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1

Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, Chin-Yao Chang, Karanjit Kalsi and Yannan Sun Abstract-- Demand Response is playing population of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness

Zhang, Wei

2

Field Evaluation of Programmable Thermostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior research suggests that poor programmable thermostats usability may prevent their effective use to save energy. We hypothesized that home occupants with a high-usability thermostats would be more likely to use them to save energy than people with a basic thermostat. We randomly installed a high-usability thermostat in half the 77 apartments of an affordable housing complex, installing a basic thermostat in the other half. During the heating season, we collected space temperature and furnace on-off data to evaluate occupant interaction with the thermostats, foremost nighttime setbacks. We found that thermostat usability did not influence energy-saving behaviors, finding no significant difference in temperature maintained among apartments with high- and low-usability thermostats.

Sachs, O.; Tiefenbeck, V.; Duvier, C.; Qin, A.; Cheney, K.; Akers, C.; Roth, K.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hamiltonian for a restricted isoenergetic thermostat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations often use mechanisms called thermostats to regulate the temperature. A Hamiltonian is presented for the case of the isoenergetic (constant internal energy) thermostat corresponding to a tunable isokinetic (constant kinetic energy) thermostat, for which a Hamiltonian has recently been given.

C. P. Dettmann

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigates the history of thermostats to better understand the context and legacy regarding the development of this important tool, as well as thermostats' relationships to heating, cooling, and other environmental controls. We analyze the architecture, interfaces, and modes of interaction used by different types of thermostats. For over sixty years, home thermostats have translated occupants' temperature preferences into heating and cooling system operations. In this position of an intermediary, the millions of residential thermostats control almost half of household energy use, which corresponds to about 10percent of the nation's total energy use. Thermostats are currently undergoing rapid development in response to emerging technologies, new consumer and utility demands, and declining manufacturing costs. Energy-efficient homes require more careful balancing of comfort, energy consumption, and health. At the same time, new capabilities will be added to thermostats, including scheduling, control of humidity and ventilation, responsiveness to dynamic electricity prices, and the ability to join communication networks inside homes. Recent studies have found that as many as 50percent of residential programmable thermostats are in permanent"hold" status. Other evaluations found that homes with programmable thermostats consumed more energy than those relying on manual thermostats. Occupants find thermostats cryptic and baffling to operate because manufacturers often rely on obscure, and sometimes even contradictory, terms, symbols, procedures, and icons. It appears that many people are unable to fully exploit even the basic features in today's programmable thermostats, such as setting heating and cooling schedules. It is important that people can easily, reliably, and confidently operate thermostats in their homes so as to remain comfortable while minimizing energy use.

Meier, Alan; Peffer, Therese; Pritoni, Marco; Aragon, Cecilia

2010-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

What Do You Set Your Thermostat to? | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Greatest Energy Concerns for Summer? At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the Summer? Contact Us E-mail: Webmaster Online: Facebook iconconnecttwitter.png Twitter...

7

Cesium heat-pipe thermostat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report a newly developed Cesium Heat-Pipe Thermostat (Cs HPT) with the operation range of 400 C to 800 C. The working medium is cesium (Cs) of 99.98% purity and contains no radioisotope. A Cs filing device is developed which can prevent Cs being in contact with air. The structural material is stainless steel. A 5000 h test has been made to confirm the compatibility between cesium and stainless steel. The Cs HPT has several thermometer wells of 220mm depth with different diameters for different sizes of thermometers. The temperature uniformity of the Cs HPT is 0.06 C to 0.20 C. A precise temperature controller is used to ensure the temperature fluctuation within 0.03 C. The size of Cs HPT is 380mm320mm280mm with foot wheels for easy moving. The thermostat has been successfully used for the calibration of industrial platinum resistance thermometers and thermocouples.

Wu, F.; Song, D.; Sheng, K.; Wu, J. [Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement, 100095, Beijing (China)] [Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement, 100095, Beijing (China); Yi, X. [China National South Aviation industry CO., LTD., 412002, Hunan (China)] [China National South Aviation industry CO., LTD., 412002, Hunan (China); Yu, Z. [Dalian Jinzhou Institute of Measurement and Testing, 116100, Liaoning (China)] [Dalian Jinzhou Institute of Measurement and Testing, 116100, Liaoning (China)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermostats | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScienceThe43068 - Energy InnovationThermostats

10

Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermostats, including scheduling, control of humidity andremote control and energy use scheduling. Anticipator: This

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is the largest energy consumer in the home- grammable thermostats can reduce the energy needed to heat and cool a home by 10-30% without reducingThe Self-Programming Thermostat: Optimizing Setback Schedules based on Home Occupancy Patterns Ge

Whitehouse, Kamin

13

Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

From thermostatics -- to the thermokinetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present-day thermodynamics has long outgrown the initial frames of the heat-engine theory and transmuted into a rather general macroscopic method for studying kinetics of various transfer processes in their inseparable connection with the thermal form of motion. However its primary notions and mathematical instrument as before based on concepts of thermostatics, to wich time, speed and productivity of processes are alien, and on the equations transitory in case of irreversible processes in inequalities. It is offered essentially other approach at wich the thermostatics equations follow from thermokinetics of spatially non-uniform systems.

V. A Etkin

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Solving the Nose-Hoover thermostat for Nuclear Pasta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we present a calculation of the hamiltonian variables solving the molecular dynamics equations of motion for a system of nuclear matter relevant to the description of nuclear pasta. The temperature is kept fixed by using the Nos\\'{e}-Hoover Thermostat and the interaction is modelled via a semiclassical potential depending on both positions and momenta.

M. Angeles Perez Garcia

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a literature review, a workshop, and many meetings with demand response and thermostat researchers and implementers. The information obtained from these resources was used to identify key issues of thermostat performance from both energy savings and peak demand perspectives. A research plan was developed to address these issues and activities have already begun to pursue the research agenda.

Meier, Alan K.; Walker, Iain

2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

19

On thermostats and entropy production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The connection between the rate of entropy production and the rate of phase space contraction for thermostatted systems in nonequilibrium steady states is discussed for a simple model of heat flow in a Lorentz gas, previously described by Spohn and Lebowitz. It is easy to show that for the model discussed here the two rates are not connected, since the rate of entropy production is non-zero and positive, while the overall rate of phase space contraction is zero. This is consistent with conclusions reached by other workers. Fractal structures appear in the phase space for this model and their properties are discussed. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of this and related work for understanding the role of chaotic dynamics and special initial conditions for an explanation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

Henk van Beijeren; J. R. Dorfman

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Deterministic Time-Reversible Thermostats : Chaos, Ergodicity, and the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relative stability and ergodicity of deterministic time-reversible thermostats, both singly and in coupled pairs, are assessed through their Lyapunov spectra. Five types of thermostat are coupled to one another through a single Hooke's-Law harmonic spring. The resulting dynamics shows that three specific thermostat types, Hoover-Holian, Ju-Bulgac, and Martyna-Klein-Tuckerman, have very similar Lyapunov spectra in their equilibrium four-dimensional phase spaces and when coupled in equilibrium or nonequilibrium pairs. All three of these oscillator-based thermostats are shown to be ergodic, with smooth analytic Gaussian distributions in their extended phase spaces ( coordinate, momentum, and two control variables ). Evidently these three ergodic and time-reversible thermostat types are particularly useful as statistical-mechanical thermometers and thermostats. Each of them generates Gibbs' universal canonical distribution internally as well as for systems to which they are coupled. Thus they obey the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics, as a good heat bath should. They also provide dissipative heat flow with relatively small nonlinearity when two or more such bath temperatures interact and provide useful deterministic replacements for the stochastic Langevin equation.

William Graham Hoover; Julien Clinton Sprott; Puneet Kumar Patra

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remoteand cooling systems. Future thermostats may reside in PCs, digital picture frames, or other kinds of remote

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

A simple deterministic and time reversal invariant thermostat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple deterministic and time reversal invariant type of thermostat is proposed to be used for computer simulations of classical systems. It acts on collisions with the walls of the container exclusively. It maps the incoming and outgoing velocity of an impinging particle onto each other uniquely, in a way that satisfies a detailed balance condition with respect to the (local) wall temperature. It is fast to implement on a computer, leads to rapid equilibration or approach to a stationary nonequilibrium state and it effects the physical properties of the system in a narrow boundary layer only. Because of the deterministic nature it is especially suitable for studying dynamical systems characteristics, such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions of attractors. A few successful applications have been reported already.

Henk van Beijeren

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Fluctuations relation and external thermostats: an application to granular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note we discuss a paradigmatic example of interacting particles subject to non conservative external forces and to the action of thermostats consisting of external (finite) reservoirs of particles. We then consider a model of granular materials of interest for experimental tests that had recently attracted lot of attentions. This model can be reduced to the previously discussed example under a number of assumptions, in particular that inelasticity due to internal collisions can be neglected for the purpose of measuring the large deviation functional for entropy production rate. We show that if the restitution coefficient in the granular material model is close to one, then the required assuptions are verified on a specific time scale and we predict a fluctuation relation for the entropy production rate measured on the same time scale.

F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; A. Giuliani; F. Zamponi

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Generalized Battery Model of a Collection of Thermostatically Controlled Loads for Providing Ancillary Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Residential Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs) such as air conditioner, heat pump, water heater, and re

Sanandaji, Borhan M.

25

Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential thermostats play a key role in controlling heating and cooling systems. Occupants often find the controls of programmable thermostats confusing, sometimes leading to higher heating consumption than when the buildings are controlled manually. A high degree of usability is vital to a programmable thermostat's effectiveness because, unlike a more efficient heating system, occupants must engage in specific actions after installation to obtain energy savings. We developed a procedure for measuring the usability of thermostats and tested this methodology with 31 subjects on five thermostats. The procedure requires first identifying representative tasks associated with the device and then testing the subjects ability to accomplish those tasks. The procedure was able to demonstrate the subjects wide ability to accomplish tasks and the influence of a device's usability on success rates. A metric based on the time to accomplish the tasks and the fraction of subjects actually completing the tasks captured the key aspects of each thermostat's usability. The procedure was recently adopted by the Energy Star Program for its thermostat specification. The approach appears suitable for quantifying usability of controls in other products, such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the penetration of intermittent energy sources grows substantially, loads will be required to play an increasingly important role in compensating the fast time-scale fluctuations in generated power. Recent numerical modeling of thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analytical models that satisfactorily quantify the aggregate power consumption of a group of TCLs are desired to enable controller design. We develop such a model for the aggregate power response of a homogeneous population of TCLs to uniform variation of all TCL setpoints. A linearized model of the response is derived, and a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) has been designed. Using the TCL setpoint as the control input, the LQR enables aggregate power to track reference signals that exhibit step, ramp and sinusoidal variations. Although much of the work assumes a homogeneous population of TCLs with deterministic dynamics, we also propose a method for probing the dynamics of systems where load characteristics are not well known.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinitsyn, Nikolai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kundu, S. [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Hiskens, I. [UNIV OF MICHIGAN

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

aggregation inhibitors reduce: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Morimoto, Richard 10 Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

28

Kansas City Power and Light- Energy Optimizer Programmable Thermostat Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers a free Honeywell programmable thermostat, worth $300, and free installation to qualifying customers to manage energy usage. Only residential and small...

29

NGNP/HTE full-power operation at reduced high-temperature heat exchanger temperatures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) with reduced reactor outlet temperature at full power was investigated for the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen-production application. The foremost challenge for operation at design temperature is achieving an acceptably long service life for heat exchangers. In both the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and the Process Heat Exchanger (PHX) (referred to collectively as high temperature heat exchangers) a pressure differential of several MPa exists with temperatures at or above 850 C. Thermal creep of the heat exchanger channel wall may severely limit heat exchanger life depending on the alloy selected. This report investigates plant performance with IHX temperatures reduced by lowering reactor outlet temperature. The objective is to lower the temperature in heat transfer channels to the point where existing materials can meet the 40 year lifetime needed for this component. A conservative estimate for this temperature is believed to be about 700 C. The reactor outlet temperature was reduced from 850 C to 700 C while maintaining reactor power at 600 MWt and high pressure compressor outlet at 7 MPa. We included a previously reported design option for reducing temperature at the PHX. Heat exchanger lengths were adjusted to reflect the change in performance resulting from coolant property changes and from resizing related to operating-point change. Turbomachine parameters were also optimized for the new operating condition. An integrated optimization of the complete system including heat transfer equipment was not performed. It is estimated, however, that by performing a pinch analysis the combined plant efficiency can be increased from 35.5 percent obtained in this report to a value between 38.5 and 40.1 percent. Then after normalizing for a more than three percent decrease in commodities inventory compared to the reference plant, the commodities-normalized efficiency lies between 40.0 and 41.3. This compares with a value of 43.9 for the reference plant. This latter plant has a reactor outlet temperature of 850 C and the two high temperature heat exchangers. The reduction in reactor outlet temperature from 850 C to 700 C reduces the tritium permeability rate in the IHX metal by a factor of three and thermal creep by five orders of magnitude. The design option for reducing PHX temperature from 800 C to 200 C reduces the permeability there by three orders of magnitude. In that design option this heat exchanger is the single 'choke-point' for tritium migration from the nuclear to the chemical plant.

VIlim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote control Control; controlling Feedback control Temperature control Measure humidity Upper limit of temperature Lower limit of temperature Cooling

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ad hoc continuum-atomistic thermostat for modeling heat flow in molecular dynamics simulations J 2004) An ad hoc thermostating procedure that couples a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation

Brenner, Donald W.

33

Silicon photonics thermal phase shifter with reduced temperature range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical devices, phased array systems and methods of phase-shifting an input signal are provided. An optical device includes a microresonator and a waveguide for receiving an input optical signal. The waveguide includes a segment coupled to the microresonator with a coupling coefficient such that the waveguide is overcoupled to the microresonator. The microresonator received the input optical signal via the waveguide and phase-shifts the input optical signal to form an output optical signal. The output optical signal is coupled into the waveguide via the microresonator and transmitted by the waveguide. At an operating point of the optical device, the coupling coefficient is selected to reduce a change in an amplitude of the output optical signal and to increase a change in a phase of the output optical signal, relative to the input optical signal.

Lentine, Anthony L; Kekatpure, Rohan D; DeRose, Christopher; Davids, Paul; Watts, Michael R

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

POSITIVITY OF ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN THE PRESENCE OF A RANDOM THERMOSTAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;nitely. Physically, this heating up is prevented by coupling the system to a thermostat, or heat simpli#12;ed model of a system coupled with a heat bath will be described by a random dynamical system ! are to be discussed later). Thermostatic action of random forces. It is easy to understand qualitatively how a heat

Ruelle, David

35

List of Programmable Thermostats Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarList ofPassive Solar Space HeatThermostats

36

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a field study of 78 small commercial customers in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District service territory who volunteered for an integrated energy-efficiency/demand-response (EE-DR) program in the summer of 2008. The original objective for the pilot was to provide a better understanding of demand response issues in the small commercial sector. Early findings justified a focus on offering small businesses (1) help with the energy efficiency of their buildings in exchange for occasional load shed, and (2) a portfolio of options to meet the needs of a diverse customer sector. To meet these expressed needs, the research pilot provided on-site energy efficiency advice and offered participants several program options, including the choice of either a dynamic rate or monthly payment for air-conditioning setpoint control. An analysis of hourly load data indicates that the offices and retail stores in our sample provided significant demand response, while the restaurants did not. Thermostat data provides further evidence that restaurants attempted to precool and reduce AC service during event hours, but were unable to because their air-conditioning units were undersized. On a 100 F reference day, load impacts of all participants during events averaged 14%, while load impacts of office and retail buildings (excluding restaurants) reached 20%. Overall, pilot participants including restaurants had 2007-2008 summer energy savings of 20% and bill savings of 30%. About 80% of participants said that the program met or surpassed their expectations, and three-quarters said they would probably or definitely participate again without the $120 participation incentive. These results provide evidence that energy efficiency programs, dynamic rates and load control programs can be used concurrently and effectively in the small business sector, and that communicating thermostats are a reliable tool for providing air-conditioning load shed and enhancing the ability of customers on dynamic rates to respond to intermittent price events.

Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth; Rasin, Josh

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Technology Evaluation of Programmable Communicating Thermostats with Radio Broadcast Data System Communications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Programmable Communicating Thermostats are thermostats that can be programmed by the user to respond to signals indicating a grid-level system emergency or pricing event. The California Energy Commission is considering standards that would include a requirement for Programmable Communicating Thermostats in residential and small commercial applications. The current specification for Programmable Communicating Thermostats requires Radio Data System communications to Programmable Communicating Thermostats. This study tested the signal strength and reliability of Radio Data System signals at 40 customer sites within the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, which is serviced by 17 radio stations that already transmit Radio Data System signals. The study also tested the functionality of a commercially available Programmable Communicating Thermostat for compliance with California Energy Commission design standards. Test results demonstrated that Radio Data System is capable of reliably sending price and emergency signals. This study also provides evidence that existing Programmable Communicating Thermostats, on receiving a Radio Data System pricing or event signal, are capable of automatically increasing set points to a customer-determined or utility-determined level, thus providing air-conditioning demand response within seconds or just a few (less than 5) minutes.

Herter, Karen; Wayland, Seth

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lyapunov Exponent Pairing for a Thermostatted Hard-Sphere Gas under Shear in the Thermodynamic Limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate why for a sheared gas of hard spheres, described by the SLLOD equations with an iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat in between collisions, deviations of the conjugate pairing rule for the Lyapunov spectrum are to be expected, employing a previous result that for a large number of particles $N$, the iso-kinetic Gaussian thermostat is equivalent to a constant friction thermostat, up to $1/\\sqrt{N}$ fluctuations. We also show that these deviations are at most of the order of the fourth power in the shear rate.

Debabrata Panja; Ramses van Zon

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide and its high-temperature coefficient of resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much effort has been made to study the formation mechanisms of photocurrents in graphene and reduced graphene oxide films under visible and near-infrared light irradiation. A built-in field and photo-thermal electrons have been applied to explain the experiments. However, much less attention has been paid to clarifying the mid-infrared response of reduced graphene oxide films at room temperature. Thus, mid-infrared photoresponse and annealing temperature-dependent resistance experiments were carried out on reduced graphene oxide films. A maximum photocurrent of 75 ?A was observed at room temperature, which was dominated by the bolometer effect, where the resistance of the films decreased as the temperature increased after they had absorbed light. The electrons localized in the defect states and the residual oxygen groups were thermally excited into the conduction band, forming a photocurrent. In addition, a temperature increase of 2 C for the films after light irradiation for 2 minutes was observed using absorption power calculations. This work details a way to use reduced graphene oxide films that contain appropriate defects and residual oxygen groups as bolometer-sensitive materials in the mid-infrared range.

Liang, Haifeng, E-mail: hfliang2004@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Optical Measurement and Thin Film of Shaanxi Province, Xian Technological University, Xian 710032 (China)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Opportunities to Reduce Air-Conditioning Loads Through Lower Cabin Soak Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-conditioning loads can significantly reduce electric vehicle (EV) range and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) fuel economy. In addition, a new U. S. emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the United States. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. If the size of the air-conditioning system is reduced, the cabin soak temperature must also be reduced, with no penalty in terms of passenger thermal comfort. This paper presents the impact of air-conditioning on EV range and HEV fuel economy, and compares the effectiveness of advanced glazing and cabin ventilation. Experimental and modeled results are presented.

Farrington, R.; Cuddy, M.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J.

1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reduced  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 RevisionDivisionReduced intermittency in

42

Kinetic approach to the Gaussian thermostat in a dilute sheared gas in the thermodynamic limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dilute gas of particles with short range interactions is considered in a shearing stationary state. A Gaussian thermostat keeps the total kinetic energy constant. For infinitely many particles it is shown that the thermostat becomes a friction force with constant friction coefficient. For finite number of particles N, the fluctuations around this constant are of order one over the square root of N, and distributed approximately Gaussian with deviations for large fluctuations. These deviations prohibit a derivation of fluctuation-dissipation relations far from equilibrium, based on the Fluctuation Theorem.

R. van Zon

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Method and System for the Production of Hydrogen at Reduced VHTR Outlet Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility dedicated to hydrogen production, early designs are expected to be dual purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor with electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. The integrated system of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant is being investigated and this system, as it is currently envisioned, will produce hydrogen by utilizing a highly efficient VHTR with a VHTR outlet temperature of 900C to supply the necessary energy and electricity to the HTSE unit. Though the combined system may produce hydrogen and electricity with high efficiency, the choices of materials that are suitable for use at 900C are limited due to high-temperature strength, corrosion, and durability (creep) considerations. The lack of materials that are ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) code-certified at these temperatures is also a problem, and is a barrier to commercial deployment. If the current system concept can be modified to produce hydrogen with comparable efficiency at lower temperatures, then the technical barriers related to materials selection and use might be eliminated, and the integrated system may have a much greater probability of succeeding at the commercial scale. This paper describes a means to reduce the outlet temperature of the VHTR to approximately 700C while still maintaining plant high efficiency.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 8 homes and comparing the expected energy usage of our algorithm against existing approaches. We Design, Experimentation, Economics, Human Factors Keywords Building Energy, Home Monitoring, ProgrammableThe Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes Jiakang Lu, Tamim Sookoor

Whitehouse, Kamin

45

POSITIVITY OF ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN THE PRESENCE OF A RANDOM THERMOSTAT.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by studying the role of a heat bath, and its idealization by random external forces. As discussed in [19], we is prevented by coupling the system to a thermostat, or heat bath. The energy changes are diluted in the large papers referred to in [19]. Random dynamics Our simplified model of a system coupled with a heat bath

46

Supervisor Thermostat Repairer (91964) 1 THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of various types of thermostats and related equipment used for the control of heating, ventilation and air conditions systems: performs related work. Qualification Requirements 1. Open to each employee of all. - Prepares work schedules and work assignments. - Prepares job orders and requisitions for tools, equipment

Rosen, Jay

47

Method of CO.sub.2 removal from a gasesous stream at reduced temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for the removal of H.sub.2O and CO.sub.2 from a gaseous stream comprising H.sub.2O and CO.sub.2, such as a flue gas. The method initially utilizes an H.sub.2O removal sorbent to remove some portion of the H.sub.2O, producing a dry gaseous stream and a wet H.sub.2O removal sorbent. The dry gaseous stream is subsequently contacted with a CO.sub.2 removal sorbent to remove some portion of the CO.sub.2, generating a dry CO.sub.2 reduced stream and a loaded CO.sub.2 removal sorbent. The loaded CO.sub.2 removal sorbent is subsequently heated to produce a heated CO.sub.2 stream. The wet H.sub.2O removal sorbent and the dry CO.sub.2 reduced stream are contacted in a first regeneration stage, generating a partially regenerated H.sub.2O removal sorbent, and the partially regenerated H.sub.2O removal sorbent and the heated CO.sub.2 stream are subsequently contacted in a second regeneration stage. The first and second stage regeneration typically act to retain an initial monolayer of moisture on the various removal sorbents and only remove moisture layers bound to the initial monolayer, allowing for relatively low temperature and pressure operation. Generally the applicable H.sub.2O sorption/desorption processes may be conducted at temperatures less than about 70.degree. C. and pressures less than 1.5 atmospheres, with certain operations conducted at temperatures less than about 50.degree. C.

Fisher, James C; Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Berry, David A; Richards, George A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

48

Growth of crystalline X-Sic on Si at reduced temperatures by chemical vapor deposition from `silacycllobutane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and TPS resulted in single crystal layer" on Si ( 111) only up to a thickness of 2000 h;. Highly orientedGrowth of crystalline X-Sic on Si at reduced temperatures by chemical vapor deposition from grown by SCB at a temperature of 800 "C. The progress of SiC/Si heterojunction devices has been C3HsSiH2

Steckl, Andrew J.

49

TEMPERATURE PREDICTION IN DOMESTIC REFRIGERATOR: DETERMINIST AND STOCHASTIC APPROACHES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the calculation of air and load temperatures. An analysis of the predicted temperatures was undertaken temperature and thermostat setting, on air and load temperatures in non ventilated domestic refrigerator was studied. A simplified steady state heat transfer model was developed which takes into account heat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

50

Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3C difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5C) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5C, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2C). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

Phillips, Claire L. [TERA; Gregg, Jillian W. [TERA; Wilson, John K. [TERA

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development and Validation of Aggregated Models for Thermostatic Controlled Loads with Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated control models for a population of thermostatically controlled loads. The effects of demand response on the load population dynamics are investigated.

Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Chassin, David P.

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Si sub- strates, depends on the polycrystalline-diamond grain size, diamond layer thicknessReduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated of synthetic diamond-silicon composite substrates. Although composite substrates are more thermally resistive

53

Thermostat for high temperature and transient characterization of thin film thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3072603 I. INTRODUCTION Thermoelectric materials have the potential-limited world. An impor- tant application of thermoelectric materials is in direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of a thermoelectric material is a func- tion of its dimensionless figure of merit

54

Question of the Week: At What Temperature Do You Set Your Thermostat in the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol.DepartmentFertilizer usedAugust

55

Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P. [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Godyak, V. [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States) [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Control of household refrigerators. Part 1: Modeling temperature control performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial household refrigerators use simple, cost-effective, temperature controllers to obtain acceptable control. A manually adjusted airflow damper regulates the freezer compartment temperature while a thermostat controls operation of the compressor and evaporator fan to regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Dual compartment temperature control can be achieved with automatic airflow dampers that function independently of the compressor and evaporator fan thermostat, resulting in improved temperature control quality and energy consumption. Under dual control, freezer temperature is controlled by the thermostat while the damper controls refrigerator temperature by regulating airflow circulation. A simulation model is presented that analyzes a household refrigerator configured with a conventional thermostat and both manual and automatic dampers. The model provides a new paradigm for investigating refrigerator systems and temperature control performance relative to the extensive verification testing that is typically done by manufacturers. The effects of each type of control and damper configuration are compared with respect to energy usage, control quality, and ambient temperature shift criteria. The results indicate that the appropriate control configuration can have significant effects and can improve plant performance.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Aggregate Flexibility of Thermostatically Controlled Loads He Haoa, Borhan M. Sanandajib, Kameshwar Poollac, and Tyrone L. Vincentd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TCLs) such as air conditioners, heat pumps, water heaters, and refrigera- to&E, aggregate residential air conditioners for peak load shaving and emergency load management [6]. Because services such as frequency regulation or load-following. Residential Thermostatically Controlled Loads

Sanandaji, Borhan M.

58

Reduced-temperature processing and consolidation of ultra-refractory Ta4HfC5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TaC, HfC, and WC powders were subjected to high-energy milling and hot pressing to produce Ta4HfC5, a composite of Ta(4)HfC5 + 30 vol.% WC, and a composite of Ta4HfC5 + 50 vol.% WC. Sub-micron powders were examined after four different milling intervals prior to hot pressing. XRD was used to verify proper phase formation. SEM, relative density, and hardness measurements were used to examine the resulting phases. Hot pressed compacts of Ta4HfC5 showed densification as high as 98.6% along with Vickers hardness values of 21.4 GPa. Similarly, Ta4HfC5 + 30 vol.% WC exhibited 99% densification with a Vickers hardness of 22.5 GPa. These levels of densification were achieved at 1500 degrees C, which is lower than any previously reported sintering temperature for Ta4HfC5. Microhardness values measured in this study were higher than those previously reported for Ta4HfC5. The WC additions to Ta4HfC5 were found to improve densification and increase microhardness. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Gaballa, Osama [Ames Laboratory; Cook, B. A. [TRI International; Russell, A. M. [Ames Laboratory

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

A stochastic thermostat algorithm for coarse-grained thermomechanical modeling of large-scale soft matters: Theory and application to microfilaments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As all-atom molecular dynamics method is limited by its enormous computational cost, various coarse-grained strategies have been developed to extend the length scale of soft matters in the modeling of mechanical behaviors. However, the classical thermostat algorithm in highly coarse-grained molecular dynamics method would underestimate the thermodynamic behaviors of soft matters (e.g. microfilaments in cells), which can weaken the ability of materials to overcome local energy traps in granular modeling. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics modeling of microfilament fragments (G-actin clusters), a new stochastic thermostat algorithm is developed to retain the representation of thermodynamic properties of microfilaments at extra coarse-grained level. The accuracy of this stochastic thermostat algorithm is validated by all-atom MD simulation. This new stochastic thermostat algorithm provides an efficient way to investigate the thermomechanical properties of large-scale soft matters.

Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Non-equilibrium deposition of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films at reduced growth temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) is actively studied as a prototypical material for energy conversion and electronic applications. Here we reduce the growth temperature of phase pure Cu{sub 2}O thin films to 300?C by intentionally controlling solely the kinetic parameter (total chamber pressure, P{sub tot}) at fixed thermodynamic condition (0.25 mTorr pO{sub 2}). A strong non-monotonic effect of P{sub tot} on Cu-O phase formation is found using high-throughput combinatorial-pulsed laser deposition. This discovery creates new opportunities for the growth of Cu{sub 2}O devices with low thermal budget and illustrates the importance of kinetic effects for the synthesis of metastable materials with useful properties.

Subramaniyan, Archana, E-mail: asubrama@mymail.mines.edu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Perkins, John D.; Lany, Stephan; Stevanovic, Vladan; Ginley, David S.; Zakutayev, Andriy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); OHayre, Ryan P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The use of reduced temperatures for reversible developmental arrest of organ cultures prior to spaceflight experimentation and for postflight analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One complication of using rapidly growing and developing tissues for spaceflight experimentation is that, due to early turnover and launch delays, the tissues often undergo complete development before orbit is achieved. We conducted a series of studies using three different types of tissue, chick pre-cardiac explants, embryonic mouse lung rudiments and embryonic mouse pre-metatarsal mesenchyme, to examine the use of reduced temperature as an inexpensive means to slow growth and development, before the experiment begins. Pre-cardiac explants could be held at 4{degree}C (277K), 13{degree}C (286K), or 22{degree}C (295K) for up to 48 hours and still begin normal beating within 24 hours of culture at 37{degree}C (310K). Lung explants could be held at 5{degree}C (278K), 15{degree}C (288K), and 24{degree}C (297K) for 3{endash}6 days without clefts changing in appearance, but would resume branching morphogenesis and growth after being placed at 37{degree}C (310K). Pre-metatarsal cultures could be held at 15{degree}C (288K), 22{degree}C (295K) and 24{degree}C (297K) for 6 days with very little change in rod length. After additional incubation at 37{degree}C (310K) the rods increased in length and mineralized. These results suggest that incubation at temperatures below standard culture temperature are capable of slowing tissue growth, but growth and development will resume after standard incubation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Klement, B.J. [Space Medicine and Life Sciences Research Center Department of Anatomy Morehouse School of Medicine 720 Westview Dr. S.W. Atlanta, Georgia30310-1495 (United States); van Twest, J. [The Bionetics Corporation Life Sciences Support Facility Hanger L Mailcode Bio-3 Kennedy Space Center, Florida32899 (United States); Staudenmaier, R.A.; Brittain, H.; Spooner, B.S. [NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training Division of Biology Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas66506 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as ?{sub e},??{sub e}{sup ?}, the MHD ? parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of T{sub e}, T{sub i}, and n{sub e} were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when ?{sub e} and ?{sub e}{sup ?} were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both ?{sub e} and ?{sub e}{sup ?} increased, microtearing became the dominant low-k{sub ?} mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-k{sub ?}, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting T{sub e} for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

Kaye, S. M., E-mail: skaye@pppl.gov; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hypoxia is well known to reduce metabolism and body temperature in many vertebrates (Wood and Gonzales, 1996),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using infrared thermography to measure the surface temperatures of the golden-mantled ground squirrel

Tattersall, Glenn

65

Keystone XL I DRIVE A HYBRID CAR AND SET MY THERMOSTAT AT 80F IN THE WASHINGTON, DC, SUMMER. I USE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Keystone XL pipeline to transport crude oil from the tar sands deposits of Alberta, Canada, and from energy future. Opponents of Keystone XL have been right to contest construction of the pipeline with- outKeystone XL I DRIVE A HYBRID CAR AND SET MY THERMOSTAT AT 80°F IN THE WASHINGTON, DC, SUMMER. I USE

Wilson, Mark A.

66

Control of household refrigerators. Part 2: Alternate control approaches for improving temperature performance and reducing energy use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Part 1 it was shown that conventional control of household refrigerators is achieved by regulating the distribution of air in the freezer compartment to all other parts of the plant. In Part 2 three alternative approaches to the conventional control of a top-mount refrigerator are presented: variable temperature bandwidths, uncoupled compressor and evaporator fan, and the combination of these two. These allowed the plant to achieve near-ideal control with respect to improved temperature performance in each compartment. Automatic airflow dampers were used with the dual controllers to independently regulate refrigerator compartment temperature. Plant performance was simulated using a model that computes the refrigerant and airflow systems behavior. Together, these alternate configurations and approaches define new control algorithms that reveal the plant's optimal control model for improving performance and energy usage relative to conventional controllers. Results based on model simulations are dependent upon the model's accuracy and validity. However, the model validation studies cited here, though limited in scope, do show agreement between simulation and experimental data for the ambient temperatures and thermal load conditions considered. This suggests that these model results are reasonable, and representative of actual plant behavior under these conditions and configurations for a top-mount style refrigerator plant.

Graviss, K.J.; Collins, R.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reduced pressure and temperature reclamation of water using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for potential space flight application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM FOR POTENTIAL SPACE FLIGHT APPLICATION A Thesis by HASAN IMTIAZ CHOWDHURY Approved as to style and content by: G. P. Peterson (Chair of Committee) T. D. Rogers (Member) R. D. pence (Member) W. Bradley (Head of Department) December... 1989 ABSTRACT Reduced Pressure and Temperature Reclamation of Water Using the GE Integrated Water-waste Management System for Potential Space Flight Application. (December 1989) Hasan Imtiaz Chowdhury, B. S. , Prairie View AlkM University Chair...

Chowdhury, Hasan Imtiaz

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Small Business Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats: SMUD's Summer Solutions Research Pilot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eRadio server at the transmission tower site. The receptionthe eRadio server at the transmission tower site. The priceserver at the transmission tower site. The temperature

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Kinetic study on the catalytic performance of Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at different temperatures in the CO-H/sub 2/ reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic CO-H/sub 2/ reaction on Rh/TiO/sub 2/ reduced at 200, 400, and 500/sup 0/C (Cat-200, -400, -500) for 2 h was kinetically studied at 250/sup 0/C using a circulating reactor and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine how Cat-400 exhibited the highest activity. The rate equation distinguished the best catalyst with zero and first orders in CO and H/sub 2/, respectively, from other catalysts with negative order in CO. The adsorption ability of the catalyst at 200/sup 0/C was comparable to that of Cat-200, and two to three times larger than that of Cat-500, although the ability of Cat-200 was much larger at room temperature. Carbon monoxide adsorbed on the catalysts reversibly as well as irreversibly. IR spectroscopy revealed that the major form of irreversibly adsorbed CO was linear on Cat-200, whereas similar amounts of linear and bridge forms were observed on Cat-400 and Cat-500. These latter forms were highly reactive against hydrogen molecules when no carbon monoxide was present in the gas phase. Based on these results, the highest activity of Cat-400 is ascribed to rhodium metal modified by properly reduced TiO/sub 2/ to show the appropriate adsorption ability of carbon monoxide which least retards the activation of hydrogen according to first-order kinetics. Typical strong metal-support interaction decreases the catalytic activity by decreasing the active sites and strengthening the CO adsorption too much.

Fujitsu, H.; Ikeyama, N.; Mochida, I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013 equivalency. Under the defined process conditions and associated material specifications, the high-purity PuO{sub 2} produced in HBL presents no unique safety concerns for packaging or storage in the 3013 required configuration. The PuO{sub 2} produced using the HBL flow sheet conditions will have a higher specific surface area (SSA) than PuO{sub 2} stabilized at 950 C and, consequently, under identical conditions will adsorb more water from the atmosphere. The greatest challenge to HBL operators will be controlling moisture content below 0.5 wt %. However, even at the 0.5 wt % moisture limit, the maximum acceptable pressure of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen in the 3013 container is greater than the maximum possible pressure for the HBL PuO{sub 2} product.

Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

Variability in Measured Space Temperatures in 60 Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the observed variability in indoor space temperature in a set of 60 homes located in Florida, New York, Oregon, and Washington. Temperature data were collected at 15-minute intervals for an entire year, including living room, master bedroom, and outdoor air temperature (Arena, et. al). The data were examined to establish the average living room temperature for the set of homes for the heating and cooling seasons, the variability of living room temperature depending on climate, and the variability of indoor space temperature within the homes. The accuracy of software-based energy analysis depends on the accuracy of input values. Thermostat set point is one of the most influential inputs for building energy simulation. Several industry standards exist that recommend differing default thermostat settings for heating and cooling seasons. These standards were compared to the values calculated for this analysis. The data examined for this report show that there is a definite difference between the climates and that the data do not agree well with any particular standard.

Roberts, D.; Lay, K.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reducible oxide based catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

Why occupancy-responsive adaptive thermostats do not always save -and the limits for when they should  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the form and function for technologies in this space vary widely. Some controls merely allow for remote adjust operation for heating, cooling, and ventilation when a space is vacant (Gupta, Intille, and Larson runtime for heating2 and cooling equipment. In certain applications it may also reduce energy use related

California at Davis, University of

74

Influence of ensemble boundary conditions (thermostat and barostat) on the deformation of amorphous polyethylene by molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular dynamics simulations are increasingly being used to investigate the structural evolution of polymers during mechanical deformation, but relatively few studies focus on the influence of boundary conditions on this evolution, in particular the dissipation of both heat and pressure through the periodic boundaries during deformation. The research herein explores how the tensile deformation of amorphous polyethylene, modelled with a united atom method potential, is influenced by heat and pressure dissipation. The stress-strain curves for the pressure dissipation cases (uniaxial tension) are in qualitative agreement with experiments and show that heat dissipation has a large effect on the strain hardening modulus calculated by molecular dynamics simulations. The evolution of the energy associated with bonded and non-bonded terms was quantified as a function of strain as well as the evolution of stress in both the loading and non-loading directions to give insight into how the stress state is altered within the elastic, yield, strain softening, and strain hardening regions. The stress partitioning shows a competition between `tensile' Van der Waal's interactions and `compressive' bond stretching forces, with the characteristic yield stress peak clearly associated with the non-bonded stress. The lack of heat dissipation had the largest effect on the strain hardening regime, where an increase in the calculated temperature correlated with faster chain alignment in the loading direction and more rapid conformation changes. In part, these observations demonstrate the role that heat and pressure dissipation play on deformation characteristics of amorphous polymers, particularly for the strain hardening regime.

M. A. Tschopp; J. L. Bouvard; D. K. Ward; D. J. Bammann; M. F. Horstemeyer

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

You Should Get Your Own ATMs (Automated Temperature, Money Savers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

save you energy and money. Jennifer Josey Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How can I participate? Purchase a programmable thermostat, or make the most of the...

76

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

with new programmable thermostats, which can be used to provide temperature setback and control during various times of day. These programmable thermostats will be equipped with...

77

Thermostat Wars | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

It's "one climate fits all" thinking, which would be fine if every office had identical solar heat gain, ventilation, etc.-but they don't. The hot offices need the AC cranked up to...

78

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Diamond, R.

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Parker, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165-174. Shipworth, M. ,and sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.timer/programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Smart Thermostats in Residential Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Current Research...

85

Programmable Thermostats | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilipspresents new Climate ActionCountry

86

Smart Thermostats in Residential Applications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment of Energy Smart Meters HelpSmart

87

Emergency building temperature restrictions. Final evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 5, 1979, DOE promulgated final regulations of the Emergency Building Temperature Restrictions program, placing emergency restrictions on thermostat settings for space heating, space cooling, and hot water in commercial, industrial, and nonresidential public buildings. The final regulations restricted space heating to a maximum of 65/sup 0/F, hot water temperature to a maximum of 105/sup 0/F, and cooling temperature to a minimum of 78/sup 0/F. A comprehensive evaluation of the entire EBTF program for a nine-month period from July 16, 1979 is presented. In Chapter 1, an estimate of the population of buildings covered by EBTR is presented. In Chapter 2, EBTR compliance by building type and region is reported. Exemptions are also discussed. In Chapter 3, the simulations of building energy use are explained and the relative impact of various building characteristics and effectiveness of different control strategies are estimated. Finally, in Chapter 4, the methodology for scaling the individual building energy savings to the national level is described, and estimated national energy savings are presented.

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

90

Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plating under reduced pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plating under reduced pressure was evaluated for both electroless nickel and electrodeposited copper systems. The objective was to reduce pitting of these coatings thereby further enhancing their usage for diamond turning applications. Cursory experiments with electroless nickel showed reduced porosity when deposition was done at around 500 torr. Detailed experiments with electrodeposited copper at around 100 torr provided similar results. Scanning tunneling microscopy was effectively used to show the improvement in the copper deposits plated under reduced pressure. Benefits included reduced surface roughness and finer and denser grain structure.

Dini, J.W.; Beat, T.G.; Cowden, W.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Ryan, L.E.; Hewitt, W.B. (TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Water heater control module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An advanced electric water heater control system that interfaces with a high temperature cut-off thermostat and an upper regulating thermostat. The system includes a control module that is electrically connected to the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module includes a switch to open or close the high-temperature cut-off thermostat and the upper regulating thermostat. The control module further includes circuitry configured to control said switch in response to a signal selected from the group of an autonomous signal, a communicated signal, and combinations thereof.

Hammerstrom, Donald J

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

95

Reducing home lighting expenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ways to reduce lighting expenses are summarized. These include: turning off lights when not in use; keeping fixtures and lamps clean; replacing lamps with more efficient types; using three-way bulbs; use of daylighting; buying fewer lamps and reducing lamp wattage; consider repainting rooms; replacing recessed fixtures with tracklighting; and using efficient lamps for outdoor use. (MCW)

Aimone, M.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Key Facts About Hurricane Readiness Preparing for a Hurricane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for washing. · Adjust the thermostat on refrigerators and freezers to the coolest possible temperature. If You

97

On Reducing Evaporator Superheat Nonlinearity with Control Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and refrigeration VCC vapor compression cycle TEV thermostatic expansion valve EEV electronic expansion valve HEV hybrid expansion valve PID proportional-integral-derivative P, Pevap evaporator pressure Q(s) transfer function from PSET to evaporator superheat (inner... by a number of different valve types, which vary in expense and design KFM product of KF times KM(v) KU gain from HEV position to mechanical pressure setpoint U HEV position MEMS micro-electrical-mechanical systemsregulating device also known...

Elliot, M.S.; Rasmussen, B.P.

98

Reducing PM Concentrations in Simulated High Temperature Gas Streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This characteristic is referred to as char having a low eutectic point. Biomasses with low eutectic points cannot be used in a combustion process because the char will result in slagging and fouling. We have used fluidized bed gasification (FBG) to control...

Luehrs, Daniel R

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

MODELING AND CONTROL OF THERMOSTATICALLY CONTROLLED LOADS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled loads (TCLs) has demonstrated that such load following is feasible, but analyt- ical models) is well matched to the role of load following. Re- search into the behavior of TCLs began with the work was then employed in a minimum variance control law to demonstrate the load following capability of a population

Hiskens, Ian A.

100

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

market conditions or periods of critical peak demand. Since residential energy consumption is dominated by HVAC

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Peffer, T. ,on 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in BuildingsSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings References

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 349-360.

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

house: Smart Phone applications USB port for setup U-Snap port Plug-N-Go Networking POWER SUPPLY Battery

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A persuasive GPS-controlled thermostat system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using 10 weeks of data from a couple living in an instrumented home, we report on the potential of context-aware power management for energy saving. We identify an opportunity to save on heating and cooling using a system ...

Gupta, Manu, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effectiveness of home heating controls in the UK 60 . Itmobile phones to the homes heating and cooling system sothe home and track time of operation for heating and cooling

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some Recent Research into Home Heating. Journal of ConsumerLiving in cold homes after heating improvements: Evidencehome: A comparative study of support aids for central heating

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the deployment of smart meters in California andappliances, gateways, HEDs, smart meters, etc. using varioususe of electricity. Smart Meter ( Interval Meter): A Smart

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on boilers, hot water, district heating, spot heating, andwood to charcoal to district heating. www.tecsoc.org/pubs/pellets) or via district heating systems. Air conditioning

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165-174. Shipworth, M. ,timer/programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. National

Meier, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Opower Thermostat App | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty, Michigan: EnergyOpenBarter Jump

112

Tips: Programmable Thermostats | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpg TinaLaundry

113

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating, cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remote

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings, Californiain peak building load (a key concern for Demand ResponseBuilding Energy Code Requirements: Title 24 .. 30 Demand Response..

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measures on Residential Air Conditioner Loads. Proc. ACEEEDeterminants of Central Air Conditioner Duty Cycles. Proc.at the number of air conditioners that might actually

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Tank closure reducing grout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

Caldwell, T.B.

1997-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reduced activation ferritic alloys for fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduced activation martensitic alloys can now be developed with properties similar to commercial counterparts, and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are under consideration. However, low chromium Bainitic alloys with vanadium additions undergo severe irradiation hardening at low irradiation temperatures and excessive softening at high temperatures, resulting in a very restricted application window. Manganese additions result in excessive embrittlement, as demonstrated by post-irradiation Charpy impact testing. The best composition range for martensitic alloys appears to be 7 to 9 Cr and 2 W, with swelling of minor concern and low temperature irradiation embrittlement perhaps eliminated. Therefore, reduced activation martensitic steels in the 7 to 9 Cr range should be considered leading contenders for structural materials applications in power-producing fusion machines.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Temperature Data Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

Gillespie, David

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

Clark, Howard L. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reducing Power Factor Cost  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing Peak DemandLow

122

Reducing Air-Conditioning System Energy Using a PMV Index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-4-1 Reducing Air-Conditioning System Energy Using a PMV Index Hui Li Qingfan Zhang Associate professor...

Li, H.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

Hirschfeld, T.B.

1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

2008-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

2D and 3D Dense-Fluid Shear Flows via Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics. Comparison of Time-and-Space-Averaged Tensor Temperature and Normal Stresses from Doll's, Sllod, and Boundary-Driven Shear Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homogeneous shear flows (with constant strainrate du/dy) are generated with the Doll's and Sllod algorithms and compared to corresponding inhomogeneous boundary-driven flows. We use one-, two-, and three-dimensional smooth-particle weight functions for computing instantaneous spatial averages. The nonlinear stress differences are small, but significant, in both two and three space dimensions. In homogeneous systems the sign and magnitude of the shearplane stress difference, P(xx) - P(yy), depend on both the thermostat type and the chosen shearflow algorithm. The Doll's and Sllod algorithms predict opposite signs for this stress difference, with the Sllod approach definitely wrong, but somewhat closer to the (boundary-driven) truth. Neither of the homogeneous shear algorithms predicts the correct ordering of the kinetic temperatures, T(xx) > T(zz) > T(yy).

Wm. G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover; Janka Petravic

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Beamline Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1 PrintTemperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV

127

Reduced-dimension transistors: Reduced-dimension transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reduced-dimension transistors: the HEMT LECTURE 20 · Reduced-dimension transistors · HEMT · 2-D;8 For a finite well · Wavefunction not completely confined · Use undoped spacer #12;9 Employment of a spacer scattering (µ ). · Electrons and donors separated no I I scattering, i.e., µ · Undoped spacer also helps

Pulfrey, David L.

128

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O'Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O'Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

131

Reduced shedding regenerator and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reduced shedding regenerator and method are disclosed with regenerator surfaces to minimize shedding of particles from the regenerator thereby alleviating a source of potential damage and malfunction of a thermal regenerative machine using the regenerator.

Qiu, Songgang (Richland, WA); Augenblick, John E. (Richland, WA); Erbeznik, Raymond M. (Kennewick, WA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

Using Reduced Herbicide Rates Effective wild oat control can be obtained in spring wheat and barley,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but key management factors must be kept in mind Beverly R. Durgan, Weed Scientist, University of Minnesota are more effective when temperatures are cool (less than 75 F) temperature and adequate soil moisture better, and with less stress, when soil and air temperatures are cool. Use caution when using reduced

Minnesota, University of

133

Reduced Harmonic Representation of Partitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present article the reduced integral representation of partitions in terms of harmonic products has been derived first by using hypergeometry and the new concept of fractional sum and secondly by studying the Fourier series of the kernel function appearing in the integral representation. Using the method of induction, a generalization of the theory has also been obtained.

Michalis Psimopoulos

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Announcing: All Recycling Reduce your  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Announcing: All Recycling Go Green! Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling toters and containers around campus. ONLY THE ITEMS BELOW ARE ACCEPTED FOR ALL RECYCLING Please do not contaminate the recycling containers with trash

Papautsky, Ian

135

Conservation Stand! Reducing My Commute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. + Diverts plastic waste for food production. + Placed beside window, replaces light input with solarConservation Stand! Reducing My Commute 72.6 mi to 5.1 mi #12;#12;Conserving Water and Energy or contribution to sedimentation. + Food produced on site without transportation costs. - Depends on energy input

Schweik, Charles M.

136

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program LA-County...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

retrofits on nine Parish buildings to replace thermostats with the latest DDC temperature control products and modify a central operator workstation at the Parish Maintenance...

137

CX-004853: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

retrofits on Parish buildings to replace thermostats with the latest DDC temperature control products and modify a central operator workstation at the Parish Maintenance...

138

CX-002218: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

retrofits on nine Parish buildings to replace thermostats with the latest DDC temperature control products and modify a central operator workstation at the Parish Maintenance...

139

U.S. Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act Categorica...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

retrofits on Parish buildings to replace thermostats with the latest DDC temperature control products and modify a central operator workstation at the Parish Maintenance...

140

ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 5: HEATING, VENTILATION...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

demand for reduced low cost of utilities operation Control to respond to demand response events Connectivity with smart meter Leverage smart meter system Thermostat design...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reducing carbon dioxide to products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quark number susceptibility of high temperature and finite density QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize lattice simulations of the dimensionally reduced effective field theory (EQCD) to determine the quark number susceptibility of QCD at high temperature ($T>2T_c$). We also use analytic continuation to obtain results at finite density. The results extrapolate well from known perturbative expansion (accurate in extremely high temperatures) to 4d lower temperature lattice data

Ari Hietanen; Kari Rummukainen

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light. 12 figs.

Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.H.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Reduced Rank Models for Contingency Tables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solution problem 73-14, Rank factorization of nonnegativein Great Britain Reduced rank models for contingency tablesclass analysis; Reduced rank models. 1. INTRODUCTION In

Jan de Leeuw; Peter van der Heijden

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The effect of lattice temperature on surface damage in fused silica optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the effect of lattice temperature on the probability of surface damage initiation for 355nm, 7ns laser pulses for surface temperatures below the melting point to temperatures well above the melting point of fused silica. At sufficiently high surface temperatures, damage thresholds are dramatically reduced. Our results indicate a temperature activated absorption and support the idea of a lattice temperature threshold of surface damage. From these measurements, we estimate the temperature dependent absorption coefficient for intrinsic silica.

Bude, J; Guss, G; Matthews, M; Spaeth, M L

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Femtosecond pump-probe studies of reduced graphene oxide thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of photocarriers in reduced graphene oxide thin films is studied by using ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Time dependent differential transmissions are measured with sample temperatures ranging from 9 to 300 K. At each sample...

Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Werake, Lalani Kumari; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Loh, Kian Ping

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Corbeels, Roger J. (Wappingers Falls, NY); Kokturk, Uygur (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Ultrasound as a method for reducing bacteria on poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of one stored at 0 C is about 12 days (Barnes, 1974). Increasing the storage temperature to 5 C, reduces the shelf-life to 6 days (Farrell and Barnes, 1964). Acid treatments Certain acid compo, unds have been investigated as potential aids... microstructure, breaking strength, cook yield and protein extractability of ground, cured ham rolls. They concluded that ultrasonic energy increased the bind i ng strength, decreased the amount of cookout, increased the potential for salt-soluble protein...

Feria, Rebeca

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Strings at finite temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

High temperature ceramic composition for hydrogen retention  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic coating for H retention in fuel elements is described. The coating has relatively low thermal neutron cross section, is not readily reduced by H at 1500 deg F, is adherent to the fuel element base metal, and is stable at reactor operating temperatures. (JRD)

Webb, R.W.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for reducing nitrogen oxides in combustion effluents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for reducing nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) in the gas stream from the combustion of fossil fuels is disclosed. In a narrow gas temperature zone, NO.sub.x is converted to nitrogen by reaction with urea or ammonia with negligible remaining ammonia and other reaction pollutants. Specially designed injectors are used to introduce air atomized water droplets containing dissolved urea or ammonia into the gaseous combustion products in a manner that widely disperses the droplets exclusively in the optimum reaction temperature zone. The injector operates in a manner that forms droplet of a size that results in their vaporization exclusively in this optimum NO.sub.x -urea/ammonia reaction temperature zone. Also disclosed is a design of a system to effectively accomplish this injection.

Zauderer, Bert (Merion Station, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Reduced models for quantum gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The preceding talks given at this conference have dealt mainly with general ideas for, main problems of and techniques for the task of quantizing gravity canonically. Since one of the major motivations to arrange for this meeting was that it should serve as a beginner's introduction to canonical quantum gravity, we regard it as important to demonstrate the usefulness of the formalism by means of applying it to simplified models of quantum gravity, here formulated in terms of Ashtekar's new variables. From the various, completely solvable, models that have been discussed in the literature we choose those that we consider as most suitable for our pedagogical reasons, namely 2+1 gravity and the spherically symmetric model. The former model arises from a dimensional, the latter from a Killing reduction of full 3+1 gravity. While 2+1 gravity is usually treated in terms of closed topologies without boundary of the initial data hypersurface, the toplogy for the spherically symmetric system is chosen to be asymptotically flat. Finally, 2+1 gravity is more suitably quantized using the loop representation while spherically symmetric gravity is easier to quantize via the self-dual representation. Accordingly, both types of reductions, both types of topologies and both types of representations that are mainly employed in the literature in the context of the new variables come into practice. What makes the discussion especially clear is the fact that for both models the reduced phase space turns out to be finitely dimensional.

T. Thiemann

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

Boyer, Edmond

155

Columbia Gas of Ohio- Programmable Thermostat Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Columbia Gas of Ohio offers professional Facility/Building Energy Audits to determine the potential for natural gas savings encouraging matching funds and requiring submittal of final energy audit...

156

Ener-Gee Whiz Answers Your Questions: Thermostat Settings and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

part of the solar hot water heating system later on? Ener-Gee Whiz: Most solar water heating systems will require a backup system for cloudy days or at times of increased demand,...

157

DRAFT October 4, 2007 Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to move on from the concept of a simple open fire to a central heating system. They utilized under (the Electric Heat Regulator Co.) eventually became Ho (Appliance Standards). 2 #12;DRAFT October 4, 2007 A Brief Historical Perspective Although heating

158

Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.heat pump water heaters. Advanced lighting controls in commercial

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as heat pump water heaters and commercial lighting.such as lights or heat pump water heaters. Our review of theing behaviour. Heat pump water heaters require sophisticated

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Training Your Thermostat to Save Money... and Energy! | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 th ,TopDepartment of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Program Your Thermostat for Automatic Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | DepartmentDepartment ofThermoChem RecoveryA09 More09 MoreEnhancedAllison

162

Facilitating Energy Savings through Enhanced Usability of Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products, such as heat pump water heaters and commercialsuch as lights or heat pump water heaters. Our review of theing behaviour. Heat pump water heaters require sophisticated

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

165

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouple (HTIR-TC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL researchers have created a new thermocouple that can resist high temperature and radiation. This device will improve safety and reduce costs associated with unit failures. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Statistical Analysis and Time Series Models for Minimum/Maximum Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, thereby reducing the adverse effect of global warming in the Antarctic Peninsula. Keywords that the observed increase in the minimum temperatures is a consequence of human activity rather than natural causes

Sidorov, Nikita

168

Optimizing MapReduce for Multicore Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MapReduce is a programming model for data-parallel programs originally intended for data centers. MapReduce simplifies parallel programming, hiding synchronization and task management. These properties make it a promising ...

Kaashoek, Frans

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Significantly reduce maintenance time Documents&Mediabecomesthekey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Significantly reduce maintenance time Documents&Mediabecomesthekey contactforallmaintenanceneeds. MajorpartsarestoredbyDocuments& MediaattheMissionCenter.Thisreduces thetimeneededtoorderpartsandresultsin&Mediaoffersthecampus communityaconvenientandeconomicsolution foritscopiers,multifunctiondevicesandprinter needs. Print Management Program advantages Reduce

Mullins, Dyche

170

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the manufacturer . Replaced with energy efficient light emitting diode (LED) signs. Project reduced risk of tritium

171

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

INFLUENCE OF SUPPLY AIR TEMPERATURE ON UNDERFLOOR AIR DISTRIBUTION (UFAD) SYSTEM ENERGY PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chilled water cooling coil, and supply fan. The fan is aspecify the VAV box cooling design supply air temperature (the underfloor supply plenum (thereby, reducing room cooling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reducing the Energy Usage of Oce Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the Energy Usage of Oce Applications Jason Flinn 1 , Eyal de Lara 2 , M. Satyanarayanan 1 of the energy usage of Microsoft's PowerPoint application and show that adaptive policies can reduce energy research e#11;ort, no silver bullet for reducing energy usage has yet been found. Instead, a comprehensive

Flinn, Jason

174

Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Temperature and RH Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

176

New waste-heat refrigeration unit cuts flaring, reduces pollution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planetec Utility Services Co. Inc. and Energy Concepts Co. (ECC), with the help of the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed and commissioned a unique waste-heat powered LPG recovery plant in August 1997 at the 30,000 b/d Denver refinery, operated by Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS). This new environmentally friendly technology reduces flare emissions and the loss of salable liquid-petroleum products to the fuel-gas system. The waste heat ammonia absorption refrigeration plant (Whaarp) is the first technology of its kind to use low-temperature waste heat (295 F) to achieve sub-zero refrigeration temperatures ({minus}40 F) with the capability of dual temperature loads in a refinery setting. The ammonia absorption refrigeration is applied to the refinery`s fuel-gas makeup streams to condense over 180 b/d of salable liquid hydrocarbon products. The recovered liquid, about 64,000 bbl/year of LPG and gasoline, increases annual refinery profits by nearly $1 million, while substantially reducing air pollution emissions from the refinery`s flare.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S. [Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Erickson, D.; Papar, R. [Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Gupta, Amita

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

OPERATING TEMPERATURE WINDOWS FOR FUSION REACTOR STRUCTURAL MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATING TEMPERATURE WINDOWS FOR FUSION REACTOR STRUCTURAL MATERIALS S.J. Zinkle1 and N.M. Ghoniem reactor structural materials: four reduced-activation structural materials (oxide-dispersion- strengthened operating temperature limit of structural materials is determined by one of four factors, all of which

California at Los Angeles, University of

179

Low temperature oxidation using support molten salt catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Molten salt reactions are performed by supporting the molten salt on a particulate support and forming a fluidized bed of the supported salt particles. The method is particularly suitable for combusting hydrocarbon fuels at reduced temperatures, so that the formation NO.sub.x species is reduced. When certain preferred salts are used, such as alkali metal carbonates, sulfur and halide species can be captured by the molten salt, thereby reducing SO.sub.x and HCl emissions.

Weimer, Alan W.; Czerpak, Peter J.; Hilbert, Patrick M.

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High temperature probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Temperature determination from the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determination of temperature from experimental data has become important in searches for critical phenomena in heavy ion collisions. Widely used methods are ratios of isotopes (which rely on chemical and thermal equilibrium), population ratios of excited states etc. Using the lattice gas model we propose a new observable: $n_{ch}/Z$ where $n_{ch}$ is the charge multiplicity and $Z$ is the charge of the fragmenting system. We show that the reduced multiplicity is a good measure of the average temperature of the fragmenting system.

S. Das Gupta; J. Pan; M. B. Tsang

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Anomalous behaviour of magnetic coercivity in graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we present the temperature dependence of the magnetic coercivity of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). We observe an anomalous decrease in coercivity of GO and RGO with decreasing temperature. The observation could be understood by invoking the inherent presence of wrinkles on graphene oxide due to presence of oxygen containing groups. Scanning electron microscopic image reveals high wrinkles in GO than RGO. We observe higher coercivity in RGO than in GO. At room temperature, we observe antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic behaviours in GO and RGO, respectively. Whereas, at low temperatures (below T?=?6070?K), both materials show paramagnetic behaviour.

Bagani, K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Kaur, J.; Rai Chowdhury, A.; Ghosh, B.; Banerjee, S., E-mail: sangam.banerjee@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Surface Physics Division, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sardar, M. [Material Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Shear and interfacial phenomena involved in reducing process temperature for the recovery of bitumen from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bitumen from Athabasca oil sand Elaine N. Stasiuk1, Laurier L. Schramm1, Harvey Yarranton1, and Bill good bitumen separation and flotation. These are needed, in part, to overcome a bitumen viscosity

Schramm, Laurier L.

185

Reduced Temperature Production of Recombinant Proteins to Increase Productivity in Mammalian Cell Culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of recombinant proteins from an industrial perspective has one of its main goals is to increase the product concentration whether in batch, fed-batch or continuous perfusion bioreactor systems. However, a ...

Fox, Steven R.

186

Reducing c-Si Module Operating Temperature via PV Packaging Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 2325, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

187

Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

It is an object of the present invention to provide a procedure for desensitizing zirconium-based alloys to large grain growth (LGG) during thermal treatment above the recrystallization temperature of the alloy. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a method for treating zirconium-based alloys which have been cold-worked in the range of 2 to 8% strain to reduce large grain growth. It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for fabricating a zirconium alloy clad nuclear fuel element wherein the zirconium clad is resistant to large grain growth.

Rosecrans, P.M.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Urban Design to Reduce Automobile Dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transport energy and area of the city, but in terms oftransport energy (reduce the area for the city, i.e. ,

Newman, Peter; Kenworthy, Jeffrey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel 2002 DEER Conference...

191

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport:...

192

Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool III, Lawrence E.

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

Aluffi, Paolo

194

The effect of inter-pass temperature on residual stresses in multi-pass welds produced using a low transformation temperature filler alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the deposition of new metal with a relatively low inter-pass temperature leads to increased residual stressesThe effect of inter-pass temperature on residual stresses in multi-pass welds produced using a low-to-martensite transformation temperatures offer an effective method of reducing residual stresses in strong, steel welds

Cambridge, University of

195

Low temperature cryoprobe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

Sungaila, Z.F.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-Temperature Superconductivity  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

Peter Johnson

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Elevated temperature crack propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

Orange, T.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Penrose Well Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

Christopherson, Karen

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

High temperature pressure gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

High temperature desulfurization of synthesis gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The hot process gas stream from the partial oxidation of sulfur-containing heavy liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel and/or sulfur-containing solid carbonaceous fuel comprising gaseous mixtures of H.sub.2 +CO, sulfur-containing gases, entrained particulate carbon, and molten slag is passed through the unobstructed central passage of a radiant cooler where the temperature is reduced to a temperature in the range of about 1800.degree. F. to 1200.degree. F. From about 0 to 95 wt. % of the molten slag and/or entrained material may be removed from the hot process gas stream prior to the radiant cooler with substantially no reduction in temperature of the process gas stream. In the radiant cooler, after substantially all of the molten slag has solidified, the sulfur-containing gases are contacted with a calcium-containing material to produce calcium sulfide. A partially cooled stream of synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas containing entrained calcium sulfide particulate matter, particulate carbon, and solidified slag leaves the radiant cooler containing a greatly reduced amount of sulfur-containing gases.

Najjar, Mitri S. (Hopewell Junction, NY); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of Mature Computations Ganesh Venkatesh, Jack Sampson! Dark Silicon #12;9 Conservation Cores Specialized cores for reducing energy ­ Automatically generated Conservation Core Architecture & Synthesis Patchable Hardware Results Conclusions #12;12 Constructing a C

Wang, Deli

203

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aims to reduce waste by banning plastic bags in light of the California state law AB 2449 which Primary energy Plastic uses 23% less Paper uses 80% less Solid waste Plastic contributes 76% less AbioticIdentify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most

Iglesia, Enrique

204

A novel isolation curtain to reduce turbine ingress heating and an advanced model for honeycomb labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but implementation of the injection curtain slot reduced substantially T* max of the outer region. In addition, a more desirable uniform adiabatic wall temperature distribution along the outer rotor and stator surfaces was observed due to the presence...

Choi, Dong Chun

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

208

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

211

High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Microbial impacts on geothermometry temperature predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional geothermometry approaches assume that the composition of a collected water sample originating in a deep geothermal reservoir still reflects chemical equilibration of the water with the deep reservoir rocks. However, for geothermal prospecting samples whose temperatures have dropped to <120C, temperature predictions may be skewed by the activity of microorganisms; microbial metabolism can drastically and rapidly change the waters chemistry. We hypothesize that knowledge of microbial impacts on exploration sample geochemistry can be used to constrain input into geothermometry models and thereby improve the reliability of reservoir temperature predictions. To evaluate this hypothesis we have chosen to focus on sulfur cycling, because of the significant changes in redox state and pH associated with sulfur chemistry. Redox and pH are critical factors in defining the mineral-fluid equilibria that form the basis of solute geothermometry approaches. Initially we are developing assays to detect the process of sulfate reduction, using knowledge of genes specific to sulfate reducing microorganisms. The assays rely on a common molecular biological technique known as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which allows estimation of the number of target organisms in a particular sample by enumerating genes specific to the organisms rather than actually retrieving and characterizing the organisms themselves. For quantitation of sulfate reducing genes using qPCR, we constructed a plasmid (a piece of DNA) containing portions of two genes (known as dsrA and dsrB) that are directly involved with sulfate reduction and unique to sulfate reducing microorganisms. Using the plasmid as well as DNA from other microorganisms known to be sulfate reducers or non-sulfate reducers, we developed qPCR protocols and showed the assays specificity to sulfate reducers and that a qPCR standard curve using the plasmid was linear over >5 orders of magnitude. As a first test with actual field samples, the assay was applied to DNA extracted from water collected at springs located in and around the town of Soda Springs, Idaho. Soda Springs is located in the fold and thrust belt on the eastern boundary of the track of the Yellowstone Hotspot, where a deep carbon dioxide source believed to originate from Mississippian limestone contacts acidic hydrothermal fluids at depth. Both sulfate and sulfide have been measured in samples collected previously at Soda Springs. Preliminary results indicate that sulfate reducing genes were present in each of the samples tested. Our work supports evaluation of the potential for microbial processes to have altered water chemistry in geothermal exploration samples.

Yoshiko Fujita; David W. Reed; Kaitlyn R. Nowak; Vicki S. Thompson; Travis L. McLing; Robert W. Smith

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy or creating waste? Big changes for a smaller carbon footprint and less pollution The Lab is working to reduce emissions by nearly 30 percent from energy use in...

215

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help...

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption Eric Niemeyer, Operations Superintendent Drilling Specialties Company A division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity...

Niemeyer, E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Examples of Process Modifications that Reduce Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ideal approach to reducing or eliminating waste products is to avoid making them in the first place. This article will examine numerous process modifications that have accomplished that goal. We'll look at changes to raw materials, reactors...

Nelson, K. E.

219

Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

Mattus, Alfred J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swimming Upstream: How to Reduce Homelessness in Tempe's Emerging Urban Setting David V. Summers will be served) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 RSVP link: Download any free QR-Code reader app to your smart phone. Scan

Zhang, Junshan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technologies for Reducing Nutrients in Dairy Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the amount of phosphorus that the river can accept safely. These limits, or total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), require that annual loading and annual average soluble concentrations of phosphorus in the river be reduced by 50 percent. To meet these new... standards, phosphorus must be reduced from dairy effluent applied to waste application fields. Consequently, dairies will need to adopt new, more effective and more efficient waste management practices. Case studies were conducted on a Geotube ? de...

Mukhtar, Saqib; Wagner, Kevin; Gregory, Lucas

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI . Submitted to the Offic of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major... Subject: Aerospace Engineering A REDUCED BLADE - VORTEX INTERACTION ROTOR A Thesis by SOMNATH MANI Submitted to Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content...

Mani, Somnath

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

Girling, P.M.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low Temperature Performance Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

225

Adaptation of US Maize to Temperature Variations Ethan E. Butler1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@fas.harvard.edu High temperatures are associated with reduced crop yields1,2 , and predictions for future warming3 have maize is locally adapted to hot temperatures across U.S. counties. Using this spatial adaptation. This result does not ac- count for possible changes in temperature variability or water resources, nor does

Huybers, Peter

226

Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Segmented superconducting tape having reduced AC losses and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting tape having reduced AC losses. The tape has a high temperature superconductor layer that is segmented. Disruptive strips, formed in one of the tape substrate, a buffer layer, and the superconducting layer create parallel discontinuities in the superconducting layer that separate the current-carrying elements of the superconducting layer into strips or filament-like structures. Segmentation of the current-carrying elements has the effect of reducing AC current losses. Methods of making such a superconducting tape and reducing AC losses in such tapes are also disclosed.

Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Wang, Haiyan (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

228

Photo-Activated Low Temperature, Micro Fuel Cell Power Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Key objective of this program is to identify electrodes that will make it possible to significantly reduce the operating temperature of micro-SOFC and thin film-based SOFCs. Towards this end, efforts are directed towards: (a) identifying the key rate limiting steps which limit presently utilized electrodes from performing at reduced temperatures, as well as, (b) investigating the use of optical, as opposed to thermal energy, as a means for photocatalyzing electrode reactions and enabling reduced operating temperatures. During Phase I, the following objectives were achieved: (a) assembly and testing of our unique Microprobe Thin Film Characterization System; (b) fabrication of the model cathode materials system in thin film form by both PLD and ink jet printing; and (c) the successful configuration and testing of the model materials as cathodes in electrochemical cells. A further key objective (d) to test the potential of illumination in enhancing electrode performance was also achieved.

Harry L. Tuller

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Control and Room Temperature Optimization of Energy Efficient Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The building sector consumes a large part of the energy used in the United States and is responsible for nearly 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore economically and environmentally important to reduce the building energy consumption to realize massive energy savings. In this paper, a method to control room temperature in buildings is proposed. The approach is based on a distributed parameter model represented by a three dimensional (3D) heat equation in a room with heater/cooler located at ceiling. The latter is resolved using finite element methods, and results in a model for room temperature with thousands of states. The latter is not amenable to control design. A reduced order model of only few states is then derived using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). A Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is computed based on the reduced model, and applied to the full order model to control room temperature.

Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

Dai, Steven Xunhu

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fitting Reduced Rank Regression Models by Alternating Maximum Likelihoods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fitting longitudinal reduced rank regression models byA J . (1965). Reduced-rank regression for the multivariateFITTING LONGITUDINAL REDUCED RANK REGRESSION MODELS BY

Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

233

Engine Cylinder Temperature Control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin Patrick (Metamora, IL)

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

Tucker, Mark D.

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

1985-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Manufacturing High Temperature Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

239

Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

Pau, George Shu Heng

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI ReducingBurden Reducing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reducing Power Factor Cost | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs ThroughReducing Power

242

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing PeakReducing

243

Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

Scanlon, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Combination process for upgrading reduced crude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reduced crude conversion process is described for heavy oil feeds having Conradson carbon numbers above two, which process comprises contacting a heavy oil feed with a catalyst to form products comprising lower molecular weight hydrocarbons and coke-on-catalyst, the coke containing minor amounts of hydrogen, and thereafter regenerating the catalyst by removing at least a portion of the coke.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

Bardsley, John

246

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel oil and Turkey Based Biofuel Energy Rocovery 12,000 Industrial Waste $30,000 $500 $29,500 1500WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2006 WASTE TYPE DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Aerosol Can Disposal System Recycling 528 66 pounds of hazardous waste per unit $7

247

Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED, REUSED, RECYCLED OR CONSERVED IN 2004 WASTE TYPE Brake Cleaner Recycling System Mercury Utility Devices Substitution 60 Hazardous Waste $1,750 $2,500 $1 of one PCB spill and clean-up event. Organic Solvents Substitution 678 Hazardous Waste $1,355 $36,500 $26

250

Kittiwakes strategically reduce investment in replacement clutches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kittiwakes strategically reduce investment in replacement clutches Julien Gasparini1,*, Alexandre). In birds, egg production is lower in replacement clutches than in first clutches, but it is unknown whether the replacement clutch is produced) or from a strategic allocation of resources between the two breeding attempts

Alvarez, Nadir

251

Problems with low-temperature clinkers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the cement industry, there are real problems connected with reducing the fuel/energy consumption and producing high-strength and rapid setting cements. A series of physicochemical examinations and pilot plant trials have shown that the use of BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ as a compound additive (barium-containing waste + gypsum) makes it possible to prepare a belite clinker at a temperature of 1250/sup 0/C; the BaSO/sub 4/ + CaSO/sub 4/ additive stabilizes the dicalcium silicate in the ..cap alpha..'-modification; introduction of the compound additive into the belite raw material mixture leads to the formation of hydraulically active minerals in the clinker-calcium sulfoaluminate, monocalcium aluminate, and ..cap alpha..'-C/sub 2/S, which in combination with alite ensure that a high-activity belite clinker is obtained at low burning temperatures.

Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Minkina, V.N.

1987-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

National Lab Directors, . .

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermionic converter temperature controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thermionic Converter Temperature Controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner,B. J.; Wolf, Joseph H.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Drexel University Temperature Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

Overeem, A.

260

HFCVD of diamond at low substrate and low filament temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been discovered that the addition of a small amount of oxygen to the CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} feed gas permits HFCVD of diamond at significantly lower filament and substrate temperatures. The effective O/C ratio here is much lower than that used in most studies of the oxygen effect. Careful control of the O/C and C/H ratios were found to be crucial to success. The effects of substrate and filament temperatures on growth rate and film quality were studied. Optimum conditions were found that gave reasonable growth rates ( {approximately}0.5 {mu}m/h ) with high film quality at filament temperatures below 1750{degrees}C and substrate temperatures below 600C. As a result, low temperature deposition has been realized. Power consumption can be reduced 50%, and the filament lifetime is extended indefinitely.

Tolt, Z.L.; Heatherly, L.; Clausing, R.E.; Shaw, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Feigerle, C.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reduced crude processing with Ashland's RCC process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashland Oil has long recognized the need to improve the process for the direct conversion of residual feedstocks into transportation fuels and other lighter products. The reduced crude oil conversion (RCC) unit now under construction at the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, refinery was developed to meet these demands. The facility incorporates RCC process innovations and recent catalyst technology improvements, and provides increased operating flexibility. Heavier, higher-sulfur crude oils can be processed under several economically attractive scenarios. They allow for an excellent balance between the production of transportation fuels, and reduced amounts of heavy fractions. An outstanding feature of the RCC process is the highoctane quality of full-boiling-range gasoline that results when converting residual feedstocks.

Zandona, O.J.; Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Soft torque rotary system reduces drillstring failures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the use of the soft torque system has significantly reduced torque fluctuations (up to 80%), torsional drillstring vibrations, and bit slip-stick conditions to help reduce drillstring failures and improve penetration rates in deep directional wells. The system was instrumental in eliminating expensive ($5-10 million) drillstring failures on Well SL 531 No. 3, a complex directional well in Mobile Bay. The soft torque rotary system attenuates and interrupts the torsional oscillations of the drillstring and thus prevents the buildup of energy in torsional waves that are reflected back and forth between the bit and the rotary table. The soft torque rotary system can be installed on any rig equipped with an independent electronically driven rotary table or top drive. The system is relatively inexpensive and easy to install.

Javanmardi, K.; Gaspard, D. (Shell Offshore Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States))

1992-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

Graham, Sean C.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

Lo, Hoi-Kwong (1309, Low Block, Lei Moon House Ap Lei Chau Estate, Hong Kong, HK); Chau, Hoi Fung (Flat C, 42nd Floor, Tower 1, University Heights 23 Pokfield Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, HK)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters and Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6, 2000 Reducing NOx in Fired Heaters Air Pollution Control and Boilers Keeping the environment clean Presented by Ashutosh Garg Furnace Improvements Low cost solutions for fired heaters Trace compounds ? Nitric oxides ? Carbon monoxide ? Sulfur... it is essential to estimate accurately baseline NOx emissions. ? This will establish each units current compliance status. ? Emissions ? Current excess air level ? Carbon monoxide ? Combustibles ? NOx corrected to 3% 02 314 ESL-IE-00-04-46 Proceedings...

Garg, A.

268

Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

Arvizu, Dan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrasonic Inspection At least 2 times per year Steam Trap Surveyor Submit reports to area management, energy team, and reliability engineers for each area every month Steam Trap Team Leader Control Plan ? Process Owner agrees...Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works GB/BB Name: Cyndi Kouba Mentor/MBB: Andrew Degraff Team Members Michael Crowley(Site Energy Lead), (Charlie) Flanigan (Aramids-maintenance), Ben Snyder (Aramids-ATO), Michael Scruggs (Central...

Kouba, C.

270

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Method for reducing ignition delay of fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of reducing ignition delay /tau/, of fuels to negligible values and negligible differences is disclosed. Fuels conditioned to have such negligible values and differences are readily used in multiple fuel engines, such fuels self-ignite substantially instantaneously when injected into an oxidant, require substantially no heat transfer from the oxidant to effect the self-ignition, and the self-ignition is sufficient to sustain continued combustion.

Hoppie, L.O.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

Graham, Sean C.

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartment ofManagementManagementReduce Hot Water Use

274

Reducing emissions by addressing steam turbine inefficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that inefficient steam turbines increase fossil plant emissions because additional fuel must be burned to meet the power output requirements. During a turbine outage, plant performance and maintenance staff make and prioritize repair decisions within tight time and budget constraints. This paper describes how Georgia Power identifies performance losses of degraded components in the steam path and determines their impact on heat rate. Turbine performance is assessed by a steam path audit program that Encotech has developed and make available to utilities. Georgia Power has conducted several operating tests that give good correlation with audit results. Georgia Power uses the audit information to make the most cost-effective repairs to maintain a low heat rate and to reduce emissions. The Clean Air Act presents electric utilities with the challenge of reducing emissions from fossil plants in the most cost-effective way possible. Meeting the stack emissions limitations often translates to large capital expenditures and increased cycle heat rate. One resource the electric utilities have to reduce the costly impact of compliance with the Clean Air Act is control over the efficiency of their steam turbines.

Harris, J.C. (Georgia Power Co., Atlanta, GA (United States)); Cioffi, D.H. (Encotech, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Development of reduced crude cracking catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1974 OPEC imposed an embargo on oil to the United States and caused a rapid rise in the price of a barrel of oil. At the time of the embargo, Ashland imported a considerable portion of its oil from the Middle East, thus raising the question of oil availability. As the problem increased in severity, Messrs. George Meyer, Oliver Zandona and Llyod Busch, began to explore alternative ways of squeezing more product from a given barrel of crude. After considering many alternatives, they arrived at the innovative thought that it might be possible to catalytically crack the 1050{degree}F plus fraction of the barrel directly to gasoline which would in effect, give them an additional volume of crude oil. Also, if vacuum fractionation were eliminated and if the entire 650{degree}F plus (reduced crude) portion of the barrel processed, this would further reduce operating costs. With these objectives and some new process innovations in mind, they began reduced crude cracking experimentation in a small 12,000 B/D FCC operating unit at Louisville. It was from these goals, concepts and a small operating unit, that the RCC process was born.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr. (Ashland Petroleum Company, KY (USA))

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Universal decay rule for reduced widths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission processes including {alpha} decay, heavy cluster decay, and proton and di-proton emission are analyzed in terms of the well-known factorization between the penetrability and the reduced width. By using a shifted harmonic oscillator plus Coulomb cluster-daughter interaction it is possible to derive a linear relation between the logarithm of the reduced width squared and the fragmentation potential, defined as the difference between the Coulomb barrier and the Q value. This relation is fulfilled with a good accuracy for transitions between ground states, as well as for most {alpha} decays to low-lying 2{sup +} excited states. The well-known Viola-Seaborg rule, connecting half-lives with the Coulomb parameter and the product between fragment charge numbers, as well as the Blendowske scaling rule, connecting the spectroscopic factor with the mass number of the emitted cluster, can be easily understood in terms of the fragmentation potential. It is shown that the recently evidenced two regions in the dependence of reduced proton half-lives versus the Coulomb parameter are directly connected with the corresponding regions of the fragmentation potential.

Delion, D. S. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 407 Atomistilor, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania) and Academy of Romanian Scientists, 54 Splaiul Independentei, Bucharest 050094 (Romania)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

Callender, Craig

278

The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

Walter, Frederick M.

279

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

282

Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

Baozhen, Li (Essex Junction, VT); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singhal, Subhash C. (Murrysville, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Visbreaking-enhanced thermal recovery method utilizing high temperature steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The displacement efficiency of a steam drive process is improved and steam override reduced by rapidly injecting a predetermined amount of high temperature steam via an injection well into the formation to visbreak a portion of the oil in the formation prior to a steam drive wherein steam is injected into the formation via the injection well to displace oil to a spaced-apart production well through which oil is recovered. The visbroken oil provides a more favorable transition of mobility ratio between the phases in the formation thereby reducing viscous fingering and increasing the displacement efficiency of the steam drive. In addition, after a predetermined amount of high temperature steam has been injected into the formation, the formation may be allowed to undergo a soak period prior to the steam drive. The high temperature steam injection and soaking steps may be sequentially repeated for a plurality of cycles.

Shu, W.R.

1984-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10C, though at 30C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Comaskey, Brian (Stockton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 |Rebecca MatulkaDeliveryUpdatedRFI Reducing

288

Reducing Energy Loss | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | DepartmentRecruitPumpingStudyReducing

289

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated |Reducing LED Costs Through

290

Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office ofof EnergyReducing Peak Demand

291

Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalancedDepartment ofColumbusReport #Study | Department of EnergyReducingBurden

292

Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

Klem, John F. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

Wu, Z.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Simulation and Optimization of the Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Showcase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new kind of showcase with temperature and humidity independent control is introduced in this paper to reduce the energy consumption of the showcase's air-conditioning system. Computational Fluid Dynamics was employed to investigate this new...

Hou, H.; Yu, L.; Wan, X.; Chen, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Rooftop Membrane Temperature Reductions with Green Roof Technology in South-Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early green roof cooling and energy reduction research in North America took place in Canada and the northern latitudes of the United States, where green roofs reduced rooftop temperatures by 70% to 90%. Less is known about green roof technology...

Dvorak, B.

296

Impact of Control System Technologies on Industrial Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modify temperature and pressure setpoints to meet requirements while optimizing energy use CHILLER ROOM TB Static Pressure Setpoint Reset Thermostatic Temperature Setpoint ESL-IE-14-05-40 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology... Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 1. HVAC: Seasonal Temperature Resets I. SETPOINT ADJUSTMENT Low payback, high savings! Image: http://www.ncelectriccooperatives.com/electricity/homeEnergy/thermostats_intro.htm Average Savings: $10,000 per year...

Parikh, P.; Pasmussen, B. P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Recommendations for reducing ambiguity in written procedures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous studies in the nuclear weapons complex have shown that ambiguous work instructions (WIs) and operating procedures (OPs) can lead to human error, which is a major cause for concern. This report outlines some of the sources of ambiguity in written English and describes three recommendations for reducing ambiguity in WIs and OPs. The recommendations are based on commonly used research techniques in the fields of linguistics and cognitive psychology. The first recommendation is to gather empirical data that can be used to improve the recommended word lists that are provided to technical writers. The second recommendation is to have a review in which new WIs and OPs and checked for ambiguities and clarity. The third recommendation is to use self-paced reading time studies to identify any remaining ambiguities before the new WIs and OPs are put into use. If these three steps are followed for new WIs and OPs, the likelihood of human errors related to ambiguity could be greatly reduced.

Matzen, Laura E.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

How Damage Diversification Can Reduce Systemic Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of risk diversification in complex networks. Nodes represent e.g. financial actors, whereas weighted links represent e.g. financial obligations (credits/debts). Each node has a risk to fail because of losses resulting from defaulting neighbors, which may lead to large failure cascades. Classical risk diversification strategies usually neglect network effects and therefore suggest that risk can be reduced if possible losses (i.e., exposures) are split among many neighbors (exposure diversification, ED). But from a complex networks perspective diversification implies higher connectivity of the system as a whole which can also lead to increasing failure risk of a node. To cope with this, we propose a different strategy (damage diversification, DD), i.e. the diversification of losses that are imposed on neighboring nodes as opposed to losses incurred by the node itself. Here, we quantify the potential of DD to reduce systemic risk in comparison to ED. For this, we develop a branching proce...

Burkholz, Rebekka; Schweitzer, Frank

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High temperature interfacial superconductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report...

302

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions March 15, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Castle Geyser at Yellowstone National Park | File photo...

303

Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

304

Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions:...

305

Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite....

306

Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat...

307

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs March 31, 2014 - 11:22am Addthis...

308

Reduced Gravity Education Flight Opportunity for Students at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reduced Gravity Education Flight Opportunity for Students at Minority Serving Institutions Reduced Gravity Education Flight Opportunity for Students at Minority Serving...

309

Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits April 8,...

310

New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases Reliability New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80 Percent and Increases...

311

Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of...

312

Optimization of A Portable Microanalytical System to Reduce Electrode...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

System to Reduce Electrode Fouling from Proteins Associated with Biomonitoring of Optimization of A Portable Microanalytical System to Reduce Electrode Fouling from Proteins...

313

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy.

314

Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency and Greenhouse Gas Emission Vehicle Electrification is Key to Reducing Petroleum Dependency and Greenhouse Gas...

315

Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates for Compression Ignition Engine Applications Development and Validation of a Reduced Mechanism for Biodiesel Surrogates...

316

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by Cummins Power Generation, June 2011 Low-Cost Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions - Presentation by...

317

Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lai.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power Losses Advanced Soft Switching Inverter for Reducing Switching and Power...

318

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building...

319

Redox reactions of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN), riboflavin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox reactions of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN), riboflavin (RBF), and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) with Redox reactions of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMN),...

320

Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular flat front face comprising a plurality of load bearing struts of a predetermined size attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides and top thereof, a pair of pliable opposing flat sheets having an outside edge portion attached to the flat front face adjacent the sides thereof and an upper edge with a predetermined curve; the opposing flat sheets being bent and attached to the struts to form effective curved airfoil shapes, and a top pliable flat sheet disposed adjacent the top of the flat front face and having predetermined curved side edges, which, when the top sheet is bent and attached to the struts to form an effective curved airfoil shape, mate with the curved upper edges of the opposing sheets to complete the aerodynamic device.

Graham, Sean C.

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

Mariner, Paul E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

322

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Method of data communications with reduced latency  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Data communications with reduced latency, including: writing, by a producer, a descriptor and message data into at least two descriptor slots of a descriptor buffer, the descriptor buffer comprising allocated computer memory segmented into descriptor slots, each descriptor slot having a fixed size, the descriptor buffer having a header pointer that identifies a next descriptor slot to be processed by a DMA controller, the descriptor buffer having a tail pointer that identifies a descriptor slot for entry of a next descriptor in the descriptor buffer; recording, by the producer, in the descriptor a value signifying that message data has been written into descriptor slots; and setting, by the producer, in dependence upon the recorded value, a tail pointer to point to a next open descriptor slot.

Blocksome, Michael A; Parker, Jeffrey J

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Electrospray ion source with reduced analyte electrochemistry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrospray ion (ESI) source and method capable of ionizing an analyte molecule without oxidizing or reducing the analyte of interest. The ESI source can include an emitter having a liquid conduit, a working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, a spray tip, a secondary working electrode, and a charge storage coating covering partially or fully the liquid contacting surface of the working electrode. The liquid conduit, the working electrode and the secondary working electrode can be in liquid communication. The electrospray ion source can also include a counter electrode proximate to, but separated from, said spray tip. The electrospray ion source can also include a power system for applying a voltage difference between the working electrodes and a counter-electrode. The power system can deliver pulsed voltage changes to the working electrodes during operation of said electrospray ion source to minimize the surface potential of the charge storage coating.

Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

Fang, Anan

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Completely Reducible maps in Quantum Information Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to compute the Schmidt decomposition of $A\\in M_k\\otimes M_m$, we must consider an associated self-adjoint map. Here, we show that if $A$ is positive under partial transposition (PPT) or symmetric with positive coefficients (SPC) or invariant under realignment then its associated self-adjoint map is completely reducible. We give applications of this fact in Quantum Information Theory. We recover some theorems recently proved for PPT and SPC matrices and we prove these theorems for matrices invariant under realignment using theorems of Perron-Frobenius theory. We also provide a new proof of the fact that if $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k$ mutually unbiased bases then $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k+1$. We search for other types of matrices that could have the same property. We consider a group of linear transformations acting on $M_k\\otimes M_k$, which contains the partial transpositions and the realignment map. For each element of this group, we consider the set of matrices in $M_k\\otimes M_k\\simeq M_{k^2}$ that are positive and remain positive, or invariant, under the action of this element. Within this family of sets, we have the set of PPT matrices, the set of SPC matrices and the set of matrices invariant under realignment. We show that these three sets are the only sets of this family such that the associated self-adjoint map of each matrix is completely reducible. We also show that every matrix invariant under realignment is PPT in $M_2\\otimes M_2$ and we present a counterexample in $M_k\\otimes M_k$, $k\\geq 3$.

Daniel Cariello

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Completely Reducible maps in Quantum Information Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to compute the Schmidt decomposition of $A\\in M_k\\otimes M_m$, we must consider an associated self-adjoint map. Here, we show that if $A$ is positive under partial transposition (PPT) or symmetric with positive coefficients (SPC) or invariant under realignment then its associated self-adjoint map is completely reducible. We give applications of this fact in Quantum Information Theory. We recover some theorems recently proved for PPT and SPC matrices and we prove these theorems for matrices invariant under realignment using theorems of Perron-Frobenius theory. One consequence of these theorems is the fact that if $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k$ mutually unbiased bases then $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k+1$. We search for other types of matrices that could have the same property. We consider a group of linear transformations acting on $M_k\\otimes M_k$, which contains the partial transpositions and the realignment map. For each element of this group, we consider the set of matrices in $M_k\\otimes M_k\\simeq M_{k^2}$ that are positive and remain positive, or invariant, under the action of this element. Within this family of sets, we have the set of PPT matrices, the set of SPC matrices and the set of matrices invariant under realignment. We show that these three sets are the only sets of this family such that the associated self-adjoint map of each matrix is completely reducible. We also show that every matrix invariant under realignment is PPT in $M_2\\otimes M_2$ and we present a counterexample in $M_k\\otimes M_k$, $k\\geq 3$.

Daniel Cariello

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

High-Temperature Quantum Coherence from Dissipative Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism is used to derive the density matrix of a quantum oscillator that is linearly coupled to an environmental reservoir. Although low-temperature reservoirs thermalize the oscillator to the usual Boltzmann distribution, reservoirs at intermediate temperatures reduce this distribution to a single, coherent ground state. Associated with this state is an imaginary frequency indicating an environment which absorbs energy from the oscillator through the suppression of all excited modes. Further increase of the environmental temperature results again in the thermalization of the quantum oscillator to the expected Boltzmann distribution. Qualitatively, this result could account for high-temperature quantum effects including the superconducting properties of graphite grains as well as the quantum coherence observed in photosynthetic systems.

George E. Cragg

2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu [National Sun Yat-Sen University-Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering, No.70, Lien-Hai Rd., Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An update is given on the work of the PV Quality Assurance Task Force; Group 3: studying the effects of humidity, temperature, and voltage bias.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

High Temperature Processing Symposium 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

} High temperature recycling operations } Materials sustainability } New furnace technology (including solar) We look forward to seeing you in February 2014. Dr M Akbar Rhamdhani (Chairman HTPS 2014) Prof

Liley, David

334

Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

335

Low temperature material bonding technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Metmyoglobin reducing ability and visual characteristics of nine selected bovine muscles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy, which decreases the metmyoglobin reducing ability. Mitochondrial activity in post-mortem muscles is increased by high storage temperature and high pH values (Ashmore et al., 1972; Bendall, 1972; Bendall and Taylor, 1972; Cheah and Cheah, 1971... that oxidative capacity of a muscle is related to marbling and tenderness and that muscle fiber type. They also presented data to support that muscle fiber type parameters explain more variation in marbling scores than variation in tenderness. Ashmore (1974...

Behrends, Jason Monroe

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SDCVP 67.380 $153.200 $41.800 $195.000 $2.89 measured energy consumption for each building. The horizontal axis is the ambient temperature. The venical axis is the average daily energy consumption in MMBtulhr. Figure 5 compares the predicted...REDUCING BUILDING ENERGY COSTS USING OPTIMIZED OPERATION STRATEGIES FOR CONSTANT VOLUME AIR HANDLING SYSTEMS Mingsheng Liu, her Atha, Agarni Reddy Ed White David Claridge and Jeff Haberl Department of Physical Plant Texas A&M University...

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Tuning photoluminescence of reduced graphene oxide quantum dots from blue to purple  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGOQDs) were synthesized by annealing GOQDs in H{sub 2} atmosphere. The photoluminescence (PL) properties of GOQDs and the rGOQDs samples were investigated. The results showed that compared to GOQDs, a blue to purple tunable PL of rGOQDs can be obtained by regulating the annealing temperature. The increase fraction of the newly formed isolated sp{sup 2} clusters may be responsible for the observed tunable PL.

Liu, Fuchi [Physics Department and Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); College of Physics and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Tang, Tao; Feng, Qian; Li, Ming; Liu, Yuan; Tang, Nujiang, E-mail: tangnujiang@nju.edu.cn; Zhong, Wei; Du, Youwei [Physics Department and Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. Substantial progress has been made on both characterizing thin films as well as developing methods to produce films on nanoporous substrates. The results of electrical conductivity measurements on ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc nanocrystalline thin films under controlled oxygen partial pressure and temperature are presented. The experimental data have been interpreted using a defect model, which describes the interaction between Sc and oxygen vacancies resulting in the formation of donor - (Sc{sub Zr} - V{sub o} - e){sup x} and acceptor - (Sc{sub Zr}-h){sup x} levels. From this the electronic and ionic contribution to the electrical transport has been determined and correlated with the band structure. These results suggest that ZrO{sub 2}:16%Sc possesses higher electronic conductivity than ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, which dominates the total conductivity in reducing atmospheres. This is an important result since it indicates that Sc-YSZ maybe useful in the anode regions of the cell. We have made important breakthroughs on depositing dense Ceria films on to porous LSM substrates. In previous studies we have found that in order to produce a surface which is smooth enough to coat with dense polymer precursor derived films, the required thickness of the colloidal film layer is determined by the maximum surface roughness. That is, if we wish to make 2 micron thick colloidal oxide layers, the roughness of the LSM surface can not exceed 2 microns. Currently, we are producing the composite CeO{sub 2}/LSM structures that can be coated with polymer precursor to produce 0.5 to 1.5 micron thickness dense YSZ films. In the next quarter, we will be testing SOFC's using these structures. YSZ/CeO{sub 2}/LSM composites have been formed by annealing at 800 C. Our studies show that the YSZ films are very dense with a 20 nm grain size. SOFC's using these composites are being fabricated and we expect to obtain cell data during the next quarter. As we reported in November 2000, we have had difficulties in making pore free films with larger areas that about 0.2cm{sup 2} which is due to problems in our clean room. Modifications have now been completed on the clean room and we should be approaching a class 100 in the film making area. This level of cleanliness is sufficient to obtain films without pores over areas up to 100cm{sup 2}.

Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Experiment Hazard Class 3 - High Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operation * APS Base Low Temperatures * Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures * Electric Furnace * Optical Furnace * Other High Temperature Lasers * Laser, Class 2 * Laser,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gate-modulated thermoelectric conversion in disordered nanowires: I. Low temperature coherent regime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gate-modulated thermoelectric conversion in disordered nanowires: I. Low temperature coherent as promising thermoelectric devices1 . In comparison to their bulk counterparts, they provide opportunities of thermoelectric conversion at a given temperature T . Indeed, they allow to reduce the phonon contribution ph

Recanati, Catherine

342

Title: Temperature acclimation (tempering) of hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria does not alter levels of Vibrio vulnificus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aquacultured hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) in order to reduce mortalities associated with cold temperature.A.C.) allowed initial storage for 6 hours at ambient temperature, followed by 10 hours at 68ºF (20º growing industry in Florida and has placed the state in the forefront of clam production nationwide

Florida, University of

343

Sintering and properties of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics for aerospace applications J.F. Justin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal shock resistance and makes them ideal for many high-temperature thermal applications : France (2013)" #12;for example, a high thermal conductivity reduces thermal stress within the material-francois.justin@onera.fr ABSTRACT The Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) represent a very interesting family of materials

344

Boost Converter Provides Temperature-Controlled Operation of 12V Fan from +5V Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enclosure, and reducing the fan supply voltage when maximum cooling is not necessary. Reducing the operatingBoost Converter Provides Temperature-Controlled Operation of 12V Fan from +5V Supply John Mc converter shown in Fig. 1 allows operation of a 12V brushless DC fan from a +5V supply. The circuit is based

McNeill, John A.

345

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comfortable. 8. Inspect thermostats, sensors, ignitors, burner orifices and other temperature regulating equipment for accuracy and function. Faulty equipment can quickly cause a spike in your fuel consumption. 9

Navara, Kristen

346

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Laser-induced magnesium production from magnesium oxide using reducing agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments for laser induced production of magnesium (Mg) from magnesium oxide (MgO) using reducing agents (R) were conducted. In these experiments, continuous wave CO{sub 2} focused laser is focused on a mixture of magnesium oxide and reducing agent. High power density of focused laser leads to high temperature and the reduction reaction resulting in Mg production. The resultant vapor is collected on a copper plate and analyzed in terms of magnesium deposition efficiency. Deposition efficiencies with various reducing agents such as Zr, C, and Si have been measured to be 60, 9.2, and 12.1 mg/kJ respectively. An excess addition of reducing agent over their corresponding reaction stoichiometric amounts is found to be optimum condition for the most of performed laser induced reactions. In addition, utilizing solar-pumped laser in Mg production with reducing agent will reduce CO{sub 2} emission and produce magnesium with high-energy efficiency and large throughput.

Mohamed, M. S.; Yabe, T.; Baasandash, C.; Sato, Y.; Mori, Y.; Shi-Hua, Liao; Sato, H.; Uchida, S. [Entropia Laser Initiative, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Delays in Reducing Waterborne and Water-related Infectious Diseases in China under Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite Chinas rapid progress improving water, sanitation and hygiene (WSH) infrastructure and access, in 2011, 471 million people lacked access to improved sanitation, and 401 million people lacked access to household piped water. Infectious diseases are sensitive to changes in climate, particularly temperature, and WSH conditions. To explore possible impacts of climate change on these diseases in China in 2020 and 2030, we coupled estimates of the temperature sensitivity of diarrheal disease and three vector-borne diseases, temperature projections from global climate models using four emissions pathways, WSH-infrastructure development scenarios and projected demographic changes. By 2030, the projected impacts would delay Chinas historically rapid progress toward reducing the burden of WSH-attributable infectious disease by 8-85 months. This developmental delay provides a key summary measure of the impact of climate change in China, and in other societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and environmental change.

Hodges, Maggie; Belle, Jessica; Carlton, Elizabeth; Liang, Song; Li, Huazhong; Luo, Wei; Freeman, Matthew C.; Liu, Yang; Gao, Yang; Hess, Jeremy; Remais, Justin V.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Low temperature irradiation tests on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

McDonald, Kirk

351

Change in composition and structure of reduced crudes during conversion on contact material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four Chinese 350{degrees}C+ reduced crude feedstocks were heated thermally in the presence of a contact material at 480-540{degrees}C in a fixed bed reactor. The feed and products were fractionated into eight fractions using normal pentane precipitation and alumina adsorption chromatography and average molecular parameters calculated with a modified Brown-Ladner method. The results obtained show that the conversion of various fractions of the reduced crudes was quite different. The conversion of asphaltic substances was much higher than those of saturates and aromatics. It is shown that the CH{sub 2}/CH{sub 3} ratio, aromaticity and the numbers of aromatic, naphthenic and total ring of heavy products were obviously lower than those of reduced crudes. The effect of temperature on metal, sulfur, nitrogen removal has been also investigated. The data indicate that the removal of weak polar non-porphyrin nickel was larger than that of middle and strong polar nickel complex.

Jixu, L. (China Luoyang, Petrochemical Engineering Co. (CN)); Guohe, Q.; Wenjie, L. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, East China Petroleum Inst., Dongying, Shandon (CN))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reducing the Probability of Capture into Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A migrating planet can capture planetesimals into mean motion resonances. However, resonant trapping can be prevented when the drift or migration rate is sufficiently high. Using a simple Hamiltonian system for first and second order resonances, we explore how the capture probability depends on the order of the resonance, drift rate and initial particle eccentricity. We present scaling factors as a function of the planet mass and resonance strength to estimate the planetary migration rate above which the capture probability drops to less than 1/2. Applying our framework to multiple extra solar planetary systems that have two planets locked in resonance, we estimate lower limits for the outer planet's migration rate allowing resonance capture of the inner planet. Mean motion resonances are comprised of multiple resonant subterms. We find that the corotation subterm can reduce the probability of capture when the planet eccentricity is above a critical value. We present factors that can be used to estimate this critical planet eccentricity. Applying our framework to the migration of Neptune, we find that Neptune's eccentricity is near the critical value that would make its 2:1 resonance fail to capture twotinos. The capture probability is affected by the separation between resonant subterms and so is also a function of the precession rates of the longitudes of periapse of both planet and particle near resonance.

Alice C. Quillen

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

353

How simple regulations can deeply reduce inequality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many models of market dynamics make use of the idea of wealth exchanges among economic agents. A simple analogy compares the wealth in a society with the energy in a physical system, and the trade between agents to the energy exchange between molecules during collisions. However, while in physical systems the equipartition of energy is valid, in most exchange models for economic markets the system converges to a very unequal "condensed" state, where one or a few agents concentrate all the wealth of the society and the wide majority of agents shares zero or a very tiny fraction of the wealth. Here we present an exchange model where the goal is not only to avoid condensation but also to reduce the inequality; to carry out this objective the choice of interacting agents is not at random, but follows an extremal dynamics regulated by the wealth of the agent. The wealth of the agent with the minimum capital is changed at random and the difference between the ancient and the new wealth of this poorest agent is take...

Iglesias, J R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reducing the Consequences of a Nuclear Detonation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction states that 'the United States must be prepared to respond to the use of WMD against our citizens, our military forces, and those of friends and allies'. Scenario No.1 of the 15 Department of Homeland Security national planning scenarios is an improvised nuclear detonation in the national capitol region. An effective response involves managing large-scale incident response, mass casualty, mass evacuation, and mass decontamination issues. Preparedness planning activities based on this scenario provided difficult challenges in time critical decision making and managing a large number of casualties within the hazard area. Perhaps even more challenging is the need to coordinate a large scale response across multiple jurisdictions and effectively responding with limited infrastructure and resources. Federal response planning continues to make improvements in coordination and recommending protective actions, but much work remains. The most critical life-saving activity depends on actions taken in the first few minutes and hours of an event. The most effective way to reduce the enormous national and international social and economic disruptions from a domestic nuclear explosion is through planning and rapid action, from the individual to the federal response. Anticipating response resources for survivors based on predicted types and distributions of injuries needs to be addressed.

Buddemeier, B R

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hamiltonian gadgets with reduced resource requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of the adiabatic model of quantum computation requires efficient encoding of the solution to computational problems into the lowest eigenstate of a Hamiltonian that supports universal adiabatic quantum computation. Experimental systems are typically limited to restricted forms of 2-body interactions. Therefore, universal adiabatic quantum computation requires a method for approximating quantum many-body Hamiltonians up to arbitrary spectral error using at most 2-body interactions. Hamiltonian gadgets, introduced around a decade ago, offer the only current means to address this requirement. Although the applications of Hamiltonian gadgets have steadily grown since their introduction, little progress has been made in overcoming the limitations of the gadgets themselves. In this experimentally motivated theoretical study, we introduce several gadgets which require significantly more realistic control parameters than similar gadgets in the literature. We employ analytical techniques which result in a reduction of the resource scaling as a function of spectral error for the commonly used subdivision, 3- to 2-body and $k$-body gadgets. Accordingly, our improvements reduce the resource requirements of all proofs and experimental proposals making use of these common gadgets. Next, we numerically optimize these new gadgets to illustrate the tightness of our analytical bounds. Finally, we introduce a new gadget that simulates a $YY$ interaction term using Hamiltonians containing only $\\{X,Z,XX,ZZ\\}$ terms. Apart from possible implications in a theoretical context, this work could also be useful for a first experimental implementation of these key building blocks by requiring less control precision without introducing extra ancillary qubits.

Yudong Cao; Ryan Babbush; Jacob Biamonte; Sabre Kais

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: ? Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments ? Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments ? Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics ? Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature ? Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: ? FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields ? Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) ? Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher temperature operation ? Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/?m. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200C and non-hermetic packages at 250C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

None

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Truher, Joel B. (Palo Alto, CA); Weiner, Kurt H. (Campbell, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

359

Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gibbs and Boltzmann definitions of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite sized `small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant to biophysics and nanotechnology.

Dixit, Purushottam D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Varying properties along lengths of temperature limited heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes an elongated heater in an opening in the formation. The elongated heater includes two or more portions along the length of the heater that have different power outputs. At least one portion of the elongated heater includes at least one temperature limited portion with at least one selected temperature at which the portion provides a reduced heat output. The heater is configured to provide heat to the formation with the different power outputs. The heater is configured so that the heater heats one or more portions of the formation at one or more selected heating rates.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Ginestra, Jean Charles (Richmond, TX)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

Zhu, Yimin

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

High temperature coatings for gas turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

363

Intensity and temperature-dependent photoluminescence of tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the recombination of excitons in tris (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum films by intensity and temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). At low temperature (15 K) and elevated excitation intensity the radiative emission is quenched by singlet-singlet annihilation processes. With rising temperature the PL quenching is strongly reduced resulting in a PL efficiency maximum at ?170 K. The reduced exciton annihilation is attributed to thermally activated occupation of non-quenchable trapped exciton states. Above 170 K the PL efficiency decreases due to thermal de-trapping of radiative states and subsequent migration to non-radiative centers.

Ajward, A. M.; Wang, X.; Wagner, H. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

PERPENDICULAR ION HEATING BY REDUCED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent theoretical studies argue that the rate of stochastic ion heating in low-frequency Alfvn-wave turbulence is given by Q = c{sub 1}((?u){sup 3}/?)exp ( c{sub 2}/?), where ?u is the rms turbulent velocity at the scale of the ion gyroradius ?, ? = ?u/v{sub i}, v{sub i} is the perpendicular ion thermal speed, and c{sub 1} and c{sub 2} are dimensionless constants. We test this theoretical result by numerically simulating test particles interacting with strong reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence. The heating rates in our simulations are well fit by this formula. The best-fit values of c{sub 1} are ?1. The best-fit values of c{sub 2} decrease (i.e., stochastic heating becomes more effective) as the Reynolds number and the number of grid points in the RMHD simulations increase. As an example, in a 1024{sup 2} 256 RMHD simulation with a dissipation wavenumber of the order of the inverse ion gyroradius, we find c{sub 2} = 0.21. We show that stochastic heating is significantly stronger in strong RMHD turbulence than in a field of randomly phased Alfvn waves with the same power spectrum, because coherent structures in strong RMHD turbulence increase orbit stochasticity in the regions where ions are heated most strongly. We find that c{sub 1} increases by a factor of ?3 while c{sub 2} changes very little as the ion thermal speed increases from values <

Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean C.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: qdy2@unh.edu, E-mail: benjamin.chandran@unh.edu, E-mail: jeanc.perez@unh.edu, E-mail: eliot@astro.berkeley.edu [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chinese translation of the Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to improve furnace energy efficiency. Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace gases are less dense and more buoyant than ambient air, so they rise, creating a differential pressure between the top and the bottom of the furnace. This differential, known as thermal head, is the source of a natural draft or negative pressure in furnaces and boilers. A well-designed furnace (or boiler) is built to avoid air leakage into the furnace or leakage of flue gases from the furnace to the ambient. However, with time, most furnaces develop cracks or openings around doors, joints, and hearth seals. These openings (leaks) usually appear small compared with the overall dimensions of the furnace, so they are often ignored. The negative pressure created by the natural draft (or use of an induced-draft fan) in a furnace draws cold air through the openings (leaks) and into the furnace. The cold air becomes heated to the furnace exhaust gas temperature and then exits through the flue system, wasting valuable fuel. It might also cause excessive oxidation of metals or other materials in the furnaces. The heat loss due to cold air leakage resulting from the natural draft can be estimated if you know four major parameters: (1) The furnace or flue gas temperature; (2) The vertical distance H between the opening (leak) and the point where the exhaust gases leave the furnace and its flue system (if the leak is along a vertical surface, H will be an average value); (3) The area of the leak, in square inches; and (4) The amount of operating time the furnace spends at negative pressure. Secondary parameters that affect the amount of air leakage include these: (1) The furnace firing rate; (2) The flue gas velocity through the stack or the stack cross-section area; (3) The burner operating conditions (e.g., excess air, combustion air temperature, and so on). For furnaces or boilers using an induced-draft (ID) fan, the furnace negative pressure depends on the fan performance and frictional losses between the fan inlet and the point of air leakage. In most cases, it would be necessary to measure or estimate negative pressure at the opening. The amount of air leakage, the heat lost in flue gases, and their effects on increased furnace or boiler fuel consumption can be calculated by using the equations and graphs given in Industrial Furnaces (see W. Trinks et al., below). Note that the actual heat input required to compensate for the heat loss in flue gases due to air leakage would be greater than the heat contained in the air leakage because of the effect of available heat in the furnace. For a high-temperature furnace that is not maintained properly, the fuel consumption increase due to air leakage can be as high as 10% of the fuel input.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AbstractThe gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

unknown authors

367

Shock temperature measurements in ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our first shock temperature measurements on a cryogenic target are reported for NH/sub 3/. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 61 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Dynamical Approach to Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

Hans Henrik Rugh

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Method for measuring surface temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, Richard S. (1 Miller Ave., Shoreham, NY 11786); Slegeir, William A. (7 Florence Rd., Hampton Bays, NY 11946); O'Hare, Thomas E. (11 Geiger Pl., Huntington Station, NY 11746); Mahajan, Devinder (14 Locust Ct., Selden, NY 11784)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Method for reducing pressure drop through filters, and filter exhibiting reduced pressure drop  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for generating and applying coatings to filters with porous material in order to reduce large pressure drop increases as material accumulates in a filter, as well as the filter exhibiting reduced and/or more uniform pressure drop. The filter can be a diesel particulate trap for removing particulate matter such as soot from the exhaust of a diesel engine. Porous material such as ash is loaded on the surface of the substrate or filter walls, such as by coating, depositing, distributing or layering the porous material along the channel walls of the filter in an amount effective for minimizing or preventing depth filtration during use of the filter. Efficient filtration at acceptable flow rates is achieved.

Sappok, Alexander; Wong, Victor

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

List of Journal Publications (updated April 2014) R. Justin, B. Chen*: Strong and conductive polymer-reduced graphene oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymer-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for transdermal drug deliveyr. Journal of Materials*: Characterisation and drug release performance of biodegradable chitosan-graphene oxide nanocomposites. Carbohydrate Polymers. 2014, 103, 70-80. R. Justin, B. Chen*: Body temperature reduction of graphene oxide through

Ojovan, Michael

375

Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include heat pump outdoor thermostat and defrost timermay include heat pump outdoor thermostat and defrost timer

Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

377

Conducting polymer actuators : temperature effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to utilize conducting polymer actuators as a viable engineering solution, it is necessary to produce usable levels of force with a reasonable bandwidth. Polypyrrole actuated at temperatures as high as 100 C ...

Del Zio, Michael R. (Michael Robert), 1982-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, W.Y.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These endeavors have lead us to a solution which we think is quite unique and should allow us to obtain flaw free dense films of thickness in the 0.5 to 5 {micro}m range at processing temperatures {le} 900{sup o}. The process involves the deposition of a slurry of nanocrystalline YSZ onto a presintered porous LSM substrate. The key element in the deposition is that the slurry contains sufficient YSZ polymer precursor to allow adhesion of the YSZ particles to each other and the surface after annealing at about 600 C. This allows the formation of a porous film of 0.5 to 5 {micro}m thick which adheres to the surface. After formation of this film, YSZ polymer precursor is allowed to impregnate the porous surface layer (capillary forces tend to confine the polymer solution in the nanoporous layer). After several impregnation/heat treatment cycles, a dense film results. Within the next few months, this process should be developed to the point that single cell measurements can be made on 0.5 to 5 {micro}m films on a LSM substrate. This type of processing allows the formation of essentially flaw free films over areas > 1 cm{sup 2}.

Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs Winning the Future: Grand Ronde Solar Projects Reduce Pollution, Cut Costs October 20, 2014 - 5:00pm...

384

Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using Old Finance Tools to Scale Up a New Industry Reduce Risk, Increase Clean Energy: How States and Cities are Using...

385

Fact #787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption Fact 787: July 8, 2013 Truck Stop Electrification Reduces Idle Fuel Consumption The U.S. Department of...

386

Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint This is one section of The University reducing the UA's carbon footprint. The Facilities Management recycling and waste department supports long

Wong, Pak Kin

387

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

388

Energy Department Announces $7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems Energy Department Announces 7 Million to Reduce Non-Hardware Costs of Solar Energy Systems November 15, 2011 -...

389

Dynamic reduced order modeling of entrained flow gasifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification-based energy systems coupled with carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from continued use of abundant and secure fossil fuels. Dynamic reduced ...

Monaghan, Rory F. D. (Rory Francis Desmond)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam This tip sheet...

391

NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

REDUCED RANK DETECTION SCHEMES FOR DS-CDMA COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REDUCED RANK DETECTION SCHEMES FOR DS-CDMA COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS Wanshi Chen Ericsson Wireless 90089­2565 e-mail: ubli@usc.edu Abstract -- Several reduced-rank detection schemes for direct- sequence to the multistage linear receiver scheme based on the Cayley Hamilton theorem. The analysis of the reduced rank

Southern California, University of

395

Reducing Fossil Carbon Emissions and Building Environmental Awareness at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Fossil Carbon Emissions and Building Environmental Awareness at Dartmouth College Summary selected the mission: "To reduce Dartmouth College's fossil carbon emissions." We believe this mission's responsibility to educate others about how it is reducing its fossil carbon emissions and encourage them to do

396

Development of Low Temperature Combustion Modes to Reduce Overall Emissions from a Medium-Duty, Four Cylinder Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

while a parametric study that just varies EGR is carried out using the knock model. The first parametric study showed that the optimal EGR and injection timing combination for the low loads occurred at high levels of EGR (60 percent) and advanced...

Breen, Jonathan Robert

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

397

Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of a Reduced Scale High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Test Facility and its Prototype with MELCOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relates to validation of systems-level computer code modeling capabilities in anticipation of the eventual need to perform HTGR licensing analyses. Because the NRC has used MELCOR for LWR licensing in the past and because MELCOR was recently updated...

Beeny, Bradley Aaron 1988-

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reduced lattice temperature high-speed operation of pseudomorphic InGaAdGaAs field-effect transistors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,um GaAs buffer, 170 A Ino.zGao,sAs strained channel, 50 A undoped Ale,,,Ga,,,As undoped spacer, S dimensions of 0.25 x 200 pm and 0.5 X 200 pm with a source-drain spacing of 2 ,um. The MODFETs have gate dimensions of 0.35~ 100 pm and 0.47X 100 pm with a source-drain spacing of 1 ,um. The MISFETs have

Kolodzey, James

399

A High-Temperature Fuel Cell to Provide On-Site Process Reducing Gas, Clean Power, and Heat  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts of 2014ReviewsndSIMPLE WAYSth800 to 1000Energy

400

NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Configuration and temperature dependence of magnetic damping in spin valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using vector-analyzer ferromagnetic resonance, we have studied the microwave susceptibility of a Py/Co/Cu/Co/MnIr spin valve over a large temperature range (5-450 K) and as a function of the magnetic configuration. An effective magnetization and Gilbert damping constant of 1.1 T and 0.021, respectively, are found for the permalloy free layer, with no discernible variation in temperature observed for either quantities. In contrast, the pinned layer magnetization is reduced by heating, and the exchange bias collapses near a temperature of 450 K. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the free layer increases by 500 MHz when the layer magnetizations are aligned in antiparallel, which is attributed to a configuration-dependent contribution to the damping from spin pumping effects.

Joyeux, X.; Devolder, T.; Kim, Joo-Von; Gomez de la Torre, Y.; Eimer, S.; Chappert, C. [Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); UMR8622, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

A new approach to oxygen enriched high temperature blast generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When increasing fuel injection in a blast furnace in order to reduce coke consumption and/or to increase production, the blast furnace operator tries to keep similar raceway conditions, for instance, an equivalent flame temperature. To compensate for the cooling effect due to the higher injection rate, two solutions can be selected or combined: to raise the temperature of the blast and/or to increase the level of oxygen in the blast. Whatever the choice, the Blast Furnace manager will certainly try to reduce the resulting investment and operating costs to a minimum. Air Liquide and Kvaerner Davy are trying to provide a new way to address these needs by offering a new technology for blast heating. A higher blast temperature will not only allow a higher fuel injection at tuyere level, a lower coke consumption, but also a lower oxygen consumption. Air Liquide and Kvaerner Davy are now able to offer a new heat regenerator with major advantages over conventional stoves. This new device can be used as a permanent substitute for a stove, or as a temporary one during repair, or stove improvement. It can also be added to an existing set of stoves to increase the average blast temperature.

Queille, P.H.; Macauley, D.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE TEMPERATURES OF RED SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a re-appraisal of the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) using their optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We have obtained data of a sample of RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds using VLT+XSHOOTER, and we fit MARCS model atmospheres to different regions of the spectra, deriving effective temperatures for each star from (1) the TiO bands, (2) line-free continuum regions of the SEDs, and (3) the integrated fluxes. We show that the temperatures derived from fits to the TiO bands are systematically lower than the other two methods by several hundred kelvin. The TiO fits also dramatically overpredict the flux in the near-IR, and imply extinctions which are anomalously low compared to neighboring stars. In contrast, the SED temperatures provide good fits to the fluxes at all wavelengths other than the TiO bands, are in agreement with the temperatures from the flux integration method, and imply extinctions consistent with nearby stars. After considering a number of ways to reconcile this discrepancy, we conclude that three-dimensional effects (i.e., granulation) are the most likely cause, as they affect the temperature structure in the upper layers where the TiO lines form. The continuum, however, which forms at much deeper layers, is apparently more robust to such effects. We therefore conclude that RSG temperatures are much warmer than previously thought. We discuss the implications of this result for stellar evolution and supernova progenitors, and provide relations to determine the bolometric luminosities of RSGs from single-band photometry.

Davies, Ben [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Plez, Bertrand [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France)] [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Trager, Scott [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Evans, Chris [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chiavassa, Andrea [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

410

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

Militzer, Burkhard

411

Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Finite Temperature Closed Superstring Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that the gas of IIA strings undergoes a phase transition into a gas of IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. A gas of free heterotic strings undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless duality transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat but vanishing internal energy at criticality. We examine the consequences of requiring a tachyon-free thermal string spectrum. We show that in the absence of Ramond-Ramond fluxes the IIA and IIB string ensembles are thermodynamically ill-defined. The 10D heterotic superstrings have nonabelian gauge fields and in the presence of a temperature dependent Wilson line background are found to share a stable and tachyon-free ground state at all temperatures starting from zero with gauge group SO(16)xSO(16). The internal energy of the heterotic string is a monotonically increasing function of temperature with a stable and supersymmetric zero temperature limit. Our results point to the necessity of gauge fields in a viable weakly coupled superstring theory. Note Added (Sep 2005).

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evolution of sputtered tungsten coatings at high temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sputtered tungsten (W) coatings were investigated as potential high temperature nanophotonic material to replace bulk refractory metal substrates. Of particular interest are materials and coatings for thermophotovoltaic high-temperature energy conversion applications. For such applications, high reflectance of the substrate in the infrared wavelength range is critical in order to reduce losses due to waste heat. Therefore, the reflectance of the sputtered W coatings was characterized and compared at different temperatures. In addition, the microstructural evolution of sputtered W coatings (1 and 5 ?m thick) was investigated as a function of anneal temperature from room temperature to 1000 C. Using in situ x-ray diffraction analysis, the microstrain in the two samples was quantified, ranging from 0.33% to 0.18% for the 1 ?m sample and 0.26% to 0.20% for the 5 ?m sample, decreasing as the temperature increased. The grain growth could not be as clearly quantified due to the dominating presence of microstrain in both samples but was in the order of 20 to 80 nm for the 1 ?m sample and 50 to 100 nm for the 5 ?m sample, as deposited. Finally, the 5 ?m thick layer was found to be rougher than the 1 ?m thick layer, with a lower reflectance at all wavelengths. However, after annealing the 5 ?m sample at 900 C for 1 h, its reflectance exceeded that of the 1 ?m sample and approached that of bulk W found in literature. Overall, the results of this study suggest that thick coatings are a promising alternative to bulk substrates as a low cost, easily integrated platform for nanostructured devices for high-temperature applications, if the problem of delamination at high temperature can be overcome.

Stelmakh, Veronika; Rinnerbauer, Veronika; Joannopoulos, John D.; Solja?i?, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan; Senkevich, Jay J. [Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tucker, Charles; Ives, Thomas; Shrader, Ronney [Materion Corporation, Buellton, California 93427 (United States)] [Materion Corporation, Buellton, California 93427 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mechanical instability at finite temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tritt, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Uher, C. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential propertymeasurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectricmaterials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectricmeasurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, Ctirad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Crystal face temperature determination means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

High temperature superconductor current leads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the reheating-cooling method (RCM), was developed and validated for measuring mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zones of alloys. The new method captures the brittle nature of aluminum alloys at temperatures close to the nonequilibrium solidus temperature, while specimens tested using the reheating method exhibit significant ductility. The RCM has been used for determining the mechanical properties of alloys at nonequilibrium mushy zone temperatures. Accurate data obtained during this project show that the metal becomes more brittle at high temperatures and high strain rates. (4) The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the alloy were determined. Constitutive models relating the stress and strain relationship at elevated temperatures were also developed. The experimental data fit the model well. (5) An integrated 3D DC casting model has been used to simulate heat transfer, fluid flow, solidification, and thermally induced stress-strain during casting. A temperature-dependent HTC between the cooling water and the ingot surface, cooling water flow rate, and air gap were coupled in this model. An elasto-viscoplastic model based on high-temperature mechanical testing was used to calculate the stress during casting. The 3D integrated model can be used for the prediction of temperature, fluid flow, stress, and strain distribution in DC cast ingots. (6) The cracking propensity of DC cast ingots can be predicted using the 3D integrated model as well as thermodynamic models. Thus, an ingot cracking index based on the ratio of local stress to local alloy strength was established. Simulation results indicate that cracking propensity increases with increasing casting speed. The composition of the ingots also has a major effect on cracking formation. It was found that copper and zinc increase the cracking propensity of DC cast ingots. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks in DC castings from a current level of 5% down to 2%. This could lead to energy savings

Das, Subodh K.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

Bhattacharyya, Rahul

423

Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

424

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

425

High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

426

Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

427

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

428

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

429

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

430

Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

Barclay, J.A.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

431

3, 771789, 2007 temperatures and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling and the onset of North American glaciation P. Huybers1 and P. Molnar2 1 Department of Earth that gradual cooling in the eastern tropical Pacific led to cooling of North America and the initiation affects North American temperature and ice-ablation. Assuming that the modern relationship holds5 over

Boyer, Edmond

432

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

High temperature synthetic cement retarder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic cement retarder which provides excellent retardation and compressive strength development has been synthesized. The response properties and temperature ranges of the synthetic retarder far exceed those of commonly used retarders such as lignosulfonates. The chemical nature of the new retarder is discussed and compared to another synthetic retarder.

Eoff, L.S.; Buster, D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Reducing intrinsic loss in superconducting resonators by surface treatment and deep etching of silicon substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present microwave-frequency NbTiN resonators on silicon, systematically achieving internal quality factors above 1 M in the quantum regime. We use two techniques to reduce losses associated with two-level systems: an additional substrate surface treatment prior to NbTiN deposition to optimize the metal-substrate interface, and deep reactive-ion etching of the substrate to displace the substrate-vacuum interfaces away from high electric fields. The temperature and power dependence of resonator behavior indicate that two-level systems still contribute significantly to energy dissipation, suggesting that more interface optimization could further improve performance.

A. Bruno; G. de Lange; S. Asaad; K. L. van der Enden; N. K. Langford; L. DiCarlo

2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

438

Challenges and Potential Solutions for Reducing Climate Control Loads in Conventional and Hybrid Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, is collaborating with U.S. automotive manufacturers to develop innovative techniques to reduce national fuel consumption and vehicle tailpipe emissions by reducing vehicle climate control loads. A new U.S. emissions test, the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), will soon begin measuring tailpipe emissions with the air conditioning system operating. Modeled results show that emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) more than double during the air conditioning part of the SFTP. Reducing the transmittance of the glazing can have a greater impact on the cabin soak temperature than ventilating the vehicle during a hot soak. Reducing the amount of outside air can decrease cooling and heating loads but requires that the recirculated air be cleaned. We discuss a photocatalytic oxidation air-cleaning process for removing volatile organic compounds and bioareosols. We conclude with an example of modeling the thermal comfort of the occupants. An auxiliary load increase of only 400 Watts (W) results in a 0.4 km/L (1 mpg) decrease for a conventional 11.9-L/100-km (28-mpg) vehicle. If every vehicle in the United States were to save only 0.4 km/L (1 mpg), $4 billion (U.S. dollars) would be saved annually in gasoline and oil costs. Further information can be found at http://www.ctts.nrel.gov/auxload.html.

Farrington, R.B., Anderson, R., Blake, D.M., Burch, S.D.; Cuddy, M.R., Keyser, M.A., Rugh, J.P.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The Casimir force on a piston at finite temperature in Randall-Sundrum models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir effect for a three-parallel-plate system at finite temperature within the frame of five-dimensional Randall-Sundrum models is studied. In the case of Randall-Sundrum model involving two branes we find that the Casimir force depends on the plates distance and temperature after one outer plate has been moved to the distant place. Further we discover that the sign of the reduced force is negative as the plate and piston locate very close, but the reduced force nature becomes repulsive when the plates distance is not very tiny and finally the repulsive force vanishes with extremely large plates separation. The thermal influence causes the repulsive Casimir force greater. Within the frame of one-brane scenario the reduced Casimir force between the piston and one plate left keeps attractive no matter how high the temperature is. It is interesting that the thermal effect leads the attractive Casimir force greater instead of changing the force nature.

Hongbo Cheng

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

440

On F p-ideals. . . . . . and Tukey reducibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On F p-ideals. . . . . . and Tukey reducibility Tam´as M´atrai Highland Park Florida February 28, 2010 #12;The result (P(), ) {F § ¦ ¤ ¥ p-ideals partially ordered by § ¦ ¤ ¥ Tukey reducibility } #12;The result (P(), ) {F § ¦ ¤ ¥ p-ideals partially ordered by § ¦ ¤ ¥ Tukey reducibility } I (P

Mátrai, Tamás

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Strain-Rate Response of High Purity Aluminum at Temperatures Approaching Melt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature, pressure-shear plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the rate-controlling mechanisms of the plastic response of high-purity aluminum at high strain rates (10{sup 6} s{sup -1}) and at temperatures approaching melt. Since the melting temperature of aluminum is pressure dependent, and a typical pressure-shear plate impact experiment subjects the sample to large pressures (2 GPa-7 GPa), a pressure-release type experiment was used to reduce the pressure in order to measure the shearing resistance at temperatures up to 95% of the current melting temperature. The measured shearing resistance was remarkably large (50 MPa at a shear strain of 2.5) for temperatures this near melt. Numerical simulations conducted using a version of the Nemat-Nasser/Isaacs constitutive equation, modified to model the mechanism of geometric softening, appear to capture adequately the hardening/softening behavior observed experimentally.

Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Jiao, T

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system...

444

Optimization Online - On reducing a quantile optimization problem ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 9, 2013 ... ... V.I.On reducing a quantile optimization problem with discrete distribution to a mixed integer programming problem // Automation and Remote...

Andrey Kibzun

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

Comments on Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2011 Notices). Comments on Request...

446

Novel Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces NOx Emissions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Application of Air Separation Membranes Reduces NOx Emissions Technology available for licensing: Selective permeation of gases using an air separation membrane. Can be retrofitted...

447

New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Report: Integrating More Wind and Solar Reduces Utilities' Carbon Emissions and Fuel Costs October 1, 2013 - 3:51pm Addthis The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)...

448

Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ballasts can reduce lighting energy by 20 to 30 percent. * ENERGY STAR light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs can last 25 years without lamp replacement. Compact...

449

accurate reduced models: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

renewable power and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels. This has become for peak shaving on their power demand profile from the grid, and thereby, minimize their...

450

activity level reduced: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cortex Scott O. Murray* , Daniel Kersten (received for review April 25, 2002) Visual perception involves the grouping of individual elements into coherent patterns that reduce...

451

aicar reduces il-6: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and signals through... Allen, Marilyn Jean 2014-05-29 24 Waste Description Pounds Reduced, Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Waste Description Type...

452

Utilization of UV or EB Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology to Significantly Reduce Costs and VOCs in the Manufacture of Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Energy Storage R&D Progress Report,...

453

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

454

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile...

455

A mixed integer programming approach to reduce fuel load ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 12, 2015 ... A mixed integer programming approach to reduce fuel load accumulation for prescribed burn planning. Ramya Rachmawati(ramya.rachmawati...

Ramya Rachmawati

2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

456

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize...

457

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

458

PPPL wins Department of Energy award for reducing greenhouse...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

an executive order signed on Oct. 5, 2009, to reduce energy consumption in federal buildings by 30 percent by 2015. "Today's Sustainability Award winners are leading by...

459

New pilot saves customers money and reduces BPA reserve requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

paced energy schedules, increasing the electric grid's flexibility to absorb changes in wind energy generation and reducing costs for both the customers and BPA. Portland General...

460

Reducing Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project Fact Sheet Reducing Industrial Energy Intensity in the Southeast Project Fact Sheet This fact sheet contains details regarding...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

acid selectively reduces: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Announcing: All Recycling Go Green Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling...

462

Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring fuel quality on electronically fuel injected engines. Reducing fuel consumption on the field, by continuously measuring...

463

Cleantech: Innovative Lab Partnership Reduces Emissions from Coal  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how the National Energy Technology Laboratory is working to reduce the emission of pollutants from existing coal-fired power plants.

464

Design modification for the modular helium reactor for higher temperature operation and reliability studies for nuclear hydrogen production processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these modifications together, the PVT is reduced to ~350 0C while keeping the outlet temperature at 950 0C and maintaining the PFT within acceptable limits. The vessel and fuel temperatures during low pressure conduction cooldown and high pressure conduction cooldown...

Reza, S.M. Mohsin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175C is the poor wettability of sodium melt on ?-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

426 AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS SEP 2 1196: vuUiJo HIM. . SPECIAL and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS -temperature meter 11 Maintenance and trouble -shooting 12 #12;AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

467

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

Militzer, Burkhard

468

High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

469

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

470

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the risk of irregu- lar heart beats -- particularly in individuals with a recent heart attack. Paul CoatesFish oil can help reduce deaths from heart disease, according to new evidence reports announced evi- dence that long-chain omega- 3 fatty acids reduce heart at- tack and other problems, re- lated

Bandettini, Peter A.

474

Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOx - 1 Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution MEASUREMENT OF SELECTED AIR POLLUTANTS IN CAR EXHAUST Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;NOx - 2 Ability of Catalytic Converters to Reduce Air Pollution MEASUREMENT OF SELECTED AIR POLLUTANTS IN CAR EXHAUST INTRODUCTION Automobile engines

Nizkorodov, Sergey

475

Volume 37 (1998), pages 95108 DEHN FILLINGS PRODUCING REDUCIBLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANIFOLDS Ying-Qing Wu ¢¡¤£¦¥¨§¤©¤¥ If two surgeries on a hyperbolic knot produce a reducible manifold;2 YING-QING WU is the reduced graph of 2. Section 3 studies the case that each vertex of 2 has valency 6

Wu, Ying-Qing

476

Reduced Turbine Emissions Using Hydrogen-Enriched Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal use of fuel lean combustion for NOx control ­ Replaces hydrocarbon fuels for reduced CO2 emissions ­ Enables use of domestically-produced H2 #12;U.S. CO2 EmissionsU.S. CO2 Emissions by Combustion Source 0 81Reduced Turbine Emissions Using Hydrogen-Enriched Fuels Robert W. Schefer Joseph C. Oefelein Jay O

477

Rank Estimation in ReducedRank Regression Efstathia Bura  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank Estimation in Reduced­Rank Regression Efstathia Bura Department of Statistics, The George, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 E­mail: dennis@stat.umn.edu Reduced rank regression assumes that the coe#cient matrix in a multi­ variate regression model is not of full rank. The unknown rank

Bura, Efstathia

478

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes Young-Woo Kwon and Eli, an increasing number of perfective maintenance tasks are concerned with optimizing energy consumption. However, optimizing a mobile application to reduce its energy consumption is non-trivial due to the highly volatile

Tilevich, Eli

479

GENETIC HEURISTICS FOR REDUCING MEMORY ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN EMBEDDED SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENETIC HEURISTICS FOR REDUCING MEMORY ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Maha IDRISSI AOUAD.loria.fr/zendra Keywords: Energy consumption reduction, Genetic heuristics, memory allocation management, optimizations on heuristic methods for SPMs careful management in order to reduce memory energy consumption. We propose

Schott, René - Institut de Mathématiques ?lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

480

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermostats reduces temperature" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Exposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton Submitted to the Department of ElectricalExposing Datapath Elements to Reduce Microprocessor Energy Consumption by Mark Jerome Hampton B Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial ful llment

482

Reducing Execution Overhead in a Data Stream Manager , Uur etintemel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is designed to take advantage of our overhead reducing techniques. We also discuss the specific overheads1 Reducing Execution Overhead in a Data Stream Manager Don Carney , Uur ?etintemel , Alex Rasin applications include sensor networks, position tracking, fabrication line management, network management

Cherniack, Mitch

483

Room to Grow How California Agriculture Can Help Reduce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room to Grow March 2010 How California Agriculture Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions #12 for helping to edit this report. Additional information was provided by Drs. James Fadel, William Horwath to Grow: How California Agriculture Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law #12

Kammen, Daniel M.

484

Pesticide exposure and sprayer design: ergonomics evaluation to reduce pesticide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pesticide exposure and sprayer design: ergonomics evaluation to reduce pesticide exposure Sonia of operator exposure to plant protection products through the introduction of ergonomics to the design process. It is suggested that a systematic ergonomics evaluation of sprayer interfaces with the view of reducing direct

485

Reducing Network Energy Consumption via Sleeping and Rate-Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Network Energy Consumption via Sleeping and Rate-Adaptation Sergiu Nedevschi Lucian Popa of two forms of power management schemes that reduce the energy consumption of networks. The first the energy consumed when actively processing packets. For real-world traffic workloads and topologies and us

California at Irvine, University of

486

Scalable Matrix Inversion Using MapReduce Jingen Xiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to implement in today's popular parallel dataflow programming systems, such as MapReduce. The reason Computing Research Institute Doha, Qatar aaboulnaga@qf.org.qa ABSTRACT Matrix operations are a fundamental dataflow programming systems like MapReduce [8] and Pregel [21] have become very popular as platforms

Aboulnaga, Ashraf

487

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

488

NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

490

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Temperature-dependent void-sheet fracture in Al-Cu-Mg-Ag-Zr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature-dependent initiation fracture toughness and stable crack growth resistance are important attributes of next-generation aluminum alloys for airframe applications such as the high speed civil transport. Previous research showed that tensile fracture strain increases as temperature increases for AA2519 with Mg and Ag additions, because the void-sheet coalescence stage of microvoid fracture is retarded. The present work characterizes intravoid-strain localization (ISL) between primary voids at large constituents and secondary-void nucleation at small dispersoids, two mechanisms that may govern the temperature dependence of void sheeting. Most dispersoids nucleate secondary voids in an ISL band at 25 C, promoting further localization, while dispersoid-void nucleation at 150 C is greatly reduced. Increased strain-rate hardening with increasing temperature does not cause this behavior. Rather, a stress relaxation model predicts that flow stress and strain hardening decrease with increasing temperature or decreasing strain rate due to a transition from dislocation accumulation to diffusional relaxation around dispersoids. This transition to softening causes a sharp increase in the model-predicted applied plastic strain necessary for dispersoid/matrix interface decohesion. This reduced secondary-void nucleation and reduced ISL at elevated temperature explain retarded void sheeting and increased fracture strain.

Haynes, M.J. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States); Gangloff, R.P. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Safety philosophy of gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has undertaken the study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300. The general concept of this study is development of a greatly simplified design that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements. Newly proposed design features enable the GTHTR300 to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010's. Also, the GTHTR300 fully takes advantage of its inherent safety characteristics. The safety philosophy of the GTHTR300 is developed based on the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) of JAERI which is the first HTGR in Japan. Major features of the newly proposed safety philosophy for the GTHTR300 are described in this article. (authors)

Shoji Katanishi; Kazuhiko Kunitomi; Shusaku Shiozawa [Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology, Oarai Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1394 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

Even, Jr., William R. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Evaluation of Aerogel Materials for High-Temperature Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Siiica aerogels have 1/3 the thermal conductivity of the best commercial composite insulations, or ~13 mW/m-K at 25C. However, aerogels are transparent in the near IR region of 4-7 m, which is where the radiation peak from a thermal-battery stack occurs. Titania and carbon- black powders were examined as thermal opacifiers, to reduce radiation at temperatures between 300C and 600C, which spans the range of operating temperature for most thermal batteries. The effectiveness of the various opacifiers depended on the loading, with the best overall results being obtained using aerogels filled with carbon black. Fabrication and strength issues still remain, however.

Ashley, Carol S.; Guidotti, Ronald A.; Reed, Scott T.; Reinhardt, Frederick W.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

495

Aerobic oxidation of anthracene in the presence of manganese porphyrinates and NaBH/sub 4/ reducing agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors investigate the kinetics of anthracene oxidation by molecular oxygen in the presence of manganese, iron, and cobalt porphyrinate catalysts and a sodium borohydride reducing agent at room temperature in solutions of ethanol or ethanol with chloroform and benzene. Effective rate constants for the reactions are determined based on the amount of anthraquinone formed in the reaction. In all cases with the exception of cobalt tetraphenylporphyrinate the only oxidation product was anthraquinone. Its structure was verified by NMR and IR spectroscopy.

Lukashova, E.A.; Solov'ev, A.B.; Chugreev, A.L.; Enikolopyan, N.S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures, we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross-field transport in comparison with local blob simulations.

Wiesenberger, M., E-mail: Matthias.Wiesenberger@uibk.ac.at; Kendl, A. [Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, Association EURATOM-AW, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Madsen, J. [Association EURATOM-DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

Hawking temperature of rotating charged black strings from tunneling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal radiations from spherically symmetric black holes have been studied from the point of view of quantum tunneling. In this paper we extend this approach to study radiation of fermions from charged and rotating black strings. Using WKB approximation and Hamilton-Jacobi method we work out the tunneling probabilities of incoming and outgoing fermions and find the correct Hawking temperature for these objects. We show that in appropriate limits the results reduce to those for the uncharged and non-rotating black strings.

Ahmed, Jamil; Saifullah, K., E-mail: jamil_051@yahoo.com, E-mail: saifullah@qau.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Nonlocal microscopic theory of Casimir forces at finite temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction energy between two metallic slabs in the retarded limit at finite temperature is expressed in terms of surface polariton propagators for separate slabs, avoiding the usual matching procedure, with both diamagnetic and paramagnetic excitations included correctly. This enables appropriate treatment of arbitrary electron density profiles and fully nonlocal electronic response, including both collective and single-particle excitations. The results are verified by performing the nonretarded and long-wavelength (local) limits and showing that they reduce to the previously obtained expressions. Possibilities for practical use of the theory are explored by applying it to calculation of various contributions to the Casimir energy between two silver slabs.

Despoja, V. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, ES-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Depto. de Fysica de Materiales and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pays Vasco, Apdo. 1072, E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Sunjic, M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, ES-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Marusic, L. [Maritime Department, University of Zadar, M. Pavlinovica b.b., HR-23000 Zadar (Croatia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Multilayer compressive seal for sealing in high temperature devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mica based compressive seal has been developed exhibiting superior thermal cycle stability when compared to other compressive seals known in the art. The seal is composed of compliant glass or metal interlayers and a sealing (gasket) member layer composed of mica that is infiltrated with a glass forming material, which effectively reduces leaks within the seal. The compressive seal shows approximately a 100-fold reduction in leak rates compared with previously developed hybrid seals after from 10 to about 40 thermal cycles under a compressive stress of from 50 psi to 100 psi at temperatures in the range from 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C.

Chou, Yeong-Shyung (Richland, WA); Stevenson, Jeffry W. (Richland, WA)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

500

Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z