roof Cooling Windsor Lake Landing #1 Windsor Point Road Columbia, S.C. 29206 G. V. Patterson National Sales Manager Evaporation is nature's way of cooling. By the The American Society... penetration through will include current engineering techniques, sys out the course of the day. tem designs and documented cases of 20% to 30% reduction in air-conditioning run time. Dr. John Yellott of the Yellott Solar Energy Labo ratories in Phoenix...

  13. Solving the Nose-Hoover thermostat for Nuclear Pasta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Angeles Perez Garcia

    2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present a calculation of the hamiltonian variables solving the molecular dynamics equations of motion for a system of nuclear matter relevant to the description of nuclear pasta. The temperature is kept fixed by using the Nos\\'{e}-Hoover Thermostat and the interaction is modelled via a semiclassical potential depending on both positions and momenta.

  14. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on boilers, hot water, district heating, spot heating, andwood to charcoal to district heating. www.tecsoc.org/pubs/pellets) or via district heating systems. Air conditioning

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE ­ INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION CEC-CF-6R-ENV-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal

  16. Using Green Roofs to Minimize Roof Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Design (LEED) programprogram Increased insulation and energy efficiencyIncreased insulation and energy efficiency #12;10/31/2008 2 Wildlife Habitat Photo Courtesy Penn State Center for Green Roof Research GreenTested membranes highly recommended ­­ Plastic root barrier above membrane?Plastic root barrier above membrane

  17. SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER THE SKY'S THE LIMIT: BERNADETTE MOKE SITS ON THE ROOF, ARE 160 SOLAR PANELS, SOME OF WHICH AUTOMATICALLY FOLLOW THE PATH OF THE SUN. 10 NJITMAGAZINE COVER STORY'S THE LIMIT: SOLAR ROOF POWERS THE NJIT CAMPUS CENTER "The solar panels even move a little at night," says

  18. Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations J 2004) An ad hoc thermostating procedure that couples a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

  19. Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting designs. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the mechanisms of modern roof bolting systems including both the tension and fully grouted bolts. Parameters to be studied are: bolt length, bolt spacing, bolt size/strength, grout annulus, in-situ stress condition, overburden depth, and roof geology (massive strata, fractured, and laminated or thinly-bedded). Based on the analysis of the mechanisms of both bolting systems and failure modes of the bolted strata, roof bolting design criteria and programs for modern roof bolting systems were developed. These criterion and/or programs were combined with the MRGIS for use in conjunction with roof bolt installation.

  20. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  1. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  2. The Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Introduction Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the largest energy consumer in the home- grammable thermostats can reduce the energy needed to heat and cool a home by 10-30% without reducingThe Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns Ge

  3. POSITIVITY OF ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN THE PRESENCE OF A RANDOM THERMOSTAT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruelle, David

    #12;nitely. Physically, this heating up is prevented by coupling the system to a thermostat, or heat simpli#12;ed model of a system coupled with a heat bath will be described by a random dynamical system ! are to be discussed later). Thermostatic action of random forces. It is easy to understand qualitatively how a heat

  4. List of Programmable Thermostats Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassive Solar Space HeatThermostats

  5. A new method for modelling roofing materials emissions on the city scale: Application for zinc in the city of Crteil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    as an important source of environmental pollution. Roofing materials, in particular the metallic ones, are considered as a major source of urban runoff metal contaminations. In the context of the European Water Directive (2000/60 CE), an accurate evaluation of contaminant flows from roofs is thus required on the city

  6. Rainwater harvesting systems that collect and convey rain-water from roofs to storage tanks are often the best or only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    tanks are often the best or only source of water for many communities in the developing world. A common are swept into the storage tank along with the rainwater. While some systems divert the "first flush into gutters, through a series of pipes and into storage tanks. Three rainwater harvesting systems

  7. Why Cool Roofs? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills. Speakers...

  8. Technology Evaluation of Programmable Communicating Thermostats with Radio Broadcast Data System Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Programmable Communicating Thermostats are thermostats that can be programmed by the user to respond to signals indicating a grid-level system emergency or pricing event. The California Energy Commission is considering standards that would include a requirement for Programmable Communicating Thermostats in residential and small commercial applications. The current specification for Programmable Communicating Thermostats requires Radio Data System communications to Programmable Communicating Thermostats. This study tested the signal strength and reliability of Radio Data System signals at 40 customer sites within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, which is serviced by 17 radio stations that already transmit Radio Data System signals. The study also tested the functionality of a commercially available Programmable Communicating Thermostat for compliance with California Energy Commission design standards. Test results demonstrated that Radio Data System is capable of reliably sending price and emergency signals. This study also provides evidence that existing Programmable Communicating Thermostats, on receiving a Radio Data System pricing or event signal, are capable of automatically increasing set points to a customer-determined or utility-determined level, thus providing air-conditioning demand response within seconds or just a few (less than 5) minutes.

  9. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OF A FLORIDA GREEN ROOF Jeffrey K. Sonne Senior Research Engineer Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL ABSTRACT Previous green roof studies have found that planted roofs significantly reduce roof temperatures... and roof heat flux, and simulations indicate cooling load reductions of up to 25%. This monitored study evaluates summer and winter energy performance aspects of a green roof on a central Florida university building addition that was completed in 2005...

  10. Lyapunov Exponent Pairing for a Thermostatted Hard-Sphere Gas under Shear in the Thermodynamic Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debabrata Panja; Ramses van Zon

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate why for a sheared gas of hard spheres, described by the SLLOD equations with an iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat in between collisions, deviations of the conjugate pairing rule for the Lyapunov spectrum are to be expected, employing a previous result that for a large number of particles $N$, the iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat is equivalent to a constant friction thermostat, up to $1/\\sqrt{N}$ fluctuations. We also show that these deviations are at most of the order of the fourth power in the shear rate.

  11. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  12. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, T.L.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the preformed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  13. Lightweight, self-ballasting photovoltaic roofing assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic roofing assembly comprises a roofing membrane (102), a plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) disposed as a layer on top of the roofing membrane (102), and a plurality of pre-formed spacers, pedestals or supports (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) which are respectively disposed below the plurality of photovoltaic modules (104, 106, 108) and integral therewith, or fixed thereto. Spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122) are disposed on top of roofing membrane (102). Membrane (102) is supported on conventional roof framing, and attached thereto by conventional methods. In an alternative embodiment, the roofing assembly may have insulation block (322) below the spacers (314, 314', 315, 315'). The geometry of the pre-formed spacers (112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 122, 314, 314', 315, 315') is such that wind tunnel testing has shown its maximum effectiveness in reducing net forces of wind uplift on the overall assembly. Such construction results in a simple, lightweight, self-ballasting, readily assembled roofing assembly which resists the forces of wind uplift using no roofing penetrations.

  14. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans A thermal model for photovoltaic systems, Solar Energy, Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer 

  15. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300...

  16. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review...

  17. A simple deterministic and time reversal invariant thermostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henk van Beijeren

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple deterministic and time reversal invariant type of thermostat is proposed to be used for computer simulations of classical systems. It acts on collisions with the walls of the container exclusively. It maps the incoming and outgoing velocity of an impinging particle onto each other uniquely, in a way that satisfies a detailed balance condition with respect to the (local) wall temperature. It is fast to implement on a computer, leads to rapid equilibration or approach to a stationary nonequilibrium state and it effects the physical properties of the system in a narrow boundary layer only. Because of the deterministic nature it is especially suitable for studying dynamical systems characteristics, such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions of attractors. A few successful applications have been reported already.

  18. Fluctuations relation and external thermostats: an application to granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; A. Giuliani; F. Zamponi

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we discuss a paradigmatic example of interacting particles subject to non conservative external forces and to the action of thermostats consisting of external (finite) reservoirs of particles. We then consider a model of granular materials of interest for experimental tests that had recently attracted lot of attentions. This model can be reduced to the previously discussed example under a number of assumptions, in particular that inelasticity due to internal collisions can be neglected for the purpose of measuring the large deviation functional for entropy production rate. We show that if the restitution coefficient in the granular material model is close to one, then the required assuptions are verified on a specific time scale and we predict a fluctuation relation for the entropy production rate measured on the same time scale.

  19. Deterministic Time-Reversible Thermostats : Chaos, Ergodicity, and the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Graham Hoover; Julien Clinton Sprott; Puneet Kumar Patra

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative stability and ergodicity of deterministic time-reversible thermostats, both singly and in coupled pairs, are assessed through their Lyapunov spectra. Five types of thermostat are coupled to one another through a single Hooke's-Law harmonic spring. The resulting dynamics shows that three specific thermostat types, Hoover-Holian, Ju-Bulgac, and Martyna-Klein-Tuckerman, have very similar Lyapunov spectra in their equilibrium four-dimensional phase spaces and when coupled in equilibrium or nonequilibrium pairs. All three of these oscillator-based thermostats are shown to be ergodic, with smooth analytic Gaussian distributions in their extended phase spaces ( coordinate, momentum, and two control variables ). Evidently these three ergodic and time-reversible thermostat types are particularly useful as statistical-mechanical thermometers and thermostats. Each of them generates Gibbs' universal canonical distribution internally as well as for systems to which they are coupled. Thus they obey the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics, as a good heat bath should. They also provide dissipative heat flow with relatively small nonlinearity when two or more such bath temperatures interact and provide useful deterministic replacements for the stochastic Langevin equation.

  20. Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    slows the transfer of heat inside but doesn't eliminate it. Researchers have measured energy savings up to 10 to 15 percent for homes with cool roof coatings. And if a standard...

  1. Maui County- Solar Roofs Initiative Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2002, Maui Electric Company (MECO) and the County of Maui teamed up to launch the Maui Solar Roofs Initiative to increase the use of renewable energy in Maui County. MECO administers...

  2. Design considerations for retractable-roof stadia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazer, Andrew H., 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As existing open-air or fully enclosed stadia are reaching their life expectancies, cities are choosing to replace them with structures with moving roofs. This kind of facility provides protection from weather for spectators, ...

  3. Roof Coating Procedures and Their Productivity Gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaby, J.; Schaub, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefit of the installation of different roof coating technologies and comparable application procedures of these technologies are ambiguous. The focal point of this research is to determine the effective correlation between various commercially... available roof coatings, and productivity gains associated with these energy saving strategies. This type of situation is evidenced in the justification of energy rebates distributed by Florida Power & Light in exchange for the application of Energy Star...

  4. How the Drudgery of Getting Water Shapes Women's Lives in Low-income Urban Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben D; McPike, Jamie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply practices: rainwater harvesting, water theft, gifts/to water, in this case from roof rainwater harvesting tanks.

  5. Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) – demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

  6. Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    products, such as heat pump water heaters and commercialsuch as lights or heat pump water heaters. Our review of theing behaviour. Heat pump water heaters require sophisticated

  7. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  8. In-situ aging of roof systems containing polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.; Graves, R.S.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam roof insulations with permeable facers were installed in roofing systems and continuously monitored for thermal performance for four years. The foams were produced using a specific formulation that represented current technology in 1989 and were blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, and HCFC-141b. These foams were installed in roof systems comprised of loosely-laid insulation boards covered by either a loosely-laid single ply white or black membrane. The in-situ testing was carried out on an outdoor test facility, the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). Additional specimens of these foams were aged in the laboratory and periodically evaluated using laboratory measurement equipment. This paper summarizes the in-situ data compiled to date, compares these data with the laboratory results, and examines whether the proposed laboratory procedure for accelerating the aging of foams by the slicing and scaling method accurately predicts the aging characteristics of these materials installed in roof systems. These experiments are part of a joint industry/government project established to evaluate the technical viability of alternative HCFC blowing agents for rigid closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam roof insulations. Members of the project are the US Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Society of the Plastics Industry-Polyurethane Division (SPI), the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

  9. Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems...

  10. Kinetic approach to the Gaussian thermostat in a dilute sheared gas in the thermodynamic limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. van Zon

    1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A dilute gas of particles with short range interactions is considered in a shearing stationary state. A Gaussian thermostat keeps the total kinetic energy constant. For infinitely many particles it is shown that the thermostat becomes a friction force with constant friction coefficient. For finite number of particles N, the fluctuations around this constant are of order one over the square root of N, and distributed approximately Gaussian with deviations for large fluctuations. These deviations prohibit a derivation of fluctuation-dissipation relations far from equilibrium, based on the Fluctuation Theorem.

  11. Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.heat pump water heaters. Advanced lighting controls in commercial

  12. Energy Performance Aspects of a Florida Green Roof Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J.; Parker, D.

    Green roof installation in the United States is growing at a significant rate. There are a number of reasons for this growth including rainwater runoff reduction and aesthetic benefits. Energy performance evaluations of green roofs, the subject...

  13. Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Answer: The West Building cool roof is estimated to save about 2,000 per year in reduced energy costs. In the spring, we will also be installing a cool roof on the Headquarters'...

  14. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation, and the roof itself may be the...

  15. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

  16. Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving "Cool Roofs" Installed at Y-12 The...

  17. Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12 Energy Saving 'Cool Roofs' Installed at Y-12...

  18. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of the roof under the solar panel (Fig.  2).  An air temperature of the  solar panel is similar to the roof 

  19. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell SPF insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990s to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated incidents of failures (either sheathing rot or SPF delamination) that raise some general concerns about the hygrothermal performance and durability of these systems. The primary risks for roof systems are rainwater leaks, condensation from diffusion and air leakage, and built-in construction moisture. This project directly investigated rain and indirectly investigated built-in construction moisture and vapor drives. Research involved both hygrothermal modeling of a range of rain water leakage scenarios and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs. Other variables considered were climate zone, orientation, interior relative humidity, and the vapor permeance of the coating applied to the interior face of open cell SPF.

  20. Rainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    and without access to municipal water may collect and store rainwater after obtaining a permit from the state) Basics of rainwater collection, calculation of: needs, collection and storage 2) Outdoor use 3) IndoorRainwater harvesting system with roof catchment, gutter, downspout, storage and drip irrigation

  1. Cool Roof Resource Guide for Federal Agencies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resource guide containing information and links for the evaluation and installation of cool roofs within the Federal Government

  2. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System assigns one rating point for the use of a cool roof in its Sustainable

  3. what is a cool roof? what is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the value, the `cooler' the roof. Solar Re ectance: the ability of a roof to re ect solar energy Thermal) as an alternative to solar reflectance and thermal emittance values · Energy and cost savings can be 20% depending Commission recogniz- es for certifying the solar reflectance and thermal emittance values of roofing products

  4. Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.such as lights or heat pump water heaters. Our review of theing behaviour. Heat pump water heaters require sophisticated

  5. Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  6. Update on the Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herig, C.

    1999-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Million Solar Roofs Initiative, announced by the President in June of 1997, spans a period of twelve years and intends to increase domestic deployment of solar technologies. This paper presents an overview of the development of the initiative and significant activities to date.

  7. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, Chin-Yao Chang, Karanjit Kalsi and Yannan Sun Abstract-- Demand Response is playing population of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness

  8. The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    in 8 homes and comparing the expected energy usage of our algorithm against existing approaches. We Design, Experimentation, Economics, Human Factors Keywords Building Energy, Home Monitoring, ProgrammableThe Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes Jiakang Lu, Tamim Sookoor

  9. POSITIVITY OF ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN THE PRESENCE OF A RANDOM THERMOSTAT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by studying the role of a heat bath, and its idealization by random external forces. As discussed in [19], we is prevented by coupling the system to a thermostat, or heat bath. The energy changes are diluted in the large papers referred to in [19]. Random dynamics Our simplified model of a system coupled with a heat bath

  10. Supervisor Thermostat Repairer (91964) 1 THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    of various types of thermostats and related equipment used for the control of heating, ventilation and air conditions systems: performs related work. Qualification Requirements 1. Open to each employee of all. - Prepares work schedules and work assignments. - Prepares job orders and requisitions for tools, equipment

  11. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  12. Status of cool roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

  13. Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    part of the solar hot water heating system later on? Ener-Gee Whiz: Most solar water heating systems will require a backup system for cloudy days or at times of increased demand,...

  14. Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington D.C., Vol. 9, p. 1, August, 1992. Akbari, H., Bretz, S., Kurn, D.M. and Hanford, J., ?Peak Power and Cooling Energy Savings of High Albedo Roofs,? Energy... positive pressure dehumidified air ventilation in hot humid climates, quiet exhaust fan ventilation in cool climates, solar water heaters, heat pump water heaters, high efficiency right sized heating/cooling equipment, and gas fired combo space...

  15. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings 1:1-11 (to energy efficiency standards for buildings. Online ataddress cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards

  16. Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    50 degrees cooler. A study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  17. Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement Cool Roofs at DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emissions. A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help...

  18. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roofbuilding when the roof is cooler than the inside air. One can develop an energy-neutral

  19. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittanceuse photovoltaic, solar- thermal, or roof-garden systems2006. Inclusion of solar reflectance and thermal emittance

  20. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG...

  1. Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

  2. Cool roof Q+A 011.doc 29 July 2009 Cool Roof Q & A (draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal radiation. Thus, a cool roof should have both high "solar reflectance" (ability to reflect, also measured on a scale of 0 to 1). The solar reflectance and thermal emittance of a surface sunlight, measured on a scale of 0 to 1) and high "thermal emittance" (ability to emit thermal radiation

  3. High Efficiency Solar Integrated Roof Membrane Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partyka, Eric; Shenoy, Anil

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was designed to address the Solar Energy Technology Program objective, to develop new methods to integrate photovoltaic (PV) cells or modules within a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) application that will result in lower installed cost as well as higher efficiencies of the encapsulated/embedded PV module. The technology assessment and development focused on the evaluation and identification of manufacturing technologies and equipment capable of producing such low-cost, high-efficiency, flexible BIPV solar cells on single-ply roofing membranes.

  4. List of Roofs Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassive SolarRoofs Incentives Jump to:

  5. Cool Roof Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | OpenMinor PermitControllingCook, Minnesota: Energy3Roof

  6. Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage ofDefects on . GradeCool Roofs Energy 101:

  7. Next Generation Attics and Roof Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership Program |MillionNext Generation Attics and Roof

  8. Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvorak, B.

    Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

  9. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  10. Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    demand ­ surrogate for organics · Heavy metals and major cations (copper, h i d i l d i ichromium1 Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for Source Control? Shirley E Facility Metal Range (mg/L) Average % COV (%) Direct roof runoff from 7 storms Metal Range (mg/L) Average

  11. Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    · Heavy metals and major cations (copper, h i d i l d i ichromium, cadmium, lead, zinc, arsenic, calcium1 Roofing in the Urban Environment: Pollution Source of Opportunity for Source Control? Shirley E Dissolved: 35 12,200 Dissolved: 11,900 From Good 1993 Galvanized uncoated Roofing ­ Airport Facility Metal

  12. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  13. PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PRESSURIZATION OF FIXED ROOF STORAGE TANKS DUE TO EXTERNAL FIRES Fabien FouiHen, INERIS, Parc. Reflections led on this accident have pushed to consider the phenomenon of tank pressurization as a potential initiating event of the fire ball observed. In concrete terms, when a fixed roof storage tank is surrounded

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - antisolar insulated roof Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    made of? Green roof benefits: Insulates building,lowering heating costs Absorption of rainwater... including a green roof. A green ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. - Aquatic...

  15. Effectiveness of Cool Roof Coatings with Ceramic Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehob, Ellen G [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid applied coatings promoted as cool roof coatings, including several with ceramic particles, were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tenn., for the purpose of quantifying their thermal performances. Solar reflectance measurements were made for new samples and aged samples using a portable reflectometer (ASTM C1549, Standard Test Method for Determination of Solar Reflectance Near Ambient Temperature Using a Portable Solar Reflectometer) and for new samples using the integrating spheres method (ASTM E903, Standard Test Method for Solar Absorptance, Reflectance, and Transmittance of Materials Using Integrating Spheres). Thermal emittance was measured for the new samples using a portable emissometer (ASTM C1371, Standard Test Method for Determination of Emittance of Materials Near Room 1 Proceedings of the 2011 International Roofing Symposium Temperature Using Portable Emissometers). Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured using a FOX 304 heat flow meter (ASTM C518, Standard Test Method for Steady-State Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The surface properties of the cool roof coatings had higher solar reflectance than the reference black and white material, but there were no significant differences among coatings with and without ceramics. The coatings were applied to EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) membranes and installed on the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA), an instrumented facility at ORNL for testing roofs. Roof temperatures and heat flux through the roof were obtained for a year of exposure in east Tennessee. The field tests showed significant reduction in cooling required compared with the black reference roof (~80 percent) and a modest reduction in cooling compared with the white reference roof (~33 percent). The coating material with the highest solar reflectivity (no ceramic particles) demonstrated the best overall thermal performance (combination of reducing the cooling load cost and not incurring a large heating penalty cost) and suggests solar reflectivity is the significant characteristic for selecting cool roof coatings.

  16. Energy-efficient water heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

  17. Development and Validation of Aggregated Models for Thermostatic Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Chassin, David P.

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated control models for a population of thermostatically controlled loads. The effects of demand response on the load population dynamics are investigated.

  18. Flexible shaft and roof drilling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanz, John H. (Carlisle, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for drilling holes in the roof of a mine has a flexible shaft with a pair of oppositely wound, coaxial flat bands. One of the flat bands defines an inner spring that is wound right handed into a helical configuration, adjacent convolutions being in nesting relationship to one another. The other flat band defines an outer spring that is wound left handed into a helical configuration about the inner band, adjacent convolutions being nesting relationship with one another. A transition member that is configured to hold a rock bit is mounted to one end of the flexible shaft. When torque and thrust are applied to the flexible shaft by a driver, the inner spring expands outwardly and the outer spring contracts inwardly to form a relatively rigid shaft.

  19. Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza and LITEC (CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

  20. Evaporative Roof Cooling- A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    Since the “Energy Crisis” Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retro-fit installations show direct energy savings...

  1. Plain Talk About Condensation and Radiation Below Metal Roof Assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, L.

    During recent decades an increasing number of users have chosen metal roofing for various commercial, industrial and institutional buildings. Because of several advantages, construction of new pre-engineered and "hybrid" buildings has outpaced low...

  2. Evaporative Roof Cooling - A Simple Solution to Cut Cooling Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the "Energy Crisis" Evaporative Roof Cooling Systems have gained increased acceptance as a cost effective method to reduce the high cost of air conditioning. Documented case histories in retrofit installations show direct energy savings...

  3. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  4. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  5. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Huang, Yu (Joe) [White Box Technologies; Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A web-based Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) has been deployed for the United States Department of Energy as an industry-consensus tool to help building owners, manufacturers, distributors, contractors and researchers easily run complex roof and attic simulations. This tool employs modern web technologies, usability design, and national average defaults as an interface to annual simulations of hour-by-hour, whole-building performance using the world-class simulation tools DOE-2.1E and AtticSim in order to provide estimated annual energy and cost savings. In addition to cool reflective roofs, RSC simulates multiple roof and attic configurations including different roof slopes, above sheathing ventilation, radiant barriers, low-emittance roof surfaces, duct location, duct leakage rates, multiple substrate types, and insulation levels. A base case and energy-efficient alternative can be compared side-by-side to estimate monthly energy. RSC was benchmarked against field data from demonstration homes in Ft. Irwin, California; while cooling savings were similar, heating penalty varied significantly across different simulation engines. RSC results reduce cool roofing cost-effectiveness thus mitigating expected economic incentives for this countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. This paper consolidates comparison of RSC s projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, AtticSim, Micropas, and EnergyPlus, and presents preliminary analyses. RSC s algorithms for capturing radiant heat transfer and duct interaction in the attic assembly are considered major contributing factors to increased cooling savings and heating penalties. Comparison to previous simulation-based studies, analysis on the force multiplier of RSC cooling savings and heating penalties, the role of radiative heat exchange in an attic assembly, and changes made for increased accuracy of the duct model are included.

  6. Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. An analysis of hourly load data indicates that the offices and retail stores in our sample provided significant demand response, while the restaurants did not. Thermostat data provides further evidence that restaurants attempted to precool and reduce AC service during event hours, but were unable to because their air-conditioning units were undersized. On a 100 F reference day, load impacts of all participants during events averaged 14%, while load impacts of office and retail buildings (excluding restaurants) reached 20%. Overall, pilot participants including restaurants had 2007-2008 summer energy savings of 20% and bill savings of 30%. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability of customers on dynamic rates to respond to intermittent price events.

  7. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  8. A stochastic thermostat algorithm for coarse-grained thermomechanical modeling of large-scale soft matters: Theory and application to microfilaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As all-atom molecular dynamics method is limited by its enormous computational cost, various coarse-grained strategies have been developed to extend the length scale of soft matters in the modeling of mechanical behaviors. However, the classical thermostat algorithm in highly coarse-grained molecular dynamics method would underestimate the thermodynamic behaviors of soft matters (e.g. microfilaments in cells), which can weaken the ability of materials to overcome local energy traps in granular modeling. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics modeling of microfilament fragments (G-actin clusters), a new stochastic thermostat algorithm is developed to retain the representation of thermodynamic properties of microfilaments at extra coarse-grained level. The accuracy of this stochastic thermostat algorithm is validated by all-atom MD simulation. This new stochastic thermostat algorithm provides an efficient way to investigate the thermomechanical properties of large-scale soft matters.

  9. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  10. Asphalt roofing industry Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy modified bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Request for Emissions Testing at Four Asphalt Roofing and Processing Facilities was submitted by the US EPA Emission Standards Division (ESD), Minerals and Inorganic Chemicals Group (MICG) to the Emission Measurement Center (EMC). The Emission Measurement Center directed Midwest Research Institute (MRI) to conduct emissions testing at asphalt roofing plants. This report presents results of MRI`s FTIR and Method 25A testing conducted at US Intec in Port Arthur, Texas. The field measurements were performed in September 1997 under several test conditions for both controlled and uncontrolled emissions.

  11. Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on top of a building to provide several benefits, including reduced energy use, reduced air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, and enhanced water quality. For more...

  12. Become One In A Million: Partnership Updates. Million Solar Roofs and Interstate Renewable Energy Council Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tombari, C.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Million Solar Roofs Initiative (MSR) is a unique public-private partnership aimed at overcoming market barriers for photovoltaics (PV), solar water heating, transpired solar collectors, solar space heating and cooling, and pool heating. This report contains annual progress reports from 866 partners across the United States.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    decisions by offering design requirements and establishing building codes. Over the last decade, muchPreliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use

  14. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms – demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

  15. Green Roof Media Selection forGreen Roof Media Selection for the Minimization of Pollutantthe Minimization of Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Decreased roofing costs Increased insulation and energy efficiencyIncreased insulation and energy efficiency ­­ U for retrofits Tested membranes highly recommendedTested membranes highly recommended ­­ Plastic root barrier above membrane?Plastic root barrier above membrane? ­­ Flood testing and leak detection units

  16. Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

  17. Effect of Surface Mass on Roof Thermal Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.; Shipp, P. H.; Sanders, J. P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF SURFACE MASS ON ROOF THERMAL PERFORMANCE KENNETH E. WILKES, PAUL H. SHIPP, AND JOHN P. SANDERS Staff Members Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee ABSTRACT The roof of a building is exposed to the most severe... 10 a0 so 4a 30 0 I1 Y J4 49 I0 12 M 88 101 110 IS1 144 158 Ilpra I. Cq.ria*n of I(ururm4 ad ?rdIoud mrm. T-raru... .I!A Y.&t Pluu. for am lara luf krh Wan hmr ?*rid T-rmauma 01- tor rr.41otlnu HEAVY PAVER, MAY 1 - MAY 7, 1986 -MI CHLn J I I...

  18. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Innovative Metal Building Roof Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Daniel James [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to meet the coming energy codes, multiple layers of various insulation types will be required. The demand for greater efficiency has pushed insulation levels beyond the cavity depth. These experiments show the potential for improving metal building roof thermal performance. Additional work is currently being done by several stakeholders, so the data is expanding. These experiments are for research and development purposes, and may not be viable for immediate use.

  19. Roofing as a Contributor to Urban Runoff Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    at: http://www.eng.ua.edu/~rpitt Map courtesy of U.S. Geological Website on Acid Rain #12;2 Roof · Summer 2002: Laboratory TCLP (acid rain simulation) · Fall/Winter 2002 and Spring 2003: Laboratory Testing Set-Up at Penn State Harrisburg During Rain Event, August 2005 pH Rainfall pH Range: 3.9 ­ 6

  20. A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

  1. Thermal resistance of prototypical cellular plastic roof insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooperative industry/government project was initiated in 1989 to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents in polyisocyanurate (PIR) boardstock for roofing applications. Five sets of PIR boardstock were produced to industry specifications for current roof insulation technology. The boardstock allowed the performance of four alternative blowing agents (HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and two blends of HCFC-123 and HCFC-14lb) to compared to CFC-11. Laboratory and field tests show the relative thermal performance of the individual PIR boards. One set of laboratory tests show the thermal conductivity (k) from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) of boards prior to installation and as a function of time after exposure to field conditions in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (0, 9, and 15 months). Another set of laboratory tests show k as a function of aging time 24{degree}C (75{degree}F) and 65{degree}C (150{degree}F) for full-thickness, half-thickness, and quarter-thickness specimens. These test results and modeling calculations show the value of thin specimen testing as an accelerated aging procedure. 24 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

  3. Comparison of the Perception of Facility Managers on Green Roofs Attributes and Barriers to their Implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrer Garcia, Eduardo R

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    on Green Roofs Wong et, al (2005) conducted a study on perception of building professionals on the issues of green roofs. The objective of the study was to determine the current perception of building professionals on the issues of green roof... development and any conflicting opinions among them. Wong et, al (2005) used two components for the field study, a self-administered postal survey questionnaire and interviews. The survey was conducted among three target populations, architectural firms...

  4. Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

  5. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  6. Attic or Roof? An Evaluation of Two Advanced Weatherization Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines implementation of advanced retrofit measures in the context of a large-scale weatherization program and the archetypal Chicago brick bungalow. One strategy applies best practice air sealing methods and a standard insulation method to the attic floor. The other strategy creates an unvented roof assembly using materials and methods typically available to weatherization contractors. Through implementations of the retrofit strategies in a total of eight (8) test homes, the research found that the two different strategies achieve similar reductions in air leakage measurement (55%) and predicted energy performance (18%) relative to the pre-retrofit conditions.

  7. Evaluation of a Direct Evaporative Roof-Spray Cooling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasco, A.; Pittard, R.; Kondepudi, S. N.; Somasundaram, S.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    involved several steps. PVC tubing, with special spray orifices, was mounted on wooden blodts. Solenoid valves were connected to the PVC tubing and then to the controller which activated them. The controller was also connected to a 95 degree F thermo.... The remainder of the thermocouples were used with thermal flux meters to measure the heat flux through the roof. Four thermal flux meters were built by placing a piece of plexiglass (k = 0.1125 Btulh ft F) with a thermo-. couple on each side between two...

  8. Urban Heat Islands: Cool Roof Infrastructure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept. ofUSA RSDepartment of Energy Updated31,Cool Roof

  9. Keystone XL I DRIVE A HYBRID CAR AND SET MY THERMOSTAT AT 80F IN THE WASHINGTON, DC, SUMMER. I USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Mark A.

    on the Keystone XL pipeline to transport crude oil from the tar sands deposits of Alberta, Canada, and from energy future. Opponents of Keystone XL have been right to contest construction of the pipeline with- outKeystone XL I DRIVE A HYBRID CAR AND SET MY THERMOSTAT AT 80°F IN THE WASHINGTON, DC, SUMMER. I USE

  10. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan; William M. Goodman

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  11. Innovative Water Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaber, F. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management 1.Rain gardens 2.Porous pavement 3.Green roofs Hydrologic Cycle ISSUES ? Water Conservation ? Is there enough? ? Can conservation make a difference? ? Water Quality ? Contamination/pollution due to runoff Eagle...-drought conditions ? A breakdown of energy use by department shows that the Austin Water Utility uses 60% of the total amount of energy used by the City of Austin. What Can We Do? ? Water Conservation ? Indoors ? Bathrooms ? Kitchen ? Showers ? Laundry...

  12. Digging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    microbes across the greater New York City area is locally variable. Green roof fungal communities wereDigging the New York City Skyline: Soil Fungal Communities in Green Roofs and City Parks Krista L a number of benefits, including decreased urban heat island effects and reduced energy costs for buildings

  13. Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State for Testing of Models of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems, at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory, Colorado issues considered in this process. Over several decades, researchers affiliated with Wind Engineering

  14. GREEN ROOFS -A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    GREEN ROOFS - A BMP FOR URBAN STORMWATER QUALITY? Brett V. Long1 , A.M.ASCE, Shirley E. Clark2 , M: khb4@psu.edu ABSTRACT The focus of this research is the impact of green roofs on urban stormwater a mix that produced the "best" overall reduction in pollutants from simulated rainwater. Because

  15. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  16. Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    Quantifying air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago Jun Yang a,c,*, Qian Yu b , Peng Gong c t The level of air pollution removal by green roofs in Chicago was quantified using a dry deposition model. The result showed that a total of 1675 kg of air pollutants was removed by 19.8 ha of green roofs in one year

  17. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. The incidents related to rainwater leakage and condensation concerns. Condensation concerns have been extensively studied by others and are not further discussed in this report. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  18. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Szilagyi1,2 and Aaron Schepers3 1 Department of Hydraulic and Water Resources Engineering, Budapest problems across a variety of disciplines [Kunsch, 1998; Szilagyi and Jozsa, 2009a, 2009b; Bhat et al., 2011

  19. Uncertainty analysis and validation of the estimation of effective hydraulic properties: application to green roof

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the hydraulic properties of each component of the GRS, namely bark compost and pozzolan, were ob- tained comparisons with conventional roofs. For that purpose13 they developped an energy balance model adapated to GR

  20. INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing; Fenestration (Page 1 of 3:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal Resistance (R-Value):_________________ Perimeter

  1. Income Tax Deduction for Solar-Powered Roof Vents or Fans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana allows taxpayers to take a deduction on solar-powered roof fans (or vent, also sometimes called an attic fan) installed in a home that the taxpayer owns or leases. The deduction is for 50%...

  2. Reduced Energy and Maintenance Costs Using Polyurethane as a Replacement Roof System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, G. D.

    &M System Facilities Planning Department modified the specifications developed by the Physical Plant for use in new construction. In the retrofit system, the urethane foam was applied to the existing roof system, which added to any pre...

  3. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  4. Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Sustainable Roofscapes: Developing a green roof implementation model for Tucson, AZ BRENT JACOBSEN Advisor: Dr. Margaret Livingston School of Landscape Architecture and Planning College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Special Acknowledgements: The University of Arizona, Technology and Research

  5. The case for cool roofs Ronnen Levinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, RMLevinson@LBL.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    typical of roofing, a national cool roof campaign could save 5.7 quad of net primary energy with a present value of $33B. Net energy conservation could reduce CO2 emissions by 0.25 Gt, and global cooling would years save 3.0 quad of net primary energy with a present value of $15.5B, at little to no extra cost

  6. Metal roofing Shingle roofing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    . Old attics act almost like a pressure cookers. They absorb thermal energy all day long and get hotter

  7. More durable roof coverings such as steel and fiber cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - heating equipment saves money. Tankless water heaters provide hot water on demand at a preset temperature- cement siding is termite- and water-resistant and warrantied to last 50 years. Increasing the amount natural daylighting. Xeriscaping, or using native plants, significantly reduces the need for watering

  8. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  9. Stand Persistence of `prestige' Buffalograss (Bouteloua Dactyloides) [Synonym Buchloe Dactyloides] Grown Under Simulated Green Roof Conditions During Summer in Oklahoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beitz, Mary Kathryn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The purpose of this research was to test the stand persistence of Prestige Buffalograss green roofs under simulated greenhouse conditions using average temperature conditions for… (more)

  10. Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the February 12, 2015, Building America webinar, High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies.

  11. Design Principles and Case Study Analysis for Low Impact Development Practices - Green Roofs, Rainwater Harvesting and Vegetated Swales.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh, Shalini

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis on Low Impact Development (LID) Practices provides design guidelines and principles for three important LID practices: green roofs, rainwater harvesting and bioswales. The… (more)

  12. Building American Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part I: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  13. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. (National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States)); Christian, J.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  14. In situ thermal performance of APP modified bitumen roof membranes coated with reflective coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.D.; Smith, T.L. [National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, IL (United States); Christian, J.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted field research program regarding seven atactic polypropylene (APP) modified bitumen membrane roof systems and four reflective coatings began in 1991. This long-term project is evaluating the performance of various APP modified bitumen membranes (both coated and uncoated), the comparative performance of coating application soon after membrane installation versus preweathering, coating performance, and aspects of recoating. This paper is a progress report on the in situ thermal performance of the various types of coatings compared to the thermal performance of the exposed membrane. The thermal performance of an adjacent ballasted ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) roofing system is also described.

  15. Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal-pillar-and-roof system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Instability leading to coal bumps and nonlinear evolutionary mechanisms for a coal mechanisms of the mechanical system that is composed of the stiff hosts (roof and floor) and the coal pillar using catastrophe theory. It is assumed that the roof is an elastic beam and the coal pillar is a strain

  16. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    India, Mexico, and the United States have signed up to join the Cool Roofs Working Group, which was announced yesterday in Abu Dhabi at the second Clean Energy Ministerial -- a high-level global forum to promote policies and programs that advance clean energy technology, to share lessons learned and best practices and to encourage the transition to a global clean energy economy.

  17. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters

  18. EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    EPIC-RoofNet: An Experimental Testbed for Solar-powered Wireless Sensor Networks Amitangshu Pal through a shared folder. Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, solar harvesting, adaptive protocols experiments on solar-powered sensor nodes. Due to constraints in cost and size, the solar panels

  19. Effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a saltstone vault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang; Hsu, R.H.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone.`` The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SDF is designed for the release of contaminants in a slow, controlled manner over thousands of years. The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Groundwater models were used to predict the fluid flow and contaminant transport at SDF. The models predicted a spatial contaminant concentration distribution in groundwater as a function of time. This study focuses on the roof configuration of Saltstone vault, with special interests in cost-effectiveness. We conducted a study to evaluate the effect of roof slope and thickness on the performance of a Saltstone vault. Four roof configurations were simulated. The tool used for the simulation was ECLIPSE, a finite-difference petroleum reservoir engineering code with an environmental tracer option. Nitrate was used as the ``tracer`` contaminant. In this study, ECLIPSE solves the two-phase two-dimensional flow and transport problem up to 10,000 years. This paper describes a modeling study used to evaluate roof design options for the Saltstone vault.

  20. Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Ten Years at the Calif. Energy Commission & White Roofs to Cool your Building, your City and (this" 32" 37" 42" 50" CEC Max Screen Area (1400 in2 or ~57.4 diagonal inches) Energy Star 3.0 TVs (10 is new !) Cool the World Arthur H. Rosenfeld, Former Commissioner California Energy Commission

  1. Laying the Foundation for a Solar America: The Million Solar Roofs Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strahs, G.; Tombari, C.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technology Program embarks on the next phase of its technology acceptance efforts under the Solar America Initiative, there is merit to examining the program's previous market transformation effort, the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. Its goal was to transform markets for distributed solar technologies by facilitating the installation of solar systems.

  2. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  3. Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

  4. Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.; Gao, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 Research on the Effect of a Planting Roof on the Thermal Load of a Business Building Weijie Zhang Jinshun Wu Yiran Wei Xudong Gao... ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Enve lope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-4-2 room has been made and some theoretical relations between outdoor air temperature and indoor thermal load within certain region have been...

  5. Roof and Attic Design Guidelines for new and retrofit Construction of Homes in Hot and Coild Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; LaFrance, Marc [International Energy Agency] [International Energy Agency

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some guidelines for improving the energy efficiency of roofs and attics are presented and are based on the research of the DOE Building Technology. The results of combined analytical and experimental studies were used to benchmark computer tools, which in turn, were used to simulate homes in hot and cold climates. Adding floor and roof insulation, above deck ventilation, radiant barriers, cool color shingle, metal or tile roofs, sealing the attic floor, sealing the duct system and sealing the attic were simulated to compute the cost of energy savings. Results are prioritized to help building owners make an informed economic decision when contemplating roof and attic retrofits. Sealing the attic floor is a top retrofit option. The sealed attic approach and a new prototype roof assembly an insulated and ventilated roof are good options for retrofit work but have paybacks ranging from 15 to 25 years. A new sealed attic concept was simulated and computations show its simple payback is about 10 to 12 years in hot and cold climates; its first cost is significantly reduced from that of a spray foam approach. For new construction the best option is to keep the ducts out of the attic, make sure the attic floor is sealed and add at least code level of insulation to the ceiling.

  6. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation. [Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  7. Roof system effects on in-situ thermal performance of HCFC polyisocyanurate insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Courville, G.; Graves, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry-produced, permeably-faced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with several different hydrochlorofluorcarbons (HCFCS) is undergoing in-situ testing at the Building Envelopes Research User Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The overall objective of this research is to determine the long term thermal performance differences between PIR foamed with CFC-11 and PIR foamed with HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb and blends of HCFCs. Boards from the same batch were installed in outdoor test facilities and instrumented in part to determine if the insulation thermal performance aging characteristics are dependent on how they are handled and installed in the field. One of the major contributions of this research is the field validation of an accelerated thermal aging procedure. The laboratory measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity (k) of 10-mm-thick slices conducted over a period of less than a year are used to predict the k of 38-50-mm-thick PIR laminated board stock for 12--20 years after production. In situ thermal performance measurements of these well characterized three-year-old boards under white and under black ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) membranes are compared with the accelerated aging procedure and with boards from the same batch in different roofing systems: mechanically attached EPDM, fully adhered EPDM, and built-up roof (BUR). The comparison indicates that this accelerated aging procedure should be seriously considered for providing in-service thermal performance information to building owners and roofing contractors.

  8. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  9. City of Grand Rapids Building Solar Roof Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeClercq, Mark; Martinez, Imelda

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Grand Rapids, Michigan is striving to reduce it environmental footprint. The municipal government organization has established environmental sustainability policies with the goal of securing 100% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. This report describes the process by which the City of Grand Rapids evaluated, selected and installed solar panels on the Water/Environmental Services Building. The solar panels are the first to be placed on a municipal building. Its new power monitoring system provides output data to assess energy efficiency and utilization. It is expected to generate enough clean solar energy to power 25 percent of the building. The benefit to the public includes the economic savings from reduced operational costs for the building; an improved environmentally sustainable area in which to live and work; and increased knowledge about the use of solar energy. It will serve as a model for future energy saving applications.

  10. Selecting a Green Roof Medium for Water Quality Benefits Brett Long, S. ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    evaluated for their abilities to retain the pollutants from a synthetic acid rain. The samples are being all media were able to neutralize the acid rain. Comparing the media for pollutant removal acid rain. Phase I results on the mineral and additive combinations show the expanded shale

  11. Technology in water conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be accomplished with instruments a#22;ached to pipelines at manholes. #27;ese devices ?listen? to the water #16;ow in the pipe; when they detect the characteristic sound of a leak, they report by radio to permanent or mobile collection points. Even a small... leak can be detected. Rainwater catchment may be a good way to replace water from other potable sources. In some situations, this involves using the simple technology of capturing rainfall runo#21; from a roof or another surface. In a hot, dry...

  12. CX-005932: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heater time clocks) and replace roof, retrofit plumbing fixtures, thermostats, occupancy sensors, and lighting fixture replacements at Thalin Hall, 3) conduct feasibility study...

  13. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heater time clocks) and replace roof, retrofit plumbing fixtures, thermostats, occupancy sensors, and lighting fixture replacements at Thalin Hall; 3) conduct feasibility study...

  14. In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual-ity, North Carolina Department of Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    Roofs, and Water Harvesting (AG-588-6). As the use of permeable pavement increases in North Carolina In 2006 and 2007, the Division of Water Qual- ity, North Carolina Department of Environment: permeable pave- ment runoff reduction, clogging, long-term hydrology, and water quality. In this update

  15. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the demand for cooling energy, urban trees indirectly reducesurfaces and shade trees to reduce energy use and improvethe energy savings and GHG benefits of cool roofs and tree

  16. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High-Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part 1: Unvented Roof Systems and Innovative Advanced Framing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on February 12, 2015, focused on methods to design and build roof and wall systems for high performance homes that optimize energy and moisture performance.

  17. Airtightness Results of Roof-Only Air Sealing Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Murry, T.; Mosiman, G.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this second study on solutions to ice dams in 1-1/2 story homes, five test homes located in both cold and very cold climates were analyzed for air leakage reduction rates following modifications by independent contractors on owner-occupied homes. The reason for choosing this house type was they are very common in our area and very difficult to air seal and insulate effectively. Two projects followed a roof-only Exterior Thermal Moisture Management System (ETMMS) process. One project used an interior-only approach to roof air sealing and insulation. The remaining two projects used a deep energy retrofit approach for whole house (foundation wall, above grade wall, roof) air leakage and heat loss reduction. All were asked to provide information regarding project goals, process, and pre and post-blower door test results. Additional air leakage reduction data was provided by several NorthernSTAR Building America industry partners for interior-applied, roof-only modifications on 1-1/2 story homes. The data represents homes in the general market as well as homes that were part of the state of Minnesota weatherization program. A goal was to compare exterior air sealing methods with interior approaches. This pool of data enabled us to compare air tightness data from over 220 homes using similar air seal methods.

  18. Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    Comparison of Software Models for Energy Savings from Cool Roofs Joshua New, Oak Ridge National consolidates comparison of RSC's projected energy savings to other simulation engines including DOE-2.1E, Attic of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO). The simulation engine used in the RSC

  19. Project Overcoat - An Exploration of Exterior Insulation Strategies for 1-1/2-Story Roof Applications in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Mosiman, G.; Huelman, P.; Schirber, T.; Yost, P.; Murry, T.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an alternative method to interior-applied insulation strategies or exterior applied 'band-aids' such as heat tapes and ice belts may help reduce energy needs of millions of 1-1/2 story homes while reducing the risk of ice dam formation. A potential strategy for energy improvement of the roof is borrowed from new construction best practices: Here an 'overcoat' of a continuous air, moisture, and thermal barrier is applied on the outside of the roof structure for improved overall performance. The continuous insulation of this approach facilitates a reduction in thermal bridging which could further reduce energy consumption and bring existing homes closer to meeting the Building America goals for energy reduction. Research favors an exterior approach to deep energy retrofits and ice dam prevention in existing homes. The greatest amount of research focuses on whole house deep energy retrofits leaving a void in roof-only applications. The research is also void of data supporting the hygrothermal performance, durability, constructability, and cost of roof-only exterior overcoat strategies. Yet, contractors interviewed for this report indicate an understanding that exterior approaches are most promising for mitigating ice dams and energy loss and are able to sell these strategies to homeowners.

  20. Comparative laboratory evaluation of resin-grouted roof bolt elements. Report of Investigations/1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartels, J.R.; Pappas, D.M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In laboratory testing, the Bureau of Mines established criteria by which common resin-grouted roof-bolting systems can be evaluated and compared. Ultimate strength and stiffness were determined for nontensioned full-column, point-anchor, tensioned full-column, and debondable resin-grouted bolts, and for variations on full-column bolts. Bolt performances were compared using the performance of the 3/4-in full-column resin-grouted bolt as the standard. New and innovative systems can also be qualitatively compared against this standard. Various host mediums were used in the testing: sandstone, concrete, simulated coal, simulated shale, and plaster. Bolt performances expected in other mediums can be inferred from the response patterns obtained in these mediums.

  1. Entanglement monogamy of multipartite higher-dimensional quantum systems using convex-roof extended negativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong San Kim; Anirban Das; Barry C. Sanders

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose replacing concurrence by convex-roof extended negativity (CREN) for studying monogamy of entanglement (MoE). We show that all proven MoE relations using concurrence can be rephrased in terms of CREN. Furthermore we show that higher-dimensional (qudit) extensions of MoE in terms of CREN are not disproven by any of the counterexamples used to disprove qudit extensions of MoE in terms of concurrence. We further test the CREN version of MoE for qudits by considering fully or partially coherent mixtures of a qudit W-class state with the vacuum and show that the CREN version of MoE for qudits is satisfied in this case as well. The CREN version of MoE for qudits is thus a strong conjecture with no obvious counterexamples.

  2. Design, development and validation of a training system for roof bolt equipment operators. Open file report, 21 September 1978-10 April 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinton, W.M. Jr.; Menzer, G.W.; Reilly, R.E.; Baker, R.M.

    1982-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the approach, procedures, and results of a program to develop training materials for roof bolter operators. The objective of the program was to design and produce a training sequence which would prepare roof bolter trainees for job performance. Data were collected and analyzed using the general procedures of Instructional Systems Development (ISD). Input data came from previous roof bolter training analysis program. These data were expanded and structured through a series of ISD steps: objectives hierarchies, media selection, syllabus, lesson specifications, and training materials development. The resulting program consisted of an ordered sequence of 15 lessons. The media mix for the 15 lessons included lectures, slide-tape lessons, and hands-on instruction using operational roof bolters. Contents of all lessons were reviewed and approved by the Bureau of Mines.

  3. DYNAMIC THERMALLY-DISCONNECTED BUILDING ENVELOPES A NEW PARADIGM FOR WALLS AND ROOFS IN LOW ENERGY BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes numerical and experimental analysis of a novel design concept. Traditionally the thermal design of building envelope assemblies is based on a static energy flow. However, building envelopes are subject to varying environmental conditions. This mismatch between the steady-state principles used in the design of roofs and walls and their dynamic operation results in relatively low thermal efficiency. Design work in support of the development of zero energy houses showed that conventional insulations may not be the most cost effective energy solution. Testing conducted on several strategies to thermally-disconnect wall and roof components showed 70% to 90% reductions in peak hour loads as compared to conventional building practice.

  4. The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a progress report on the initial results of laboratory test on a set of prototypical, experimental, polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminate boardstock produced to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents. All boardstock was produced from the same formulation and was not optimized for thermal performance. Boardstock made in the future may differ in performance from this set. Thermal resistance values are reported for PIR boards prepared with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, and two blends of HCFC-123 and HCFC-141b. The primary purpose of the laboratory tests is to answer a key question: will foams produced with the alternative blowing agents yield the same outstanding thermal properties obtained with CFC-11 The CFC problem is enormous. Reductions in the production of CFC-11 and CFC-12 may lead to less efficient substitutes and increase annual US energy consumption for building applications alone by one (10{sup 15}Btu) or more (1). The current effort is a cooperative industry/government program to avoid this undesirable effect by establishing the viability of alternative blowing agents. The research project for CFC alternatives resulted from two workshops that involved participants from industry, government, and academia (2). At the initial workshop the participants prioritized 29 research projects of a CFC research menu. The second workshop focused on a single cooperative project, the long-term performance of substitute insulations containing HCFC-123 and HCFC-141b for roofing applications. 20 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling energy in India. Meteorological simulations in this study indicated that a reduction of 2C in air temperature in the Hyderabad area would be likely if a combination of increased surface albedo and vegetative cover are used as urban heat-island control strategies. In addition, air-temperature reductions on the order of 2.5-3.5C could be achieved if moderate and aggressive heat-island mitigation measures are adopted, respectively. A large-scale deployment of mitigation measures can bring additional indirect benefit to the urban area. For example, cooling outside air can improve the efficiency of cooling systems, reduce smog and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and indirectly reduce pollution from power plants - all improving environmental health quality. This study has demonstrated the effectiveness of cool-roof technology as one of the urban heat-island control strategies for the Indian industrial and scientific communities and has provided an estimate of the national energy savings potential of cool roofs in India. These outcomes can be used for developing cool-roof building standards and related policies in India. Additional field studies, built upon the successes and lessons learned from this project, may be helpful to further confirm the scale of potential energy savings from the application of cooler roofs in various regions of India. In the future, a more rigorous meteorological simulation using urbanized (meso-urban) meteorological models should be conducted, which may produce a more accurate estimate of the air-temperature reductions for the entire urban area.

  6. Thermostat Wars | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    It's "one climate fits all" thinking, which would be fine if every office had identical solar heat gain, ventilation, etc.-but they don't. The hot offices need the AC cranked up to...

  7. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Diamond, R.

  8. How people actually use thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Parker, D.

  9. How people actually use thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

  10. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165-174. Shipworth, M. ,and sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.timer/programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

  11. How people actually use thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

  12. How people actually use thermostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

  13. Smart Thermostats in Residential Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Current Research...

  14. Programmable Thermostats | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new Climate ActionCountry

  15. Smart Thermostats in Residential Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment of Energy Smart Meters HelpSmart

  16. Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1 1/2-Story Homes in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

  17. Design and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed roof by using the developed computational tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roof by using the developed computational tools 031.PDF Keywords: Architectural Geometry, Procedural an innovative computational design tool used to edit architectural geometry interactively and demonstratesDesign and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed

  18. A new comprehensive semiempirical approach to calculate three-phase water/hydrocarbons equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandia, Bagus Krisna

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et a/. ' worked on n-butane and water systems in both two- and three-phase regions. McKetta and Katz '' investigated the mutual solubility of a methane/n-butane/water system in two-phase and three-phase regions. Kobayashi and Katz" worked... on propane and water in both two- and three-phase regions. Wehe and McKetta reported the mutual solubility of an n-butane/i-butane/water system. Anthony and McKetta" provided similar data on the propane/propylene/water system. Roof" investigated the vapor...

  19. Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dieckmann, John T. (Belmont, MA); Nowicki, Brian J. (Watertown, MA); Teagan, W. Peter (Acton, MA); Zogg, Robert (Belmont, MA)

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A water heater and storage tank assembly comprises a housing defining a chamber, an inlet for admitting cold water to the chamber, and an outlet for permitting flow of hot water from the chamber. A compressor is mounted on the housing and is removed from the chamber. A condenser comprises a tube adapted to receive refrigerant from the compressor, and winding around the chamber to impart heat to water in the chamber. An evaporator is mounted on the housing and removed from the chamber, the evaporator being adapted to receive refrigerant from the condenser and to discharge refrigerant to conduits in communication with the compressor. An electric resistance element extends into the chamber, and a thermostat is disposed in the chamber and is operative to sense water temperature and to actuate the resistance element upon the water temperature dropping to a selected level. The assembly includes a first connection at an external end of the inlet, a second connection at an external end of the outlet, and a third connection for connecting the resistance element, compressor and evaporator to an electrical power source.

  20. Saving public resources: Tips for conserving energy and water in home and landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the soil. Many homeowners are conserving water by catching rainwater. At the workshops, Billy Kniffen, AgriLife Extension program specialist, said rainwater harvesting can be as small as collecting rain in a small rain barrel or as large as collecting... system for using the rain- water as drinking water in his home. For every 1 inch of rainfall, about 6 gallons of water are collected per square foot of roof area, he said. The main components needed to set up a rainwater harvesting system are: 1...

  1. Effect of Saltstone Vault Roof Configuration on the Rate of Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, R.H.; Yu, A.D.; Lam, Poh-Sang

    1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is mixed with slag, flyash, and cement to form a grout-like material called ``Saltstone``. The Saltstone is poured into concrete vaults constructed at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The impact of SDF on groundwater has been studied in a radiological performance assessment (PA). Sophisticated groundwater models were used to predict the groundwater flow and contaminant transport problems. The modeling effort was divided into two parts: the unsaturated-zone model and the saturated zone model. One of the major performance objectives is to show that the impacted groundwater will be in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act.

  2. Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartment ofCreatingCell Research |ofStay Above Water

  3. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    France of the Building Technologies Program. The IrBCP project team members are Andre? Desjarlais, William Miller, Tom Petrie, Jan Kosny and Achilles Karagiozis, all of ORNL’s Buildings Envelope Program. The Metal Construction Association and its affiliate members.... Beal, D., and S. Chandra. 1995. “The Measured Summer Performance of Tile Roof Systems and Attic Ventilation Strategies in Hot Humid Climates.” In Proceedings of the Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings VI. U.S. DOE/ORNL...

  4. Performance of powder-filled evacuated panel insulation in a manufactured home roof cavity: Tests in the Large Scale Climate Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, T.W.; Kosny, J.; Childs, P.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale section of half the top of a single-wide manufactured home has been studied in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A small roof cavity with little room for insulation at the eaves is often the case with single-wide units and limits practical ways to improve thermal performance. The purpose of the current tests was to obtain steady-state performance data for the roof cavity of the manufactured home test section when the roof cavity was insulated with fiberglass batts, blown-in rock wool insulation or combinations of these insulations and powder-filled evacuated panel (PEP) insulation. Four insulation configurations were tested: (A) a configuration with two layers of nominal R{sub US}-7 h {center_dot} ft{sup 2} {center_dot} F/BTU (R{sub SI}-1.2 m{sup 2} {center_dot} K/W) fiberglass batts; (B) a layer of PEPs and one layer of the fiberglass batts; (C) four layers of the fiberglass batts; and (D) an average 4.1 in. (10.4 cm) thick layer of blown-in rock wool at an average density of 2.4 lb/ft{sup 3} (38 kg/m{sup 3}). Effects of additional sheathing were determined for Configurations B and C. With Configuration D over the ceiling, two layers of expanded polystyrene (EPS) boards, each about the same thickness as the PEPs, were installed over the trusses instead of the roof. Aluminum foils facing the attic and over the top layer of EPS were added. The top layer of EPS was then replaced by PEPs.

  5. The technical viability of alternative blowing agents in polyisocyanurate roof insulation: A cooperative industry/government project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Wendt, R.L.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the cooperative industry/government program to establish the viability of alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The project was initiated in 1989 following two workshops that focused on needed research on thermal insulation blown with substitutes for CFC-11 and CFC-12. The project is directed by a steering committee of representatives of the sponsors and of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the project is to determine if the performance of polyisocyanurate (PIR) roof insulation foam boards blown with alternate agents differs from the performance of boards blown with CFC-1. This report describes apparent thermal conductivity (k) results obtained from field and laboratory tests from 1989 to 1992 on a set of experimental PIR laminate boardstock produced to evaluate the viability of alternative hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as blowing agents. All boardstock was manufactured from similar formulations that were not optimized for thermal performance. Commercial broadstock made in the future may differ in performance from this set. The PIR boards were prepared with CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b.

  6. Fuel Economy and Emissions Effects of Low Tire Pressure, Open Windows, Roof Top and Hitch-Mounted Cargo, and Trailer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To quantify the fuel economy (FE) effect of some common vehicle accessories or alterations, a compact passenger sedan and a sport utility vehicle (SUV) were subjected to SAE J2263 coastdown procedures. Coastdowns were conducted with low tire pressure, all windows open, with a roof top or hitch-mounted cargo carrier, and with the SUV pulling an enclosed cargo trailer. From these coastdowns, vehicle dynamometer coefficients were developed which enabled the execution of vehicle dynamometer experiments to determine the effect of these changes on vehicle FE and emissions over standard drive cycles and at steady highway speeds. The FE penalty associated with the rooftop cargo box mounted on the compact sedan was as high as 25-27% at higher speeds, where the aerodynamic drag is most pronounced. For both vehicles, use of a hitch mounted cargo tray carrying a similar load resulted in very small FE penalties, unlike the rooftop cargo box. The results for the SUV pulling a 3500 pound enclosed cargo trailer were rather dramatic, resulting in FE penalties ranging from 30%, for the city cycle, to 50% at 80 mph, at which point significant CO generation indicated protective enrichment due to high load. Low tire pressure cases resulted in negligible to 10% FE penalty depending on the specific case and test point. Driving with all four windows open decreased FE by 4-8.5% for the compact sedan, and 1-4% for the SUV.

  7. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drives Water conservation Water heaters Windows Exit signsThermostats Drain water heat recovery Water heater heatpumps Solar water heaters Motor retrofit New/replacement

  8. In-situ and thin-specimen aging of experimental polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field and laboratory aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternatives to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-14lb. The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) using techniques that meet ASTM C 114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). Results on laminate boards with facers provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The observed laboratory increase in k was between 8% and 11% for a 240 day field exposure in the RTRA. A thin-specimen aging procedure established the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C (75{degree}F and 150{degree}F) for up to 300 days. An exponential dependency of k with the quantity (diffusion coefficient X time){sup {1/2}}/ thickness, provide effective diffusion coefficients for air components into the foams and blowing agent out of the foams. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited k-values 3 to 16% (average 9.4%) above CFC-11 foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 400 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain K as a function of mean temperature on a week by week basis. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-14B under a black and under a white membrane is reported. 29 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air sealing cracks; and installing programmable thermostats, energy-efficient replacement water heaters, heat pumps, air conditioners,

  10. Solar hot water system installed at Mobile, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the solar energy hot water system installed at LaQuinta Motor Inn Inc., at Mobile, Alabama. The building is a 122 unit motel. The system consists of six rows of ten collectors and three rows of eleven collectors (1990 square feet) mounted on the roof. Griswald flow control valves were installed to regulate the flow to each row. Two Heliotrope electronic thermometers with a combined capability of measuring the temperatures of 22 different locations were installed for monitoring purposes. Engineering drawings, component specifications, and operator instructions are included.

  11. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  12. MODELING AND CONTROL OF THERMOSTATICALLY CONTROLLED LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analyt- ical models) is well matched to the role of load following. Re- search into the behavior of TCLs began with the work was then employed in a minimum variance control law to demonstrate the load following capability of a population

  13. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market conditions or periods of critical peak demand. Since residential energy consumption is dominated by HVAC

  14. Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Peffer, T. ,on 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in BuildingsSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings References

  15. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 349-360.

  16. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    house: Smart Phone applications USB port for setup U-Snap™ port Plug-N-Go Networking ™ POWER SUPPLY Battery

  17. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote control Control; controlling Feedback control Temperature control Measure humidity Upper limit of temperature Lower limit of temperature Cooling

  18. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

  19. A persuasive GPS-controlled thermostat system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Manu, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 10 weeks of data from a couple living in an instrumented home, we report on the potential of context-aware power management for energy saving. We identify an opportunity to save on heating and cooling using a system ...

  20. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of home heating controls in the UK 60 . Itmobile phones to the home’s heating and cooling system sothe home and track time of operation for heating and cooling

  1. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some Recent Research into Home Heating. Journal of ConsumerLiving in cold homes after heating improvements: Evidencehome: A comparative study of support aids for central heating

  2. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the deployment of smart meters in California andappliances, gateways, HEDs, smart meters, etc. using varioususe of electricity. Smart Meter ( Interval Meter): A Smart

  3. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165-174. Shipworth, M. ,timer/programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. National

  4. Opower Thermostat App | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarter Jump

  5. Tips: Programmable Thermostats | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpg TinaLaundry

  6. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating, cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remote

  7. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings, Californiain peak building load (a key concern for Demand ResponseBuilding Energy Code Requirements: Title 24 .. 30 Demand Response..

  8. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measures on Residential Air Conditioner Loads. Proc. ACEEEDeterminants of Central Air Conditioner Duty Cycles. Proc.at the number of air conditioners that might actually

  9. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t y (2009). 11. Pacific Gas &Electric, Go Solar California:California Solar Initiative (2008). A consumer's guide toprograms such as the California Solar Initiative (CSI) to

  10. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    d b y t h e a n g l e d solar panel F i g u r e 62: C a l cK l e i s s l , C h a i r Solar panels were mounted w i t hthe optimal angles for solar panels [9], i n this study both

  11. Roofing Moisture Tolerance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource ProgramEnergyMaterials: Sulfur K-edge XANESMoisture

  12. Building America Case Study: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

  13. Green Roofs: Optimizing the Water Quality of Rooftop Runoff Brett Long, Dr. Shirley E. Clark, Dr. Katherine Baker, Dr. Robert Berghage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    for pollutant retention from synthetic acid rain containing nutrients and metals. Once the mineral portion Runoff pH is elevated compared to the acid rain, indicating neutralization of the acid rain retention of total phosphorus from the acid rain occurs within the fine grade expanded shale (and at much

  14. Energy Efficiency Retrofits for U.S. Housing: Removing the Bottlenecks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardhan, Ashok; Jaffee, Dwight; Kroll, Cynthia; Wallace, Nancy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HVAC • thermostatwater heater • lighting Billing analysisLeakage Appliances • Water heater • Refrigerator • Washinginsulated ducts  Windows  Water heater  Heating equipment 

  15. Effects of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the properties of model water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mohori?; B. Hribar-Lee; V. Vlachy

    2015-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for rotational and translational motions were used to study the effects of these degrees of freedom on the structure of water at a fixed density. To describe water molecules, we used the SPC/E model. The results indicate that an increase of the rotational temperature, $T_\\textrm{R}$, causes a significant breaking of the hydrogen bonds. This is not the case, at least not to such an extent, when the translational temperature, $T_\\textrm{T}$, is raised. The probability of finding an empty spherical cavity (no water molecule present) of a given size, strongly decreases with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, but this only marginally affects the free energy of the hydrophobe insertion. The excess internal energy increases proportionally with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, while an increase of $T_\\textrm{T}$ yields a much smaller effect at high temperatures. The diffusion coefficient of water exhibits a non-monotonous behaviour with an increase of the rotational temperature.

  16. Effects of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on the properties of model water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohori?, T; Vlachy, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for rotational and translational motions were used to study the effects of these degrees of freedom on the structure of water at a fixed density. To describe water molecules, we used the SPC/E model. The results indicate that an increase of the rotational temperature, $T_\\textrm{R}$, causes a significant breaking of the hydrogen bonds. This is not the case, at least not to such an extent, when the translational temperature, $T_\\textrm{T}$, is raised. The probability of finding an empty spherical cavity (no water molecule present) of a given size, strongly decreases with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, but this only marginally affects the free energy of the hydrophobe insertion. The excess internal energy increases proportionally with an increase of $T_\\textrm{R}$, while an increase of $T_\\textrm{T}$ yields a much smaller effect at high temperatures. The diffusion coefficient of water exhibits a non-monotonous behaviour with an increase of the rotational ...

  17. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  18. u.s. DEPARTIvIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems. installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator...

  19. RECIPIENT: NREL u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems, installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator...

  20. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJ ECT MANAG EM EN T CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems, installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator...

  1. U.S. DEPARTMENT OFllNERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems, installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator...

  2. u.s. DFP.'\\RThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of thermostat settingS, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems, installation of efficient lighting, improvements in generator...

  3. .s. DEPARTrvIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    not limited to: programmed lowering of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems, installation of efficient...

  4. PMC·I'Fl.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    not limited to: programmed lowering of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot water systems. installation of efficient...

  5. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

  7. Marketing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management, water conservation programs Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 17 public information programs and materials that increase awareness about regional water issues. The company recently opened the TecH2O, a water resource learning center...tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many...

  8. Joint Industry/Government Research Project: Comparison of thermal aging for roof exposures and thin-specimens of experimental polyisocyanurate insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, R.S.; Christian, J.E.; McElroy, D.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field exposures and laboratory aging of a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternative to chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C using techniques that meet ASTM C 1114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). The increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA) was confirmed by independent laboratory tests. The observed laboratory increase in k was about the same, between 17 and 22%, for all three blowing agent foams for a 450 day field exposure in the RTRA. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C for up to 460 days. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited long-term k-values 7 to 15% above those for CFC foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 680 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain k as a function of mean insulation temperature on a week-by-week basis. The k-values derived from the field data provided effective diffusion coefficients for air in the foam, which were within 7% of those obtained from the thin-specimen aging procedure at 24%C except for one sample. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-141b under a black and under a white membrane is reported, and data suggest that differences are relatively small. 26 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

  10. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    INSIDE UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT PROTECTING NEBRASKAĂ­S WATER RESOURCES THROUGH RESEARCH with a vision, thereĂ­s an untapped market using resources right under our feet,Ă® the University of Nebraska outdoors in India, Bangladesh, China and Viet- nam. Thousands of them have been grown to harvest

  11. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for windows/sashes, programmable thermostats, water...

  12. DEP.~ThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    not limited to: programmed lowering of thermostat settings, placement of timers on hot water heaters, installation of solar hot waler systems, inslallation of effiCient lighting,...

  13. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  14. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  15. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  16. DOE's Roof Savings Calculator (RSC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    energy consumption, 2006 Source: Building Energy Data Book, U.S. DOE, Prepared by D&R International, Ltd and windows Source: Building Energy Data Book, U.S. DOE, Prepared by D&R International, Ltd., September 2008. Figure 3. Commercial energy loads attributed to envelope and windows Source: Building Energy Data Book, U

  17. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCool

  18. Roof Separation Highlights Bolting Priority

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource ProgramEnergyMaterials: Sulfur K-edge XANES

  19. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Surfaces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department ofEnergyDeployment ofAccelerated

  20. Caprock Roofing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacility | Open EnergySolar33.6850215°,HatterasCapitaline

  1. Computerized Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

  2. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  3. Water Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

  4. Demand Response Projects: Technical and Market Demonstrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -progress) ­ AMI dispatched remote control of water heaters and smart thermostats Wind Integration Pilot Project heaters, smart thermostats Residential Wind Integration Pilot (41 customer units) · Water heaters, thermal Pacific Northwest GridwiseTM Testbed Program (2005 ­ 2007) ­ Internet based remote control of water

  5. Investigating Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................... 193 Lesson 11 Water and Pollution........................................................................................................................ 195 Activity 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere...! ............................................................................. 205 Record Sheet 11.1, Pollution, Pollution, Everywhere! ..................................................................... 207 Activity 11.2, Pollution at Its Source...

  6. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  7. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  8. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-fired Storage Water Heater .. 418 Assess California’s Small Gas Storage Water Heaters Small Gas Storage Water Heater Market The objective of

  9. Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

  10. Columbia Gas of Ohio- Programmable Thermostat Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Ohio offers professional Facility/Building Energy Audits to determine the potential for natural gas savings encouraging matching funds and requiring submittal of final energy audit...

  11. DRAFT October 4, 2007 Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to move on from the concept of a simple open fire to a central heating system. They utilized under (the Electric Heat Regulator Co.) eventually became Ho (Appliance Standards). 2 #12;DRAFT October 4, 2007 A Brief Historical Perspective Although heating

  12. Training Your Thermostat to Save Money... and Energy! | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 th ,TopDepartment of Energy

  13. Program Your Thermostat for Automatic Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartment ofThermoChem RecoveryA09 More09 MoreEnhancedAllison

  14. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

  15. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  16. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    in water heater. Scale buildup in pipes and re duced water flow. Hard water due to calcium and magnesiumHousehold Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension Many areas have water containing impurities from natural or artificial sources. These impurities may

  17. Environmental controls for underground coal gasification: ground-water effects and control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.; Raber, E.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasfication (UCG) promises to provide economic access to an enormous deep-coal resource. It is, therefore, of considerable importance to develop appropriate environmental controls for use in conjunction with the UCG process. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted three UCG experiments at its Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Environmental studies are being conducted in conjunction with these UCG experiments, including an investigation of changes in local ground-water quality and subsidence effects. Ground-water monitoring and geotechnical measurements have helped to clarify the environmental significance of reaction-product contaminants that remain underground following gasification, and the implications of cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection. These investigations have led to the development of preliminary plans for a specific method of ground water quality restoration utilizing activated carbon adsorption. Unconventional technologies are also being investigated that may be appropriate for restoring ground water that has been contaminated as a result of UCG operations. These water treatment technologies are being explored as possible supplements to natural controls and process restrictions.

  18. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  19. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health). Water Safety Plans A Water Safety Plan (WSP) is a preventive management approach used to manage threats to a drinking water system--from catchment to consumer. It helps in the · Management of activities

  20. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  1. Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Regional Water Management: Adapting to Uncertain Water Supply and Demand Jim Schneider, Ph · How Nebraska manages water · Dealing with uncertain water supplies: adaptive management #12;Regional-wide, systematic approach · Flexible--Adaptive Management Adaptive Manageme nt #12;Integrated Water Management

  2. Water Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

  3. Protected Water Sources (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for water withdrawals from these sources may still be...

  4. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

  5. Water Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2013 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Light Water Reactor Sustainability ACCOMPLISHMENTS REPORT 2014 Accomplishments Report | Light Water Reactor Sustainability 2 T he mission of the Light Water Reactor...

  8. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL....

  9. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and Materials Disposition InformationInteractionsWater

  10. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout Printable VersionProtectiveWaste to beswim WatchingWaterW

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 1974. "Solar Water Heaters You Can Buy or Build,"RESTRICTOR INSULATE WATER HEATER NIGHT-TIME: THE:RMOSTAT SET$6SQ) Rl\\NGE SPACE HEATER WATER HEATER $2a~ (ENERGY SAVINGS

  12. Drinking Water Problems: Lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

  13. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cadeddu, Maria

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  14. Water watch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

  15. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  16. Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushing, Jim. M.

    · Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

  17. Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

  18. Water-quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F T; Mead, S W; Stuermer, D H

    1982-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the ground water. However, field studies, conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Hoe Creek site, have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer, and contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have provided opportunities to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than the water in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, valuable lessons ere learned concerning groundwater monitoring. A suggested monitoring strategy is discussed.

  19. Bare knuckle and better technics: trajectories of access to safe water in history and in the global south

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, Ben

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H2O disinfection in plastic bottle) Point-of-use ?ltrationbag and wasteland Plastic bottle. roof and sunlight Highstandard, clear plastic (PET) bottles and ?ll them with

  20. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Chapter 14 Water Pollution #12;Factory-style hog farms in North Carolina Each pig produces, September 1999. #12;Hogs killed by flooding #12; Water pollution Common water pollutants Treating water pollution Wastewater treatment and renovation Learning Objectives #12; Water pollution refers

  1. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  2. Grains, Water Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

  4. Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for...

  5. Radioactive contamination of cistern waters along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic Sea by [sup 90]Sr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franic, Z.; Lokobauer, N.; Marovic, G. (Inst. for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia). Radiation Protection Unit)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of radioactive contamination of water samples from cisterns collecting rainwater containing fission products from roofs and other surfaces have been carried out along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic sea since 1968. An exponential decline of radioactivity followed the nuclear moratorium. After the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, higher levels of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr were detected again, with cistern waters being the only environmental samples in Croatia in which elevated [sup 90]Sr activities persisted for several years. For the pre-Chernobyl period, the observed mean residence time of [sup 90]Sr in cistern waters, estimated to be 6.2 [+-] 1.9 y, was similar to that calculated for fallout. Contrary, for the post-Chernobyl time, observed [sup 90]Sr mean residence time was calculated to be considerably shorter, reflecting the tropospheric mean residence time. The annual dose for the critical adult population received from [sup 90]Sr and [sup 137]Cs by drinking cistern water was estimated to be very small, in the 1990's less than few [micro]Sv y[sup [minus]1].

  6. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    current pricing policies and legal structures. In analyzing energy-water relationships, wasteful may be obscured by others such as energy, environment, and quality of life, but in the long run of water to all major social issues is finally driven home. The energy crisis is a case in point. Water

  7. Water Rights (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial...

  8. Reduction of Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, J.

    Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

  9. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plants, water withdrawals for electricity generationelectricity generation in 2009 (33). Water used in thermal electric power plantsplant with CCS technologies requires roughly 1,000 gallons of water for every megawatt-hour of electricity generation (

  10. Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water...

  11. Lawn Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  12. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

  13. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  14. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental policy and integrated water management hasenvironmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

  15. Integrated regional water management: Collaboration or water politics as usual?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark N.; Lippert, Lucas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental policy and integrated water management hastypes of water management organizations, environmental NGOs,environmental and water infrastructure stakeholders involved in Bay Area water management.

  16. Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio...

  17. What's your water footprint?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower... water footprint is the amount of water you directly or indirectly consume. This includes ?virtual water??the amount of water needed to produce everyday things such as food, clothing, and energy. ] What?s your water footprint? tx H2O | pg. 22...

  18. Water Efficiency Goal Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

  19. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  20. Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - Second Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, V. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired); Craddick, William G [ORNL

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1980s various attempts have been made to apply the efficiency of heat pumps to water heating. The products generated in the 80s and 90s were not successful, due in part to a lack of reliability and difficulties with installation and servicing. At the turn of the century, EnvironMaster International (EMI) produced a heat pump water heater (HPWH) based on a design developed by Arthur D. Little (ADL), with subsequent developmental assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ADL. This design was a drop-in replacement for conventional electric water heaters. In field and durability testing conducted by ORNL, it proved to be reliable and saved on average more than 50% of the energy used by the best conventional electric water heater. However, the retail price set by EMI was very high, and it failed in the market. ORNL was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. Several cost saving opportunities were found. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. After some experimentation, a prototype unit was built with a double-wall coil inserted into the tank. When tested it achieved an energy factor (EF) of 2.12 to 2.2 using DOE-specified test procedures. A.O. Smith contacted ORNL in May 2006 expressing their interest in the ORNL design. The prototype unit was shipped to A.O. Smith to be tested in their laboratory. After they completed their test, ORNL analyzed the raw test data provided by A.O. Smith and calculated the EF to be approximately 1.92. The electric resistance heating elements of a conventional electric water heater are typically retained in a heat pump water heater to provide auxiliary heating capacity in periods of high demand. A.O. Smith informed us that when they applied electric resistance backup heating, using the criterion that resistance heat would be applied whenever the upper thermostat saw water temperatures below the heater s nominal setpoint of 135oF, they found that the EF dropped to approximately 1.5. This is an extremely conservative criterion for backup resistance heating. In a field test of the previously mentioned EMI heat pump water heater, residential consumers found satisfactory performance when the criterion for use of electric resistance backup heating was the upper temperature dropping below the set point minus 27 degrees. Applying this less conservative criterion to the raw data from the original A.O. Smith EF tests indicates that electric resistance heating would never have come on during the test, and thus the EF would have remained in the vicinity of 1.9. A.O. Smith expressed concern about having an EF below 2, as that value triggers certain tax advantages and would assist in their marketing of the product. We believe that insertion of additional length of tubing plus a less conservative set point for electric resistance backup heating would remedy this concern. However, as of this writing, A.O. Smith has not decided to proceed with a commercial product.

  1. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  2. Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

  3. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    , effectiveness of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This report is for continued water Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto- sampler and data sonde. The Portland site. Garret Bridge site. 2 #12;Figure 2 Portland site. METHODS The Garrett Bridge site is a full storm-water

  4. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  5. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - air handling systems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment heating Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  9. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  10. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  11. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  12. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING.m~ Mondays, 206 Agricultural Engihee~1n~Build1ng January 2~ January 31' Februar;"'7 February 14 " February 21 Irrigation Development and Implications Recreational Potential Economic Importance of the Sandhills Film

  13. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biodeterioration of plasticised PVC during burial in soilfabric. Polymers used include EPDM, PVC, and TPO. EPDM is aand D) polymerized together. PVC is the ubiquitous polymer

  14. One Cool Roof | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has many benefits; including reducing both the demand for energy use and the resulting air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. OSTI has a proud history of being green --...

  15. Cool Roofs | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCoolCool

  16. Boots on the Roof | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE ISJumpSphereBonitaBooleanElectric

  17. Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalwayHydrothermalMcFarlandSurvey Professionalandis

  18. SolarRoofs com | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information Silver

  19. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  20. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water in Texas sometimes contains potentially harmful chemicals, including benzene. Well owners can learn how to treat their well water to remove these chemicals. 4 pages, 3 images...

  1. General Water Quality (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this water quality rule is to protect, maintain and improve the quality of waters of the State. Any applicant for a federal license, permit or project to conduct any activity...

  2. Water Pollution Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Water Pollution Control Board are tasked with the prevention of pollution in the waters of the state. The Board may adopt rules and...

  3. Outdoor Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    L-438 Outdoor Water Conservation The City of OKLAHOMA CITY UTILITIES DEPARTMENT Oklahoma.JustinQ.Moss 1 #12;2 SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR CREATING A WATER CONSERVING LANDSCAPE 1. GOOD LANDSCAPE PLANNING

  4. A gathering of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

  5. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

  6. State Water Quality (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and...

  7. Water Quality (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state. The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

  8. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .........................................................................................................................7 THE ENERGY INTENSITY OF THE WATER USE CYCLE.........................................................................................9 ENERGY INTENSITY IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support

  9. Walking on water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

  10. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinach Beets Bush, Pole Beans Carrots Cucumbers Eggplant Peas Peppers Summer Squash Pumpkins Tomatoes Watermelon Winter Squash Water

  11. Be Water Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of native or non-invasive adapted trees, shrubs, grasses and flowers that can tolerate temporary wet conditions. A layer of mulch prevents weed growth and aids in filtration. These low spots fill with water during periods of heavy rain, helping...W aterSmart, a water conservation program, uses a unique approach to protect and conserve water quality and quantity in upper Texas Gulf Coast urban landscapes. Part of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program (TCWP), WaterSmart is creating rain...

  12. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    birds, the overall water requirements are minimal and exist only for washing the blades of wind turbines

  13. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

  14. Water Management Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Star Programs ? www.epa.gov/watersense www.energystar.gov ? Conserve Florida Water Clearinghouse ? http://www.conservefloridawater.org/ ? Arizona Department of Water Resources ? www.azwater.gov/conservation The True Cost of Water... Future Demands Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA...

  15. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  16. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the embodied energy in drinking water supply systems: a caselosses to 5% of total drinking water supply for threeResearch Council. Drinking Water Distribution Systems:

  17. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development of the cycle and have gained an in-depth understanding of the governing fundamental knowledge, based on the laws of physics and thermodynamics and verified with our testing results. Through this research, we are identifying optimal working fluid and operating conditions to eventually demonstrate the core technology for space cooling or other applications.

  18. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  19. Energy-Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

  20. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This project is a cooperative effort Bridge, AR and near Portland, AR. The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto;METHODS The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station. It uses an automatic sampler

  1. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  2. PROCEEDINGS Stockholm Water Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    -0127 The Joint Conference 7th Stockholm Water Symposium1 3rd InternationalConference a11 tlie Enviro~~mnent;~l Ma.A.G.M, a Systematic Approach to Lake Water Pollution Assessment, - Eindhoven: University of Technology, Eindhoven Assessment, Water Pollution in the Catchment of Lake Victoria, Dares Salaam, Tanzania, August, 1994

  3. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    -photosynthesis, energy transfer in animals, and so on. Life as we know it is water-centric (and organic carbon 20, 2012 6 / 17 #12;Water availability Total renewable (defined using the water cycle) per-capita, per year. Country cu. m. Congo 275,000 Canada 94,000 Brazil 48,000 Mongolia, Indonesia 13,000 Japan

  4. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  5. Getting their feet wet: Young water researchers learn the ropes, thanks to grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrology. The 2010?2011 grant recipients are examining such topics as the biological treatment of wastewater contaminated with estrogenic compounds and the effect of photovoltaic nanoma- terial roofing on harvested rainwater quality. To learn more...

  6. Getting their feet wet: Young water researchers learn the ropes, thanks to grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Leslie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrology. The 2010?2011 grant recipients are examining such topics as the biological treatment of wastewater contaminated with estrogenic compounds and the effect of photovoltaic nanoma- terial roofing on harvested rainwater quality. To learn more...

  7. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . 7). Nitrate ions are drawn through the membrane pores with elec- trical currents. The nitrate is pulled from the water into a brine waste stream. Ni trate-contaminated water Treated water Nitrate Chloride or hydroxide Exchange resin Figure 6. Ion... and Extension Agricultural Engineer, Texas Cooperative Extension, The Texas A&M University System B-6184 3-08 ' the safe levels of chemicals for U.S. drinking water. The EPA conducts research to determine the level of a contaminant in drinking water...

  8. Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution control program. The WQCA identifies the responsibilities and extent of authority for the Commissioner of the Water Quality...

  9. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  10. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  11. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  12. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  13. Water-quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Stuermer, D.H.

    1983-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual gasification products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the groundwater. However, our field studies at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may be interconnected with the coal aquifer. Contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have enabled us to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. Our preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than that in the gasified coal aquifer. In conducting these field investigations, we have also learned valuable lessons concerning a strategy for groundwater monitoring. 21 figures.

  14. Water quality monitoring at the Hoe Creek test site: review and preliminary conclusions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.T.; Mead, S.W.; Sturmer, D.H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that underground coal gasification (UCG) may introduce a broad range of residual products into the groundwater of a coal aquifer. Sorption of many contaminants by the coal itself is an important factor in restricting the migration of these contaminants in the groundwater. However, our field studies at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming have shown that sorption of organic compounds by coal is not as effective as expected, perhaps because the coal surface area is limited. Furthermore, if severe roof collapse has taken place during gasification, non-coal aquifers located above the gasified coal seam may become interconnected with the cavity. Contaminants may enter these non-coal aquifers, in which sorption is even less effective. The Hoe Creek II and III experiments have enabled us to study the contamination of a sand aquifer located above a gasified coal seam in a hydrological recharge area. The preliminary results indicate that the water in the overlying sand aquifer is much less contaminated with organic compounds than that in the gasified

  15. Water Quality and Quantity Concerns Population growth, increasing water demands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, private water well screening, and soil nutrient management. Water conservation programs of Agri, efficient use, sustainable practices, watershed management and environmental stewardship. Through 660 and utilizing water-conservation practices will be essential to sustain the state's water supply

  16. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

  17. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  18. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  19. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  20. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  1. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Input Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tankthe house. Supply pipe – this is the water heater inlet pipewith refills the water heater with cold water Note: The TANK

  2. home power 114 / august & september 2006 in Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    the great steam-engine catastrophes I had ever read about. Not only that, but my wife Carlene was giving me friends and I were always messing around with stuff. Chemistry sets, model rockets, lawn mower engines on the roof started to make a funny kind of squeal, and we started to see steam coming from the relief valves

  3. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system for harvesting and returning clean water to Lakeharvesting for landscape and species health, and surface water and

  4. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  5. Green Features Tour Duke Environment Hall Landscaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    and irrigation. Rainwater is collected: · From the Duke Environment Hall roof collected from the new building's roof and site paving. The building itself with a variety of water-wise edible plants, and irrigated with recycled rainwater

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Durable Energy Builders, Houston...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    super-insulated roof, 11,500 gallon rainwater cistern to supply most of the home's drinking water, hurricane-proof roof, and triple-pane windows. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home:...

  7. Selecting a new water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

  8. The Mystery of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is essential for our existence on this planet - critical to countless physical, biological, geological and chemical processes - it has defied scientific understanding. Exhibiting peculiar properties such as increased density upon melting and high surface tension, water is one of the most intriguing problems in condensed matter and chemical physics. Current research at SSRL, however, is illuminating the nature of H-bonding, presenting exciting new avenues of research and challenging existing models of water's structure.

  9. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . This compound belongs to a chemical family of fuel oxygenates that enhance gaso- line combustion by increasing oxygen available for the process. Added to gasoline, MTBE has reduced carbon monoxide and ozone emissions by promoting more complete burning.... Texas follows the EPA drinking water advisory of 20 to 40 micrograms per liter. How can MTBE be Removed from Well Water? MTBE requires a specific treatment process for removal from water. Well owners can use granular activated carbon or charcoal...

  10. Water purification in Borexino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giammarchi, M. [Infn Milano (Italy)] [Infn Milano (Italy); Balata, M.; Ioannucci, L.; Nisi, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy)] [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Goretti, A.; Ianni, A. [Princeton University (United States)] [Princeton University (United States); Miramonti, L. [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universitŕ di Milano e Infn (Italy)] [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universitŕ di Milano e Infn (Italy)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Astroparticle Physics and Underground experiments searching for rare nuclear events, need high purity materials to act as detectors or detector shielding. Water has the advantage of being cheap, dense and easily available. Most of all, water can be purified to the goal of obatining a high level of radiopurity. Water Purification can be achieved by means of a combination of processes, including filtration, reverse osmosis, deionization and gas stripping. The Water Purification System for the Borexino experiment, will be described together with its main performances.

  11. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy intensive of the four types—consume 2,951 kWh of electricity per million gallons (3.8 million liters) of treated water

  12. Water Conservation Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal sites across the country are incorporating water efficiency measures as part of their overall comprehensive UESC projects. As it becomes more difficult to secure internal funding for...

  13. Water Pollution Fee (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules....

  14. Water Pollution (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of...

  15. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  16. What's In My Water?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .The salts in conductivity levels are conductivity levels. allow for too much water to evaporate water are not just table high, evaluate other from the surface, or where soils are salt, but are often a individual characteristics naturally high in salts...- tive safety margin. You can have your water analyzed by a government agency or a private company. 13 Salt: an organic or inorganic com- pound that is subject to dissociation when water is added, resulting in a dis- tinct increase in specific anions...

  17. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar thermal production facilities are those with power towers,tower where water or molten salt is flowing to absorb the solar

  18. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Involved in the Selection of Alternatives.. 7 Gasification/liquefaction with Subsequent Transportation. 7 of the Slurry Waste- water as a Function of Residence T

  19. Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

  20. Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E.; Stone, R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

  1. Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    include heat pump outdoor thermostat and defrost timermay include heat pump outdoor thermostat and defrost timer

  2. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    officials on the new Phase II Storm Water NPDES regulations and Best Management Practices available requirements. In addition, they are typically unaware of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that are availableArkansas Water Resources Center STORMWATER POLLUTION PREVENTION BMP WORKSHOP, DEMONSTRATION

  3. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  4. Secondary condenser Cooling water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Receiver Secondary condenser LC LC Reboiler TC PC Cooling water PC FCPC Condenser LC XC Throttling valve ¨ mx my l© ª y s § y m «¬ ly my wx l n® ® x np © ¯ Condenser Column Compressor Receiver Super-heater Decanter Secondary condenser Reboiler Throttling valve Expansion valve Cooling water

  5. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  6. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    states. Recycling of nutrients and organic matter is essential in reducing the need for fertilization closely with colleges, universities and other organizations in Arkansas to address the states water Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point source pollution

  8. Watering the Sun Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Watering the Sun Corridor Managing Choices in Arizona's Megapolitan Area #12;#12;Managing ChoicesSored by Printing generously provided by SRP. Watering the Sun Corridor Tom Buschatzke, City of Phoenix Peter Culp i C y | 5 Introduction............................................7 I. The Sun Corridor

  9. Hardness of water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Oza

    This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and it’s also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

  10. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  11. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

  12. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  13. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

  14. Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Water Management in A PEMFC: Water Transport Mechanism and Material Degradation in Gas Diffusion on the water management of the PEMFC, namely the transport of product water (both liquid and vapor its water management performance and func- tion as indicators of the degradation of GDL material

  15. New "Cool Roof Time Machine" Will Accelerate Cool Roof Deployment |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007TransmissiontoSystem |NevisDepartment

  16. DOE Cool Roof Calculator for Low-Slope or Flat Roofs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases onOrganization FY MiddlePLAN-46847ApprovedDOEDOE ContractDOECool

  17. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Chaplin

    2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

  18. DESIGNER WATER Dr. Torleiv Bilstad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGNER WATER Dr. Torleiv Bilstad Professor of Environmental Engineering, University of Stavanger #12;Pictures #12;OIL ­ GAS - WATER - SOLIDS MANAGEMENT #12;Job done All produced water discharge Reservoir wettability determines the flow of oil and water in the reservoir #12;DESIGNER WATER Designer

  19. WATER SUPPLY A Handbook on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    WATER SUPPLY HANDBOOK A Handbook on Water Supply Planning and Resource Management Institute for Water Resources Water Resources Support Center U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 7701 Telegraph Road Studies Division December 1998 Revised IWR Report 96-PS-4 #12;U.S. Army Institute for Water Resources

  20. Water Budgets: Foundations for Effective Water-Resources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for consumption, for producing food, and for manufacturing; we also are attracted to water for its esthetic value pets and livestock--all depend on water. Competition for water among humans and between humans

  1. Burbank Water and Power- Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one...

  2. Champions of Texas Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reuse, she is a firm believer in the market system. ?I think the market is the solution. I think the state forcing rural people to give under- priced water to urban areas is not right.? Solving these water issues needs to be sooner rather than later..., a South Texas lawyer for 40 years, has worked with Combs and White on several water issues. ?They both have real high quality of moral courage; they stand for and support what they believe in as opposed to what people might want them to stand...

  3. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

  4. California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California State Water Resources Control Board 401 Water Quality Certification Website Abstract This website...

  5. UV water disinfector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA); Garud, Vikas (Bombay, IN)

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

  6. Cooling Water System Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

  7. Water Quality Control (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state of Texas is to promote the quality of the state's water by regulating existing industries, taking into consideration the economic development of the state, and by...

  8. Water Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

  9. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Production .quality water (2, 32). Oil Production In 2009, oil supplied90% of U.S. onshore oil production uses between 2.1 and 5.4

  10. Water Resource Management (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water may be used in reasonable amounts for beneficial purposes, which are defined by the state of Indiana to include power generation and energy conversion. This section describes other...

  11. UV water disinfector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

    1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

  12. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,the production and processing of each gallon of crude oil (production and processing of 1 gallon (3.8 liters) of crude oil

  13. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information meeting to discuss the biannual update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of...

  14. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  15. Optimization of Cooling Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

  16. Report on Produced Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the pond, as well as the quality of the produced water. In semiarid regions, hot, dry air moving from a land surface will result in high evaporation rates for smaller ponds. As...

  17. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  18. Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

  19. Water Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state policy of Montana requires that water resources of the state be put to optimum beneficial use and not wasted. The state must promote the conservation, development, and beneficial use of...

  20. Dehumidifying water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Drawings and specifications are included for the system to heat water for the swimming pool and dehumidify the building of the Glen Cove YMCA. An overview is presented of the Nautica product used in this system. (MHR)

  1. Electrophoretic Clarification of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiler, E. A.; Lyle, W. M.

    purification by electrochemical means overcame this problem and was successful both operationally and economically. As a result of the experimental testing, an example design of a small semiautomated electrochemical water system is offered which incorporates...

  2. Legal Definition of "Traditional Navigable Waters" Waters that Qualify as Waters of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) "Clean Water Act Jurisdiction Following the U.S. Supreme.F.R. § 230.3(s)(1). The guidance also states that, for purposes of the guidance, these "(a)(1) waters" are the "traditional navigable waters." These (a)(1) waters include all of the "navigable waters of the United States

  3. Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Water Quality and Water Law Headline UNL's Fifth Annual Water Law, Policy and Science Conference "Water Quality Challenges in the Great Plains" is the theme of this year's University of Nebraska-Lincoln Water, Law, Policy and Science conference. The fifth annual UNL conference is April 22 and 23 at Lincoln

  4. Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

  5. Water Resources Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ontario Water Resources Act is designed to conserve, protect and manage Ontario's water resources for efficient and sustainable use. The act focuses on both groundwater and surface water...

  6. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  7. Water Resource Districts (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Water Resource Districts are created throughout the state of North Dakota to manage, conserve, protect, develop, and control water resources. Each District will be governed by a Water Resource...

  8. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential gas-fired storage water heater was modeled underin a typical residential storage water heater that meets thereplace a gas-fired storage water heater with a conventional

  9. Innovative Water Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Variable Frequency Drive Air Cooled ? Geothermal ? Thermal absorption and desiccant systems Direct Expansion Air Cooling Hybrid Cooling Tower Old Chiller Replaced With Geothermal Loop Other Ways to Reduce Water Use ? Energy Conservation...Air Conditioning & Refrigeration ? Energy Meets Water H.W. (Bill)Hoffman, P.E. H.W. (Bill)Hoffman & Associates, LLC 512-294-7193 billhoffmantx@earthlink.net Cooling Towers The purpose of a cooling tower is to get rid of unwanted...

  10. Purifying contaminated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

  11. Factors affecting water coning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Randy Keith

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (December 1977) Randy Keith Parker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. Richard A. Morse The production of oil that is underlain by water, through a partially penetrating well at a production rate greater than a certain... of well, reservoir, and fluid parameters, it was found that equivalent systems could be determined that had the same water and oil production characteristics. Most of the we' ll, reservoir, and fluid relationships are based on two equations which were...

  12. Surface Water Quality Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recreational uses. ?The Commission will seek substantial additional public comment on any proposed changes to the standards before adopting them into the state admin- istrative code,? Davenport said. ?Because of the com- plexity and regulatory importance... Conservation Board?s state watershed coordinator, said the standards for contact recreation, with only a few exceptions, are uniformly applied regardless of water body type or the actual level of recreation use. ?Because a minimum of 10 water samples over a...

  13. Molded polymer solar water heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.

    2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar water heater has a rotationally-molded water box and a glazing subassembly disposed over the water box that enhances solar gain and provides an insulating air space between the outside environment and the water box. When used with a pressurized water system, an internal heat exchanger is integrally molded within the water box. Mounting and connection hardware is included to provide a rapid and secure method of installation.

  14. The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University College Station, TX ABSTRACT More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water... and the rest 46 buildings are located on the west campus. More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are installed on chilled water and hot water pumps. The variable speed pump has reduced the over-pressuring of water systems and reduced pump...

  15. Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

  16. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an atom of one of the reactants (water) is substituted with its isotope (deuterium, or "heavy water") and the two reactions are compared for differences. This effect is...

  17. Water Pollution Control Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act gives the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency broad responsibility to establish pollution standards for state waters; monitor water conditions and sources of pollution; review construction,...

  18. Appropriation of Water (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes procedures for applications to appropriate water for beneficial uses, including irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. Once granted, water users must continue to seek...

  19. Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

  20. Water Network Design by MINLP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a solution method for a water-network optimization problem using a ... The optimal design of a WDN (Water Distribution Network) consists, in its ...