National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermonuclear experimental reactor

  1. TRANSP simulations of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    TRANSP simulations of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plasmas R. V. Budny, D. C-consistent models for plasmas within the separatrix surface in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. INTRODUCTION One of the goals for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER is the production

  2. ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

  3. Review of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) detailed design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-18

    Dr. Martha Krebs, Director, Office of Energy Research at the US Department of Energy (DOE), wrote to the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC), in letters dated September 23 and November 6, 1996, requesting that FESAC review the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Detailed Design Report (DDR) and provide its view of the adequacy of the DDR as part of the basis for the United States decision to enter negotiations with the other interested Parties regarding the terms and conditions for an agreement for the construction, operations, exploitation and decommissioning of ITER. The letter from Dr. Krebs, referred to as the Charge Letter, provided context for the review and a set of questions of specific interest.

  4. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield and blanket work package report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. US ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield and blanket design activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    This paper summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. Primary tasks carried out during the past year include design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components, and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. The blanket concepts considered are the aqueous/Li salt solution, a water-cooled, solid breeder blanket, a helium-cooled, solid-breeder blanket, a blanket cooled by helium containing lithium-bearing particulates, and a blanket concept based on breeding tritium from He/sup 3/. 1 ref., 2 tabs.

  6. Antenna design for fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostic for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leipold, F.; Furtula, V.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Korsholm, S. B.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M. [Association Euratom--Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2009-09-15

    Fast ion physics will play an important role for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where confined alpha particles will affect and be affected by plasma dynamics and thereby have impacts on the overall confinement. A fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic using gyrotrons operated at 60 GHz will meet the requirements for spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the velocity distributions of confined fast alphas in ITER by evaluating the scattered radiation (CTS signal). While a receiver antenna on the low field side of the tokamak, resolving near perpendicular (to the magnetic field) velocity components, has been enabled, an additional antenna on the high field side (HFS) would enable measurements of near parallel (to the magnetic field) velocity components. A compact design solution for the proposed mirror system on the HFS is presented. The HFS CTS antenna is located behind the blankets and views the plasma through the gap between two blanket modules. The viewing gap has been modified to dimensions 30x500 mm{sup 2} to optimize the CTS signal. A 1:1 mock-up of the HFS mirror system was built. Measurements of the beam characteristics for millimeter-waves at 60 GHz used in the mock-up agree well with the modeling.

  7. 03/01/2006 09:51 AMLoading "People's Daily Online --Chinese experimental thermonuclear reactor on discharge test in July" Page 1 of 1http://english.people.com.cn/200603/01/print20060301_247035.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    03/01/2006 09:51 AMLoading "People's Daily Online -- Chinese experimental thermonuclear reactor experimental thermonuclear reactor on discharge test in July China's new generation experimental Tokamak fusion and the former Soviet Union launched a 10 billion- euro ambitious plan, the International Thermonuclear

  8. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-26

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

  9. The Japan Times Printer Friendly Articles France has won the competition to host the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the world's first nuclear-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the world's first nuclear- fusion reactor. Japan fought for nuclear energy in Japan. The controversies surrounding the Monju fast-breeder-reactor project -- nuclear-fusion reactions -- to produce energy. Scientists at the ITER plant will create nuclear

  10. ITER --"INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITER -- "INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH PROGRAM". ORGANIZATION TO DIRECT WORLD plasmas and thermonuclear burn processes (cost -$1.5-36)2. (2) An expanded, more ambitious international Thermonuclear Experimental Research Program" by L. J. Perkins #12;NORMAL-CONDUCTING COPPER OPTIONS FOR THE ITER

  11. PUBLISHED VERSION Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUBLISHED VERSION Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna F. Durodie,1,a) P. Dumortier,1 M

  12. Evaluation of graphite/steam interactions for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolik, G.R.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.; Holland, D.F.

    1990-09-01

    In this report we present the results of an experimental/analytical study designed to determine the quantity of hydrogen generated during a coolant inleakage accident in ITER. This hydrogen could represent a potential explosive hazard, provided the proper conditions exist, causing machine damage and release of radioactive material. We have measured graphite/steam reaction rates for several graphites and carbon-based composites at temperatures between 1000 C and 1700 C. The effects of steam flow rate, and partial pressure were also examined. The measured reaction rates correlated well with two Arrhenius type relationships. We have used the relationships for GraphNOL N3M in a thermal model to determine that for ITER the quantity of hydrogen produced would range between 5 and 35 kg, depending upon how the graphite tiles are attached to the first wall. While 5 kg is not a significant concern, 35 kg presents an explosive hazard. 20 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-08

    The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

  14. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  15. Thermonuclear reactor may begin to be built 2004 21.02.2004, 00.55

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the premises of the French nuclear center Cadarache, while the center of control, data processing and researchThermonuclear reactor may begin to be built 2004 21.02.2004, 00.55 MOSCOW, February 20 (Itar-Tass) -- Construction of what may become the world's first-ever thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) may begin

  16. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these i...

  17. Recent Steps Towards a Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor with Results from the JET Tokamak Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recent Steps Towards a Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor with Results from the JET Tokamak Device

  18. Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor -To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor - expert To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's strength, and reports that Iran has made

  19. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/2003/12/27/k20031227000018.html 3 national visits related to proposed site for experimental reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minister communication meeting on Japanese Proposed site for Thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor realize the Japanese proposed site for the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER international support for experimental reactor ITER of the fusion centering on proposed site in Aomori

  20. Stars as thermonuclear reactors: their fuels and ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ray

    2004-05-28

    Atomic nuclei are transformed into each other in the cosmos by nuclear reactions inside stars: -- the process of nucleosynthesis. The basic concepts of determining nuclear reaction rates inside stars and how they manage to burn their fuel so slowly most of the time are discussed. Thermonuclear reactions involving protons in the hydrostatic burning of hydrogen in stars are discussed first. This is followed by triple alpha reactions in the helium burning stage and the issues of survival of carbon and oxygen in red giant stars connected with nuclear structure of oxygen and neon. Advanced stages of nuclear burning in quiescent reactions involving carbon, neon, oxygen and silicon are discussed. The role of neutron induced reactions in nucleosynthesis beyond iron is discussed briefly, as also the experimental detection of neutrinos from SN 1987A which confirmed broadly the ideas concerning gravitational collapse leading to a supernova.

  1. Application of variational techniques for parametric studies of steady-state controlled thermonuclear reactor blankets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, James David

    1975-01-01

    APPLICATION OF VARIATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR PARAMETRIC STUDIES OF STEADY-STATE CONTROLLED THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR BLANKETS A Thesis JAMES DAVID PEARCE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1975 Ma)or Subject: Nuclear Engineering APPLICATION OF VARIATIONAL TECHNIQUES FOR PARAMETRIC STUDIES OF STEADY-STATE CONTROLLED THERMONUCLEAR REACTOR BLANKETS A Thesis by JAMES DAVID PEARCE Approved...

  2. Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step Ren Pellat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Fusion Energy : Assessment and Next Step René Pellat High Commissioner at the French 2000, Rome Abstract Fifty years of thermonuclear fusion work with no insurmountable road blocks have is well advanced through the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme, which has

  3. Astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William J. Anderson; Hans J. Haubold; Arak Mathai Mathai

    1993-08-23

    Stars are gravitationally stabilized fusion reactors changing their chemical composition while transforming light atomic nuclei into heavy ones. The atomic nuclei are supposed to be in thermal equilibrium with the ambient plasma. The majority of reactions among nuclei leading to a nuclear transformation are inhibited by the necessity for the charged participants to tunnel through their mutual Coulomb barrier. As theoretical knowledge and experimental verification of nuclear cross sections increases it becomes possible to refine analytic representations for nuclear reaction rates. Over the years various approaches have been made to derive closed-form representations of thermonuclear reaction rates (Critchfield 1972, Haubold and John 1978, Haubold, Mathai and Anderson 1987). They show that the reaction rate contains the astrophysical cross section factor and its derivatives which has to be determined experimentally, and an integral part of the thermonuclear reaction rate independent from experimental results which can be treated by closed-form representation techniques in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions. In this paper mathematical/statistical techniques for deriving closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions will be summarized and numerical results for them will be given. The separation of thermonuclear functions from thermonuclear reaction rates is our preferred result. The purpose of the paper is also to compare numerical results for approximate and closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions. This paper completes the work of Haubold, Mathai, and Anderson (1987).

  4. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Darwin D. (Pleasanton, CA); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

    1991-01-01

    The plasma column in a stellarator is compressed and expanded alternatively in minor radius. First a plasma in thermal balance is compressed adiabatically. The volume of the compressed plasma is maintained until the plasma reaches a new thermal equilibrium. The plasma is then expanded to its original volume. As a result of the way a stellarator works, the plasma pressure during compression is less than the corresponding pressure during expansion. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma over a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils. Direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. Alternatively, after the compression step, the plasma can be expanded at constant pressure. The cycle can be made self-sustaining by operating a system of two stellarator reactors in tandem. Part of the energy derived from the expansion phase of a first stellarator reactor is used to compress the plasma in a second stellarator reactor.

  5. EU to build experimental fusion reactor Associated Press, THE JERUSALEM POST Sep 25, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EU to build experimental fusion reactor Associated Press, THE JERUSALEM POST Sep 25, 2006 European Union nations on Monday endorsed a pact to build an experimental fusion reactor with the aim, China, Japan, South Korea and Russia - also aim to ratify the International Thermonuclear Experimental

  6. Lower hybrid current drive at densities required for thermonuclear reactors R. Cesario 1), L. Amicucci 2), M. L. Apicella 1), G. Calabr 1), A. Cardinali 1), C. Castaldo 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vlad, Gregorio

    EXW/P7-02 Lower hybrid current drive at densities required for thermonuclear reactors R@frascati.enea.it Abstract. For the progress of the thermonuclear fusion energy research based on the tokamak concept in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experiment Reactor) at relatively high plasma densities also

  7. Astrophysical thermonuclear functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Anderson; H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1994-02-08

    As theoretical knowledge and experimental verification of nuclear cross sections increases it becomes possible to refine analytic representations for nuclear reaction rates. In this paper mathematical/statistical techniques for deriving closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions are summarized and numerical results for them are given.The purpose of the paper is also to compare numerical results for approximate and closed-form representations of thermonuclear functions.

  8. Concept of a thermonuclear reactor based on gravity retention of high-temperature plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Fisenko; I. S. Fisenko

    2007-05-27

    In the present paper the realization of the obtained results in relation to the dense high- temperature plasma of multivalent ions including experimental data interpretation is discussed.

  9. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  10. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woolley, Robert D. (Belle Mead, NJ)

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  11. China To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project reached agreement in Moscow Tuesday to construct the first fusion devices in thermonuclear reaction," and that "Chinese scientists started to develop a fusion operationChina To Build Its Own Fusion Reactor ENERGY TECH by Edward Lanfranco Beijing (UPI) July 1, 2005

  12. Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke

    2008-04-14

    The application of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators in cosmology calls for a sound understanding of these objects. Recent years have seen a brisk development of astrophysical models which explain SNe Ia as thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars. While the evolution of the progenitor is still uncertain, the explosion mechanism certainly involves the propagation of a thermonuclear flame through the white dwarf star. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations allowed to study a wide variety of possibilities involving subsonic flame propagation (deflagrations), flames accelerated by turbulence, and supersonic detonations. These possibilities lead to a variety of scenarios. I review the currently discussed approaches and present some recent results from simulations of the turbulent deflagration model and the delayed detonation model.

  13. Physics modeling support for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    There are two major sections to this report. The first section of the report is an executive summary of the work done this year. For each task, the major results are condensed for the reader's convenience. The major result of each memo, report or presentation is summarized briefly in this section. The second section of the report is a collection of appendices containing reports, memos, and presentations written this year. Here, the interested reader can investigate any topic discussed in the summary in more detail. The documentation is presented in chronological order, and we would like to note that the content of later documents may supercede that of earlier ones. The summaries are divided into sections, corresponding to the tasks outlined in the original proposal for the work. These sections are: MUMAK code development and application; Alfven wave stability problem; TETRA systems code development and application; lower hybrid heating and current drive; and advanced blanket modeling.

  14. Progress in preparing scenarios for operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sips, A. C. C.; European Commission, Brussels; Giruzzi, G.; Ide, S.; Kessel, C.; Luce, T. C.; Snipes, J. A.; Stober, J. K.

    2015-02-01

    The development of operating scenarios is one of the key issues in the research for ITER which aims to achieve a fusion gain (Q) of ~10, while producing 500MW of fusion power for ?300 s. The ITER Research plan proposes a success oriented schedule starting in hydrogen and helium, to be followed by a nuclear operation phase with a rapid development towards Q ~ 10 in deuterium/tritium. The Integrated Operation Scenarios Topical Group of the International Tokamak Physics Activity initiates joint activities among worldwide institutions and experiments to prepare ITER operation. Plasma formation studies report robust plasma breakdown in devicesmore »with metal walls over a wide range of conditions, while other experiments use an inclined EC launch angle at plasma formation to mimic the conditions in ITER. Simulations of the plasma burn-through predict that at least 4MW of Electron Cyclotron heating (EC) assist would be required in ITER. For H-modes at q??~ 3, many experiments have demonstrated operation with scaled parameters for the ITER baseline scenario at ne/nGW ~ 0.85. Most experiments, however, obtain stable discharges at H??(y,2) ~ 1.0 only for bN = 2.0–2.2. For the rampup in ITER, early X-point formation is recommended, allowing auxiliary heating to reduce the flux consumption. A range of plasma inductance (li(3)) can be obtained from 0.65 to 1.0, with the lowest values obtained in H-mode operation. For the rampdown, the plasma should stay diverted maintaining H-mode together with a reduction of the elongation from 1.85 to 1.4. Simulations show that the proposed rampup and rampdown schemes developed since 2007 are compatible with the present ITER design for the poloidal field coils. At 13–15 MA and densities down to ne/nGW ~ 0.5, long pulse operation (>1000 s) in ITER is possible at Q ~ 5, useful to provide neutron fluence for Test Blanket Module assessments. ITER scenario preparation in hydrogen and helium requires high input power (>50 MW). H-mode operation in helium may be possible at input powers above 35MW at a toroidal field of 2.65T, for studying H-modes and ELM mitigation. In hydrogen, H-mode operation is expected to be marginal, even at 2.65T with 60MW of input power. Simulation code benchmark studies using hybrid and steady state scenario parameters have proved to be a very challenging and lengthy task of testing suites of codes, consisting of tens of sophisticated modules. Nevertheless, the general basis of the modelling appears sound, with substantial consistency among codes developed by different groups. For a hybrid scenario at 12 MA, the code simulations give a range for Q = 6.5–8.3, using 30MW neutral beam injection and 20MW ICRH. For non-inductive operation at 7–9 MA, the simulation results show more variation. At high edge pedestal pressure (Tped ~ 7 keV), the codes predict Q = 3.3–3.8 using 33MW NB, 20MW EC, and 20MW ion cyclotron to demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state operation with the day-1 heating systems in ITER. Simulations using a lower edge pedestal temperature (~3 keV) but improved core confinement obtain Q = 5–6.5, when ECCD is concentrated at mid-radius and ~ 20MW off-axis current drive (ECCD or LHCD) is added. Several issues remain to be studied, including plasmas with dominant electron heating, mitigation of transient heat loads integrated in scenario demonstrations and (burn) control simulations in ITER scenarios.« less

  15. ITER vacuum vessel fabrication plan and cost study (D 68) for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    ITER Task No. 8, Vacuum Vessel Fabrication Plan and Cost Study (D68), was initiated to assess ITER vacuum vessel fabrication, assembly, and cost. The industrial team of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors and Chicago Bridge & Iron (Raytheon/CB&I) reviewed the current vessel basis and prepared a manufacturing plan, assembly plan, and cost estimate commensurate with the present design. The guidance for the Raytheon/CB&I assessment activities was prepared by the ITER Garching Work Site. This guidance provided in the form of work descriptions, sketches, drawings, and costing guidelines for each of the presently identified vacuum vessel Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) elements was compiled in ITER Garching Joint Work Site Memo (Draft No. 9 - G 15 MD 01 94-17-05 W 1). A copy of this document is provided as Appendix 1 to this report. Additional information and clarifications required for the Raytheon/CB&I assessments were coordinated through the US Home Team (USHT) and its technical representative. Design details considered essential to the Task 8 assessments but not available from the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) were generated by Raytheon/CB&I and documented accordingly.

  16. Experimental and Computational Study of Fluid Dynamics in Solar Reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien, Min-Hsiu

    2014-02-19

    The experimental simulation and a computational validation of a methane-cracking solar reactor powered by solar energy is the focus of this article. A solar cyclone reactor operates at over 1000 °C where the methane decomposition reaction takes...

  17. Comparison of zero-dimensional and one-dimensional thermonuclear burn computations for the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nebel, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Moses, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor designs of the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) have been based on profile-averaged zero-dimensional (point) plasma models. The plasma response/performance that has been predicted by the point plasma model is re-examined by a comprehensive one-dimensional (radial) burn code that has been developed and parametrically evaluated for the RFPR. Agreement is good between the zero-dimensional and one-dimensional models, giving more confidence in the RFPR design point reported previously from the zero-dimensional analysis.

  18. Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

    2007-05-07

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

  19. Elastic-plastic analysis of the transition divertor joint for high performance divertor target plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navaei, Dara

    2011-01-01

    CER) 8. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a

  20. Decommissioning experience from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henslee, S.P.; Rosenberg, K.E.

    2002-03-28

    Consistent with the intent of this International Atomic Energy Agency technical meeting, decommissioning operating experience and contributions to the preparation for the Coordinated Research Project from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II activities will be discussed. This paper will review aspects of the decommissioning activities of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, make recommendations for future decommissioning activities and reactor system designs and discuss relevant areas of potential research and development. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was designed as a 62.5 MWt, metal fueled, pool reactor with a conventional 19 MWe power plant. The productive life of the EBR-II began with first operations in 1964. Demonstration of the fast reactor fuel cycle, serving as an irradiation facility, demonstration of fast reactor passive safety and lastly, was well on its way to close the fast breeder fuel cycle for the second time when the Integral Fast Reactor program was prematurely ended in October 1994 with the shutdown of the EBR-II. The shutdown of the EBR-II was dictated without an associated planning phase that would have provided a smooth transition to shutdown. Argonne National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy arrived at a logical plan and sequence for closure activities. The decommissioning activities as described herein fall into in three distinct phases.

  1. Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-19

    The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

  2. Modeling and data analysis of a palladium membrane reactor for tritiated impurities cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A model was developed to explore the use of a palladium membrane reactor for fusion fuel processing. The model was benchmarked to tritium-containing experiments that simulated the expected plasma exhaust of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. This modeling effort has greatly improved our understanding of the processes occurring in the reactor. 10 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudia, Travaglio [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  4. Macroscopic implications from phase space dynamics of tokamak turbulence : relaxation, transport, and flow generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosuga, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (

  5. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (fusionThermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) fusion experiment

  6. Experimental Criticality Benchmarks for SNAP 10A/2 Reactor Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krass, A.W.

    2005-12-19

    This report describes computational benchmark models for nuclear criticality derived from descriptions of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Critical Assembly (SCA)-4B experimental criticality program conducted by Atomics International during the early 1960's. The selected experimental configurations consist of fueled SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores subject to varied conditions of water immersion and reflection under experimental control to measure neutron multiplication. SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores are compact volumes fueled and moderated with the hydride of highly enriched uranium-zirconium alloy. Specifications for the materials and geometry needed to describe a given experimental configuration for a model using MCNP5 are provided. The material and geometry specifications are adequate to permit user development of input for alternative nuclear safety codes, such as KENO. A total of 73 distinct experimental configurations are described.

  7. Prediction of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Rauscher

    1998-10-15

    Recent improvements and remaining problems in the prediction of thermonuclear rates are reviewed. The main emphasis is on statistical model calculations, but the challenge to include direct reactions close to the driplines is also briefly addressed. Further theoretical as well as experimental investigations are motivated.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , proposed by the European Community for a Demonstration Reactor (DEMO), is based on using ceramic breeder as a material form for the blanket of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Beryllium is usedEXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTIVE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM PACKED

  9. Incipient Transient Detection in Reactor Systems: Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefteri H. Tsoukalas; S.T. Revankar; X Wang; R. Sattuluri

    2005-09-27

    The main goal of this research was to develop a method for detecting reactor system transients at the earliest possible time through a comprehensive experimental, testing and benchmarking program. This approach holds strong promise for developing new diagnostic technologies that are non-intrusive, generic and highly portable across different systems. It will help in the design of new generation nuclear power reactors, which utilize passive safety systems with a reliable and non-intrusive multiphase flow diagnostic system to monitor the function of the passive safety systems. The main objective of this research was to develop an improved fuzzy logic based detection method based on a comprehensive experimental testing program to detect reactor transients at the earliest possible time, practically at their birth moment. A fuzzy logic and neural network based transient identification methodology and implemented in a computer code called PROTREN was considered in this research and was compared with SPRT (Sequentially Probability Ratio Testing) decision and Bayesian inference. The project involved experiment, theoretical modeling and a thermal-hydraulic code assessment. It involved graduate and undergraduate students participation providing them with exposure and training in advanced reactor concepts and safety systems. In this final report, main tasks performed during the project period are summarized and the selected results are presented. Detailed descriptions for the tasks and the results are presented in previous yearly reports (Revankar et al 2003 and Revankar et al 2004).

  10. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 {times} 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-08-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-italic-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-italic-function is discussed in physical terms.

  12. Liquid metal reactor deactivation as applied to the experimental breeder reactor - II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, O. K.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Pfannenstiel, D. F.; Wells, P. B.

    1999-05-28

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was shutdown in September, 1994. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and by the US Department of Energy (DOE) mandate, was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility (SPF) was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the SPF.

  13. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents experimental study of a Cu-zeolite SCR in both reactor and engine test cell, and comparison of the model parameters between the SCR reactor and engine model

  14. Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and a closure project was initiated.

  15. France gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (6.6bn) nuclear fusion reactor, in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) nuclear fusion reactor, in the face of strong competition from Japan. The International ThermonuclearFrance gets nuclear fusion plant France will get to host the project to build a 10bn-euro (£6.6bn Experimental Reactor (Iter) will be the most expensive joint scientific project after the International Space

  16. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  17. Measurement of neutron capture on $^{48}$Ca at thermal and thermonuclear energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Beer; C. Coceva; P. V. Sedyshev; Yu. P. Popov; H. Herndl; R. Hofinger; P. Mohr; H. Oberhummer

    1996-08-07

    At the Karlsruhe pulsed 3.75\\,MV Van de Graaff accelerator the thermonuclear $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca(8.72\\,min) cross section was measured by the fast cyclic activation technique via the 3084.5\\,keV $\\gamma$-ray line of the $^{49}$Ca-decay. Samples of CaCO$_3$ enriched in $^{48}$Ca by 77.87\\,\\% were irradiated between two gold foils which served as capture standards. The capture cross-section was measured at the neutron energies 25, 151, 176, and 218\\,keV, respectively. Additionally, the thermal capture cross-section was measured at the reactor BR1 in Mol, Belgium, via the prompt and decay $\\gamma$-ray lines using the same target material. The $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca cross-section in the thermonuclear and thermal energy range has been calculated using the direct-capture model combined with folding potentials. The potential strengths are adjusted to the scattering length and the binding energies of the final states in $^{49}$Ca. The small coherent elastic cross section of $^{48}$Ca+n is explained through the nuclear Ramsauer effect. Spectroscopic factors of $^{49}$Ca have been extracted from the thermal capture cross-section with better accuracy than from a recent (d,p) experiment. Within the uncertainties both results are in agreement. The non-resonant thermal and thermonuclear experimental data for this reaction can be reproduced using the direct-capture model. A possible interference with a resonant contribution is discussed. The neutron spectroscopic factors of $^{49}$Ca determined from shell-model calculations are compared with the values extracted from the experimental cross sections for $^{48}$Ca(d,p)$^{49}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca(n,$\\gamma$)$^{49}$Ca.

  18. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  19. President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  20. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  1. The laminar flow tube reactor as a quantitative tool for nucleation studies: Experimental results and theoretical analysis of homogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Ian

    The laminar flow tube reactor as a quantitative tool for nucleation studies: Experimental results, United Kingdom Received 24 March 2000; accepted 2 June 2000 A laminar flow tube reactor was designed

  2. Thermonuclear Ignition of Dark Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2006-04-13

    Dark matter is thought to be at least an order of magnitude more abundant than luminous matter in the Universe, but there has yet to be an unambiguous identification of a wholly dark, galactic-scale structure. There is, however, increasing evidence that VIRGOHI 21 may be a dark galaxy. If VIRGOHI 21 turns out to be composed of dark stars, having approximately the same mass of stars found in luminous galaxies, it will pose an enigma within the framework of current astrophysical models, but will provide strong support for my concept, published in 1994 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, of the thermonuclear ignition of stars by nuclear fission, and the corollary, non-ignition of stars. The possibility of galactic thermonuclear ignition is discussed from that framework and leads to my suggestion that the distribution of luminous stars in a galaxy may simply be a reflection of the galactic distribution of the heavy elements.

  3. New Views of Thermonuclear Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod Strohmayer; Lars Bildsten

    2003-05-06

    Since the advent of powerful new X-ray observatories, NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the Italian - Dutch BeppoSAX mission, XMM-Newton and Chandra, a number of entirely new phenomena associated with thermonuclear burning on neutron stars have been discovered. These include: (i) the discovery of millisecond (300 - 600 Hz) oscillations during bursts, so called ``burst oscillations'', (ii) a new regime of nuclear burning on neutron stars which manifests itself through the generation of hours long flares about once a decade, now referred to as ``superbursts'',(iii) discoveries of bursts from low accretion rate neutron stars, and (iv) new evidence for discrete spectral features from bursting neutron stars. In this article we review our current understanding of thermonuclear bursts on neutron stars, with a focus on these new phenomena.

  4. Experimental spectrum of reactor antineutrinos and spectra of main fissile isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinev, V. V., E-mail: vsinev@pcbai10.inr.ruhep.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Within the period between the years 1988 and 1990, the spectrum of positrons from the inverse-beta-decay reaction on a proton was measured at the Rovno atomic power plant in the course of experiments conducted there. The measured spectrum has the vastest statistics in relation to other neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors and the lowest threshold for positron detection. An experimental reactor-antineutrino spectrum was obtained on the basis of this positron spectrum and was recommended as a reference spectrum. The spectra of individual fissile isotopes were singled out from the measured antineutrino spectrum. These spectra can be used to analyze neutrino experiments performed at nuclear reactors for various compositions of the fuel in the reactor core.

  5. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  6. Experimental determination of neutron lifetimes through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP Travessa R-400, 05508-900, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    The neutron lifetimes of the core, reflector, and global were experimentally obtained through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor for five levels of subcriticality. The theoretical Auto Power Spectral Densities were derived by point kinetic equations taking the reflector effect into account, and one of the approaches consider an additional group of delayed neutrons.

  7. A E Costley, US/ITER Town meeting, San Diego, 22 April 2004 N 55 IP 57 04-04-30 F 1 International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Vessel) (N/C) MSE based on heating beam Neutron Flux Monitors (Ex-Vessel) Microwave Diagnostics Gamma-Ray Spectrometers ECE Diagnostics for Main Plasma Neutron Activation System Reflectometers for Main Plasma Lost in ITER environment ~40 diagnostic systems have been selected for design, integration and budget provision

  8. Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westfall, C.

    2003-02-20

    On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable material, that is, more than ''invested,'' and at the same time produce power. The group identified the problem of removing heat in such a reactor and presaged the eventual solution by suggesting the use of sodium coolant, which has minimal interaction with neutrons.

  9. Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications 24-25 November 2011, Athensrd and final circular for the Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

  10. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-05-08

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad.

  11. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W, [U.S. DOE; Huckaby, Ernest D. [U.S. DOE; Shadle, Lawrence J [U.S. DOE; Spenik, James L. [REM Engineering PLLC

    2013-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.

  12. Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, F X; Champagne, Art E

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples ...

  13. Thermonuclear burst physics with RXTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. K. Galloway; D. Chakrabarty; A. Cumming; E. Kuulkers; L. Bildsten; R. Rothschild

    2004-04-22

    Recently we have made measurements of thermonuclear burst energetics and recurrence times which are unprecedented in their precision, largely thanks to the sensitivity of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. In the "Clocked Burster", GS 1826-24, hydrogen burns during the burst via the rapid-proton (rp) process, which has received particular attention in recent years through theoretical and modelling studies. The burst energies and the measured variation of alpha (the ratio of persistent to burst flux) with accretion rate strongly suggests solar metallicity in the neutron star atmosphere, although this is not consistent with the corresponding variation of the recurrence time. Possible explanations include extra heating between the bursts, or a change in the fraction of the neutron star over which accretion takes place. I also present results from 4U 1746-37, which exhibits regular burst trains which are interrupted by "out of phase" bursts.

  14. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Rosswog; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; W. R. Hix

    2008-11-13

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than $2\\times 10^5$ M$_\\odot$ swallow a typical 0.6 M$_\\odot$ dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's self-gravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an X-ray flare close to the Eddington limit of $L_{\\rm Edd} \\simeq 10^{41} {\\rm erg/s} M_{\\rm bh}/1000 M$_\\odot$), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  15. The Early Characterization of Irradiation Effects in Stainless Steels at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Porter

    2008-01-01

    The new Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is revitalizing interest in materials development for fast spectrum reactors. With this comes the need for new, high-performance materials that are resistant to property changes caused by radiation damage. In the 1970s there was an effort to monitor the irradiation effects on stainless steels used in fast reactor cores, largely because there were a number of ‘surprises’ where materials subjected to a high flux of fast neutrons incurred dimensional and property changes that had not been expected. In the U.S., this applied to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Void swelling and irradiation-induced creep caused dimensional changes in the reactor components that shortened their useful lifetime and impacted reactor operations by creating fuel handling difficulties and reactivity anomalies. The surveillance programs and early experiments studied the simplest of austenitic stainless steels, such as Types 304 and 304L stainless steel, and led to some basic understanding of the links between these irradiation effects and microchemical changes within the steel caused by operational variables such as temperature, neutron flux and neutron fluence. Some of the observations helped to define later alloy development programs designed to produce alloys that were much more resistant to the effects of neutron irradiation.

  16. Electron screening effect on stellar thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potekhin, A Y

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of plasma correlation effects on nonresonant thermonuclear reactions for various stellar objects, namely in the liquid envelopes of neutron stars, and the interiors of white dwarfs, low-mass stars, and substellar objects. We examine in particular the effect of electron screening on the enhancement of thermonuclear reactions in dense plasmas within and beyond the linear mixing rule approximation as well as the corrections due to quantum effects at high density. In addition, we examine some recent unconventional (Yukawa-potential and "quantum-tail") theoretical results on stellar thermonuclear fusions and show that these scenarios do not apply to stellar conditions.

  17. Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications 24-25 November 2011, Athens circular for the Workshop on Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics Applications, to be held of thermonuclear reaction rates. The topics of the workshop, in relation with thermonuclear reaction rates

  18. UV Light Curves of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Blinnikov; E. I. Sorokina

    2000-03-17

    Ultraviolet light curves are calculated for several thermonuclear supernova models using a multifrequency radiation hydrodynamic code. It is found that Chandrasekhar-mass models produce very similar light curves both for detonation and deflagration. Sub-Chandrasekhar-mass models essentially differ from ``normal'' Chandrasekhar ones regarding behaviour of their UV fluxes. Differences in absolute brightness and in shape of light curves of thermonuclear supernovae could be detectable up to 300 Mpc with modern UV space telescopes.

  19. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  20. Recent progress in the development of materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, E.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    Development of materials with suitable properties is essential if fusion is to be realized as an economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable energy source. For each of the major reactor systems (e.g., superconducting magnets, blankets, divertors, auxiliary heating, and diagnostic devices), material requirements have been defined and alloy and ceramic systems, which have attractive properties for the various applications, have been identified. The next experimental fusion reactor, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will utilize existing materials technology. However, for many applications in power reactors, existing materials do not have adequate properties and advanced materials must be developed. This paper presents an overview of the status of materials technology in four key areas: structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), plasma-facing materials, materials for superconducting magnets, and ceramics for electrical and structural applications. 7 refs.

  1. Frequency response testing at Experimental Breeder Reactor II using discrete-level periodic signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, W.D.; Larson, H.A. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (USA). Coll. of Engineering); Dean, E.M. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactivity-to-power frequency-response function was measured with pseudo-random, discrete-level, periodic signals. The reactor power deviation was small with insignificant perturbation of normal operation and in-place irradiation experiments. Comparison of results with measured rod oscillator data and with theoretical predictions show good agreement. Moreover, measures of input signal quality (autocorrelation function and energy spectra) confirm the ability to enable this type of frequency response determination at EBR-2. Measurements were made with the pseudo-random binary sequence, quadratic residue binary sequence, pseudo-random ternary sequence, and the multifrequency binary sequence. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinton, Jim

    White dwarf mergers,White dwarf mergers, thermonuclear supernovae,thermonuclear supernovae fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. #12;CO white dwarf accretes, either from companion, or from disk after merger. As it approaches maximum mass, C fusion is ignited. Degenerate, hence runaway. SN Ia

  3. Experimental Study on Flow Optimization in Upper Plenum of Reactor Vessel for a Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Kenji; Kamide, Hideki; Itoh, Masami; Sekine, Tadashi

    2005-11-15

    An innovative sodium-cooled fast reactor has been investigated in a feasibility study of fast breeder reactor cycle systems in Japan. A compact reactor vessel and a column-type upper inner structure with a radial slit for an arm of a fuel-handling machine (FHM) are adopted. Dipped plates are set in the reactor vessel below the free surface to prevent gas entrainment. We performed a one-tenth-scaled model water experiment for the upper plenum of the reactor vessel. Gas entrainment was not observed in the experiment under the same velocity condition as the reactor. Three vortex cavitations were observed near the hot-leg inlet. A vertical rib on the reactor vessel wall was set to restrict the rotating flow near the hot leg. The vortex cavitation between the reactor vessel wall and the hot leg was suppressed by the rib under the same cavitation factor condition as in the reactor. The cylindrical plug was installed through the hole in the dipped plates for the FHM to reduce the flow toward the free surface. It was effective when the plug was submerged into the middle height in the upper plenum. This combination of two components had a possibility to optimize the flow in the compact reactor vessel.

  4. Antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either DT or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. In the second part, the technologies for producing antiprotons with high energy accelerator systems and the means for manipulating and storing microgram amounts of antihydrogen are examined. While there seems to be no theoretical obstacles to the production of 10^{18} antiprotons per day (the amount required for triggering one thermonuclear bomb), the construction of such a plant involves several techniques which are between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude away from present day technology.

  5. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula A. Buitrago, Mike Morrill, JoAnn S. Lighty, Geoffrey D.; Silcox,

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300- W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150oC. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and intraparticle diffusion. The Freundlich isotherm more accurately described in-flight mercury capture. Using these parameters, very little intraparticle diffusion was evident. Consistent with other data, smaller particles resulted in higher mercury uptake due to available surface area. Therefore, it is important to capture the particle size distribution in the model. At typical full-scale sorbent feed rates, the calculations underpredicted adsorption, suggesting that wall effects can account for as much as 50 percent of the removal, making it an important factor in entrained-mercury adsorption models.

  6. 3D Simulations of Thermonuclear Supernovae From Very Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    3D Simulations of Thermonuclear Supernovae From Very Massive Stars Ke-Jung (Ken) Chen Johnston #12;3D Simulations of Thermonuclear Supernovae From Very Massive Stars Ke-Jung (Ken) Chen Johnston

  7. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01

    conditions required for thermonuclear burn lies on the edgeThe International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)is successful in achieving thermonuclear burn. While NIF is

  8. THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE* I.V. Kurchatov of the energy of thermonuclear reactions. Physicists the world over are attracted by the extraordinarily interest- ing and very difficult task of controlling thermonuclear reactiom. Investigations in this field

  9. Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Introduction to Magnetic Thermonuclear Fusion and Related Research Projects Ghassan Antar Fusion 2. Research on Turbulence (Theory and Experiment) 3. Research on Disruptions 4. Research on Plasma Facing Components #12;Ghassan Y. ANTAR 3 Fusion Occurs when Two Nuclei Unite to Form One The Energy

  10. Resonances and the thermonuclear reaction rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Hussein; M. Ueda; A. J. Sargeant; M. P. Pato

    2003-07-21

    We present an approximate analytic expression for thermonuclear reaction rate of charged particles when the cross section contains a single narrow or wide resonance described by a Breit-Wigner shape. The resulting expression is uniformly valid as the effective energy and resonance energy coalesce. We use our expressions to calculate the reaction rate for $^{12}$C(p,$\\gamma$)$^{13}$N.

  11. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V. [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  12. Formulation and experimental evaluation of closed-form control laws for the rapid maneuvering of reactor neutronic power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, J.A. . Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes both the theoretical development and the experimental evaluation of a novel, robust methodology for the time-optimal adjustment of a reactor's neutronic power under conditions of closed-loop digital control. Central to the approach are the MIT-SNL Period-Generated Minimum Time Control Laws' which determine the rate at which reactivity should be changed in order to cause a reactor's neutronic power to conform to a specified trajectory. Using these laws, reactor power can be safely raised by five to seven orders of magnitude in a few seconds. The MIT-SNL laws were developed to facilitate rapid increases of neutronic power on spacecraft reactors operating in an SDI environment. However, these laws are generic and have other applications including the rapid recovery of research and test reactors subsequent to an unanticipated shutdown, power increases following the achievement of criticality on commercial reactors, power adjustments on commercial reactors so as to minimize thermal stress, and automated startups. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under contract to the Sandia National Laboratories. Support was also provided by the US Department of Energy's Division of University and Industry Programs. The work described in this report is significant in that a novel solution to the problem of time-optimal control of neutronic power was identified, in that a rigorous description of a reactor's dynamics was derived in that the rate of change of reactivity was recognized as the proper control signal, and in that extensive experimental trials were conducted of these newly developed concepts on actual nuclear reactors. 43 refs., 118 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. An experimental system for the n-butyl-lithium initiated polymerization of styrene in a multi-sampled batch reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, James Harvey

    1974-01-01

    AN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM FOR THE n-BUTYLLITHIUM INITIATED POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE IN A MULTI-SAMPLED BATCH REACTOR A Thesis by JAMES HARVEY COX, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Ma]or Subject: Chemical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM FOR THE n-BUTYLLITHIUM INITIATED POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE IN A MULTI-SAMPLED BATCH REACTOR A Thesis by JAMES HARVEY COX, JR. Approved...

  14. Neutron capture of 26Mg at thermonuclear energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mohr; H. Beer; H. Oberhummer; G. Staudt

    1998-05-20

    The neutron capture cross section of 26Mg was measured relative to the known gold cross section at thermonuclear energies using the fast cyclic activation technique. The experiment was performed at the 3.75 MV Van-de-Graaff accelerator, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The experimental capture cross section is the sum of resonant and direct contributions. For the resonance at E(n,lab) = 220 keV our new results are in disagreement with the data from Weigmann et al. An improved Maxwellian averaged capture cross section is derived from the new experimental data taking into account s- and p-wave capture and resonant contributions. The properties of so-called potential resonances which influence the p-wave neutron capture of 26}Mg are discussed in detail.

  15. Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Alain Coc; F. X. Timmes; Art E. Champagne

    2014-09-19

    Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples are given for applications to s-process neutron sources, core-collapse supernovae, classical novae, and big bang nucleosynthesis.

  16. IAEA-CN-SO/F-I-4 ITER: CONCEPT DEFINITION*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    way. 1. INTRODUCTION The activity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER. * The activity of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is conducted under the auspices

  17. October 10th Daejeon Convention Center, KOREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using pilot devices during the construction phase of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor European Union Russia China Japan United States of America India Korea #12

  18. Merging White Dwarfs and Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kerkwijk, Marten H

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear supernovae result when interaction with a companion reignites nuclear fusion in a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, causing a thermonuclear runaway, a catastrophic gain in pressure, and the disintegration of the whole white dwarf. It is usually thought that fusion is reignited in near-pycnonuclear conditions when the white dwarf approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. I briefly describe two long-standing problems faced by this scenario, and our suggestion that these supernovae instead result from mergers of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, including those that produce sub-Chandrasekhar mass remnants. I then turn to possible observational tests, in particular those that test the absence or presence of electron captures during the burning.

  19. Solar Models and NACRE thermonuclear reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Morel; B. Pichon; J. Provost; G. Berthomieu

    1999-07-27

    Using the most recent updated physics, calibrated solar models have been computed with the new thermonuclear reaction rates of NACRE, the recently available European compilation. Comparisons with models computed with the reaction rates of Caughlan & Fowler (\\cite{cf88}) and of Adelberger et al. (\\cite{a98}) are made for global structure, expected neutrinos fluxes, chemical composition and sound speed profiles, helioseismological properties of p-modes and g-modes.

  20. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  1. Thermonuclear processes of the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey B. Dubovichenko

    2011-08-12

    The book considers some theoretical questions of nuclear astro-physics thermal energies and light atomic nuclei. For the analysis of re-actions is used potential two cluster model of light nuclei with classifica-tion of states by orbital schemes. On its basis photonuclear processes in p2H, p3H, p6Li, p7Li, p9Be and p12C, and also 2H4He, 3H4He, 3He4He and 4He12C channels are considered and astrophysical S - factors corre-sponding to them are calculated. It is shown, that used methods allow to describe well available experimental data in the field of astrophysical energies. This Book is written in Russian, but will perhaps present certain interest.

  2. Experimental study of the oxidation of methyl oleate in a jet-stirred reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bax, Sarah; Hakka, Mohammed Hichem; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frederique

    2010-06-15

    The experimental study of the oxidation of a blend containing n-decane and a large unsaturated ester, methyl oleate, was performed in a jet-stirred reactor over a wide range of temperature covering both low and high temperature regions (550-1100 K), at a residence time of 1.5 s, at quasi atmospheric pressure with high dilution in helium (n-decane and methyl oleate inlet mole fractions of 1.48 x 10{sup -3} and 5.2 x 10{sup -4}) and under stoichiometric conditions. The formation of numerous reaction products was observed. At low and intermediate temperatures, the oxidation of the blend led to the formation of species containing oxygen atoms like cyclic ethers, aldehydes and ketones deriving from n-decane and methyl oleate. At higher temperature, these species were not formed anymore and the presence of unsaturated species was observed. Because of the presence of the double bond in the middle of the alkyl chain of methyl oleate, the formation of some specific products was observed. These species are dienes and esters with two double bonds produced from the decomposition paths of methyl oleate and some species obtained from the addition of H-atoms, OH and HO{sub 2} radicals to the double bond. Experimental results were compared with former results of the oxidation of a blend of n-decane and methyl palmitate performed under similar conditions. This comparison allowed highlighting the similarities and the differences in the reactivity and in the distribution of the reaction products for the oxidation of large saturated and unsaturated esters. (author)

  3. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilas, Germina; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  4. Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

    2011-03-27

    Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

  5. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  6. Experimental development of a multi-solid fluidized bed reactor concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litt, R.D.; Paisley, M.A.; Tewksbury, T.L.

    1990-02-01

    Battelle's Columbus Division is developing a coal mild gasification process based upon the Multi-Solid Fluidized bed reactor system to produce high quality liquid and gaseous products. This process uses 2-stages to gasify coal at high throughputs to produce a range of products in compact reactors without requiring an oxygen plant. 8 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Simulation-Based Design and Experimental Evaluation of a Spatially Controllable CVD Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    , University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 Gary W. Rubloff, Laurent Henn-Lecordier, and Yijun Liu Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park with the semiconductor industry, from early bell-jar CVD reactors to current cold-wall single-wafer reactors (Xia et al

  8. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  9. Neutronics model of the bulk shielding reactor (BSR): validation by comparison of calculations with the experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.O.; Miller, L.F.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1981-05-01

    A neutronics model for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bulk Shielding Reactor (ORNL-SAR) was developed and verified by experimental measurements. A cross-section library was generated from the 218 group Master Library using the AMPX Block Code system. A series of one-, two-, and three-dimensional neutronics calculations were performed utilizing both transport and diffusion theory. Spectral comparison was made with /sup 58/Ni(n,p) reaction. The results of the comparison between the calculational model and other experimental measurements showed agreement within 10% and therefore the model was determined to be adequate for calculating the neutron fluence for future irradiation experiments in the ORNL-BSR.

  10. Experimental and Computational Study of a Scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaghetto, Rodolfo

    2013-11-25

    ), producing fission power in a circulating molten salt fuel mixture with an epithermal-spectrum reactor and a full actinide recycling fuel cycle. 7 Figure 4. Generation IV Nuclear Systems [7] (1: GFR; 2: VHTR; 3: SCWR; 4: SFR; 5: LFR; 6: MSR... Of Energy GFR Gas-cooled Fast Reactor GT-MHR Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor HS Heat Structure IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency ID Inner Diameter INL Idaho National Laboratory IRUG International RELAP5 Users Group L Length LFR Lead...

  11. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  12. Isabel Ribeiro Instituto de Sistemas e Robtica / Instituto Superior Tcnico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro,Isabel

    Automaticamente (AGVs), e desde 1996 colabora com o ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  13. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), now being constructed in Caderache, France [5]. In contrast, inertial fusion

  14. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF THREE-PHASE SLURRY-BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    1999-09-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding three-phase reactors from the point of view of kinetic theory. In a paper in press for publication in Chemical Engineering Science (Wu and Gidaspow, 1999) we have obtained a complete numerical solution of bubble column reactors. In view of the complexity of the simulation a better understanding of the processes using simplified analytical solutions is required. Such analytical solutions are presented in the attached paper, Large Scale Oscillations or Gravity Waves in Risers and Bubbling Beds. This paper presents analytical solutions for bubbling frequencies and standing wave flow patterns. The flow patterns in operating slurry bubble column reactors are not optimum. They involve upflow in the center and downflow at the walls. It may be possible to control flow patterns by proper redistribution of heat exchangers in slurry bubble column reactors. We also believe that the catalyst size in operating slurry bubble column reactors is not optimum. To obtain an optimum size we are following up on the observation of George Cody of Exxon who reported a maximum granular temperature (random particle kinetic energy) for a particle size of 90 microns. The attached paper, Turbulence of Particles in a CFB and Slurry Bubble Columns Using Kinetic Theory, supports George Cody's observations. However, our explanation for the existence of the maximum in granular temperature differs from that proposed by George Cody. Further computer simulations and experiments involving measurements of granular temperature are needed to obtain a sound theoretical explanation for the possible existence of an optimum catalyst size.

  15. The physics of antimatter induced fusion and thermonuclear explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of using antihydrogen for igniting inertial confinement fusion pellets or triggering large scale thermonuclear explosions is investigated. The number of antiproton annihilations required to start a thermonuclear burn wave in either D or Li_2DT is found to be about 10^{21}/k^2, where k is the compression factor of the fuel to be ignited. We conclude that the financial and energy investments needed to produce such amounts of antiprotons would confine applications of antimatter triggered thermonuclear devices to the military domain.

  16. Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmignani, B

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

  17. Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

  18. Experimental Validation of a Novel Fischer Tropsch Tubular Fixed Bed Reactor Under Supercritical Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasht, Amro Ismail

    2015-05-21

    R Reactor Ru Ruthenium SC Supercritical SCADA Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition SCF Supercritical Fluids SC-FTS Supercritical Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis SiO2 Silica SM Static Mixer SMDS Shell Middle distillates Synthesis SNG Sweet.... ........................................................................................... 29 Figure 4. PLC/SCADA computer graphical interface. .................................................... 30 Figure 5. Dräger Polytron 7000 Fixed CO gas detector with Dräger REGARD-1 Control System connected...

  19. Thermonuclear Reaction Rate of 23Mg(p,gamma)24$Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Herndl; M. Fantini; C. Iliades; P. M. Endt; H. Oberhummer

    1998-06-05

    Updated stellar rates for the reaction 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al are calculated by using all available experimental information on 24Al excitation energies. Proton and gamma-ray partial widths for astrophysically important resonances are derived from shell model calculations. Correspondences of experimentally observed 24Al levels with shell model states are based on application of the isobaric multiplet mass equation. Our new rates suggest that the 23Mg(p,gamma)24Al reaction influences the nucleosynthesis in the mass A>20 region during thermonuclear runaways on massive white dwarfs.

  20. Thermonuclear 42Ti(p,gamma)43V rate in type I X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. He; A. Parikh; B. A. Brown; T. Rauscher; S. Q. Hou; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou; H. S. Xu

    2014-03-10

    The thermonuclear rate of the $^{42}$Ti($p$,$\\gamma$)$^{43}$V reaction has been reevaluated based on a recent precise proton separation energy measurement of $S_p$($^{43}$V)=83$\\pm$43 keV. The astrophysical impact of our new rates has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing type I x-ray burst calculations. It shows that the new experimental value of $S_p$ significantly affects the yields of species between A$\\approx$40--45. As well, the precision of the recent experimental $S_p$ value constrains these yields to better than a factor of three.

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1993-98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chartock, Michael

    2009-01-01

    FUSION ENERGY The International Thermonuclear ExperimentalThermonuclear Experimental Reactor Jackson State University Joint Work Statement National Laboratory for High Energy

  2. Automated operator procedure prompting for startup of Experimental Breeder Reactor-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renshaw, A.W.; Ball, S.J.; Ford, C.E.

    1990-11-01

    This report describes the development of an operator procedure prompting aid for startup of a nuclear reactor. This operator aid is a preliminary design for a similar aid that eventually will be used with the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) presently in the design stage. Two approaches were used to develop this operator procedure prompting aid. One method uses an expert system software shell, and the other method uses database software. The preliminary requirements strongly pointed toward features traditionally associated with both database and expert systems software. Database software usually provides data manipulation flexibility and user interface tools, and expert systems tools offer sophisticated data representation and reasoning capabilities. Both methods, including software and associated hardware, are described in this report. Proposals for future enhancements to improve the expert system approach to procedure prompting and for developing other operator aids are also offered. 25 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buitrago, Paula A; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S; Silcox, Geoffrey D

    2014-08-20

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150oC. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150?C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and intraparticle diffusion. The Freundlich isotherm more accurately described in-flight mercury capture. Using these parameters, very little intraparticle diffusion was evident. Consistent with other data, smaller particles resulted in higher mercury uptake due to available surface area. Therefore, it is important to capture the particle size distribution in the model. At typical full-scale sorbent feed rates, the calculations underpredicted adsorption, suggesting that wall effects can account for as much as 50 percent of the removal, making it an important factor in entrained-mercury adsorption models.

  4. Experimental Study of the Thermal-Hydraulic Phenomena in the Reactor Cavity Cooling System and Analysis of the Effects of Graphite Dispersion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaghetto, Rodolfo

    2012-07-16

    An experimental activity was performed to observe and study the effects of graphite dispersion and deposition on thermal hydraulic phenomena in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The small scale RCCS experimental facility (16.5cm x 16.5cm x 30...

  5. Thermonuclear supernova simulations with stochastic ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2005-10-14

    We apply an ad hoc model for dynamical ignition in three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernovae assuming pure deflagrations. The model makes use of the statistical description of temperature fluctuations in the pre-supernova core proposed by Wunsch & Woosley (2004). Randomness in time is implemented by means of a Poisson process. We are able to vary the explosion energy and nucleosynthesis depending on the free parameter of the model which controls the rapidity of the ignition process. However, beyond a certain threshold, the strength of the explosion saturates and the outcome appears to be robust with respect to number of ignitions. In the most energetic explosions, we find about 0.75 solar masses of iron group elements. Other than in simulations with simultaneous multi-spot ignition, the amount of unburned carbon and oxygen at radial velocities of a few 1000 km/s tends to be reduced for an ever increasing number of ignition events and, accordingly, more pronounced layering results.

  6. Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

    2013-09-13

    This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

  7. Experimental characterization of an Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) reactor for methane oxyfuel combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apo, Daniel Jolomi

    2012-01-01

    Ion Transport Membranes (ITM) which conduct both electrons and oxygen ions have been investigated experimentally for oxygen separation and fuel (mostly methane) conversion purposes over the last three decades. The fuel ...

  8. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, P; Iliadis, C

    2014-01-01

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  9. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mohr; R. Longland; C. Iliadis

    2014-12-14

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  10. Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidet, Florent

    2010-01-01

    for the Second Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II), infuel in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II project [32].

  11. Thermonuclear Fusion with the Sheared Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterberg, F

    2008-01-01

    Two basic approaches to producing thermonuclear fusion with a sheared flow stabilized z-pinch are considered. One consists of heating the entire length of the z-pinch column to the required temperatures. The other basic approach considered here involves the concept of fast ignition. A localized "hot-spot" is produced under the proper conditions to ignite a thermonuclear burn wave in the z-pinch plasma. Here we demonstrate that sheared flow stabilization is more efficient in the fast-ignition method with isentropic compression then in a z-pinch where the entire plasma column is heated.

  12. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Simulations of the Deflagration Stage and Their Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Gamezo; A. M. Khokhlov; E. S. Oran; A. Y. Chtchelkanova; R. O. Rosenberg

    2002-12-03

    Large-scale three-dimensional numerical simulations of the deflagration stage of a thermonuclear supernova explosion show the formation and evolution of a highly convoluted turbulent flame in a gravitational field of an expanding carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The flame dynamics is dominated by the gravity-induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability that controls the burning rate. The thermonuclear deflagration releases enough energy to produce a healthy explosion. The turbulent flame, however, leaves large amounts of unburnt and partially burnt material near the star center, whereas observations imply these materials only in outer layers. This disagreement could be resolved if the deflagration triggers a detonation.

  13. A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sipahi, Rifat

    1 A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear for thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Indeed, advanced plasma confinement scenarios, such as the ones considered

  14. MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY PLASMA FUSI0.N CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), a superconducting device, is being designed to achieve transport processes and alpha heating effectiveness,[2] at the re- quired thermonuclear conditions

  15. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning'Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  16. First direct evidence that filament fracture accompanies degradation of superconducting cables designed for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) ­ The tokomak fusion reactor ITER generation from nuclear fusion. Eighteen toroidal field coils, each weighing 363 tons, will confine High Magnetic Field Laboratory; 2. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Organization

  17. Effect of inlet conditions on the performance of a palladium membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.; Arzu, P.; Costello, A.

    1997-10-01

    Palladium membrane reactors (PMR) will be used to remove tritium and other hydrogen isotopes from impurities, such as tritiated methane and tritiated water, in the exhaust of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. In addition to fusion-fuel processing, the PMR system can be used to recover tritium from tritiated waste water. This paper investigates the effect of inlet conditions on the performance of a PMR. A set of experiments were run to determine, independently, the effect of inlet compositions and residence time on performance. Also, the experiments were designed to determine if the injected form of hydrogen (CH{sub 4} or H{sub 2}O) effects performance. Results show that the PMR operates at optimal hydrogen recovery with a broad range of inlet compositions and performance is shown to increase with increased residence time. PMR performance is shown to be independent of whether hydrogen is injected in the form of CH{sub 4} or H{sub 2}O.

  18. CONTROLLED THERMONUCLEAR PROCESSES THE APPLICATION OF MICROWAVE TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATT-I7 CONTROLLED THERMONUCLEAR PROCESSES THE APPLICATION OF MICROWAVE TECHNIQUES f TO STELLARATOR-11 .. · The Application of Microwave Techniques to Ste11arator Research Mark A. Heald August 26, 1959 Abstract .. This report summarizes the basic principles of microwave diagnostics as applied

  19. The LOFT perspective on neutron star thermonuclear bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, J J M in 't; Ballantyne, D R; Bhattacharyya, S; Brown, E F; Cavecchi, Y; Chakrabarty, D; Chenevez, J; Cumming, A; Degenaar, N; Falanga, M; Galloway, D K; Heger, A; José, J; Keek, L; Linares, M; Mahmoodifar, S; Malone, C M; Méndez, M; Miller, M C; Paerels, F B S; Poutanen, J; Rózanska, A; Schatz, H; Serino, M; Strohmayer, T E; Suleimanov, V F; Thielemann, F -K; Watts, A L; Weinberg, N N; Woosley, S E; Yu, W; Zhang, S; Zingale, M

    2015-01-01

    This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

  20. Millisecond oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muno, Michael Patrick, 1975-

    2002-01-01

    I analyze 68 oscillation trains detected in a search of 159 thermonuclear bursts from eight neutron star X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. I use all data that were public as of September 2001. ...

  1. Contribution to modeling of the reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core using PRELUDE experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France); Quintard, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France)

    2012-07-01

    In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ significantly from original rod-bundle geometry. Any attempt to inject water after significant core degradation can lead to further fragmentation of core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods may result in the formation of a 'debris bed'. The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), i.e., a high permeability porous medium. The French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' is developing experimental programs (PEARL and PRELUDE) and simulation tools (ICARE-CATHARE and ASTEC) to study and optimize the severe accident management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of in-vessel core degradation. It is shown that the quench front exhibits either a ID behaviour or a 2D one, depending on injection rate or bed characteristics. The PRELUDE experiment covers a rather large range of variation of parameters, for which the developed model appears to be quite predictive. (authors)

  2. The Effects of Thermonuclear Reaction Rate Variations on Nova Nucleosynthesis: A Sensitivity Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Art Champagne; Jordi Jose; Sumner Starrfield; Paul Tupper

    2002-06-03

    We investigate the effects of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on nova nucleosynthesis. One-zone nucleosynthesis calculations have been performed by adopting temperature-density-time profiles of the hottest hydrogen-burning zone (i.e., the region in which most of the nucleosynthesis takes place). We obtain our profiles from 7 different, recently published, hydrodynamic nova simulations covering peak temperatures in the range from Tpeak=0.145-0.418 GK. For each of these profiles, we individually varied the rates of 175 reactions within their associated errors and analyzed the resulting abundance changes of 142 isotopes in the mass range below A=40. In total, we performed 7350 nuclear reaction network calculations. We use the most recent thermonuclear reaction rate evaluations for the mass ranges A=1-20 and A=20-40. For the theoretical astrophysicist, our results indicate the extent to which nova nucleosynthesis calculations depend on presently uncertain nuclear physics input, while for the experimental nuclear physicist our results represent at least a qualitative guide for future measurements at stable and radioactive ion beam facilities. We find that present reaction rate estimates are reliable for predictions of Li, Be, C and N abundances in nova nucleosynthesis. However, rate uncertainties of several reactions have to be reduced significantly in order to predict more reliable O, F, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl and Ar abundances. Results are presented in tabular form for each adopted nova simulation.

  3. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

  4. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Kravchuk; D. G. Yakovlev

    2014-01-11

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. The model assumes fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate the combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  5. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Jean in 't; Cavecchi, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    We study the exceptionally short (32-41 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with RXTE from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1$c$ to 0.3$c$ subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth ($y_{\\rm ign}$ = 10$^{10}$ g cm$^{-2}$). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the alpha-capture on $^...

  6. Method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueckner, Keith A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1986-01-01

    A method of achieving the controlled release of thermonuclear energy by illuminating a minute, solid density, hollow shell of a mixture of material such as deuterium and tritium with a high intensity, uniformly converging laser wave to effect an extremely rapid build-up of energy in inwardly traveling shock waves to implode the shell creating thermonuclear conditions causing a reaction of deuterons and tritons and a resultant high energy thermonuclear burn. Utilizing the resulting energy as a thermal source and to breed tritium or plutonium. The invention also contemplates a laser source wherein the flux level is increased with time to reduce the initial shock heating of fuel and provide maximum compression after implosion; and, in addition, computations and an equation are provided to enable the selection of a design having a high degree of stability and a dependable fusion performance by establishing a proper relationship between the laser energy input and the size and character of the selected material for the fusion capsule.

  7. Experimental Validation of Passive Safety System Models: Application to Design and Optimization of Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweibaum, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors,” Ph.D. Dissertation,Handbook for Nuclear Reactor Safety,” Luxembourg: Commissiondevelopment of advanced nuclear reactor technology requires

  8. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradin, Michael; Anderson, M.; Muci, M.; Hassan, Yassin; Dominguez, A.; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hamman, K.

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  9. Extension of thermonuclear functions through the pathway model including Maxwell-Boltzmann and Tsallis distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; D. Kumar

    2007-08-16

    The Maxwell-Boltzmannian approach to nuclear reaction rate theory is extended to cover Tsallis statistics (Tsallis, 1988) and more general cases of distribution functions. An analytical study of respective thermonuclear functions is being conducted with the help of statistical techniques. The pathway model, recently introduced by Mathai (2005), is utilized for thermonuclear functions and closed-form representations are obtained in terms of H-functions and G-functions. Maxwell-Boltzmannian thermonuclear functions become particular cases of the extended thermonuclear functions. A brief review on the development of the theory of analytic representations of nuclear reaction rates is given.

  10. English home Forum Photo Gallery Features Newsletter Archive About US Help Site Map languages Culture/Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to build its own thermonuclear experimental reactor A leading Chinese plasma physicist said Thursday China might build its own thermonuclear experimental reactor, which would be expected to supply sustained in thermonuclear reaction, Chinese scientists have already participated in the International Thermonuclear

  11. Experimental Validation of Passive Safety System Models: Application to Design and Optimization of Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweibaum, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    test SFR – Sodium-cooled fast reactor SWU – Separative workvalues than sodium-cooled fast reactors ( SFRs) and HTGRs.

  12. Thermonuclear Explosions of Chandrasekhar-Mass White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; J. C. Niemeyer

    2000-05-16

    We present a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, consisting of carbon and oxygen, undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is a front capturing/tracking hybrid scheme, based on a level set method, which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. First results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are discussed. It will be shown that even in 2-D and even with a physically motivated sub-grid model numerically ``converged'' results are difficult to obtain.

  13. ENERGETIC PARTICLE PHYSICS STUDIES ON ALCATOR C-MOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor1 ~ITER! are expected to excite moderate toroidal mode number n

  14. Secretary Bodman Visits Clean Energy Museum in Tokyo | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for a Hydrogen Economy; Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; and Generation IV International Forum. Secretary Bodman...

  15. Adequacy of the Heat-Mass Transfer Analogy to Simulate Containment Atmospheric Cooling in the New Generation of Advanced Nuclear Reactors: Experimental Confirmation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, Luis E. [CIEMAT (Spain); Campo, Antonio [Idaho State University (United States)

    2002-09-15

    Driving forces of passive cooling systems of advanced reactor containments are substantially weaker than those brought in by active systems of operating power plants. This fact along with the new geometries being used suggest the need either to develop new reliable simulation techniques or to adapt and validate traditional approaches. Suitability of the heat-mass transfer analogy for this purpose is investigated based on previous authors' experience. Major analogy drawbacks are identified and overcome by supplementing it with analytically derived factors. By comparing against experimental data available, the heat-mass transfer analogy is demonstrated to be a sound, configuration-independent, and accurate-enough theoretical approximation.

  16. The classification of magnetohydrodynamic regimes of thermonuclear combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remming, Ian S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Khokhlov, Alexei M. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Enrico Fermi Institute, and the Computational Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    Physical properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) reaction fronts are studied as functions of the thermodynamic conditions, and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the unburned matter through which the fronts propagate. We determine the conditions for the existence of the various types of MHD reaction fronts and the character of the changes in physical quantities across these reaction fronts. The analysis is carried out in general for a perfect gas equation of state and a constant energy release, and then extended to thermonuclear reaction fronts in degenerate carbon-oxygen mixtures and degenerate helium in conditions typical of Type Ia supernova explosions. We find that as unburned matter enters perpendicular to a reaction front, the release of energy through burning generates shear velocity in the reacting gas that, depending on the type of reaction front, strengthens or weakens the magnetic field. In addition, we find that the steady-state propagation of a reaction front is impossible for certain ranges of magnetic field direction. Our results provide insight into the phenomena of MHD thermonuclear combustion that is relevant to the interpretation of future simulations of SN Ia explosions that have magnetic fields systematically incorporated.

  17. Simulations of Turbulent Thermonuclear Burning in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Hillebrandt; M. Reinecke; W. Schmidt; F. K. Roepke; C. Travaglio; J. C. Niemeyer

    2004-05-11

    Type Ia supernovae have recently received considerable attention because it appears that they can be used as "standard candles" to measure cosmic distances out to billions of light years away from us. Observations of type Ia supernovae seem to indicate that we are living in a universe that started to accelerate its expansion when it was about half its present age. These conclusions rest primarily on phenomenological models which, however, lack proper theoretical understanding, mainly because the explosion process, initiated by thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen into heavier elements, is difficult to simulate even on supercomputers. Here, we investigate a new way of modeling turbulent thermonuclear deflagration fronts in white dwarfs undergoing a type Ia supernova explosion. Our approach is based on a level set method which treats the front as a mathematical discontinuity and allows for full coupling between the front geometry and the flow field. New results of the method applied to the problem of type Ia supernovae are obtained. It is shown that in 2-D with high spatial resolution and a physically motivated subgrid scale model for the nuclear flames numerically "converged" results can be obtained, but for most initial conditions the stars do not explode. In contrast, simulations in 3-D, do give the desired explosions and many of their properties, such as the explosion energies, lightcurves and nucleosynthesis products, are in very good agreement with observed type Ia supernovae.

  18. Faint Thermonuclear Supernovae from AM Canum Venaticorum Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Ken J. Shen; Nevin N. Weinberg; Gijs Nelemans

    2007-05-06

    Helium that accretes onto a Carbon/Oxygen white dwarf in the double white dwarf AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) binaries undergoes unstable thermonuclear flashes when the orbital period is in the 3.5-25 minute range. At the shortest orbital periods (and highest accretion rates, Mdot > 10^-7 Msol/yr), the flashes are weak and likely lead to the Helium equivalent of classical nova outbursts. However, as the orbit widens and Mdot drops, the mass required for the unstable ignition increases, leading to progressively more violent flashes up to a final flash with Helium shell mass ~ 0.02-0.1 Msol. The high pressures of these last flashes allow the burning to produce the radioactive elements 48Cr, 52Fe, and 56Ni that power a faint (M_V in the range of -15 to -18) and rapidly rising (few days) thermonuclear supernova. Current galactic AM CVn space densities imply one such explosion every 5,000-15,000 years in 10^11 Msol of old stars (~ 2-6% of the Type Ia rate in E/SO galaxies). These ".Ia" supernovae (one-tenth as bright for one-tenth the time as a Type Ia supernovae) are excellent targets for deep (e.g. V=24) searches with nightly cadences, potentially yielding an all-sky rate of 1,000 per year.

  19. On the Evolution of Thermonuclear Flames on Large Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju Zhang; O. E. Bronson Messer; Alexei M. Khokhlov; Tomasz Plewa

    2006-10-05

    The thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf in a Type Ia supernova explosion is characterized by vastly disparate spatial and temporal scales. The extreme dynamic range inherent to the problem prevents the use of direct numerical simulation and forces modelers to resort to subgrid models to describe physical processes taking place on unresolved scales. We consider the evolution of a model thermonuclear flame in a constant gravitational field on a periodic domain. The gravitational acceleration is aligned with the overall direction of the flame propagation, making the flame surface subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The flame evolution is followed through an extended initial transient phase well into the steady-state regime. The properties of the evolution of flame surface are examined. We confirm the form of the governing equation of the evolution suggested by Khokhlov (1995). The mechanism of vorticity production and the interaction between vortices and the flame surface are discussed. The results of our investigation provide the bases for revising and extending previous subgrid-scale model.

  20. Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bravo; C. Badenes; D. Garcia-Senz

    2004-12-07

    In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predicitions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

  1. Cosmic and Galactic Neutrino Backgrounds from Thermonuclear Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristiano Porciani; Silvia Petroni; Giovanni Fiorentini

    2003-11-20

    We estimate energy spectra and fluxes at the Earth's surface of the cosmic and Galactic neutrino backgrounds produced by thermonuclear reactions in stars. The extra-galactic component is obtained by combining the most recent estimates of the cosmic star formation history and the stellar initial mass function with accurate theoretical predictions of the neutrino yields all over the thermonuclear lifetime of stars of different masses. Models of the structure and evolution of the Milky Way are used to derive maps of the expected flux generated by Galactic sources as a function of sky direction. The predicted neutrino backgrounds depend only slightly on model parameters. In the relevant 50 keV-10 MeV window, the total flux of cosmic neutrinos ranges between 20 and 65 particles per square cm per s. Neutrinos reaching the Earth today have been typically emitted at redshift z~2. Their energy spectrum peaks at E~0.1-0.3 MeV. The energy and entropy densities of the cosmic background are negligible with respect to the thermal contribution of relic neutrinos originated in the early universe. In every sky direction, the cosmic background is outnumbered by the Galactic one, whose integrated flux amounts to 300-1000 particles per square cm per s. The emission from stars in the Galactic disk contributes more than 95 per cent of the signal.

  2. A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Indeed, advanced plasma confinement scenarios, such as the ones considered1 A time-delay approach for the modeling and control of plasma instabilities in thermonuclear fusion Emmanuel WITRANT, Erik OLOFSSON, Silviu-Iulian NICULESCU, March 13, 2009. Abstract This letter

  3. Astrophysical Thermonuclear Functions for Boltzmann-Gibbs Statistics and Tsallis Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. K. Saxena; A. M. Mathai; H. J. Haubold

    2004-06-22

    We present an analytic proof of the integrals for astrophysical thermonuclear functions which are derived on the basis of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics. Among the four different cases of astrophysical thermonuclear functions, those with a depleted high-energy tail and a cut-off at high energies find a natural interpretation in q-statistics.

  4. Steady state and dynamic modeling of a packed bed reactor for the partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde: experimental results compared with model predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwedock, M.J.; Windes, L.C.; Ray, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Heterogeneous and pseudohomogeneous models are compared to experimental data from a packed bed reactor for the partical oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over an iron oxide-molybdenum oxide catalyst. Heat transfer parameters which were successful in matching data from experiments without reaction were not successful in matching temperature data from experiments with reaction. This made it necessary to decrease the fluid radial heat transfer to obtain good fit. A good fit was obtained for steady state composition profiles by optimizing selected frequency factors and the activation energy for methanol. A redox rate expression for the oxidation of formaldehyde to carbon monoxide was proposed since a simple first-order rate expression did not fit the data. The pseudohomogeneous model gave results similar to the heterogeneous model for both steady state and dynamic experiments and has been recommended for future experimental state estimation and control studies. 21 refs., 31 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. A Systematic Approach to the Design of a Large Scale Detritiation System for Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Systematic Approach to the Design of a Large Scale Detritiation System for Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Experiments

  6. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and charts that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet velocity profiles is also presented.

  7. Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosswog, Stephan

    Tidally-induced thermonuclear Supernovae Stephan Rosswog1, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz2, W. Raphael Hix3 1 in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate

  8. Thermonuclear rates of the 28Si(p, y) reaction M. Kicinska-Habior and T. Matulewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1881 Thermonuclear rates of the 28Si(p, y) reaction M. Kicinska-Habior and T. Matulewicz Institute Thermonuclear reaction rates NA av > are the quan- tities of essential importance for models of stellar in a much more extended energy range. The thermonuclear rates of the 28Si(p, y) reaction, although it does

  9. Screening in Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei V. Gruzinov; John N. Bahcall

    1998-01-20

    We evaluate the effect of electrostatic screening by ions and electrons on low-Z thermonuclear reactions in the sun. We use a mean field formalism and calculate the electron density of the screening cloud using the appropriate density matrix equation of quantum statistical mechanics. Because of well understood physical effects that are included for the first time in our treatment, the calculated enhancement of reaction rates does not agree with the frequently used interpolation formulae. Our result does agree, within small uncertainties, with Salpeter's weak screening formula. If weak screening is used instead of the commonly employed screening prescription of Graboske et al., the predicted $^8$B neutrino flux is increased by 7% and the predicted chlorine rate is increased by 0.4 SNU.

  10. On the stability of thermonuclear shell sources in stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -C. Yoon; N. Langer; M. van der Sluys

    2004-06-07

    We present a quantitative criterion for the thermal stability of thermonuclear shell sources. We find the thermal stability of shell sources to depend on exactly three factors: they are more stable when they are geometrically thicker, less degenerate and hotter. This confirms and unifies previously obtained results in terms of the geometry, temperature and density of the shell source, by a simplified but quantitative approach to the physics of shell nuclear burning. We present instability diagrams in the temperature-density plane for hydrogen and helium shell burning, which allow a simple evaluation of the stability conditions of such shell sources in stellar models. The performance of our stability criterion is demonstrated in various numerical models: in a 3 Msun AGB star, in helium accreting CO white dwarfs, in a helium white dwarf which is covered by a thin hydrogen envelope, and in a 1.0 Msun giant.

  11. The Periods Discovered by RXTE in Thermonuclear Flash Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Strohmayer; J. H. Swank; W. Zhang

    1998-01-23

    Oscillations in the X-ray flux of thermonuclear X-ray bursts have been observed with RXTE from at least 6 low-mass binaries, at frequencies from 330 Hz to 589 Hz. There appear to be preferred relations between the frequencies present during the bursts and those seen in the persistent flux. The amplitude of the oscillations can exceed 50 % near burst onset. Except for a systematic increase in oscillation frequency as the burst progresses, the frequency is stable. Time resolved spectra track increases in the X-ray emitting area due to propagation of the burning front over the neutron star surface, as well as radiation driven expansion of the photosphere. The neutron star mass, radius, and distance can be inferred when spectra are compared to theoretical expectations.

  12. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data...

  13. Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae I. Explosion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Plewa

    2006-11-24

    We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions which are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msun of silicon group elements, 0.9-1.2 Msun of iron group elements, and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg-shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon-group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~1.3-1.5 10^51 erg.

  14. Measurement of neutron capture on 50Ti at thermonuclear energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Sedyshev; P. Mohr; H. Beer; H. Oberhummer; Yu. P. Popov; W. Rochow

    1999-07-28

    At the Karlsruhe and Tuebingen 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerators the thermonuclear 50Ti(n,gamma)51Ti(5.8 min) cross section was measured by the fast cyclic activation technique via the 320.852 and 928.65 keV gamma-ray lines of the 51Ti-decay. Metallic Ti samples of natural isotopic composition and samples of TiO2 enriched in 50Ti by 67.53 % were irradiated between two gold foils which served as capture standards. The capture cross-section was measured at the neutron energies 25, 30, 52, and 145 keV, respectively. The direct capture cross section was determined to be 0.387 +/- 0.011 mbarn at 30 keV. We found evidence for a bound state s-wave resonance with an estimated radiative width of 0.34 eV which destructively interfers with direct capture. The strength of a suggested s-wave resonance at 146.8 keV was determined. The present data served to calculate, in addition to the directly measured Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections at 25 and 52 keV, an improved stellar 50Ti(n,gamma)51Ti rate in the thermonuclear energy region from 1 to 250 keV. The new stellar rate leads at low temperatures to much higher values than the previously recommended rate, e.g., at kT=8 keV the increase amounts to about 50 %. The new reaction rate therefore reduces the abundance of 50Ti due to s-processing in AGB stars.

  15. Design of an experimental loop for post-LOCA heat transfer regimes in a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to design an experimental thermal-hydraulic loop capable of generating accurate, reliable data in various convection heat transfer regimes for use in the formulation of a comprehensive convection ...

  16. Three-dimensional neutronics optimization of helium-cooled blanket for multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FDS-MFX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Yuan, B.; Jin, M.; Wang, M.; Long, P.; Hu, L.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional neutronics optimization calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) and maximum average Power Density (PDmax) in a helium-cooled multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-MFX (Multi-Functional experimental) blanket. Three-stage tests will be carried out successively, in which the tritium breeding blanket, uranium-fueled blanket and spent-fuel-fueled blanket will be utilized respectively. In this contribution, the most significant and main goal of the FDS-MFX blanket is to achieve the PDmax of about 100 MW/m3 with self-sustaining tritium (TBR {>=} 1.05) based on the second-stage test with uranium-fueled blanket to check and validate the demonstrator reactor blanket relevant technologies based on the viable fusion and fission technologies. Four different enriched uranium materials were taken into account to evaluate PDmax in subcritical blanket: (i) natural uranium, (ii) 3.2% enriched uranium, (iii) 19.75% enriched uranium, and (iv) 64.4% enriched uranium carbide. These calculations and analyses were performed using a home-developed code VisualBUS and Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (HENDL). The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with 64.4% enriched uranium was the most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency (TBR-1.05) and a high maximum average power density ({approx}100 MW/m{sup 3}) when the blanket was loaded with the mass of {sup 235}U about 1 ton. (authors)

  17. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm lithium metaborate solution respectively at the saturation temperature for 1000 psi (68.9 bar) coolant pressure. Boiling tests also revealed the formation of fine deposits of boron and lithium on the cladding surface which degraded the heat transfer rates. The boron and lithium metaborate precipitates after a 5 day test at 5000 ppm concentration and 1000 psi (68.9 bar) operating pressure reduced the heat transfer rate 21% and 30%, respectively for the two solutions.

  18. A bright thermonuclear X-ray burst simultaneously observed with Chandra and RXTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in't Zand, J. J. M.

    The prototypical accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4?3658 was observed simultaneously with Chandra-LETGS and RXTE-PCA near the peak of a transient outburst in November 2011. A single thermonuclear (type-I) ...

  19. 11/21/2006 07:40 AMITAR-TASS Page 1 of 2http://www.itar-tass.com/eng/prnt.html?NewsID=11003725

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by means of thermonuclear fusion at new power plants. The total cost of the project, in which approximately thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) was signed at the Elysee Palace here on Tuesday. Representatives the thermonuclear synthesis and had carried out a broad range of experimental works on "Tokamak" thermonuclear

  20. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  1. Tritium recovery from tritiated water with a two-stage palladium membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsell, S.A.; Willms, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    A process to recover tritium from tritiated water has been successfully demonstrated at TSTA. The 2-stage palladium membrane reactor (PMR) is capable of recovering tritium from water without generating additional waste. This device can be used to recover tritium from the substantial amount of tritiated water that is expected to be generated in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor both from torus exhaust and auxiliary operations. A large quantity of tritiated waste water exists world wide because the predominant method of cleaning up tritiated streams is to oxidize tritium to tritiated water. The latter can be collected with high efficiency for subsequent disposal. The PMR is a combined catalytic reactor/permeator. Cold (non-tritium) water processing experiments were run in preparation for the tritiated water processing tests. Tritium was recovered from a container of molecular sieve loaded with 2,050 g (2,550 std. L) of water and 4.5 g of tritium. During this experiment, 27% (694 std. L) of the water was processed resulting in recovery of 1.2 g of tritium. The maximum water processing rate for the PMR system used was determined to be 0.5 slpm. This correlates well with the maximum processing rate determined from the smaller PMR system on the cold test bench and has resulted in valuable scale-up and design information.

  2. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  3. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD-BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  4. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  5. Reaction Rate and Composition Dependence of the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning on Accreting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keek, L; Heger, A

    2014-01-01

    The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a ten times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of triple alpha and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15O(a,g)19Ne and 18Ne(a,p)21Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor ten decrease of the 15O(a,g)19Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depend...

  6. Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Theory vs. Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cumming

    2003-11-18

    I review our theoretical understanding of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars, concentrating on comparisons to observations. Sequences of regular Type I X-ray bursts from GS 1826-24 and 4U 1820-30 are very well described by the theory. I discuss recent work which attempts to use the observed burst properties in these sources to constrain the composition of the accreted material. For GS 1826-24, variations in the burst energetics with accretion rate indicate that the accreted material has solar metallicity; for 4U 1820-30, future observations should constrain the hydrogen fraction, testing evolutionary models. I briefly discuss the global bursting behavior of burst sources, which continues to be a major puzzle. Finally, I turn to superbursts, which naturally fit into the picture as unstable carbon ignition in a thick layer of heavy elements. I present new time-dependent models of the cooling tails of superbursts, and discuss the various interactions between superbursts and normal Type I bursts, and what can be learned from them.

  7. The NACRE Thermonuclear Reaction Compilation and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard H. Cyburt; Brian D. Fields; Keith A. Olive

    2001-05-17

    The theoretical predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction cross sections. In this paper, we examine the impact on BBN of the recent compilation of nuclear data and thermonuclear reactions rates by the NACRE collaboration. We confirm that the adopted rates do not make large overall changes in central values of predictions, but do affect the magnitude of the uncertainties in these predictions. Therefore, we then examine in detail the uncertainties in the individual reaction rates considered by NACRE. When the error estimates by NACRE are treated as 1\\sigma limits, the resulting BBN error budget is similar to those of previous tabulations. We propose two new procedures for deriving reaction rate uncertainties from the nuclear data: one which sets lower limits to the error, and one which we believe is a reasonable description of the present error budget. We propagate these uncertainty estimates through the BBN code, and find that when the nuclear data errors are described most accurately, the resulting light element uncertainties are notably smaller than in some previous tabulations, but larger than others. Using these results, we derive limits on the cosmic baryon-to-photon ratio $\\eta$, and compare this to independent limits on $\\eta$ from recent balloon-borne measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). We discuss means to improve the BBN results via key nuclear reaction measurements and light element observations.

  8. Struct Multidisc Optim (2006) 32: 473484 DOI 10.1007/s00158-006-0022-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vel, Senthil

    2006-01-01

    for fusion reactors, and in critical engine components, such as intake and exhaust valves. Several studies investigated for plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Ueda

  9. Laser-fusion targets for reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuckolls, John H. (Livermore, CA); Thiessen, Albert R. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A laser target comprising a thermonuclear fuel capsule composed of a centrally located quantity of fuel surrounded by at least one or more layers or shells of material for forming an atmosphere around the capsule by a low energy laser prepulse. The fuel may be formed as a solid core or hollow shell, and, under certain applications, a pusher-layer or shell is located intermediate the fuel and the atmosphere forming material. The fuel is ignited by symmetrical implosion via energy produced by a laser, or other energy sources such as an electron beam machine or ion beam machine, whereby thermonuclear burn of the fuel capsule creates energy for applications such as generation of electricity via a laser fusion reactor.

  10. Heat Transfer Simulation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System Experimental Facility using RELAP5-3D and Generation of View Factors using MCNP 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Huali

    2013-08-08

    As one of the most attractive reactor types, The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is designed to be passively safe with the incorporation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). In this paper, a RELAP5-3D simulation model is set up based...

  11. The Sensitivity of Nucleosynthesis in Type I X-ray Bursts to Thermonuclear Reaction-Rate Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anuj Parikh; Jordi Jose; Fermin Moreno; Christian Iliadis

    2008-06-18

    We examine the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis in Type I X-ray bursts to variations in nuclear rates. As a large number of nuclear processes are involved in these phenomena -with the vast majority of reaction rates only determined theoretically due to the lack of any experimental information- our results can provide a means for determining which rates play significant roles in the thermonuclear runaway. These results may then motivate new experiments. For our studies, we have performed a comprehensive series of one-zone post-processing calculations in conjunction with various representative X-ray burst thermodynamic histories. We present those reactions whose rate variations have the largest effects on yields in our studies.

  12. Astrophysical S-factors of proton radiative capture for thermonuclear reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. B. Dubovichenko; A. V. Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov

    2011-12-09

    In this review we have considered the possibility to describe the astrophysical S-factors of radiative capture reactions with light atomic nuclei on the basis of the potential two-cluster model by taking into account the splitting the orbital states according to Young's schemes. Within this model, interaction of the nucleon clusters is described by local two-particle potential determined by fit to the scattering data and properties of bound states of these clusters. Many-body character of the problem is taken into account under some approximation, in terms of the allowed or forbidden by the Pauli principle states in intercluster potentials. An important feature of the approach is accounting for a dependence of interaction potential between clusters on the orbital Young scheme, which determines the permutation symmetry of the nucleon system. The astrophysical S-factors of the radiative capture processes in the p2H, p7Li and p12C systems are analyzed on the basis of this approach. It is shown that the approach allows one to describe quite reasonably experimental data available at low energies, when the phase shifts of cluster-cluster scattering are extracted from the data with minimal errors. In this connection the problem of experimental error decrease is exclusively urgent for the differential cross-sections of elastic scattering of light atomic nuclei at astrophysical energies and to perform a more accurate phase shift analysis. The increase in the accuracy will allow, in future, making more definite conclusions regarding the mechanisms and conditions of thermonuclear reactions, as well as understanding better their nature in general.

  13. Also on the agenda would be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the multi- billion dollar International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), one of the most exciting the multi-billion dollar International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), one of the most exciting International Thermonuclear French President Jacques Chirac Six Month World Exposition Beijing Tiananmen Square

  14. Brussels, May 31, 2005 NOTES Basic 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the exploitation of an experimental thermonuclear reactor (ITER) and implementation of the calendar envisaged and the exploitation of an experimental thermonuclear reactor (ITER) and implementation of the calendar envisaged thermonuclear engine. Six parts take part in the negotiations: China, South Korea, the United States, Japan

  15. Contents of ITER deal revealed The Yomiuri Shimbun (May 27, 2005, 4 am)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in thermonuclear fusion. The country also will supply 20 percent of workers to ITER facilities. The four other on the roles of host and non-hosting countries involved in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The planned ITER is an experimental facility for a thermonuclear reactor designed to produce power by fusing

  16. On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

    2004-04-26

    The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization - which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism - is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here.

  17. The development and operational testing of an experimental reactor for gas-liquid-solid reaction systems at high temperatures and pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, Richard Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    , but REACTANTS IN P L'MP CATALYST BED PROD L'CT5 OUT Figure 2. A schematic drawing of an external recycle reactor. ARROWS SHOW FLUID FLOW PATTERN TC PORT CATALYST BED TC PORT INLET IMPELLER OUTLET IMPELLER SHAFT Figure 3. A ISerty reactor. 10...

  18. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 401, 26 (2010) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15632.x Systematic variation in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Cole

    2010-01-01

    in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear bursts and its implication for neutron star radius measurement Sudip area during the decay portions of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts. However, this apparent area are challenging. Thermonuclear bursts provide one of the very few promising methods to measure the neutron star

  19. PHYS 390 Lecture 20 -Reactions III -Thermonuclear processes 20 -1 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    PHYS 390 Lecture 20 - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes 20 - 1 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes What's Important: · energy-dependent cross sections · complete rate 20 - Reactions III - Thermonuclear processes 20 - 2 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University

  20. Contrib. Plasma Phys. 53, No. 45, 397 405 (2013) / DOI 10.1002/ctpp.201200094 Electron screening effect on stellar thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    effect on stellar thermonuclear fusion Alexander Y. Potekhin1,2 and Gilles Chabrier2,3 1 Ioffe Physical thermonuclear reactions for various stellar objects, namely in the liquid envelopes of neutron stars. In addition, we examine some recent unconventional theo- retical results on stellar thermonuclear fusions

  1. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  2. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and thermonuclear bursts from Terzan 5: A showcase of burning regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linares, M.

    We present a comprehensive study of the thermonuclear bursts and millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) from the neutron star (NS) transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480–2446, located in the globular cluster ...

  3. High target gain to ICF reactor - a problem of repetition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    The near term goal of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program in the United States is the demonstration of high target gain, where the thermonuclear energy released from the ICF target exceeds the driver energy input to the target by roughly a factor of one hundred or more. This paper briefly reviews the most notable published ICF conceptual reactor designs and then focuses on the engineering problems of commercial ICF reactors with emphasis on the problems associated with the high repetition frequency inherent in such systems.

  4. Course: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Universit degli Studi di Padova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesare, Bernardo

    the subject of controlled thermonuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas. Both fusion science of Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, b) Engineering of a Magnetically Confined Fusion Reactor, c) ExperimentalCourse: FUSION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Università degli Studi di Padova in agreement

  5. CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2, and L. Grossman2,3, 1Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONDENSATION IN EJECTA FROM DENSE THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVAE. T. Yu1, B. S. Meyer1, A. V. Fedkin2 Thermonuclear Supernova Model: Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are explosions of white dwarf stars. Our model and then oxy- gen burning proceed under degenerate conditions, a thermonuclear runaway occurs, which leads

  6. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  7. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaughton, V.

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky ...

  8. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  9. Thermonuclear fusion in dense stars: Electron screening, conductive cooling, and magnetic field effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potekhin, A Y

    2012-01-01

    We study the plasma correlation effects on nonresonant thermonuclear reactions of carbon and oxygen in the interiors of white dwarfs and liquid envelopes of neutron stars. We examine the effects of electron screening on thermodynamic enhancement of thermonuclear reactions in dense plasmas beyond the linear mixing rule. Using these improved enhancement factors, we calculate carbon and oxygen ignition curves in white dwarfs and neutron stars. The energy balance and ignition conditions in neutron star envelopes are evaluated, taking their detailed thermal structure into account. The result is compared to the simplified "one-zone model," which is routinely used in the literature. We also consider the effect of strong magnetic fields on the ignition curves in the ocean of magnetars.

  10. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: A New Probe of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    1999-11-19

    Observations of thermonuclear (Type I) X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have revealed large amplitude, high coherence X-ray brightness oscillations with frequencies in the 300 - 600 Hz range. Substantial spectral and timing evidence point to rotational modulation of the X-ray burst flux as the cause of these oscillations, and it is likely that they reveal the spin frequencies of neutron stars in LMXB from which they are detected. Here I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and describe how they can be used to constrain the masses and radii of neutron stars as well as the physics of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars.

  11. The variation of the fine structure constant: testing the dipole model with thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraiselburd, Lucila; Negrelli, Carolina; Berro, Enrique García

    2014-01-01

    The large-number hypothesis conjectures that fundamental constants may vary. Accordingly, the spacetime variation of fundamental constants has been an active subject of research for decades. Recently, using data obtained with large telescopes a phenomenological model in which the fine structure constant might vary spatially has been proposed. We test whether this hypothetical spatial variation of {\\alpha}, which follows a dipole law, is compatible with the data of distant thermonuclear supernovae. Unlike previous works, in our calculations we consider not only the variation of the luminosity distance when a varying {\\alpha} is adopted, but we also take into account the variation of the peak luminosity of Type Ia supernovae resulting from a variation of {\\alpha}. This is done using an empirical relation for the peak bolometric magnitude of thermonuclear supernovae that correctly reproduces the results of detailed numerical simulations. We find that there is no significant difference between the several phenome...

  12. An experimental study of external reactor vessel cooling strategy on the critical heat flux using the graphene oxide nano-fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S. D.; Lee, S. W.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium as a key severe accident management strategy can be achieved by flooding the reactor cavity during a severe accident. In this accident mitigation strategy, the decay heat removal capability depends on whether the imposed heat flux exceeds critical heat flux (CHF). To provide sufficient cooling for high-power reactors such as APR1400, there have been some R and D efforts to use the reactor vessel with micro-porous coating and nano-fluids boiling-induced coating. The dispersion stability of graphene-oxide nano-fluid in the chemical conditions of flooding water that includes boric acid, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was checked in terms of surface charge or zeta potential before the CHF experiments. Results showed that graphene-oxide nano-fluids were very stable under ERVC environment. The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel external wall was measured using the small scale two-dimensional slide test section. The radius of the curvature is 0.1 m. The dimension of each part in the facility simulated the APR-1400. The heater was designed to produce the different heat flux. The magnitude of heat flux follows the one of the APR-1400 when the severe accident occurred. All tests were conducted under inlet subcooling 10 K. Graphene-oxide nano-fluids (concentration: 10 -4 V%) enhanced CHF limits up to about 20% at mass flux 50 kg/m{sup 2}s and 100 kg/m{sup 2}s in comparison with the results of the distilled water at same test condition. (authors)

  13. Application of a new screening model to thermonuclear reactions of the rp process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore Liolios

    2003-05-09

    A new screening model for astrophysical thermonuclear reactions was derived recently which improved Salpeter's weak-screening one. In the present work we prove that the new model can also give very reliable screening enhancement factors (SEFs) when applied to the rp process. According to the results of the new model, which agree well with Mitler's SEFs, the screened rp reaction rates can be, at most, twice as fast as the unscreened ones.

  14. Hydrodynamic simulations of a combined hydrogen, helium thermonuclear runaway on a 10-km neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, S.; Kenyon, S.; Truran, J.W.; Sparks, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    We have used a Lagrangian, hydrodynamic stellar-evolution computer code to evolve a thermonuclear runaway in the accreted hydrogen rich envelope of a 1.0M, 10-km neutron star. Our simulation produced an outburst which lasted about 2000 sec and peak effective temperature was 3 keV. The peak luminosity exceeded 2 x 10/sup 5/ L. A shock wave caused a precursor in the light curve which lasted 10/sup -5/ sec.

  15. Lightcurves of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe of the explosion mechanism and their use in cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Blinnikov; E. Sorokina

    2002-12-30

    Thermonuclear supernovae are valuable for cosmology but their physics is not yet fully understood. Modeling the development and propagation of nuclear flame is complicated by numerous instabilities. The predictions of supernova light curves still involve some simplifying assumptions, but one can use the comparison of the computed fluxes with observations to constrain the explosion mechanism. In spite of great progress in recent years, a number of issues remains unsolved both in flame physics and light curve modeling.

  16. Thermonuclear Runaways on Accreting White Dwarfs: Models of Classical Novae Explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margarita Hernanz; Jordi Jose

    2000-01-11

    The mechanism of classical novae explosions is explained, together with some of their observational properties. The scarce but not null impact of novae in the chemical evolution of the Milky Way is analyzed, as well as their relevance for the radioactivity in the Galaxy. A special emphasis is given to the predicted gamma-ray emission from novae and its relationship with the thermonuclear model itself and its related nucleosynthesis.

  17. A revised thermonuclear rate of $^{7}$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^{4}$He relevant to Big-Bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, S Q; Kubono, S; Chen, Y S

    2015-01-01

    In the standard Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model, the primordial $^7$Li abundance is overestimated by about a factor of 2--3 comparing to the astronomical observations, so called the pending cosmological lithium problem. The $^7$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^4$He reaction, which may affect the $^7$Li abundance, was regarded as the secondary important reaction in destructing the $^7$Be nucleus in BBN. However, the thermonuclear rate of $^7$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^4$He has not been well studied so far. This reaction rate was firstly estimated by Wagoner in 1969, which has been generally adopted in the current BBN simulations and the reaction rate library. This simple estimation involved only a direct-capture reaction mechanism, but the resonant contribution should be also considered according to the later experimental results. In this work, we have revised this rate based on the indirect cross-section data available for the $^4$He($\\alpha$,$n$)$^7$Be and $^4$He($\\alpha$,$p$)$^7$Li reactions, with the charge symmetry and deta...

  18. Thermonuclear explosion of rotating massive stars could explain core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushnir, Doron

    2015-01-01

    It is widely thought that core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), the explosions of massive stars following the collapse of the stars' iron cores, is obtained due to energy deposition by neutrinos. So far, this scenario was not demonstrated from first principles. Kushnir and Katz (2014) have recently shown, by using one-dimensional simulations, that if the neutrinos failed to explode the star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial profiles. However, the energy released was small and negligible amounts of ejected $^{56}$Ni were obtained, implying that these one-dimensional collapse induced thermonuclear explosions (CITE) are unlikely to represent typical CCSNe. Here I provide evidence supporting a scenario in which the majority of CCSNe are the result of CITE. I use two-dimensional simulations to show that collapse of stars that include slowly (few percent of breakup) rotating $\\sim0.1-10\\,M_{\\odot}$ shells of mixed helium-oxygen, leads to an ignition of a thermonuclear d...

  19. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Subject:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiated power H-mode experiments in Alcator C-Mod and consequences for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) QDT 10 operation. Physics of Plasmas,...

  1. U.S. and China Announce Cooperation on FutureGen and Sign Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Hydrogen Economy; the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum; the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; and the Generation IV International Forum. Secretary Bodman...

  2. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from national laboratories and universities. Leading the list was the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, a facility capable of producing a "burning plasma" fusion...

  3. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    joined Martin Marietta Energy Systems as project coordinator for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) engineering design activities. He became the U.S. ITER...

  4. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING SUPERCONDUCTOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supercond. Sci. Technol. 18 (2005) S241S252 doi:10.1088/0953-2048/18/12/005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    2005-01-01

    research effort. This is motivated in particular by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will inductively heat and confine a plasma for fusion physics applications [20

  5. 2012 DOE Sustainability Awards | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needs in Iraq and Afghanistan, commercial vendors, and the DOE International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor for a planned research project. Total return on investment...

  6. LANL: Facility Focus: Sigma Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the US and European Union and qualified the process for use in International Experimental Thermonuclear Reactor. Customers: DOE Department of Fusion Energy Sciences, European...

  7. House Committee on Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    them. We are also carrying forward with U.S. participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project to pursue the potential of energy from nuclear...

  8. Interfacial effects in fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidi, Mohammad Said

    1979-01-01

    The problem of increased resonance capture rates near zone interfaces in fast reactor media has been examined both theoretically and experimentally. An interface traversing assembly was designed, constructed and employed ...

  9. Reactor physics project final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1970-01-01

    This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

  10. PPPL-3171 -Preprint Date: May 1996, UC-421, 423, 427 Simulations of alpha particle ripple loss from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (International from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor M. H. Redi, R. V. Budny, D. C. McCune, C. O for D shaped ripple contours. In contrast to alpha loss simulations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

  11. Activation characteristics of different steel alloys proposed for near-term fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attaya, H.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.; Baker, C.C.

    1988-08-01

    Analyses have been made for different structural alloys proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Candidate alloys include austenitic steels stabilized with nickel (NiSS) or manganese (MnSS). The radioactivity, the decay heat, and the waste disposal rating of each alloy have been calculated for the inboard shield of the ITER design option utilizing water cooled solid breeder blanket. The results show, for the 55 cm inboard shield and after 3 MW.yr/m2 fluence, that the long term activation problems, e.g., radioactive waste, of the MnSS are much less than that of the NiSS. All the MnSS alloys considered are qualified as Class C or better low level waste. Most of the NiSS alloys are not qualified for near surface burial. However, the short term decay heat generation rate for the MnSS is much higher than that of the NiSS. 6 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    beams of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. Ain magnetic confinement thermonuclear devices, such as

  13. NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FROM 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, D.R.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical Effects of Thermonuclear Plasma Interactions Withfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA-

  14. Evidence for a New Path to the Self-Sustainment of the Thermonuclear Fusion Reactions in Magnetically Confined Burning Plasma Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evidence for a New Path to the Self-Sustainment of the Thermonuclear Fusion Reactions in Magnetically Confined Burning Plasma Experiments

  15. A Characterization of the Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coleman Miller

    1999-04-08

    The discovery of nearly coherent brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from six neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries has opened up a new way to study the propagation of thermonuclear burning, and may ultimately lead to greater understanding of thermonuclear propagation in other astrophysical contexts, such as in Type Ia supernovae. Here we report detailed analyses of the ~580 Hz brightness oscillations during bursts from 4U 1636-536. We investigate the bursts as a whole and, in more detail, the initial portions of the bursts. We analyze the ~580 Hz oscillations in the initial 0.75 seconds of the five bursts that were used in a previous search for a brightness oscillation at the expected ~290 Hz spin frequency, and find that if the same frequency model describes all five bursts there is insufficient data to require more than a constant frequency or, possibly, a frequency plus a frequency derivative. Therefore, although it is appropriate to use an arbitrarily complicated model of the ~580 Hz oscillations to generate a candidate waveform for the ~290 Hz oscillations, models with more than two parameters are not required by the data. For the bursts as a whole we show that the characteristics of the brightness oscillations vary greatly from burst to burst. We find, however, that in at least one of the bursts, and possibly in three of the four that have strong brightness oscillations throughout the burst, the oscillation frequency reaches a maximum several seconds into the burst and then decreases. This behavior has not been reported previously for burst brightness oscillations, and it poses a challenge to the standard burning layer expansion explanation for the frequency changes.

  16. On the Thermonuclear Runaway in Type Ia Supernovae: How to run away?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich; J. Stein

    2001-12-07

    Type Ia Supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs (WD). We present the first study of multi-dimensional effects during the final hours prior to the thermonuclear runaway which leads to the explosion. The calculations utilize an implicit, 2-D hydro code.Mixing and the ignition process are studied in detail. We find that the initial chemical structure of the WD is changed but the material is not fully homogenized. The exploding WD sustains a central region with a low C/O ratio. This implies that the explosive nuclear burning will begin in a partially C-depleted environment. The thermonuclear runaway happens in a well defined region close to the center. It is induced by compressional heat when matter is brought inwards by convective flows. We find no evidence for multiple spot or strong off-center ignition. Convective velocities are of the order of 100 km/sec which is well above the effective burning speeds in SNe Ia previously expected right after the runaway. For about 0.5 to 1 sec, the speed of the burning front will neither be determined by the laminar speed nor the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities but by convective flows produced prior to the runaway. The consequences are discussed for our under- standing of the detailed physics of the flame propagation, the deflagration detonation transition, and the nucleosynthesis in the central layers. Our results strongly suggest the pre-conditioning of the progenitor as a key-factor for our understanding of the diversity in SNeIa.

  17. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: IV. Comparison to Previous Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23

    We compare our Monte Carlo reaction rates (see Paper II of this series) to previous results that were obtained by using the classical method of computing thermonuclear reaction rates. For each reaction, the comparison is presented using two types of graphs: the first shows the change in reaction rate uncertainties, while the second displays our new results normalized to the previously recommended reaction rate. We find that the rates have changed significantly for almost all reactions considered here. The changes are caused by (i) our new Monte Carlo method of computing reaction rates (see Paper I of this series), and (ii) newly available nuclear physics information (see Paper III of this series).

  18. Enhancement of Resonant Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in Extremely Dense Stellar Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Itoh; Nami Tomizawa; Shinya Wanajo; Satoshi Nozawa

    2002-12-06

    The enhancement factor of the resonant thermonuclear reaction rates is calculated for the extremely dense stellar plasmas in the liquid phase. In order to calculate the enhancement factor we use the screening potential which is deduced from the numerical experiment of the classical one-component plasma. It is found that the enhancement is tremendous for white dwarf densities if the ^{12}C + ^{12}C fusion cross sections show resonant behavior in the astrophysical energy range. We summarize our numerical results by accurate analytic fitting formulae.

  19. A revised thermonuclear rate of $^{7}$Be($n$,$?$)$^{4}$He relevant to Big-Bang nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Q. Hou; J. J. He; S. Kubono; Y. S. Chen

    2015-02-13

    In the standard Big-Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model, the primordial $^7$Li abundance is overestimated by about a factor of 2--3 comparing to the astronomical observations, so called the pending cosmological lithium problem. The $^7$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^4$He reaction, which may affect the $^7$Li abundance, was regarded as the secondary important reaction in destructing the $^7$Be nucleus in BBN. However, the thermonuclear rate of $^7$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^4$He has not been well studied so far. This reaction rate was firstly estimated by Wagoner in 1969, which has been generally adopted in the current BBN simulations and the reaction rate library. This simple estimation involved only a direct-capture reaction mechanism, but the resonant contribution should be also considered according to the later experimental results. In this work, we have revised this rate based on the indirect cross-section data available for the $^4$He($\\alpha$,$n$)$^7$Be and $^4$He($\\alpha$,$p$)$^7$Li reactions, with the charge symmetry and detailed-balance principle. Our new result shows that the previous rate (acting as an upper limit) is overestimated by about a factor of ten. The BBN simulation shows that the present rate leads to a 1.2\\% increase in the final $^7$Li abundance compared to the result using the Wagoner rate, and hence the present rate even worsens the $^7$Li problem. By the present estimation, the role of $^7$Be($n$,$\\alpha$)$^4$He in destroying $^7$Be is weakened from the secondary importance to the third, and the $^7$Be($d$,$p$)2$^4$He reaction becomes of secondary importance in destructing $^7$Be.

  20. Magnetic burial and the harmonic content of millisecond oscillations in thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. B. Payne; A. Melatos

    2006-07-11

    Matter accreting onto the magnetic poles of a neutron star spreads under gravity towards the magnetic equator, burying the polar magnetic field and compressing it into a narrow equatorial belt. Steady-state, Grad-Shafranov calculations with a self-consistent mass-flux distribution (and a semi-quantitative treatment of Ohmic diffusion) show that, for $\\Ma \\gtrsim 10^{-5}\\Msun$, the maximum field strength and latitudinal half-width of the equatorial magnetic belt are $B_{\\rm max} = 5.6\\times 10^{15} (\\Ma/10^{-4}\\Msun)^{0.32}$ G and $\\Delta\\theta = \\max[3^{\\circ} (\\Ma/10^{-4}\\Msun)^{-1.5},3^{\\circ} (\\Ma/10^{-4}\\Msun)^{0.5}(\\dot{M}_{\\rm a}/10^{-8}\\Msun {\\rm yr}^{-1})^{-0.5}]$ respectively, where $\\Ma$ is the total accreted mass and $\\dot{M}_{\\rm a}$ is the accretion rate. It is shown that the belt prevents north-south heat transport by conduction, convection, radiation, and ageostrophic shear. This may explain why millisecond oscillations observed in the tails of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts in low-mass X-ray binaries are highly sinusoidal: the thermonuclear flame is sequestered in the magnetic hemisphere which ignites first. The model is also consistent with the occasional occurrence of closely spaced pairs of bursts. Time-dependent, ideal-magnetohydrodynamic simulations confirm that the equatorial belt is not disrupted by Parker and interchange instabilities.

  1. Relics of metal-free low mass stars exploding as thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama

    2006-01-16

    Renewed interest in the first stars that were formed in the universe has led to the discovery of extremely iron-poor stars. Since several competing scenarios exist, our understanding of the mass range that determines the observed elemental abundances remains unclear. In this study, we consider three well-studied metal-poor stars in terms of the theoretical supernovae (SNe) model. Our results suggest that the observed abundance patterns in the metal-poor star BD +80 245 and the pair of stars HD 134439/40 agree strongly with the theoretical possibility that these stars inherited their heavy element abundance patterns from SNe initiated by thermonuclear runaways in the degenerate carbon-oxygen cores of primordial asymptotic giant branch stars with \\~3.5-5 solar masses. Recent theoretical calculations have predicted that such SNe could be originated from metal-free stars in the intermediate mass range. On the other hand, intermediate mass stars containing some metals would end their lives as white dwarfs after expelling their envelopes in the wind due to intense momentum transport from outgoing photons to heavy elements. This new pathway for the formation of SNe requires that stars are formed from the primordial gas. Thus, we suggest that stars of a few solar masses were formed from the primordial gas and that some of them caused thermonuclear explosions when the mass of their degenerate carbon-oxygen cores increased to the Chandrasekhar limit without experiencing efficient mass loss.

  2. A Deep Search for Prompt Radio Emission from Thermonuclear Supernovae with the Very Large Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chomiuk, Laura; Chevalier, Roger A; Bruzewski, Seth; Foley, Ryan J; Parrent, Jerod; Strader, Jay; Badenes, Carles; Fransson, Claes; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Rupen, Michael P; Simon, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Searches for circumstellar material around Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the most powerful tests of the nature of SN Ia progenitors, and radio observations provide a particularly sensitive probe of this material. Here we report radio observations for SNe Ia and their lower-luminosity thermonuclear cousins. We present the largest, most sensitive, and spectroscopically diverse study of prompt (delta t thermonuclear SNe, including 25 obtained by our team with the unprecedented depth of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. With these observations, SN 2012cg joins SN 2011fe and SN 2014J as a SN Ia with remarkably deep radio limits and excellent temporal coverage (six epochs, spanning 5--216 days after explosion, yielding Mdot/v_w <~ 5 x 10^-9 M_sun/yr / (100 km/s), assuming epsilon_B = 0.1 and epsilon_e = 0.1). All observations yield non-detections, placing strong constraints on the presence of circumstellar material. We present analytical models for the temporal an...

  3. Level set simulations of turbulent thermonuclear deflagration in degenerate carbon and oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

    2005-08-02

    We study the dynamics of thermonuclear flames propagating in fuel stirred by stochastic forcing. The fuel consists of carbon and oxygen in a state which is encountered in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. The level set method is applied to represent the flame fronts numerically. The computational domain for the numerical simulations is cubic, and periodic boundary conditions are imposed. The goal is the development of a suitable flame speed model for the small-scale dynamics of turbulent deflagration in thermonuclear supernovae. Because the burning process in a supernova explosion is transient and spatially inhomogeneous, the localised determination of subgrid scale closure parameters is essential. We formulate a semi-localised model based on the dynamical equation for the subgrid scale turbulence energy $k_{\\mathrm{sgs}}$. The turbulent flame speed $s_{\\mathrm{t}}$ is of the order $\\sqrt{2k_{\\mathrm{sgs}}}$. In particular, the subgrid scale model features a dynamic procedure for the calculation of the turbulent energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales, which has been successfully applied to combustion problems in engineering. The options of either including or suppressing inverse energy transfer in the turbulence production term are compared. In combination with the piece-wise parabolic method for the hydrodynamics, our results favour the latter option. Moreover, different choices for the constant of proportionality in the asymptotic flame speed relation, $s_{\\mathrm{t}}\\propto\\sqrt{2k_{\\mathrm{sgs}}}$, are investigated.

  4. Thermonuclear Burning on the Accreting X-Ray Pulsar GRO J1744-28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Edward F. Brown

    1996-09-23

    We investigate the thermal stability of nuclear burning on the accreting X-ray pulsar GRO J1744-28. The neutron star's dipolar magnetic field is thermonuclear instabilities are unlikely causes of the hourly bursts seen at very high accretion rates. We then discuss how the stability of the thermonuclear burning depends on both the global accretion rate and the neutron star's magnetic field strength. We emphasize that the appearance of the instability (i.e., whether it looks like a Type I X-ray burst or a flare lasting a few minutes) will yield crucial information on the neutron star's surface magnetic field and the role of magnetic fields in convection. We suggest that a thermal instability in the accretion disk is the origin of the long (~300 days) outburst and that the recurrence time of these outbursts is >50 years. We also discuss the nature of the binary and point out that a velocity measurement of the stellar companion (most likely a Roche-lobe filling giant with m_K>17) will constrain the neutron star mass.

  5. Relativistic collapse and explosion of rotating supermassive stars with thermonuclear effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro J. Montero; Hans-Thomas Janka; Ewald Mueller

    2012-02-01

    We present results of general relativistic simulations of collapsing supermassive stars with and without rotation using the two-dimensional general relativistic numerical code Nada, which solves the Einstein equations written in the BSSN formalism and the general relativistic hydrodynamics equations with high resolution shock capturing schemes. These numerical simulations use an equation of state which includes effects of gas pressure, and in a tabulated form those associated with radiation and the electron-positron pairs. We also take into account the effect of thermonuclear energy released by hydrogen and helium burning. We find that objects with a mass of 5x10^{5} solar mass and an initial metallicity greater than Z_{CNO}~0.007 do explode if non-rotating, while the threshold metallicity for an explosion is reduced to Z_{CNO}~0.001 for objects uniformly rotating. The critical initial metallicity for a thermonuclear explosion increases for stars with mass ~10^{6} solar mass. For those stars that do not explode we follow the evolution beyond the phase of black hole formation. We compute the neutrino energy loss rates due to several processes that may be relevant during the gravitational collapse of these objects. The peak luminosities of neutrinos and antineutrinos of all flavors for models collapsing to a BH are ~10^{55} erg/s. The total radiated energy in neutrinos varies between ~10^{56} ergs for models collapsing to a BH, and ~10^{45}-10^{46} ergs for models exploding.

  6. Thermonuclear Flame Spreading on Rapidly Spinning Neutron Stars: Indications of the Coriolis Force?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer

    2007-08-27

    Millisecond period brightness oscillations during the intensity rise of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are likely caused by an azimuthally asymmetric, expanding burning region on the stellar surface. The time evolution of the oscillation amplitude during the intensity rise encodes information on how the thermonuclear flames spread across the stellar surface. This process depends on properties of the accreted burning layer, surface fluid motions, and the surface magnetic field structure, and thus can provide insight into these stellar properties. We present two examples of bursts from different sources that show a decrease in oscillation amplitude during the intensity rise. Using theoretical modeling, we demonstrate that the observed amplitude evolution of these bursts is not well described by a uniformly expanding circular burning region. We further show that by including in our model the salient aspects of the Coriolis force (as described by Spitkovsky, Levin, and Ushomirsky) we can qualitatively reproduce the observed evolution curves. Our modeling shows that the evolutionary structure of burst oscillation amplitude is sensitive to the nature of flame spreading, while the actual amplitude values can be very useful to constrain some source parameters.

  7. Russian scientists to join round-the-world computer network ring. 28.01.2004, 21.08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in order to exchange with their foreign colleagues information on thermonuclear fusion and the creation thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) project have an opportunity to offer technical solutions for building of ITER, Velikhov said the decision on the site for the world' s first international thermonuclear

  8. English home Forum Photo Gallery Features Newsletter Archive About US Help Site Map languages Culture/Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and tomorrow's electricity-producing fusion power plants. The new Chinese investment into the thermonuclear invests more into thermonuclear reaction study China's announced Friday in to invest 50 million yuan (6 million US dollars) more to the country's ongoing research on thermonuclear experimental reactors

  9. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisenko, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  10. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Fisenko; Igor Fisenko

    2010-06-27

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  11. Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 °C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

  12. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Pharis E. [Williams Research, P.O. Box 554, Los Alamos, NM87544 (United States)

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  13. Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Technology Advanced Reactor Concepts Advanced Instrumentation & Controls Light Water Reactor Sustainability Safety and Regulatory Technology Small Modular Reactors Nuclear...

  14. Plasma Barodiffusion in Inertial-Confinement-Fusion Implosions: Application to Observed Yield Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalies in Thermonuclear Fuel Mixtures Peter Amendt, O. L. Landen, and H. F. Robey Lawrence Livermore. Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuel mixtures and Ar-doped deu- terium fuels [J. D. Lindl with deuterium (D2 or DD) fuel [5] in direct-drive ICF implo- sions at the OMEGA laser facility [6]. Compared

  15. Spreading of thermonuclear flames on the neutron star in SAX J1808.4-3658: an observational tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudip Bhattacharyya; Tod E. Strohmayer

    2006-04-03

    We analyse archival Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) proportional counter array (PCA) data of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the 2002 outburst of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658. We present evidence of nonmonotonic variations of oscillation frequency during burst rise, and correlations among the time evolution of the oscillation frequency, amplitude, and the inferred burning region area. We also discuss that the amplitude and burning region area evolutions are consistent with thermonuclear flame spreading on the neutron star surface. Based on this discussion, we infer that for the 2002 Oct. 15 thermonuclear burst, the ignition likely occured in the mid-latitudes, the burning region took ~ 0.2 s to nearly encircle the equatorial region of the neutron star, and after that the lower amplitude oscillation originated from the remaining asymmetry of the burning front in the same hemisphere where the burst ignited. Our observational findings and theoretical discussion indicate that studies of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during burst rise can provide a powerful tool to understand thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron star surfaces under extreme physical conditions.

  16. Model based multivariable controller for large scale compression stations. Design and experimental validation on the LHC 18KW cryorefrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick [INAC, SBT, UMR-E 9004 CEA/UJF-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Alamir, Mazen [Gipsa-Lab, Control Systems Department, CNRS-University of Grenoble, 11, rue des Mathématiques, BP 46, 38402 Saint Martin d'Hères (France); Bradu, Benjamin [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a multivariable model-based non-linear controller for Warm Compression Stations (WCS) is proposed. The strategy is to replace all the PID loops controlling the WCS with an optimally designed model-based multivariable loop. This new strategy leads to high stability and fast disturbance rejection such as those induced by a turbine or a compressor stop, a key-aspect in the case of large scale cryogenic refrigeration. The proposed control scheme can be used to have precise control of every pressure in normal operation or to stabilize and control the cryoplant under high variation of thermal loads (such as a pulsed heat load expected to take place in future fusion reactors such as those expected in the cryogenic cooling systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced fusion experiment JT-60SA). The paper details how to set the WCS model up to synthesize the Linear Quadratic Optimal feedback gain and how to use it. After preliminary tuning at CEA-Grenoble on the 400W@1.8K helium test facility, the controller has been implemented on a Schneider PLC and fully tested first on the CERN's real-time simulator. Then, it was experimentally validated on a real CERN cryoplant. The efficiency of the solution is experimentally assessed using a reasonable operating scenario of start and stop of compressors and cryogenic turbines. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  17. Reactor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A reactor apparatus for hydrocracking a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbonaceous feedstock to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the hydrocarbonaceous feedstock with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst.

  18. Thermonuclear Processes for Three Body System in the Potential Cluster Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubovichenko, S B

    2015-01-01

    The manuscript is devoted to the description of the results obtained in the frame of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of states according to Young tableaux for neutron and proton radiative capture processes on 2H at thermal and astrophysical energies. It demonstrates methods of application that were obtained on the basis of phase shift analysis and characteristics of the bound states of 2H potentials for consideration of the radiative capture processes. First reaction of the proton capture directly takes part in the pp solar cycle, where it is the second reaction. The neutron capture is not a part of usual thermonuclear cycles in the Sun and stars, but can take part in the processes of primordial nucleosynthesis, following at formation and evolution of our entire Universe.

  19. Small-scale Interaction of Turbulence with Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; W. K. Bushe; G. R. Ruetsch

    1999-05-07

    Microscopic turbulence-flame interactions of thermonuclear fusion flames occuring in Type Ia Supernovae were studied by means of incompressible direct numerical simulations with a highly simplified flame description. The flame is treated as a single diffusive scalar field with a nonlinear source term. It is characterized by its Prandtl number, Pr << 1, and laminar flame speed, S_L. We find that if S_L ~ u', where u' is the rms amplitude of turbulent velocity fluctuations, the local flame propagation speed does not significantly deviate from S_L even in the presence of velocity fluctuations on scales below the laminar flame thickness. This result is interpreted in the context of subgrid-scale modeling of supernova explosions and the mechanism for deflagration-detonation-transitions.

  20. Registration of the First Thermonuclear X-ray Burst from AX J1754.2-2754

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Chelovekov; S. A. Grebenev

    2007-10-30

    During the analysis of the INTEGRAL observatory archival data we found a powerful X-ray burst, registered by JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI telescopes on April 16, 2005 from a weak and poorly known source AX J1754.2-2754. Analysis of the burst profiles and spectrum shows, that it was a type I burst, which result from thermonuclear explosion on the surface of nutron star. It means that we can consider AX J1754.2-2754 as an X-ray burster. Certain features of burst profile at its initial stage witness of a radiation presure driven strong expansion and a corresponding cooling of the nutron star photosphere. Assuming, that the luminosity of the source at this phase was close to the Eddington limit, we estimated the distance to the burst source d=6.6+/-0.3 kpc (for hidrogen atmosphere of the neutron star) and d=9.2+/-0.4 kpc (for helium atmosphere).

  1. Registration of the First Thermonuclear X-ray Burst from AX J1754.2-2754

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chelovekov, I V

    2007-01-01

    During the analysis of the INTEGRAL observatory archival data we found a powerful X-ray burst, registered by JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI telescopes on April 16, 2005 from a weak and poorly known source AX J1754.2-2754. Analysis of the burst profiles and spectrum shows, that it was a type I burst, which result from thermonuclear explosion on the surface of nutron star. It means that we can consider AX J1754.2-2754 as an X-ray burster. Certain features of burst profile at its initial stage witness of a radiation presure driven strong expansion and a corresponding cooling of the nutron star photosphere. Assuming, that the luminosity of the source at this phase was close to the Eddington limit, we estimated the distance to the burst source d=6.6+/-0.3 kpc (for hidrogen atmosphere of the neutron star) and d=9.2+/-0.4 kpc (for helium atmosphere).

  2. Thermonuclear Processes for Three Body System in the Potential Cluster Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. B. Dubovichenko; A. V. Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov

    2015-04-19

    The manuscript is devoted to the description of the results obtained in the frame of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of states according to Young tableaux for neutron and proton radiative capture processes on 2H at thermal and astrophysical energies. It demonstrates methods of application that were obtained on the basis of phase shift analysis and characteristics of the bound states of 2H potentials for consideration of the radiative capture processes. First reaction of the proton capture directly takes part in the pp solar cycle, where it is the second reaction. The neutron capture is not a part of usual thermonuclear cycles in the Sun and stars, but can take part in the processes of primordial nucleosynthesis, following at formation and evolution of our entire Universe.

  3. Astrophysics Simulations from the ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The "Flash Center" works to solve the long-standing problem of thermonuclear flashes on the surfaces of compact stars such as neutron stars and white dwarfs, and in the interior of white dwarfs (i.e., Type I supernovae). The physical conditions, and many of the physical phenomena, are similar to those confronted by the Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship program. The (fully ionized) plasmas are at very high temperatures and densities; and the physical problems of nuclear ignition, deflagration or detonation, turbulent mixing, and interface dynamics for complex multicomponent fluids are common to the weapons program. Because virtually every aspect of this problem represents a computational Grand Challenge, large-scale numerical simulations are at the heart of its resolution (Taken from Executive Summary page). More than 35 simulations and computer animations developed through research at the "Flash Center" are available here. Each .avi or .mov file also references the related research paper or presentation and provides a link.

  4. The fastest unbound star in our Galaxy ejected by a thermonuclear supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geier, S; Ziegerer, E; Kupfer, T; Heber, U; Irrgang, A; Wang, B; Liu, Z; Han, Z; Sesar, B; Levitan, D; Kotak, R; Magnier, E; Smith, K; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Wainscoat, R; Waters, C

    2015-01-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVS) travel with velocities so high, that they exceed the escape velocity of the Galaxy. Several acceleration mechanisms have been discussed. Only one HVS (US 708, HVS 2) is a compact helium star. Here we present a spectroscopic and kinematic analysis of US\\,708. Travelling with a velocity of $\\sim1200\\,{\\rm km\\,s^{-1}}$, it is the fastest unbound star in our Galaxy. In reconstructing its trajectory, the Galactic center becomes very unlikely as an origin, which is hardly consistent with the most favored ejection mechanism for the other HVS. Furthermore, we discovered US\\,708 to be a fast rotator. According to our binary evolution model it was spun-up by tidal interaction in a close binary and is likely to be the ejected donor remnant of a thermonuclear supernova.

  5. Oxygen emission in remnants of thermonuclear supernovae as a probe for their progenitor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosenko, D; Kromer, M; Blinnikov, S I; Pakmor, R; Kaastra, J S

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernova explosions brings up a unique opportunity in studying the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Coupling state-of-the-art explosion models with detailed hydrodynamical simulations of the supernova remnant evolution and the most up-to-date atomic data for X-ray emission calculations makes it possible to create realistic synthetic X-ray spectra for the supernova remnant phase. Comparing such spectra with high quality observations of supernova remnants could allow to constrain the explosion mechanism and the progenitor of the supernova. The present study focuses in particular on the oxygen emission line properties in young supernova remnants, since different explosion scenarios predict a different amount and distribution of this element. Analysis of the soft X-ray spectra from supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud and confrontation with remnant models for different explosion scenarios suggests that SNR 0509-67.5 could originate from a de...

  6. On the small-scale stability of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. K. Roepke; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

    2003-05-02

    We present a numerical model which allows us to investigate thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions. The model is based on a finite-volume explicit hydrodynamics solver employing PPM. Using the level-set technique combined with in-cell reconstruction and flux-splitting schemes we are able to describe the flame in the discontinuity approximation. We apply our implementation to flame propagation in Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova models. In particular we concentrate on intermediate scales between the flame width and the Gibson-scale, where the burning front is subject to the Landau-Darrieus instability. We are able to reproduce the theoretical prediction on the growth rates of perturbations in the linear regime and observe the stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The increase of the mean burning velocity due to the enlarged flame surface is measured. Results of our simulation are in agreement with semianalytical studies.

  7. Thermonuclear Burning Regimes and the Use of SNe Ia in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Sorokina; S. I. Blinnikov; O. S. Bartunov

    1999-10-02

    The calculations of the light curves of thermonuclear supernovae are carried out by a method of multi-group radiation hydrodynamics. The effects of spectral lines and expansion opacity are taken into account. The predictions for UBVI fluxes are given. The values of rise time for B and V bands found in our calculations are in good agreement with the observed values. We explain why our results for the rise time have more solid physical justification than those obtained by other authors. It is shown that small variations in the chemical composition of the ejecta, produced in the explosions with different regimes of nuclear burning, can influence drastically the light curve decline in the B band and, to a lesser extent, in the V band. We argue that recent results on positive cosmological constant Lambda, found from the high redshift supernova observations, could be wrong in the case of possible variations of the preferred mode of nuclear burning in the earlier Universe.

  8. Temperature Measurement during Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beri, Aru; Orlandini, Mauro; Maitra, Chandreyee

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a study of temperature evolution during thermonuclear bursts in LMXBs using broad band data from two instruments onboard BeppoSAX, the MECS and the PDS. However, instead of applying the standard technique of time resolved spectroscopy, we have determined the temperature in small time intervals using the ratio of count rates in the two instruments assuming a blackbody nature of burst emission and different interstellar absorption for different sources. Data from a total of twelve observations of six sources were analysed during which 22 bursts were detected. We have obtained temperatures as high as ~3.0 keV, even when there is no evidence of photospheric radius expansion. These high temperatures were observed in the sources within different broadband spectral states (soft and hard).

  9. Spiral Disk Instability Can Drive Thermonuclear Explosions in Binary White Dwarf Mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashyap, Rahul; García-Berro, Enrique; Aznar-Siguán, Gabriela; Ji, Suoqing; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Thermonuclear, or Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), originate from the explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, and serve as standardizable cosmological candles. However, despite their importance, the nature of the progenitor systems which give rise to SNe Ia has not been hitherto elucidated. Observational evidence favors the double-degenerate channel, in which merging white dwarf binaries lead to SNe Ia. Furthermore, significant discrepancies exist between observations and theory, and to date, there has been no self-consistent merger model which yields a SNe Ia. Here we show that a spiral mode instability in the accretion disk formed during a binary white dwarf merger leads to a detonation on a dynamical timescale. This mechanism sheds light on how white dwarf mergers may frequently yield SNe Ia.

  10. Analysis of the Thermonuclear Instability including Low-Power ICRH Minority Heating in IGNITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinali, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal balance equation for classical plasma in a toroidal geometry is analytically and numerically investigated including ICRH power. The determination of the equilibrium temperature and the analysis of the stability of the solution are performed by solving the energy balance equation that includes the transport relations obtained by the kinetic theory. An estimation of the confinement time is also provided. We show that the ICRH heating in the IGNITOR experiment, among other applications, is expected to stabilize the power of the thermonuclear burning by automatic regulation of the RF coupled power. Here a scenario is considered where IGNITOR is led to operate in a slightly sub-critical regime by adding a small fraction of ${}^3He$ to the nominal 50-50 Deuterium-Tritium mixture. The difference between power lost and alpha heating is compensated by additional ICRH heating, which should be able to increase the global plasma temperature via collisions between ${}^3He$ minority and the background...

  11. Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Organization, Cadarache, FRANCE 3 Plasma Science and Fusion Center at MIT International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Organization, Cadarache, FRANCE 3 Plasma Science and Fusion, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

  12. TB, AP, UK, JPhysB/330302, 29/12/2009 IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version for future experiments at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The effect, spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions relevant to fusion plasmas was recently discussed by Biedermann et

  13. PPPL3171 Preprint Date: May 1996, UC421, 423, 427 Simulations of alpha particle ripple loss from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research from the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor M. H. Redi, R. V. Budny, D. C. McCune, C. O of the ripple minimum for D shaped ripple contours. In contrast to alpha loss simulations for the Tokamak Fusion

  14. In-situ Condition Monitoring of Components in Small Modular Reactors Using Process and Electrical Signature Analysis. Final report, volume 1. Development of experimental flow control loop, data analysis and plant monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, J. Wesley; Damiano, Brian; Mehta, Chaitanya; Collins, Price; Lish, Matthew; Cady, Brian; Lollar, Victor; de Wet, Dane; Bayram, Duygu

    2015-12-15

    The research and development under this project was focused on the following three major objectives: Objective 1: Identification of critical in-vessel SMR components for remote monitoring and development of their low-order dynamic models, along with a simulation model of an integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR). Objective 2: Development of an experimental flow control loop with motor-driven valves and pumps, incorporating data acquisition and on-line monitoring interface. Objective 3: Development of stationary and transient signal processing methods for electrical signatures, machinery vibration, and for characterizing process variables for equipment monitoring. This objective includes the development of a data analysis toolbox. The following is a summary of the technical accomplishments under this project: - A detailed literature review of various SMR types and electrical signature analysis of motor-driven systems was completed. A bibliography of literature is provided at the end of this report. Assistance was provided by ORNL in identifying some key references. - A review of literature on pump-motor modeling and digital signal processing methods was performed. - An existing flow control loop was upgraded with new instrumentation, data acquisition hardware and software. The upgrading of the experimental loop included the installation of a new submersible pump driven by a three-phase induction motor. All the sensors were calibrated before full-scale experimental runs were performed. - MATLAB-Simulink model of a three-phase induction motor and pump system was completed. The model was used to simulate normal operation and fault conditions in the motor-pump system, and to identify changes in the electrical signatures. - A simulation model of an integral PWR (iPWR) was updated and the MATLAB-Simulink model was validated for known transients. The pump-motor model was interfaced with the iPWR model for testing the impact of primary flow perturbations (upsets) on plant parameters and the pump electrical signatures. Additionally, the reactor simulation is being used to generate normal operation data and data with instrumentation faults and process anomalies. A frequency controller was interfaced with the motor power supply in order to vary the electrical supply frequency. The experimental flow control loop was used to generate operational data under varying motor performance characteristics. Coolant leakage events were simulated by varying the bypass loop flow rate. The accuracy of motor power calculation was improved by incorporating the power factor, computed from motor current and voltage in each phase of the induction motor.- A variety of experimental runs were made for steady-state and transient pump operating conditions. Process, vibration, and electrical signatures were measured using a submersible pump with variable supply frequency. High correlation was seen between motor current and pump discharge pressure signal; similar high correlation was exhibited between pump motor power and flow rate. Wide-band analysis indicated high coherence (in the frequency domain) between motor current and vibration signals. - Wide-band operational data from a PWR were acquired from AMS Corporation and used to develop time-series models, and to estimate signal spectrum and sensor time constant. All the data were from different pressure transmitters in the system, including primary and secondary loops. These signals were pre-processed using the wavelet transform for filtering both low-frequency and high-frequency bands. This technique of signal pre-processing provides minimum distortion of the data, and results in a more optimal estimation of time constants of plant sensors using time-series modeling techniques.

  15. Neutronics qualification of the Jules Horowitz reactor fuel by interpretation of the VALMONT experimental program - Transposition of the uncertainties on the reactivity of JHR with JEF2.2 and JEFF3.1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leray, O.; Hudelot, J. P.; Antony, M.; Doederlein, C.; Santamarina, A.; Bernard, D.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.

    2011-07-01

    The new European material testing Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), currently under construction in Cadarache center (CEA France), will use LEU (20% enrichment in {sup 235}U) fuels (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} for the start up and UMoAl in the future) which are quite different from the industrial oxide fuel, for which an extensive neutronics qualification database has been established. The HORUS3D/N neutronics calculation scheme, used for the design and safety studies of the JHR, is being developed within the framework of a rigorous verification-validation-qualification methodology. In this framework, the experimental VALMONT (Validation of Aluminium Molybdenum uranium fuel for Neutronics) program has been performed in the MINERVE facility of CEA Cadarache (France), in order to qualify the capability of HORUS3D/N to accurately calculate the reactivity of the JHR reactor. The MINERVE facility using the oscillation technique provides accurate measurements of reactivity effect of samples. The VALMONT program includes oscillations of samples of UAl{sub x}/Al and UMo/Al with enrichments ranging from 0.2% to 20% and Uranium densities from 2.2 to 8 g/cm{sup 3}. The geometry of the samples and the pitch of the experimental lattice ensure maximum representativeness with the neutron spectrum expected for JHR. By comparing the effect of the sample with the one of a known fuel specimen, the reactivity effect can be measured in absolute terms and be compared to computational results. Special attention was paid to the rigorous determination and reduction of the experimental uncertainties. The calculational analysis of the VALMONT results was performed with the French deterministic code APOLLO2. A comparison of the impact of the different calculation methods, data libraries and energy meshes that were tested is presented. The interpretation of the VALMONT experimental program allowed the qualification of JHR fuel UMoAl8 (with an enrichment of 19.75% {sup 235}U) by the Minerve-dedicated interpretation tool: PIMS. The effect of energy meshes and evaluations put forward the JEFF3.1.1/SHEM scheme that leads to a better calculation of the reactivity effect of VALMONT samples. Then, in order to quantify the impact of the uncertainties linked to the basic nuclear data, their propagation from the cross section measurement to the final computational result was analysed in a rigorous way by using a nuclear data re-estimation method based on Gauss-Newton iterations. This study concludes that the prior uncertainties due to nuclear data (uranium, aluminium, beryllium and water) on the reactivity of the Begin Of Cycle (BOC) for the JHR core reach 1217 pcm at 2{sigma}. Now, the uppermost uncertainty on the JHR reactivity is due to aluminium. (authors)

  16. Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

  17. Catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  19. ROLE OF FUSION ENERGY FOR THE 21 CENTURY ENERGY MARKET AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAR EXPERIMENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research, advantages of Fusion Energy in comparison with fossil, fission and renewable, preliminaryROLE OF FUSION ENERGY FOR THE 21 CENTURY ENERGY MARKET AND DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH INTERNATIONAL Energy Research Institute, Japan INOUE Nobuyuki Kyoto University, Japan 1. Introduction (Introduction

  20. Reactor accelerator coupling experiments: a feasability study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woddi Venkat Krishna, Taraknath

    2006-08-16

    ) ______________________________ William E. Burchill (Head of Department) ______________________________ Marvin L. Adams (Member) ______________________________ Ronald J. Ellis (Member) May 2005 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering iii ABSTRACT Reactor... (Commissariat ? l??nergie Atomique), EDF (Electricit? de France), and FRAMATOME. This experimental program takes place at the research reactor MASURCA (MAquette de SURg?n?rateur ? CAdarache) of the CEA Nuclear Center of Cadarache. It is devoted to the study...

  1. April 15, 2005 NOTES for PRESS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and exploitation of an experimental thermonuclear reactor (ITER) and envisaged calendar for implementation to make fusion an economically viable source of energy by about 2050. The reactor could be operational

  2. Igniting the Light Elements: The Los Alamos Thermonuclear Weapon Project, 1942-1952

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne C. Fitzpatrick

    1999-07-01

    The American system of nuclear weapons research and development was conceived and developed not as a result of technological determinism, but by a number of individual architects who promoted the growth of this large technologically-based complex. While some of the technological artifacts of this system, such as the fission weapons used in World War II, have been the subject of many historical studies, their technical successors--fusion (or hydrogen) devices--are representative of the largely unstudied highly secret realms of nuclear weapons science and engineering. In the postwar period a small number of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's staff and affiliates were responsible for theoretical work on fusion weapons, yet the program was subject to both the provisions and constraints of the US Atomic Energy Commission, of which Los Alamos was a part. The Commission leadership's struggle to establish a mission for its network of laboratories, least of all to keep them operating, affected Los Alamos's leaders' decisions as to the course of weapons design and development projects. Adapting Thomas P. Hughes's ''large technological systems'' thesis, I focus on the technical, social, political, and human problems that nuclear weapons scientists faced while pursuing the thermonuclear project, demonstrating why the early American thermonuclear bomb project was an immensely complicated scientific and technological undertaking. I concentrate mainly on Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Theoretical, or T, Division, and its members' attempts to complete an accurate mathematical treatment of the ''Super''--the most difficult problem in physics in the postwar period--and other fusion weapon theories. Although tackling a theoretical problem, theoreticians had to address technical and engineering issues as well. I demonstrate the relative value and importance of H-bomb research over time in the postwar era to scientific, politician, and military participants in this project. I analyze how and when participants in the H-bomb project recognized both blatant and subtle problems facing the project, how scientists solved them, and the relationship this process had to official nuclear weapons policies. Consequently, I show how the practice of nuclear weapons science in the postwar period became an extremely complex, technologically-based endeavor.

  3. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J. (Augusta, GA); Babcock, Dale F. (Wilmington, DE); Menegus, Robert L. (Wilmington, DE)

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  4. Failure of a neutrino-driven explosion after core-collapse may lead to a thermonuclear supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushnir, Doron

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that $\\sim10$ seconds after core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (1957). We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of $\\lesssim100\\,\\textrm{s}$ ($\\approx10$ times the free-fall time), a ...

  5. Reactor physics project progress report no. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1969-01-01

    This is the second annual report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single and few element heterogeneous methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. During the period covered ...

  6. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

    2013-10-26

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

  7. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linares, M; Jenke, P; van der Horst, A J; Camero-Arranz, A; Kouveliotou, C; Chakrabarty, D; Beklen, E; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Finger, M; Paciesas, W; Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the neutron star interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09, when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12+/-3 d (68% confidence interval) between March 2010 and March 2011, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 d (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations, and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bu...

  8. MA50177: Scientific Computing Nuclear Reactor Simulation Generalised Eigenvalue Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    MA50177: Scientific Computing Case Study Nuclear Reactor Simulation ­ Generalised Eigenvalue of a malfunction or of an accident experimentally, the numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is of utmost balance in a nuclear reactor are the two-group neutron diffusion equations -div (K1 u1) + (a,1 + s) u1 = 1

  9. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta

    2014-01-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from ten neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found from any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional ampli...

  10. Thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion and comparison with magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betti, R.; Chang, P. Y.; Anderson, K. S.; Nora, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Fusion Science Center for Extreme States of Matter, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Spears, B. K.; Edwards, J.; Lindl, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fatenejad, M. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Shvarts, D. [NRCN, Negev and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84015 (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA[T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptauapprox1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptauapprox1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (Tapprox2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chiapprox0.02-0.03 is approx5x lower than in JET (chiapprox0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  11. Relics of metal-free low mass stars exploding as thermonuclear supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, T; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Renewed interest in the first stars that were formed in the universe has led to the discovery of extremely iron-poor stars. Since several competing scenarios exist, our understanding of the mass range that determines the observed elemental abundances remains unclear. In this study, we consider three well-studied metal-poor stars in terms of the theoretical supernovae (SNe) model. Our results suggest that the observed abundance patterns in the metal-poor star BD +80 245 and the pair of stars HD 134439/40 agree strongly with the theoretical possibility that these stars inherited their heavy element abundance patterns from SNe initiated by thermonuclear runaways in the degenerate carbon-oxygen cores of primordial asymptotic giant branch stars with \\~3.5-5 solar masses. Recent theoretical calculations have predicted that such SNe could be originated from metal-free stars in the intermediate mass range. On the other hand, intermediate mass stars containing some metals would end their lives as white dwarfs after ex...

  12. The progenitors of core-collapse supernovae suggest thermonuclear origin for the explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushnir, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the explosions of massive stars following the collapse of the stars' iron cores. Poznanski (2013) has recently suggested an observational correlation between the ejecta velocities and the inferred masses of the red supergiant progenitors of type II-P explosions, which implies that the kinetic energy of the ejecta ($E_{\\textrm{kin}}$) increases with the mass of the progenitor. I point out that the same conclusion can be reached from the model-free observed correlation between the ejected $^{56}$Ni masses ($M_{\\textrm{Ni}}$) and the luminosities of the progenitors for type II supernovae, which was reported by Fraser et al. (2011). This correlation is in an agreement with the predictions of the collapse-induced thermonuclear explosions (CITE) for CCSNe and in a possible contradiction with the predictions of the neutrino mechanism. I show that a correlation between $M_{\\textrm{Ni}}$ and $E_{\\textrm{kin}}$ holds for all types of CCSNe (including type Ibc). This correlation sugg...

  13. Rotational effects in thermonuclear Type I Bursts: equatorial crossing and directionality of flame spreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavecchi, Yuri; Levin, Yuri; Braithwaite, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study on thermonuclear (Type I) Bursts on accreting neutron stars we addressed and demonstrated the importance of the effects of rotation, through the Coriolis force, on the propagation of the burning flame. However, that study only analysed cases of longitudinal propagation, where the Coriolis force coefficient $2\\Omega\\cos\\theta$ was constant. In this paper, we study the effects of rotation on propagation in the meridional (latitudinal) direction, where the Coriolis force changes from its maximum at the poles to zero at the equator. We find that the zero Coriolis force at the equator, while affecting the structure of the flame, does not prevent its propagation from one hemisphere to another. We also observe structural differences between the flame propagating towards the equator and that propagating towards the pole, the second being faster. In the light of the recent discovery of the low spin frequency of burster IGR~J17480-2446 rotating at 11 Hz (for which Coriolis effects should be negligib...

  14. On the applicability of the level set method beyond the flamelet regime in thermonuclear supernova simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt

    2007-01-15

    In thermonuclear supernovae, intermediate mass elements are mostly produced by distributed burning provided that a deflagration to detonation transition does not set in. Apart from the two-dimensional study by Roepke & Hillebrandt (2005), very little attention has been payed so far to the correct treatment of this burning regime in numerical simulations. In this article, the physics of distributed burning is reviewed from the literature on terrestrial combustion and differences which arise from the very small Prandtl numbers encountered in degenerate matter are pointed out. Then it is shown that the level set method continues to be applicable beyond the flamelet regime as long as the width of the flame brush does not become smaller than the numerical cutoff length. Implementing this constraint with a simple parameterisation of the effect of turbulence onto the energy generation rate, the production of intermediate mass elements increases substantially compared to previous simulations, in which the burning process was stopped once the mass density dropped below 10^7 g/cm^3. Although these results depend on the chosen numerical resolution, an improvement of the constraints on the the total mass of burning products in the pure deflagration scenario can be achieved.

  15. Screened thermonuclear reactions and predictive stellar evolution of detached double-lined eclipsing binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore Liolios; Theocharis Kosmas

    2005-07-06

    The low energy fusion cross sections of charged-particle nuclear reactions (and the respective reaction rates) in stellar plasmas are enhanced due to plasma screening effects. We study the impact of those effects on predictive stellar evolution simulations for detached double-lined eclipsing binaries. We follow the evolution of binary systems (pre-main sequence or main sequence stars) with precisely determined radii and masses from 1.1Mo to 23Mo (from their birth until their present state). The results indicate that all the discrepancies between the screened and unscreened models (in terms of luminosity, stellar radius, and effective temperature) are within the observational uncertainties. Moreover, no nucleosynthetic or compositional variation was found due to screening corrections. Therefore all thermonuclear screening effects on the charged-particle nuclear reactions that occur in the binary stars considered in this work (from their birth until their present state) can be totally disregarded. In other words, all relevant charged-particle nuclear reactions can be safely assumed to take place in a vacuum, thus simplifying and accelerating the simulation processes.

  16. Evidence for enhanced persistent emission during sub-Eddington thermonuclear bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worpel, Hauke; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach for time-resolved X-ray spectral analysis of thermonuclear bursts involves subtraction of the pre-burst emission as background. This approach implicitly assumes that the persistent flux remains constant throughout the burst. We reanalyzed 332 photospheric radius expansion bursts observed from 40 sources by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, introducing a multiplicative factor $f_a$ to the persistent emission contribution in our spectral fits. We found that for the majority of spectra the best-fit value of $f_a$ is significantly greater than 1, suggesting that the persistent emission typically increases during a burst. Elevated $f_a$ values were not found solely during the radius expansion interval of the burst, but were also measured in the cooling tail. The modified model results in a lower average value of the $\\chi^2$ fit statistic, indicating superior spectral fits, but not yet to the level of formal statistical consistency for all the spectra. We interpret the elevated $f_a$ values as...

  17. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 18O(p,gamma)19F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Q. Buckner; C. Iliadis; J. M. Cesaratto; C. Howard; T. B. Clegg; A. E. Champagne; S. Daigle

    2012-12-05

    For stars between 0.8-8.0 solar masses, nucleosynthesis enters its final phase during the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage. During this evolutionary period, grain condensation occurs in the stellar atmosphere, and the star experiences significant mass loss. The production of presolar grains can often be attributed to this unique stellar environment. A subset of presolar oxide grains features dramatic 18O depletion that cannot be explained by the standard AGB star burning stages and dredge-up models. An extra mixing process, referred to as "cool bottom processing" (CBP), was proposed for low-mass AGB stars. The 18O depletion observed within certain stellar environments and within presolar grain samples may result from the 18O+p processes during CBP. We report here on a study of the 18O(p,gamma)19F reaction at low energies. Based on our new results, we found that the resonance at Er = 95 keV (lab) has a negligible affect on the reaction rate at the temperatures associated with CBP. We also determined that the direct capture S-factor is almost a factor of 2 lower than the previously recommended value at low energies. An improved thermonuclear reaction rate for 18O(p,gamma)19F is presented.

  18. Reactor Engineering: Experimental Investigation of Alpha Convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usman, Shoaib

    2012-10-12

    Natural convection, Rayleigh-Bernard convection, Transient convection and Conduction convection transition.

  19. Seminar 1b-1.letnik, II.stopnja Deuterium depth profiling with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    of most critical issues in the construction of thermonuclear reactor based on magnetic confiment of the deuterium-tritium operation of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER walls-facing materials in nuclear fusion research resulted in an increasing interest in quantitative profiling

  20. Doubts Rise Over the Great Nuclear Promise Julio Godoy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that a thermonuclear reactor poses three technical problems: production of the elements to undergo fusion (deuterium over a decision to base the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in France seems to introduce new nuclear technology. It will seek a nuclear fusion of two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium which

  1. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  2. Recent results and challenges in development of metallic Hall sensors for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?uran, Ivan; Mušálek, Radek; Kova?ík, Karel [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Sentkerestiová, Jana [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, B?ehová 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Kohout, Michal [Institute of Physics AS CR, Na Slovance 1999/2, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Viererbl, Ladislav [Research Centre Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec-?ež (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-21

    Reliable and precise diagnostic of local magnetic field is crucial for successful operation of future thermonuclear fusion reactors based on magnetic confinement. Magnetic sensors at these devices will experience an extremely demanding operational environment with large radiation and thermal loads in combination with required long term, reliable, and service-free performance. Neither present day commercial nor laboratory measurement systems comply with these requirements. Metallic Hall sensors based on e.g. copper or bismuth could potentially satisfy these needs. We present the technology for manufacturing of such sensors and some initial results on characterization of their properties.

  3. The Energy Dependence of Millisecond Oscillations in Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Muno; Feryal Ozel; Deepto Chakrabarty

    2003-02-28

    We examine the energy-resolved pulse profiles of 51 flux oscillations observed during the decline of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from accreting weakly- magnetized neutron stars with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We find that the fractional rms amplitudes of the oscillations increase as a function of energy by 0.25%/keV to 0.9%/keV between 3-20 keV, and are as large as 20% in the 13-20 keV band. We also show that the pulses observed in the higher energy bands generally lag behind those in lower energy bands by 0.002 cycles/keV to 0.007 cycles/keV between 3-20 keV. This amounts to total delays of 0.03-0.12 cycles between the lowest and highest energy bands, or time delays that range from 100-200 mus. We then model the oscillations as flux variations arising from temperature patterns on the surfaces of rapidly rotating neutron stars. In this framework, we find that the increase in the pulse amplitude with photon energy can be explained if the cooler regions on the neutron star emit in the lower energy bands, reducing the flux variations there. On the other hand, the Doppler shifts caused by the rapid rotation of the neutron star should cause the hard pulses to precede the soft pulses by about 0.05 cycles (100 mus), in contrast to the observations. This suggests that the photons originating from the stellar surface are reprocessed by a hot corona of electrons before they reach the observer.

  4. Evidence of thermonuclear flame spreading on neutron stars from burst rise oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Bhattacharyya, Sudip E-mail: sudip@tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    Burst oscillations during the rising phases of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are usually believed to originate from flame spreading on the neutron star surface. However, the decrease of fractional oscillation amplitude with rise time, which provides a main observational support for the flame spreading model, have so far been reported from only a few bursts. Moreover, the non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations from many bursts are not yet understood considering the flame spreading scenario. Here, we report the decreasing trend of fractional oscillation amplitude from an extensive analysis of a large sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array bursts from 10 neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. This trend is 99.99% significant for the best case, which provides, to the best of our knowledge, by far the strongest evidence of such a trend. Moreover, it is important to note that an opposite trend is not found in any of the bursts. The concave shape of the fractional amplitude profiles for all the bursts suggests latitude-dependent flame speeds, possibly due to the effects of the Coriolis force. We also systematically study the roles of low fractional amplitude and low count rate for non-detection and intermittent detections of rise oscillations, and attempt to understand them within the flame spreading scenario. Our results support a weak turbulent viscosity for flame spreading, and imply that burst rise oscillations originate from an expanding hot spot, thus making these oscillations a more reliable tool to constrain the neutron star equations of state.

  5. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: I. Monte Carlo Method and Statistical Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Longland; Christian Iliadis; Art Champagne; Joe Newton; Claudio Ugalde; Alain Coc; Ryan Fitzgerald

    2010-04-23

    A method based on Monte Carlo techniques is presented for evaluating thermonuclear reaction rates. We begin by reviewing commonly applied procedures and point out that reaction rates that have been reported up to now in the literature have no rigorous statistical meaning. Subsequently, we associate each nuclear physics quantity entering in the calculation of reaction rates with a specific probability density function, including Gaussian, lognormal and chi-squared distributions. Based on these probability density functions the total reaction rate is randomly sampled many times until the required statistical precision is achieved. This procedure results in a median (Monte Carlo) rate which agrees under certain conditions with the commonly reported recommended "classical" rate. In addition, we present at each temperature a low rate and a high rate, corresponding to the 0.16 and 0.84 quantiles of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. These quantities are in general different from the statistically meaningless "minimum" (or "lower limit") and "maximum" (or "upper limit") reaction rates which are commonly reported. Furthermore, we approximate the output reaction rate probability density function by a lognormal distribution and present, at each temperature, the lognormal parameters miu and sigma. The values of these quantities will be crucial for future Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. Our new reaction rates, appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory, are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II). The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the third paper of this series (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this series (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  6. Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor Closed reactor Active Zone -- chemical quasi- equilibria, similarity principles and macroscopic kinetics", in: Lectures on Plasma Physics

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  9. Programme A. Nuclear Power Subprogramme A.4 Technology Development for Advanced Reactor Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cindio, Fiorella

    , and decommissioning of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors. The objectives of the CRP are to: (1 and power sodium cooled fast reactors; (2) enable easy access to the information from this feedback; (3 of experimental and power sodium cooled fast reactors. The output from the CRP will be one or more IAEA Technical

  10. The Effects of Variations in Nuclear Interactions on Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anuj Parikh; Jordi Jose; Ivo R. Seitenzahl; Friedrich K. Roepke

    2013-06-25

    The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on nucleosynthesis in thermonuclear supernovae has not been fully explored using comprehensive and systematic studies with multiple models. To better constrain predictions of yields from these phenomena, we have performed a sensitivity study by post-processing thermodynamic histories from two different hydrodynamic, Chandrasekhar-mass explosion models. We have individually varied all input reaction and, for the first time, weak interaction rates by a factor of ten and compared the yields in each case to yields using standard rates. Of the 2305 nuclear reactions in our network, we find that the rates of only 53 reactions affect the yield of any species with an abundance of at least 10^-8 M_sun by at least a factor of two, in either model. The rates of the 12C(a,g), 12C+12C, 20Ne(a,p), 20Ne(a,g) and 30Si(p,g) reactions are among those that modify the most yields when varied by a factor of ten. From the individual variation of 658 weak interaction rates in our network by a factor of ten, only the stellar 28Si(b+)28Al, 32S(b+)32P and 36Ar(b+)36Cl rates significantly affect the yields of species in a model. Additional tests reveal that reaction rate changes over temperatures T > 1.5 GK have the greatest impact, and that ratios of radionuclides that may be used as explosion diagnostics change by a factor of less than two from the variation of individual rates by a factor of 10. Nucleosynthesis in the two adopted models is relatively robust to variations in individual nuclear reaction and weak interaction rates. Laboratory measurements of a limited number of reactions would help to further constrain predictions. As well, we confirm the need for a consistent treatment for relevant stellar weak interaction rates since simultaneous variation of these rates (as opposed to individual variation) has a significant effect on yields in our models.

  11. BURN CONTROL IN FUSION REACTORS VIA NONLINEAR STABILIZATION TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    of low temperature and high density where the thermonuclear reaction is inherently thermally unstable. Figure 1a shows that for low temperatures the rate of thermonuclear reaction for a D-T mixture in stabilization of the thermonuclear reaction can be obtained. Neverthe- less, this approach is often insufficient

  12. Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prost, Lionel Robert

    2007-01-01

    for a Power Producing Thermonuclear Reactor, in Proceedingsorder for significant thermonuclear energy production, thethe approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion which uses

  13. On the Frequency Evolution of X-ray Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Evidence for Coherent Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer; Craig B. Markwardt

    1999-03-03

    We investigate the time dependence of the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear bursts from several neutron star low mass X-ray binaries. We find that the oscillation frequencies in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34 are well described by an exponential "chirp" model. With this model we demonstrate that the pulse trains in the cooling tails of many bursts are highly phase coherent, having oscillation quality factors as high as Q ~ 4000. We use this model of the frequency evolution to search sensitively for significant power at the harmonics and first sub-harmonic of the 330 and 363 Hz signals in bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34, respectively, but find not evidence for significant power at any harmonic or the sub-harmonic. We argue that the high coherence favors stellar rotation as the source of the oscillations. We briefly discuss the frequency evolution in terms of rotational motion of an angular momentum conserving thermonuclear shell. we discuss how the limits on harmonic content can be used to infer properties of the neutron star.

  14. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  15. Reactor safety method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  16. Power-reactor fuel-pin thermomechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutnov, A.A.; Ul'yanov, A.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe a method for determining the creep and elongation and other aspects of mechanical behavior of fuel pins and cans under the effects of irradiation and temperature encountered in reactors under loading and burnup conditions. An exhaustive method for testing for fuel-cladding interactions is described. The methodology is shown to be applicable to the design, fabrication, and loading of pins for WWER, SGHWR, and RBMK type reactors, from which much of the experimental data were derived.

  17. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-10-29

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.

  18. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fissionmore »as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.« less

  19. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.

  20. Nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, Wallace B. (Severna Park, MD)

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  1. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  2. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  3. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  4. On the Effect of Explosive Thermonuclear Burning on the Accreted Envelopes of White Dwarfs in Cataclysmic Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sion, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables, coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some cataclysmic variables contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by repeated novae ejecta and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in ystems that underwent thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed.

  5. ON THE EFFECT OF EXPLOSIVE THERMONUCLEAR BURNING ON THE ACCRETED ENVELOPES OF WHITE DWARFS IN CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sion, Edward M. [Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Villanova University, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Sparks, Warren, E-mail: edward.sion@villanova.edu, E-mail: warrensparks@comcast.net [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 701 Meadow Lane, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The detection of heavy elements at suprasolar abundances in the atmospheres of some accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables (CVs), coupled with the high temperatures needed to produce these elements, requires explosive thermonuclear burning. The central temperatures of any formerly more massive secondary stars in CVs undergoing hydrostatic CNO burning are far too low to produce these elements. Evidence is presented that at least some CVs contain donor secondaries that have been contaminated by white dwarf remnant burning during the common envelope phase and are transferring this material back to the white dwarf. This scenario does not exclude the channel in which formerly more massive donor stars underwent CNO processing in systems with thermal timescale mass transfer. Implications for the progenitors of CVs are discussed and a new scenario for the white dwarf's accretion-nova-outburst is given.

  6. Attrition reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxvile, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  7. Attrition reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  8. POTENTIAL BENCHMARKS FOR ACTINIDE PRODUCTION IN HANFORD REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PUIGH RJ; TOFFER H

    2011-10-19

    A significant experimental program was conducted in the early Hanford reactors to understand the reactor production of actinides. These experiments were conducted with sufficient rigor, in some cases, to provide useful information that can be utilized today in development of benchmark experiments that may be used for the validation of present computer codes for the production of these actinides in low enriched uranium fuel.

  9. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  11. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  12. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  15. 27 JUNE 23:26 ABOUT US | SERVICES RUS ENG TEXT ONLY SCREEN 800 1024 100% TOP NEWS RUSSIA [ | ]GOVERNMENT ECONOMY WORLD CIS AND THE BALTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the thermonuclear reactor will have been built by 2014, Dr. Raymond Orbach, the director of the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy told a news conference after the Moscow meeting on ITER construction. According to him, it will be clear in ten years whether an experimental thermonuclear power plant is built

  16. Monday, February 10, 2003 http://www.recherche.gouv.fr/discours/2003/enprojetiter.htm Page: 1 Ministre | Ministre | Recherche | Technologie | Espace | Politique gnrale | B.O.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) on thermonuclear fusion (tritium : 100 million degrees). The aim of these systems is to satisfy the planet's long-term energy needs problem, that of the long-term availability of energy resources.'' The Minister expressed her satisfaction

  17. ITER site contest counts down Junichi Miura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), an international project to use nuclear fusion energy for electric on a site for the project. The ITER project envisions using thermonuclear fusion to generate huge amounts heavy hydrogen and tritium used for fuel in the fusion reaction are heated in a vacuum receptacle at 100

  18. Deadlock in ITER talks must end Tatsuo Nakajima Yomiuri Shimbun Staff Writer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japan and the European Union over where to construct the International Thermonuclear Experimental flights home, leaving before those in attendance were able to schedule the next meeting. A thermonuclear fusion, which is more efficient than nuclear fission reactors. In what will be the world's first

  19. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor coremore »examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.« less

  20. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

  1. Effects of specimen thickness and impurity on the conductivity of alumina under electron irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    windows in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), where the electrical conductivity believed to be critical issues for the application of a-Al2O3 to insulators in fusion reac- tors. The RIC

  2. Small reversible axial-strain window for the critical current of a high performance Nb3Sn superconducting strand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    .1063/1.2789696 The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER is one of the biggest scientific projects in the 21st sufficiently low ac losses for fusion ITER applications but the engineering JC defined as the critical current

  3. IOP PUBLISHING SUPERCONDUCTOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supercond. Sci. Technol. 23 (2010) 025002 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0953-2048/23/2/025002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    2010-01-01

    ago, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [1­4] has in the last 10 years driven. At present bronze-route and advanced internal-tin Nb3Sn strands have sufficiently low ac losses for fusion

  4. Development of an experiment to study the effects of transverse stress on the critical current of a niobium-tin superconducting cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiesa, Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting magnets will play a central role for the success of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER is a current driven plasma experiment that could set a milestone towards the demonstration ...

  5. Signicance of sample thickness and surface segregation on the electrical conductivity of Wesgo AL995 alumina under ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    are expected to be used in fusion reactors like international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER insulating material in fusion reactors [1] because of its high thermal conductivity [2], high resistance of alumina are to be used in fusion reactors, no studies have ever been done on the thickness dependence

  6. Reactor vessel support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Martin P. (Trafford, PA); Holley, John C. (McKeesport, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  7. Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japanese set to direct `sun-power' nuclear reactor in France September 16, 2005 Japan has been develop three generations of nuclear reactors and includes six low-capacity experimental reactors and a 17 asked to nominate the chief of an international project to build a multi- billion-dollar nuclear fusion

  8. The thermonuclear rate for the 19F(a,p)22Ne reaction at stellar temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Ugalde; Richard Azuma; Aaron Couture; Joachim Görres; Hye-Young Lee; Edward Stech; Elizabeth Strandberg; Wanpeng Tan; Michael Wiescher

    2008-03-04

    The $^{19}$F($\\alpha$,p)$^{22}$Ne reaction is considered to be one of the main sources of fluorine depletion in AGB and Wolf-Rayet stars. The reaction rate still retains large uncertainties due to the lack of experimental studies available. In this work the yields for both exit channels to the ground state and first excited state of $^{22}$Ne have been measured and several previously unobserved resonances have been found in the energy range E$_{lab}$=792-1993 keV. The level parameters have been determined through a detailed R-matrix analysis of the reaction data and a new reaction rate is provided on the basis of the available experimental information.

  9. Investigating the Spectral Anomaly with Different Reactor Antineutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Buck; Antoine P. Collin; Julia Haser; Manfred Lindner

    2015-12-21

    The spectral shape of reactor antineutrinos measured in recent experiments shows anomalies in the neutrino flux predictions. New precision measurements of the reactor neutrino spectra as well as more complete input in nuclear data bases are needed to resolve the observed discrepancies between flux models and experimental results. We combine experiments at reactors which are highly enriched in ${}^{235}$U with commercial reactors with typically lower enrichment to gain new insights into the origin of the anomalous neutrino spectrum. As an example, we discuss the option of a direct comparison of the measured shape in the currently running Double Chooz near detector and the upcoming Stereo experiment.

  10. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  11. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  12. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  13. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available.

  14. Role of research reactors in training of NPP personnel with special focus on training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Frybort, J.; Huml, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Research reactors play an important role in providing key personnel of nuclear power plants a hands-on experience from operation and experiments at nuclear facilities. Training of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) staff is usually deeply theoretical with an extensive utilisation of simulators and computer visualisation. But a direct sensing of the reactor response to various actions can only improve the personnel awareness of important aspects of reactor operation. Training Reactor VR-1 and its utilization for training of NPP operators and other professionals from Czech Republic and Slovakia is described. Typical experimental exercises and good practices in organization of a training program are demonstrated. (authors)

  15. Dynamic reactor modeling with applications to SPR and ZEDNA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma

    2011-12-01

    A dynamic reactor model has been developed for pulse-type reactor applications. The model predicts reactor power, axial and radial fuel expansion, prompt and delayed neutron population, and prompt and delayed gamma population. All model predictions are made as a function of time. The model includes the reactivity effect of fuel expansion on a dynamic timescale as a feedback mechanism for reactor power. All inputs to the model are calculated from first principles, either directly by solving systems of equations, or indirectly from Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) derived results. The model does not include any empirical parameters that can be adjusted to match experimental data. Comparisons of model predictions to actual Sandia Pulse Reactor SPR-III pulses show very good agreement for a full range of pulse magnitudes. The model is also applied to Z-pinch externally driven neutron assembly (ZEDNA) type reactor designs to model both normal and off-normal ZEDNA operations.

  16. The longest thermonuclear X-ray burst ever observed? (A BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera observation of 4U 1735-44)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cornelisse; J. Heise; E. Kuulkers; F. Verbunt; J. J. M. in 't Zand

    2000-03-30

    A long flux enhancement, with an exponential decay time of 86 min, is detected in 4U 1735-44 with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras. We argue that this is a type-I X-ray burst, making it the longest such burst ever observed. Current theories for thermonuclear bursts predict shorter and more frequent bursts for the observed persistent accretion rate.

  17. BDDR, a new CEA technological and operating reactor database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soldevilla, M.; Salmons, S.; Espinosa, B.

    2013-07-01

    The new application BDDR (Reactor database) has been developed at CEA in order to manage nuclear reactors technological and operating data. This application is a knowledge management tool which meets several internal needs: -) to facilitate scenario studies for any set of reactors, e.g. non-proliferation assessments; -) to make core physics studies easier, whatever the reactor design (PWR-Pressurized Water Reactor-, BWR-Boiling Water Reactor-, MAGNOX- Magnesium Oxide reactor-, CANDU - CANada Deuterium Uranium-, FBR - Fast Breeder Reactor -, etc.); -) to preserve the technological data of all reactors (past and present, power generating or experimental, naval propulsion,...) in a unique repository. Within the application database are enclosed location data and operating history data as well as a tree-like structure containing numerous technological data. These data address all kinds of reactors features and components. A few neutronics data are also included (neutrons fluxes). The BDDR application is based on open-source technologies and thin client/server architecture. The software architecture has been made flexible enough to allow for any change. (authors)

  18. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  19. The Long Term Stability of Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Constraining the Binary X-ray Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer; William Zhang; Jean H. Swank; Iosif Lapidus

    1998-06-18

    We report on the long term stability of the millisecond oscillations observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) 4U 1728-34 and 4U 1636-53. We show that bursts from 4U 1728-34 spanning more than 1.5 years have observed asymptotic oscillation periods which are within 0.2 microsec. of each other, well within the magnitude which could be produced by the orbital motion of the neutron star in a typical LMXB. This stability implies a timescale to change the oscillation period of > 23,000 years, suggesting a highly stable process such as stellar rotation as the oscillation mechanism. We show that period offsets in three distinct bursts from 4U 1636-53 can be plausibly interpreted as due to orbital motion of the neutron star in this 3.8 hour binary system. We discuss the constraints on the mass function which can in principle be derived using this technique.

  20. Systematic variation in the apparent burning area of thermonuclear bursts and its implication for neutron star radius measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudip Bhattacharyya; M. Coleman Miller; Duncan K. Galloway

    2009-08-28

    Precision measurements of neutron star radii can provide a powerful probe of the properties of cold matter beyond nuclear density. Beginning in the late 1970s it was proposed that the radius could be obtained from the apparent or inferred emitting area during the decay portions of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts. However, this apparent area is generally not constant, preventing reliable measurement of the source radius. Here we report for the first time a correlation between the variation of the inferred area and the burst properties, measured in a sample of almost 900 bursts from 43 sources. We found that the rate of change of the inferred area during decay is anticorrelated with the burst decay duration. A Spearman rank correlation test shows that this relation is significant at the <10^{-45} level for our entire sample, and at the 7x10^{-37} level for the 625 bursts without photospheric radius expansion. This anticorrelation is also highly significant for individual sources exhibiting a wide range of burst durations, such as 4U 1636-536 and Aql X-1. We suggest that variations in the colour factor, which relates the colour temperature resulted from the scattering in the neutron star atmosphere to the effective temperature of the burning layer, may explain the correlation. This in turn implies significant variations in the composition of the atmosphere between bursts with long and short durations.

  1. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  2. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  3. Tokamak reactor first wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

    1984-11-20

    This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

  4. Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

  5. Probabilistic Safety Assessment of Tehran Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hadi; Nematollahi, Mohammad Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2004-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. In this paper the application of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment to the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: Familiarization with the plant, selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development and dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is discussed with highlights from the selected results. Quantification of the constructed models is done using SAPHIRE software. This Study shows that the obtained core damage frequency for Tehran Research Reactor (8.368 E-6 per year) well meets the IAEA criterion for existing nuclear power plants (1E-4). But safety improvement suggestions are offered to decrease the most probable accidents. (authors)

  6. Investigation of thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate via resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Y. Zhang; J. J. He; A. Parikh; S. W. Xu; H. Yamaguchi; D. Kahl; S. Kubono; P. Mohr; J. Hu; P. Ma; S. Z. Chen; Y. Wakabayashi; H. W. Wang; W. D. Tian; R. F. Chen; B. Guo; T. Hashimoto; Y. Togano; S. Hayakawa; T. Teranishi; N. Iwasa; T. Yamada; T. Komatsubara; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou

    2014-03-19

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is thought to be one of the key breakout reactions from the hot CNO cycles to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this work, the resonant properties of the compound nucleus $^{22}$Mg have been investigated by measuring the resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$. An 89 MeV $^{21}$Na radioactive beam delivered from the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam Separator bombarded an 8.8 mg/cm$^2$ thick polyethylene (CH$_{2}$)$_{n}$ target. The $^{21}$Na beam intensity was about 2$\\times$10$^{5}$ pps, with a purity of about 70% on target. The recoiled protons were measured at the center-of-mass scattering angles of $\\theta_{c.m.}$$\\approx$175.2${^\\circ}$, 152.2${^\\circ}$, and 150.5${^\\circ}$ by three sets of $\\Delta E$-$E$ telescopes, respectively. The excitation function was obtained with the thick-target method over energies $E_x$($^{22}$Mg)=5.5--9.2 MeV. In total, 23 states above the proton-threshold in $^{22}$Mg were observed, and their resonant parameters were determined via an $R$-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. We have made several new $J^{\\pi}$ assignments and confirmed some tentative assignments made in previous work. The thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate has been recalculated based on our recommended spin-parity assignments. The astrophysical impact of our new rate has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing x-ray burst calculations. We find that the $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate significantly affects the peak nuclear energy generation rate, reaction fluxes, as well as the onset temperature of this breakout reaction in these astrophysical phenomena.

  7. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: II. Tables and Graphs of Reaction Rates and Probability Density Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc; Ryan Fitzgerald

    2010-04-23

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this series (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, "lower limit", "nominal value" and "upper limit" of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters {\\mu} and {\\sigma} at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this series (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this series (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  8. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  9. Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

    2012-05-30

    The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

  10. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  11. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  12. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Ronald J. (Pensacola, FL); Land, John T. (Pensacola, FL); Misvel, Michael C. (Pensacola, FL)

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  13. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  14. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  15. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Mitrovski, Svetlana M. (Urbana, IL)

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  16. ---Home Yahoo! Help My Yahoo! http://asia.news.yahoo.com/041102/kyodo/d863kr500.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2, 17:04 PM Japan, EU, others to discuss nuclear fusion reactor next week Japan, the European where they will build the world's first prototype nuclear fusion reactor, Japan's science ministry said are together working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project will meet next Tuesday

  17. Lithium Ceramic Blankets for Russian Fusion Reactors and Influence of Breeding Operation Mode on Parameters of Reactor Tritium Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapyshev, Victor K.; Chernetsov, Mikhail Yu.; Zhevotov, Sergej I.; Kersnovskij, Alexandr Yu.; Kolbasov, Boris N.; Kovalenko, Victor G.; Paltusov, Nikolaj P.; Sernyaev, Georgeij A.; Sterebkov, Juri S.; Zyryanov, Alexej P.

    2005-07-15

    Russian controlled fusion program supposes development of a DEMO reactor design and participation in ITER Project. A solid breeder blanket of DEMO contains a ceramic lithium orthosilicate breeder and a beryllium multiplier. Test modules of the blanket are developed within the scope of ITER activities. Experimental models of module tritium breeding zones (TBZ), materials and fabrication technology of the TBZ, tritium reactor systems to analyse and process gas released from lithium ceramics are being developed. Two models of tritium breeding and neutron multiplying elements of the TBZ have been designed, manufactured and tested in IVV-2M nuclear reactor. Initial results of the in-pile experiments and outcome of lithium ceramics irradiation in a water-graphite nuclear reactor are considered to be a data base for development of the test modules and initial requirements for DEMO tritium system design. Influence of the tritium release parameters and hydrogen concentration in a purge gas on parameters of reactor system are discussed.

  18. Experimental Studies of Active Temperature Control in Solid Breeder Blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    1 Experimental Studies of Active Temperature Control in Solid Breeder Blankets M. S. Tillack, A. R on the breeder material. The coolant temperature is often lower, particularly in experimental fusion devices ITER as well as commercial power reactor applications. Experimental studies are being carried out

  19. Reactor- Nuclear Science Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    A neutronic evaluation of two reactor benchmark problems was performed. The benchmark problems describe typical PWR uranium and plutonium (mixed oxide) fueled lattices. WIMSd4m, a neutron transport lattice code, was used to evaluate multigroup...

  20. P Reactor Grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01

    Filling the P Reactor with grout. This seals the radioactive material and reduces the environmental footprint left from the Cold War. Project sponsored by the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site.

  1. Hypothetical Reactor Accident Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POPULATIONS; IODINE 131; MELTDOWN; METEOROLOGY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; P CODES; PWR TYPE REACTORS; RADIATION in a Typical BWR and in a typical PWR. Comparison with WASH-1400 by C F . Højerup 202 APPENDIX 3. Calculation

  2. Molten metal reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-11-05

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  3. F Reactor Inspection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-11-24

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  4. F Reactor Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grindstaff, Keith; Hathaway, Boyd; Wilson, Mike

    2014-10-29

    Workers from Mission Support Alliance, LLC., removed the welds around the steel door of the F Reactor before stepping inside the reactor to complete its periodic inspection. This is the first time the Department of Energy (DOE) has had the reactor open since 2008. The F Reactor is one of nine reactors along the Columbia River at the Department's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, where environmental cleanup has been ongoing since 1989. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, the Department completes surveillance and maintenance activities of cocooned reactors periodically to evaluate the structural integrity of the safe storage enclosure and to ensure confinement of any remaining hazardous materials. "This entry marks a transition of sorts because the Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program, for the first time, was responsible for conducting the entry and surveillance and maintenance activities," said Keith Grindstaff, Energy Department Long-Term Stewardship Program Manager. "As the River Corridor cleanup work is completed and transitioned to long-term stewardship, our program will manage any on-going requirements."

  5. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.; Lambert, J.; Hayes, S.; Sackett, J.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  6. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  7. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  8. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  9. Residence time distribution studies in a multiphase reactor under high temperature and pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.; Davies, O.L.

    1987-06-01

    The residence time distribution of the slurry phase in a coal liquefaction reactor is determined experimentally under high temperature and pressure conditions using native radioactive tracers. The experimental data are fitted to several exit age distribution models, and a model is selected based on the best fit. The effect of process conditions such as recycle gas rate, coal feed rate, reactor temperature, and solvent-to-coal ratio on the degree of backmixing and mean residence time is studied. Gas holdup is estimated from the experimental mean residence time, the nominal residence time, and the total reactor holdup. The effect of gas superficial velocity on gas holdup is studied.

  10. Predicting Reactor Antineutrino Emissions Using New Precision Beta Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wootan, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors are currently vital to the study of neutrino oscillations. The observed antineutrino rates at reactors are typically lower than model expectations. This observed deficit is called the “reactor neutrino anomaly”. A new understanding of neutrino physics may be required to explain this deficit, though model estimation uncertainties may also play a role in the apparent discrepancy. PNNL is currently investigating an experimental technique that promises reduced uncertainties for measured data to support these hypotheses and interpret reactor antineutrino measurements. The experimental approach is to 1) direct a proton accelerator beam on a metal target to produce a source of neutrons, 2) use spectral tailoring to modify the neutron spectrum to closely simulate the energy distribution of a power reactor neutron spectrum, 3) irradiate isotopic fission foils (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu) in this neutron spectrum so that fissions occur at energies representative of a reactor, 4) transport the beta particles released by the fission products in the foils to a beta spectrometer, 5) measure the beta energy spectrum, and 6) invert the measured beta energy spectrum to an antineutrino energy spectrum. A similar technique using a beta spectrometer and isotopic fission foils was pioneered in the 1980’s at the ILL thermal reactor. Those measurements have been the basis for interpreting all subsequent antineutrino measurements at reactors. A basic constraint in efforts to reduce uncertainties in predicting the antineutrino emission from reactor cores is any underlying limitation of the original measurements. This may include beta spectrum energy resolution, the absolute normalization of beta emission to number of fission, statistical counting uncertainties, lack of 238U data, the purely thermal nature of the IIL reactor neutrons used, etc. An accelerator-based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra (i.e. "in the reactor core") affects the resulting fission product beta spectrum. Furthermore, the 238U antineutrino spectrum, which has not been measured, can be studied directly because of the enhanced 1 MeV fast neutron flux available at the accelerator source. A facility such as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE) 30 MeV proton linear accelerator at Fermilab is being considered for this experiment. The hypothesis is that a new approach utilizing the flexibility of an accelerator neutron source with spectral tailoring coupled with a careful design of an isotopic fission target and beta spectrometer and the inversion of the beta spectrum to the neutrino spectrum will allow further reduction in the uncertainties associated with prediction of the reactor antineutrino spectrum.

  11. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  12. Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlinesPotentialReactor Decommissioning

  13. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stormo, Keith E. (Moscow, ID)

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  14. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extends from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  15. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  16. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, Ernest (Wilmette, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A safety device is disclosed for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of an upward thermal excursion. Such safety device comprises a laminated helical ribbon configured as a tube-like helical coil having contiguous helical turns with slidably abutting edges. The helical coil is disclosed as a portion of a drive member connected axially to the control rod. The laminated ribbon is formed of outer and inner laminae. The material of the outer lamina has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material of the inner lamina. In the event of an upward thermal excursion, the laminated helical coil curls inwardly to a smaller diameter. Such inward curling causes the total length of the helical coil to increase by a substantial increment, so that the control rod is axially repositioned by a corresponding amount to reduce the power output of the reactor.

  17. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  18. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  19. Design Editorial Design and the National Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    , and engineering, including nu- clear fission reactors, thermonuclear fusion, high-powered lasers, computer

  20. Fast quench reactor method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.; Berry, R.A.

    1999-08-10

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream. 8 figs.

  1. Perspectives on reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Camp, A.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains a technical training center at Chattanooga, Tennessee to provide appropriate training to both new and experienced NRC employees. This document describes a one-week course in reactor, safety concepts. The course consists of five modules: (1) historical perspective; (2) accident sequences; (3) accident progression in the reactor vessel; (4) containment characteristics and design bases; and (5) source terms and offsite consequences. The course text is accompanied by slides and videos during the actual presentation of the course.

  2. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

    1978-01-01

    A lifting, rotating and sealing apparatus for nuclear reactors utilizing rotating plugs above the nuclear reactor core. This apparatus permits rotation of the plugs to provide under the plug refueling of a nuclear core. It also provides a means by which positive top core holddown can be utilized. Both of these operations are accomplished by means of the apparatus lifting the top core holddown structure off the nuclear core while stationary, and maintaining this structure in its elevated position during plug rotation. During both of these operations, the interface between the rotating member and its supporting member is sealingly maintained.

  3. Fast quench reactor method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Berry, Ray A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A fast quench reaction includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a means of rapidly expanding a reactant stream, such as a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Metal halide reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. Reducing gas is added at different stages in the process to form a desired end product and prevent back reactions. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by expansion of the gaseous stream.

  4. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  5. Experimental Conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Gasification is that any type of biomass (including low cost feedstocks like agricultural residues, forest) Objective Results Experimental Conclusions 1000°C 600°C 4s 30s A major advantage of Biomass waste, etc) can be converted to syngas. Pyrolysis and Char gasification proceed sequentially

  6. Innovative design of uranium startup fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, Tingzhou

    2012-01-01

    Sodium Fast Reactors are one of the three candidates of GEN-IV fast reactors. Fast reactors play an important role in saving uranium resources and reducing nuclear wastes. Conventional fast reactors rely on transuranic ...

  7. F Reactor Area Cleanup Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractors have cleaned up the F Reactor Area, the first reactor area at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state to be fully remediated.

  8. Reactor operation environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Print this article Close This Window EU OKs India joining ITER nuclear reactor project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Print this article Close This Window EU OKs India joining ITER nuclear reactor project Fri Dec 2-billion-euro project to build an experimental nuclear fusion reactor that in the long-run could provide virtually unlimited, cheap and clean energy. The EU's willingness to work with India on a civil nuclear

  10. Reactor on-off antineutrino measurement with KamLAND H. Hanakago,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    , University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA 9 Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA 10 Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics) The recent long-term shutdown of Japanese nuclear reactors has resulted in a significantly reduced reactor "e

  11. Development of a Data Driven Dynamic Model for a Plasma Etching Reactor Michael Nikolaoua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolaou, Michael

    1 Development of a Data Driven Dynamic Model for a Plasma Etching Reactor Michael Nikolaoua for identification and validation of an empirical model for a helicon plasma reactor, on the basis of experimental manufacturing processes such as plasma etching, accurate models based on first principles may be developed

  12. Reactor operation safety information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The report contains a reactor facility description which includes K, P, and L reactor sites, structures, operating systems, engineered safety systems, support systems, and process and effluent monitoring systems; an accident analysis section which includes cooling system anomalies, radioactive materials releases, and anticipated transients without scram; a summary of onsite doses from design basis accidents; severe accident analysis (reactor core disruption); a description of operating contractor organization and emergency planning; and a summary of reactor safety evolution. (MB)

  13. Recovery of hydrogen from impurities using a palladium membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willms, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Okuno, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-01

    One of the important steps in processing the exhaust from a fusion reactor is recovering tritium which is incorporated into molecules such as water and methane. One device which may prove to be very effective for this purpose is a palladium membrane reactor. This is a reactor which incorporates a Pd/Ag membrane in the reactor geometry. Reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking can be carried out over the reactor catalyst, and the product hydrogen can be simultaneously removed from the reacting mixture. Because product is removed, greater than usual conversions can be obtained. In addition ultrapure hydrogen is produced, eliminating the need for an additional processing step. A palladium membrane reactor has been built and tested with three different catalysts. Initial results with a Ni-based catalyst show that it is very effective at promoting all three reactions listed above. Under the proper conditions, hydrogen recoveries approaching 100% have been observed. This study serves to experimentally validate the palladium membrane reactor as potentially important tool for fusion fuel processing.

  14. Models of iodine behavior in reactor containments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, C.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Models are developed for many phenomena of interest concerning iodine behavior in reactor containments during severe accidents. Processes include speciation in both gas and liquid phases, reactions with surfaces, airborne aerosols, and other materials, and gas-liquid interface behavior. Although some models are largely empirical formulations, every effort has been made to construct mechanistic and rigorous descriptions of relevant chemical processes. All are based on actual experimental data generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) or elsewhere, and, hence, considerable data evaluation and parameter estimation are contained in this study. No application or encoding is attempted, but each model is stated in terms of rate processes, with the intention of allowing mechanistic simulation. Taken together, this collection of models represents a best estimate iodine behavior and transport in reactor accidents.

  15. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axe, J.D.; Greenberg, R.

    1992-10-01

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance.

  16. Fossil fuel furnace reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

  17. Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  18. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  19. Cermet fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  1. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-04-05

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

  2. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  3. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  4. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cribier, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  5. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  6. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  7. Design, construction and evaluation of a facility for the simulation of fast reactor blankets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Ian Alexander

    1970-01-01

    A facility has been designed and constructed at the MIT Reactor for the experimental investigation of typical LMFBR breeding blankets. A large converter assembly, consisting of a 20-cm-thick layer of graphite followed by ...

  8. Static corrosion of candidate alloys for the lead-bismuth fast reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

    2008-01-01

    This project examined the corrosion rates and mechanisms of two candidate alloys for use in Lead-bismuth Eutectic (LBE) cooled fast nuclear reactors. The two alloys examined were T91 and Fe-12Cr-2Si. An experimental study ...

  9. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

  10. Alternative Passive Decay-Heat Systems for the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2006-07-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a low-pressure, liquid-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The high-temperature (950 deg C) variant is defined as the liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR). The AHTR has the same safety goals and uses the same graphite-matrix coated particle fuel as do modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. However, the large AHTR power output [2400 to 4000 MW(t)] implies the need for a different type of passive decay-heat removal system. Because the AHTR is a low-pressure, liquid-cooled reactor like sodium-cooled reactors, similar types of decay-heat-removal systems can be used. Three classes of passive decay heat removal systems have been identified: the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system which is similar to that proposed for the General Electric S-PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor; the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system, which is similar to that used in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II; and a new pool reactor auxiliary cooling system. These options are described and compared. (author)

  11. Reactor vessel support system. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, M.P.; Holley, J.C.

    1980-05-09

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  12. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Cambridge, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  13. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bers, Abraham (Arlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  14. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-03-20

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. PowerEnerCat was unable to raise their cash contribution for the project, and the work was stopped. This report summarizes some of the progress of the project and the concepts that were intended for experimental tests.

  15. U.S. Plans to Rejoin Project to Develop Fusion Reactor Friday, January 31, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/2003/01/31/politics/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Plans to Rejoin Project to Develop Fusion Reactor Friday, January 31, 2003 http to Rejoin Project to Develop Fusion Reactor By KENNETH CHANG he United States will seek to join a $5 billion international project to build an experimental fusion reactor, Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced

  16. Reactor Material Program Fracture Toughness of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awadalla, N.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes the experimental procedure for Type 304 Stainless Steel fracture toughness measurements and the application of results. Typical toughness values are given based on the completed test program for the Reactor Materials Program (RMP). Test specimen size effects and limitations of the applicability in the fracture mechanics methodology are outlined as well as a brief discussion on irradiation effects.

  17. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  18. Experimental characterisation of bubbly flow using MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tayler, Alexander B.

    2011-11-08

    and industry. Known as gas-liquid flows, these systems occur in situations as diverse as the bow wave of a ship to the cooling system in a nuclear power plant. The structure of a gas-liquid flow depends upon the relative flow-rates of the two phases, and... . [3] Deckwer, W.D., 1985. Bubble column reactors. Wiley, Chichester. [4] Jacobsen, H.A., 2008. Chemical reactor modeling. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. [5] Saxena, S.C., Patel, D., Smith, D.N. and Ruether, J.A., 1988. An assessment of experimental...

  19. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat so as to insulate the reactor vessel bottom end wall from the containment structure base mat and allow the reactor vessel bottom end wall to freely expand as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof. Further, a deck is supported upon the side wall of the containment structure above the top open end of the reactor vessel, and a plurality of serially connected extendible and retractable annular bellows extend between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnect the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck. An annular guide ring is disposed on the containment structure and extends between its side wall and the top open end of the reactor vessel for providing lateral support of the reactor vessel top open end by limiting imposition of lateral loads on the annular bellows by the occurrence of a lateral seismic event.

  20. Experimental Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergy Technologies | Blandinenews Experimental

  1. Nuclear reactor safety device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutter, E.

    1983-08-15

    A safety device is described for use in a nuclear reactor for axially repositioning a control rod with respect to the reactor core in the event of a thermal excursion. It comprises a laminated strip helically configured to form a tube, said tube being in operative relation to said control rod. The laminated strip is formed of at least two materials having different thermal coefficients of expansion, and is helically configured such that the material forming the outer lamina of the tube has a greater thermal coefficient of expansion than the material forming the inner lamina of said tube. In the event of a thermal excursion the laminated strip will tend to curl inwardly so that said tube will increase in length, whereby as said tube increases in length it exerts a force on said control rod to axially reposition said control rod with respect to said core.

  2. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  3. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  4. NUCLEAR MATERIALS RESEARCH PROGRESS REPORTS FOR 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical E f f e c t s of Thermonuclear Plasma I n t e r a cfor Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor (CTR), USAEC Report LA

  5. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01

    conditions for thermonuclear burn in fusion reactors is theFusion Energy (LIFE) Engine The transition from demonstrating thermonuclearfusion being well understood, the confinement conditions required for thermonuclear

  6. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

  7. Direct-Drive Inerital Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Charting the Path to Thermonuclear Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Regan, S.P.; Loucks, S.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-10-07

    Significant theoretical and experimental progress continues to be made at the University of Rocheter's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), charting the path to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition. Direct drive offers the potential for higher-gain implosions than x-ray drive and is a leading candidate for an inertial fusion enery power plant.

  8. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Neal P.; Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J.; Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J.

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  9. How far is a Fusion Power Reactor from an Experimental Reactor?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to achieve a safe shut-down state; - no structure should approach its melting temperature under any and reliability should be compatible with an availability of 75 -80 %. Only a few short unplanned shut-downs disposal - there should be no need for an emergency evacuation plan, under any accident driven by in

  10. Benchmark Development in Support of Generation-IV Reactor Validation (IRPhEP 2010 Handbook)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs

    2010-06-01

    The March 2010 edition of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) Handbook includes additional benchmark data that can be implemented in the validation of data and methods for Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactor designs. Evaluations supporting sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) efforts include the initial isothermal tests of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) 10B and 10C experiments at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the burn-up reactivity coefficient of Japan’s JOYO reactor. An assessment of Russia’s BFS-61 assemblies at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) provides additional information for lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) systems. Benchmarks in support of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) project include evaluations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland and the start-up core physics tests of Japan’s High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The critical configuration of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the INL which used ternary ceramic fuel, U(18)O2-CaO-ZrO2, is of interest for fuel cycle research and development (FCR&D) and has some similarities to “inert-matrix” fuels that are of interest in GEN-IV advanced reactor design. Two additional evaluations were revised to include additional evaluated experimental data, in support of light water reactor (LWR) and heavy water reactor (HWR) research; these include reactor physics experiments at Brazil’s IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor Facility and the French High Flux Reactor (RHF), respectively. The IRPhEP Handbook now includes data from 45 experimental series (representing 24 reactor facilities) and represents contributions from 15 countries. These experimental measurements represent large investments of infrastructure, experience, and cost that have been evaluated and preserved as benchmarks for the validation of methods and collection of data in support of current and future reactor design and development.

  11. Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a range of reactor types and coolant selections. The concepts included five fast reactors and three thermal reactors. As to reactor coolants, there were three sodium-cooled...

  12. A meeting is planned Tuesday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (AFP) - Japan is still pushing to host a revolutionary nuclear energy reactor, a Japanese official said, which support Japan's bid, and Russia and China which back the EU's case. BACK JAPAN PUSHES FOR NUCLEAR Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) -- a test bed for what is being billed as a safe and inexhaustible

  13. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas , S Klasky2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due reactor design relies on the extrapolation of the transport level from present-day fusion experiments to much larger future devices, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)1

  14. Saturday, January 24, 2004 Search Archives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and remote control center for an international nuclear fusion project should built in France and control center for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor be located in Cadarache, southern been unable to agree on where the world's first prototype nuclear fusion reactor should be located

  15. Ads by Google Quality Computer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7361 10 May 2005 Weblinks International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor http://www.ofes.fusion | E PLORE BY SUBJECTX | AST WORDL | UBSCRIBES | SEAR HC | RCHIVEA | SSR | OBSJ Biggest nuclear fusion's biggest nuclear fusion reactor, a $12 billion project designed to harness the power of the Sun

  16. France to win huge nuclear fusion project 10:42 24 June 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18524831.100 22 January 2005 Weblinks International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor http://www.ofes.fusionFrance to win huge nuclear fusion project 10:42 24 June 2005 NewScientist.com news service Rob Edwards A long and bitter dispute about where to site the world's largest nuclear fusion reactor looks all

  17. Cooling molten salt reactors using “gas-lift”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitek, Pavel E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Valenta, Vaclav E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz; Klimko, Marek E-mail: klimko@kke.zcu.cz

    2014-08-06

    This study briefly describes the selection of a type of two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying the natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel - cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a “Two-phase flow demonstrator” (TFD) used for experimental study of the “gas-lift” system and its influence on the support of natural convection. The measuring device and the application of the TDF device is described. The work serves as a model system for “gas-lift” (replacing the classic pump in the primary circuit) for high temperature MSR planned for hydrogen production. An experimental facility was proposed on the basis of which is currently being built an experimental loop containing the generator, separator bubbles and necessary accessories. This loop will model the removal of gaseous fission products and tritium. The cleaning of the fuel mixture of fluoride salts eliminates problems from Xenon poisoning in classical reactors.

  18. Fast quench reactor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Detering, B.A.; Donaldson, A.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Kong, P.C.

    1998-05-12

    A fast quench reactor includes a reactor chamber having a high temperature heating means such as a plasma torch at its inlet and a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. Reactants are injected into the reactor chamber. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle. This ``freezes`` the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage. 7 figs.

  19. Small modular reactors (SMRs) such...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ARO), using soluble boron in the coolant for reactivity control. Conversely, boiling water reactors (BWRs) typically maneuver their control blades as often as every 2 GWdmtU...

  20. Progress Update: Reactor Disassembly Grouting

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    Grouting the P&R reactors in order to remove these basins as an environmental threat. This will end the Cold War legacy and end the environmental footprint.

  1. Progress Update: Reactor Disassembly Grouting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Grouting the P&R reactors in order to remove these basins as an environmental threat. This will end the Cold War legacy and end the environmental footprint.

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  3. Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  4. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle ?13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  5. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  6. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  7. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  8. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  9. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1995-04-25

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  10. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Meuschke, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced.

  11. Reactor refueling containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, J.E.; Meuschke, R.E.

    1995-05-02

    A method of refueling a nuclear reactor is disclosed whereby the drive mechanism is disengaged and removed by activating a jacking mechanism that raises the closure head. The area between the barrier plate and closure head is exhausted through the closure head penetrations. The closure head, upper drive mechanism, and bellows seal are lifted away and transported to a safe area. The barrier plate acts as the primary boundary and each drive and control rod penetration has an elastomer seal preventing excessive tritium gases from escaping. The individual instrumentation plugs are disengaged allowing the corresponding fuel assembly to be sealed and replaced. 2 figs.

  12. High flux reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1988-01-01

    A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

  13. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  14. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  15. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1996-02-27

    A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  16. INL Experimental Program Roadmap for Thermal Hydraulic Code Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn McCreery; Hugh McIlroy

    2007-09-01

    Advanced computer modeling and simulation tools and protocols will be heavily relied on for a wide variety of system studies, engineering design activities, and other aspects of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), and light-water reactors. The goal is for all modeling and simulation tools to be demonstrated accurate and reliable through a formal Verification and Validation (V&V) process, especially where such tools are to be used to establish safety margins and support regulatory compliance, or to design a system in a manner that reduces the role of expensive mockups and prototypes. Recent literature identifies specific experimental principles that must be followed in order to insure that experimental data meet the standards required for a “benchmark” database. Even for well conducted experiments, missing experimental details, such as geometrical definition, data reduction procedures, and manufacturing tolerances have led to poor Benchmark calculations. The INL has a long and deep history of research in thermal hydraulics, especially in the 1960s through 1980s when many programs such as LOFT and Semiscle were devoted to light-water reactor safety research, the EBRII fast reactor was in operation, and a strong geothermal energy program was established. The past can serve as a partial guide for reinvigorating thermal hydraulic research at the laboratory. However, new research programs need to fully incorporate modern experimental methods such as measurement techniques using the latest instrumentation, computerized data reduction, and scaling methodology. The path forward for establishing experimental research for code model validation will require benchmark experiments conducted in suitable facilities located at the INL. This document describes thermal hydraulic facility requirements and candidate buildings and presents examples of suitable validation experiments related to VHTRs, sodium-cooled fast reactors, and light-water reactors. These experiments range from relatively low-cost benchtop experiments for investigating individual phenomena to large electrically-heated integral facilities for investigating reactor accidents and transients.

  17. Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

    2009-09-01

    Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and thermophysical properties of the fuel and their compatibility with the reactor coolant, with corresponding differences in the challenges presented to the reactor developers. Accident phenomena are discussed for the sodium-cooled fast reactor based on the mechanistic progression of conditions from accident initiation to accident termination, whether a benign state is achieved or more severe consequences are expected. General principles connecting accident phenomena and fuel properties are developed from the oxide and metal fuel safety analyses, providing guidelines that can be used as part of the evaluation for selection of fuel type for the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

  18. PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is to understand the plasma under thermonuclear conditions. Significant progress been made achieving plasmas, collisionality, confinement required for thermonuclear reactors. TFTR are toroidal MCF devices (tokamaks effectiveness in confining thermonuclear plasmas, devices or plasma pressure pressure the magnetic confining

  19. Electrical characterization and an equivalent circuit model of a microhollow cathode discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylan, O.; Berberoglu, H., E-mail: berberoglu@mail.utexas.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    This paper reports the electrical characterization and an equivalent circuit of a microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) reactor in the self-pulsing regime. A MHCD reactor was prototyped for air plasma generation, and its current-voltage characteristics were measured experimentally in the self-pulsing regime for applied voltages from 2000 to 3000?V. The reactor was modeled as a capacitor in parallel with a variable resistor. A stray capacitance was also introduced to the circuit model to represent the capacitance of the circuit elements in the experimental setup. The values of the resistor and capacitors were recovered from experimental data, and the proposed circuit model was validated with independent experiments. Experimental data showed that increasing the applied voltage increased the current, self-pulsing frequency and average power consumption of the reactor, while it decreased the peak voltage. The maximum and the minimum voltages obtained using the model were in agreement with the experimental data within 2.5%, whereas the differences between peak current values were less than 1%. At all applied voltages, the equivalent circuit model was able to accurately represent the peak and average power consumption as well as the self-pulsing frequency within the experimental uncertainty. Although the results shown in this paper was for atmospheric air pressures, the proposed equivalent circuit model of the MHCD reactor could be generalized for other gases at different pressures.

  20. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-11-08

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream. 1 fig.

  1. Solvent refined coal reactor quench system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved SRC reactor quench system using a condensed product which is recycled to the reactor and provides cooling by evaporation. In the process, the second and subsequent reactors of a series of reactors are cooled by the addition of a light oil fraction which provides cooling by evaporation in the reactor. The vaporized quench liquid is recondensed from the reactor outlet vapor stream.

  2. Advances in process intensification through multifunctional reactor engineering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Miller, James Edward; O'Hern, Timothy John; Gill, Walter; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2011-02-01

    A multifunctional reactor is a chemical engineering device that exploits enhanced heat and mass transfer to promote production of a desired chemical, combining more than one unit operation in a single system. The main component of the reactor system under study here is a vertical column containing packing material through which liquid(s) and gas flow cocurrently downward. Under certain conditions, a range of hydrodynamic regimes can be achieved within the column that can either enhance or inhibit a desired chemical reaction. To study such reactors in a controlled laboratory environment, two experimental facilities were constructed at Sandia National Laboratories. One experiment, referred to as the Two-Phase Experiment, operates with two phases (air and water). The second experiment, referred to as the Three-Phase Experiment, operates with three phases (immiscible organic liquid and aqueous liquid, and nitrogen). This report describes the motivation, design, construction, operational hazards, and operation of the both of these experiments. Data and conclusions are included.

  3. Development of a Heavy Water Detritiation Plant for PIK Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekseev, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Fedorchenko, O.A.; Konoplev, K.A.; Vasyanina, T.V.; Arkhipov, E.A.; Uborsky, V.V

    2005-07-15

    The research reactor PIK should be supplied with a Detritiation Plant (DP) to remove tritium from heavy water in order to reduce operator radiation dose and tritium emissions. The original design of the reactor PIK Detritiation Plant was completed several years ago. A number of investigations have been made to obtain data for the DP design. Nowadays the design of the DP is being revised on a basis of our investigations. The Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process will be used at the Detritiation Plant instead of Vapor Phase Catalytic Exchange. The experimental industrial plant for hydrogen isotope separation on the basis of the CECE process is under operation in Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. The plant was updated to provide a means for heavy water detritiation. Very high detritiation factors have been achieved in the plant. The use of the CECE process will allow the development of a more compact and less expensive detritiation plant for heavy water reactor PIK.

  4. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  5. Advances in process intensification through multifunctional reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hern, T. J.

    2012-03-01

    This project was designed to advance the art of process intensification leading to a new generation of multifunctional chemical reactors. Experimental testing was performed in order to fully characterize the hydrodynamic operating regimes critical to process intensification and implementation in commercial applications. Physics of the heat and mass transfer and chemical kinetics and how these processes are ultimately scaled were investigated. Specifically, we progressed the knowledge and tools required to scale a multifunctional reactor for acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation to industrial dimensions. Understanding such process intensification strategies is crucial to improving the energy efficiency and profitability of multifunctional reactors, resulting in a projected energy savings of 100 trillion BTU/yr by 2020 and a substantial reduction in the accompanying emissions.

  6. Antineutrino Monitoring of Thorium Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akindele, Oluwatomi A; Norman, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Various groups have demonstrated that antineutrino monitoring can be successful in assessing the plutonium content in water-cooled nuclear reactors for nonproliferation applications. New reactor designs and concepts incorporate nontraditional fuels types and chemistry. Understanding how these properties affect the antineutrino emission from a reactor can extend the applicability of antineutrino monitoring.Thorium molten salt reactors (MSR) breed U-233, that if diverted constitute an IAEA direct use material. The antineutrino spectrum from the fission of U-233 has been determined, the feasibility of detecting the diversion of a significant quantity, 8 kg of U-233, within the IAEA timeliness goal of 30 days has been evaluated. The antineutrino emission from a thorium reactor operating under normal conditions is compared to a diversion scenario at a 25 meter standoff by evaluating the daily antineutrino count rate and the energy spectrum of the detected antineutrinos. It was found that the diversion of a signifi...

  7. Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  8. THE MATERIALS OF FAST BREEDER REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) concern the behavior ofmetal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Despite the simplicityinduced by irradiation. LMFBR funding is the largest single

  9. Reactor Engineering Design | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Engineering Design The Reactor Engineering Design Key Technology will focus on control of chemical reactions with unprecedented precision in increasingly modular and...

  10. MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-06

    This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

  11. MOOSE simulating nuclear reactor CRUD buildup

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-21

    This simulation uses multiple physical models to show how the buildup of boron deposits on reactor fuel can affect performance and the reactor's power profile.

  12. Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 You...

  13. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  14. Optical Thermonuclear Transients From Tidal Compression of White Dwarfs as Tracers of the Low End of the Massive Black Hole Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Kasen, Daniel; Rosswog, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we model the observable signatures of tidal disruptions of white dwarf (WD) stars by massive black holes (MBHs) of moderate mass, $\\approx 10^3 - 10^5 M_\\odot$. When the WD passes deep enough within the MBH's tidal field, these signatures include thermonuclear transients from burning during maximum compression. We combine a hydrodynamic simulation that includes nuclear burning of the disruption of a $0.6 M_\\odot$ C/O WD with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculation to synthesize the properties of a representative transient. The transient's emission emerges in the optical, with lightcurves and spectra reminiscent of type I SNe. The properties are strongly viewing-angle dependent, and key spectral signatures are $\\approx 10,000$ km s$^{-1}$ Doppler shifts due to the orbital motion of the unbound ejecta. Disruptions of He WDs likely produce large quantities of intermediate-mass elements, offering a possible production mechanism for Ca-rich transients. Accompanying multiwavelength transients ar...

  15. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J.

    2013-07-15

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  16. Nuclear reactor control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cawley, William E. (Phoenix, AZ); Warnick, Robert F. (Pasco, WA)

    1982-01-01

    1. In a nuclear reactor incorporating a plurality of columns of tubular fuel elements disposed in horizontal tubes in a mass of graphite wherein water flows through the tubes to cool the fuel elements, the improvement comprising at least one control column disposed in a horizontal tube including fewer fuel elements than in a normal column of fuel elements and tubular control elements disposed at both ends of said control column, and means for varying the horizontal displacement of the control column comprising a winch at the upstream end of the control column and a cable extending through the fuel and control elements and attached to the element at the downstream end of the column.

  17. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N. (Cupertino, CA)

    1983-10-25

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod.

  18. Tokamak reactor startup power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weldon, D.M.; Murray, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Tokamak startup with ohmic heating (OH)-induced voltages requires rather large voltages and power supplies. On present machines, with no radiofrequency (rf)-assist provisions, hundreds of volts have been specified for their designs. With the addition of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) assist, the design requirements have been lowered. To obtain information on the cost and complexity associated with this ECRH-assisted, OH-pulsed startup voltage for ignition-type machines, a trade-off study was completed. The Fusion Engineering Device (FED) configuration was selected as a model because information was available on the structure. The data obtained are applicable to all tokamaks of this general size and complexity, such as the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR).

  19. Environmental Assessment and FONSI Proposed Decontamination and Disassembly of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor (ATSR) at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-07-15

    The purpose of this project is to protect human health and the environment from risks associated with the contaminated surplus ATSR. The proposed action is needed because the ATSR, a former experimental reactor, contains residual radioactivity and hazardous materials.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor - A National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford J. Stanley

    2008-05-01

    The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected nuclear research reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The unique serpentine configuration of the fuel elements creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) and nine flux traps. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 additional irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. There are also 34 low-flux irradiation positions in the irradiation tanks outside the core reflector tank. The ATR is designed to provide a test environment for the evaluation of the effects of intense radiation (neutron and gamma). Due to the unique serpentine core design each of the five lobes can be operated at different powers and controlled independently. Options exist for the individual test trains and assemblies to be either cooled by the ATR coolant (i.e., exposed to ATR coolant flow rates, pressures, temperatures, and neutron flux) or to be installed in their own independent test loops where such parameters as temperature, pressure, flow rate, neutron flux, and energy can be controlled per experimenter specifications. The full-power maximum thermal neutron flux is ~1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec with a maximum fast flux of ~5.0 x1014 n/cm2-sec. The Advanced Test Reactor, now a National Scientific User Facility, is a versatile tool in which a variety of nuclear reactor, nuclear physics, reactor fuel, and structural material irradiation experiments can be conducted. The cumulative effects of years of irradiation in a normal power reactor can be duplicated in a few weeks or months in the ATR due to its unique design, power density, and operating flexibility.