National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermographic imaging observation

  1. Segmentation of thermographic images of hands using a genetic Payel Ghosha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Melanie

    contour (an individual) is evaluated for its fitness based on the texture of the region it encloses evaluation of the segmentation performed by all the methods. We conclude that LSGA successfully segments's Ergonomics and Work Physiology Lab where far-infrared images of hands were acquired using ThermaCAM AM40

  2. Thermographic inspection of massive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Guimaraes, Maria; Scott, David B.

    2014-02-18

    Nondestructive Evaluation of concrete structures is a growing concern for the nuclear industry as well as for many other industries. As critical concrete components continue to age, the ability to assess the health and suitability for continued service has become a key consideration. In some cases, repair of these structures is difficult and expensive, while replacement is prohibitively expensive or, in some cases, not feasible. Therefore, the ability to inspect these key assets is a primary concern, especially in the nuclear industry. Due to the large size of containment buildings, cooling towers, and other large concrete assets, the ability to rapidly inspect for defects of concern is very desirable. Thermographic inspection appears to have the required ability to rapidly inspect large structures to ascertain the location and size of many of the defects of concern. This ability was demonstrated by performing a thermographic inspection of a large concrete dam in 2 days.

  3. Applications of thermal infrared imaging for research in aeroecology Nickolay I. Hristov,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betke, Margrit

    of this tool: behavioral observations, thermographic analysis of animal energetics, and censusing large

  4. City of College Station's Thermographic Mobile Scan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    During the first quarter of 1986, the City of College Station conducted a thermographic mobile scan of the entire city. A thermographic mobile scan is a process by which heat loss/heat gain data is accumulated by a vehicle traveling the city...

  5. Thermographic Inspections | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE- Non-ResidentialAlliantPGE andOfficeMattRand, ResidentialThermographic

  6. Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

    1986-07-01

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  7. Infrared thermographic study of laser ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, J.H.; Chow, C.T.S.

    1986-07-21

    Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet.

  8. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton ORNL ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R ORNL ORNL;...

  9. Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of energetic electrons in solar flares: event of 2003 to nonthermal energies are seen via microwave and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona. Imaging sophisticated and fully dedicated solar radio telescope operating at microwave frequencies (17 & 34 GHz) capable

  10. Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    . The large-scale coronal shock waves observed from radio type II bursts and from More- ton waves have proven surprisingly difficult to detect in coronal images. I review the evidence for such waves in radio, optical, EUV-scale waves. The discovery of radio type II bursts showed immediately that these waves became shocks

  11. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL ATOMS AT 1 AU OBSERVED BY THE IMAGE/LENA IMAGER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Ghielmetti, A. G.; Wurz, P. E-mail: gmetti@mail.spasci.com

    2009-06-20

    Observations from the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora: Global Exploration (IMAGE) Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager from 2005 are used to investigate characteristics of interstellar neutrals in the inner solar system. The LENA imager detected an interstellar neutral signal starting in 2004 December and extending to early 2005 April. Using the orientation of the field of view of the imager and the date of the loss of the interstellar neutral signal, it is concluded that the signal is consistent with a relatively compact (several degrees wide in ecliptic latitude and longitude) source of neutral helium and/or energetic (>150 eV) hydrogen originating from the solar apex direction. Observations later in 2005 are used to distinguish the composition and conclude that the relatively compact source likely contains some energetic hydrogen (in addition to the helium)

  12. "Observing and Analyzing" Images From a Simulated High Redshift Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Robert J; Scannapieco, Evan; Thacker, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the high-redshift evolution of the restframe UV-luminosity function (LF) of galaxies via hydrodynamical cosmological simulations, coupled with an emulated observational astronomy pipeline that provides a direct comparison with observations. We do this by creating mock images and synthetic galaxy catalogs of approximately 100 square arcminute fields from the numerical model at redshifts ~ 4.5 to 10.4. We include the effects of dust extinction and the point spread function (PSF) for the Hubble WFC3 camera for comparison with space observations. We also include the expected zodiacal background to predict its effect on space observations, including future missions such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When our model catalogs are fitted to Schechter function parameters, we predict that the faint-end slope alpha of the LF evolves as alpha = -1.16 - 0.12 z over the redshift range z ~ 4.5 to 7.7, in excellent agreement with observations from e.g., Hathi et al. (2010). However, for redshifts z ...

  13. Characteristics of Magnetohydrodynamic Oscillations Observed with Michelson Doppler Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, A A; Bush, R I; Tarbell, T D

    1999-01-01

    We report on the spatial distribution of magnetogram oscillatory power and phase angles between velocity and magnetogram signals as observed with the Michelson Doppler Imager. The dataset is 151.25 arcsec times 151.25 arcsec containing sunspot from Dec 2, 1997 with a temporal sampling interval of 60 seconds and spatial sampling of 0.605 arcsec. Simultaneously observed continuum intensity and surface velocity accompany the magnetic information. We focus on three frequency regimes: 0.5-1.0, 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz corresponding roughly to timescales of magnetic evolution, p-modes and the 3 minute resonant sunspot oscillation. Significant low frequency magnetogram power is found in lower flux pixels, 100-300 Gauss, in a striking ring with filamentary structure surrounding sunspot. Five minute magnetogram power peaks in extended regions of flux 600-800 Gauss. The 3 minute oscillation is observed in sunspot umbra in pixels whose flux measures 1300-1500 Gauss. Phase angles of approximately -90 degrees between veloc...

  14. Characteristics of Magnetohydrodynamic Oscillations Observed with Michelson Doppler Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Norton; R. K. Ulrich; R. I. Bush; T. D. Tarbell

    1999-07-19

    We report on the spatial distribution of magnetogram oscillatory power and phase angles between velocity and magnetogram signals as observed with the Michelson Doppler Imager. The dataset is 151.25 arcsec times 151.25 arcsec containing sunspot from Dec 2, 1997 with a temporal sampling interval of 60 seconds and spatial sampling of 0.605 arcsec. Simultaneously observed continuum intensity and surface velocity accompany the magnetic information. We focus on three frequency regimes: 0.5-1.0, 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz corresponding roughly to timescales of magnetic evolution, p-modes and the 3 minute resonant sunspot oscillation. Significant low frequency magnetogram power is found in lower flux pixels, 100-300 Gauss, in a striking ring with filamentary structure surrounding sunspot. Five minute magnetogram power peaks in extended regions of flux 600-800 Gauss. The 3 minute oscillation is observed in sunspot umbra in pixels whose flux measures 1300-1500 Gauss. Phase angles of approximately -90 degrees between velocity and magnetic flux in the 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz regimes are found in regions of significant cross amplitude.

  15. Fourier, Fresnel and Image CGHs of three-dimensional objects observed from many different projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Fourier, Fresnel and Image CGHs of three-dimensional objects observed from many different of synthesizing three types of computer-generated hologram (CGH); Fourier, Fresnel and image CGHs. These holograms in the computer as a Fourier hologram. Then, it can be converted to either Fresnel or image holograms by computing

  16. Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS allsky imager observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Click Here for Full Article Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS allsky imager) and followed by a northsouth (NS) arc moving equatorward toward the onset latitude. Because of the linkage by enhanced earthward plasma flows associated with enhanced reconnection near the preexisting openclosed field

  17. ESO Imaging Survey. Hubble Deep Field South: Optical-Infrared Observations, Data Reduction and Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. da Costa; M. Nonino; R. Rengelink; S. Zaggia; C. Benoist; T. Erben; A. Wicenec; M. Scodeggio; L. F. Olsen; M. D. Guarnieri; E. Deul; S. D'Odorico; R. Hook; A. Moorwood; R. Slijkhuis

    1998-12-04

    This paper presents ground-based data obtained from deep optical and infrared observations of the HST Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) field carried out at the ESO 3.5 New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, a public survey coordinated by ESO and member states, in preparation for the first year of operation of the VLT. Deep CCD images are available for five optical passbands, reaching 2 sigma limiting magnitudes of U_AB~27.0, B_AB~26.5, V_AB~26, R_AB~26, I_AB~25, covering a region of ~25 square arcmin, which includes the HST WPFC2 field. The infrared observations cover a total area of ~42 square arcmin and include both the HST WFPC2 and STIS fields. The observations of the WFPC2 region were conducted in JHKs passbands, reaching J_AB~25, and H_AB and K_AB~24.0. Due to time constraints, the adjacent field, covering the STIS field, has been observed only in R, I and JHKs, while no observations were conducted covering the NIC3 field. This paper describes the observations and data reduction. It also presents images of the surveyed region and lists the optical and infrared photometric parameters of the objects detected on the co-added images of each passband, as well as multicolor optical and infrared catalogs. These catalogs together with the astrometrically and photometrically calibrated co-added images are being made public world-wide and can be retrieved from the world-wide web (http://www.eso.org/eis).

  18. Inter- and Intra-Observer Variability in Prostate Definition With Tissue Harmonic and Brightness Mode Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, Gurpreet Kaur, E-mail: Gurpreet.Sandhu2@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Meyer, Tyler [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Pavamani, Simon [Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare the relative utility of tissue harmonic (H) and brightness (B) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of the prostate by studying interobserver and intraobserver variation in prostate delineation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage disease were randomly selected. TRUS images of prostates were acquired using B and H modes. The prostates on all images were contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist (RO) and five equally trained observers. The observers were blinded to information regarding patient and imaging mode. The volumes of prostate glands and areas of midgland slices were calculated. Volumes contoured were compared among the observers and between observer group and RO. Contours on one patient were repeated five times by four observers to evaluate the intraobserver variability. Results: A one-sample Student t-test showed the volumes outlined by five observers are in agreement (p > 0.05) with the RO. Paired Student t-test showed prostate volumes (p = 0.008) and midgland areas (p = 0.006) with H mode were significantly smaller than that with B mode. Two-factor analysis of variances showed significant interobserver variability (p < 0.001) in prostate volumes and areas. Inter- and intraobserver consistency was quantified as the standard deviation of mean volumes and areas, and concordance indices. It was found that for small glands ({<=}35 cc) H mode provided greater interobserver consistency; however, for large glands ({>=}35 cc), B mode provided more consistent estimates. Conclusions: H mode provided superior inter- and intraobserver agreement in prostate volume definition for small to medium prostates. In large glands, H mode does not exhibit any additional advantage. Although harmonic imaging has not proven advantageous for all cases, its utilization seems to be judicious for small prostates.

  19. Qualities of sequential chromospheric brightenings observed in H? and UV images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, Michael S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McAteer, R. T. James

    2014-12-01

    Chromospheric flare ribbons observed in H? appear well-organized when first examined: ribbons impulsively brighten, morphologically evolve, and exponentially decay back to pre-flare levels. Upon closer inspection of the H? flares, there is often a significant number of compact areas brightening in concert with the flare eruption but are spatially separated from the evolving flare ribbon. One class of these brightenings is known as sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs). SCBs are often observed in the immediate vicinity of erupting flares and are associated with coronal mass ejections. In the past decade there have been several previous investigations of SCBs. These studies have exclusively relied upon H? images to discover and analyze these ephemeral brightenings. This work employs the automated detection algorithm of Kirk et al. to extract the physical qualities of SCBs in observations of ground-based H? images and complementary Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images in He II, C IV, and 1700 Å. The metadata produced in this tracking process are then culled using complementary Doppler velocities to isolate three distinguishable types of SCBs. From a statistical analysis, we find that the SCBs at the chromospheric H? layer appear earlier and last longer than their corresponding signatures measured in AIA. From this multi-layer analysis, we infer that SCBs are spatially constrained to the mid-chromosphere. We also derive an energy budget to explain SCBs which have a postulated energy of not more than 0.01% of the total flare energy.

  20. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberoi, Divya

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9–201.6 MHz. ...

  1. Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

    2005-11-30

    The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

  2. Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,

  3. Category:Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,GroundNear Infrared SurveysNumericalOpen

  4. Imaging and Spectral Observations of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in a Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-01-01

    We explore the Quasi-Periodic Pulsations (QPPs) in a solar flare observed by Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on 2014 September 10. QPPs are identified as the regular and periodic peaks on the rapidly-varying components, which are the light curves after removing the slowly-varying components. The QPPs display only three peaks at the beginning on the hard X-ray (HXR) emissions, but ten peaks on the chromospheric and coronal line emissions, and more than seven peaks (each peak is corresponding to a type III burst on the dynamic spectra) at the radio emissions. An uniform quasi-period about 4 minutes are detected among them. AIA imaging observations exhibit that the 4-min QPPs originate from the flare ribbon, and tend to appear on the ribbon front. IRIS spectral observations show that each peak of the QPPs tends to a broad line width and a red Doppler velocity at C I, O IV, Si ...

  5. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  6. Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhenghua; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) study of cool transition region loops. This class of loops has received little attention in the literature. A cluster of such loops was observed on the solar disk in active region NOAA11934, in the Si IV 1402.8 \\AA\\ spectral raster and 1400 \\AA\\ slit-jaw (SJ) images. We divide the loops into three groups and study their dynamics and interaction. The first group comprises relatively stable loops, with 382--626\\,km cross-sections. Observed Doppler velocities are suggestive of siphon flows, gradually changing from -10 km/s at one end to 20 km/s at the other end of the loops. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of $10^{15}$ Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two footpoin...

  7. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  8. Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01

    been offerred to ex- plain this disagreement.5,6 Namely, finite LDOS are pre- dicted at the Zn or Cu sites only, with no continuous LDOS between these lattice sites. This is of course not what has been observed, which is quasi... two STM images. One is a topographic image (an energy- integrated spatial image), which gives the top BiO layer, showing only the Bi atoms. They are observed to be dis- placed from their ideal orthorhombic lattice sites, forming a supermodulation...

  9. ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  10. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D.; Renner, S.; Evans, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 ± 0.001) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 ± 0.006) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 ± 0.03) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ?10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not confined to times of apse anti-alignment.

  11. Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-10-15

    Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

  12. VLBA Imaging at 7 mm and Linear Polarimetric Observations at 6 cm and 3 mm of Sagittarius A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey C. Bower; Heino Falcke; Don Backer; Melvyn Wright

    1998-11-13

    We summarize the results of 7 mm VLBA imaging of Sgr A* and discuss some of the difficulties of accurately constraining the size of Sgr A* with VLBI observations. Our imaging results are fully consistent with the hypothesis that the VLBA image of Sgr A* is a resolved elliptical Gaussian caused by the scattering of an intervening thermal plasma. We show that determination of the minor axis size at 7 mm with the VLBA is very unreliable. We also present new polarimetric observations from the VLA and from the BIMA array of Sgr A*. At 4.8 GHz, we find an upper limit to the polarization of 0.1%. At 86 GHz, we report a marginal detection of $1 \\pm 1$% linear polarization. We discuss the effects of interstellar propagation on the linear polarization and consider the significance of very low intrinsic linear polarization in Sgr A*.

  13. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. In situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ) The preexisting arc is located 1 $2 poleward of the equatorward edge of the 1 keV electron plasma sheetIn situ observations of the "preexisting auroral arc" by THEMIS all sky imagers and the FAST involve brightening followed by poleward expansion of a discrete auroral arc. The arc that brightens

  15. Peptidogenomics approaches to study peptidic molecules from unsequenced microbes and that observed from imaging mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Cheng-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    a continuing dialogue. Microbes and Infection. 2002, 4: 309-molecules from unsequenced microbes and that observed frommolecules from unsequenced microbes and that observed from

  16. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observation of the 1809 keV line from Galactic 26Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2003-04-28

    Observations of the central radian of the Galaxy by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI) have yielded a high-resolution measurement of the 1809 keV line from 26Al, detected at 11 sigma significance in nine months of data. The RHESSI result for the width of the cosmic line is 2.03 (+0.78, -1.21) keV FWHM. The best fit line width of 5.4 keV FWHM reported by Naya et al. (1996) using the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) balloon instrument is rejected with high confidence.

  17. HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-11-10

    We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

  18. Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping August 2013; accepted 7 September 2013; published 13 November 2013. [1] 3-D Hydraulic tomography (3-D HT (primarily hydraulic conductivity, K) is estimated by joint inversion of head change data from multiple

  19. Vortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geostrophic and gradient wind velocity, and potential vorticity fields with very high spatial resolution, limited largely by the pixel resolution of the available imaging sensors. Cylinder wakes on the polar. INTRODUCTION The energy-containing eddies provide the strongest cur- rents in most areas of the world ocean

  20. Visibility of microcalcification clusters and masses in breast tomosynthesis image volumes and digital mammography: A 4AFC human observer study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timberg, P.; Baath, M.; Andersson, I.; Mattsson, S.; Tingberg, A.; Ruschin, M.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the visibility of simulated lesions in digital breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes compared with 2D digital mammography (DM). Methods: Simulated lesions (masses and microcalcifications) were added to images of the same women acquired on a DM system (Mammomat Novation, Siemens) and a BT prototype. The same beam quality was used for the DM and BT acquisitions. The total absorbed dose resulting from a 25-projection BT acquisition and reconstruction (BT{sub 25}) was approximately twice that of a single DM view. By excluding every other projection image from the reconstruction (BT{sub 13}), approximately the same dose as in DM was effected. Simulated microcalcifications were digitally added with varying contrast to the DM and BT images. Simulated masses with 8 mm diameter were also added to BT images. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments were conducted. Four medical physicists participated in all experiments, each consisting of 60 trials per experimental condition. The observers interpreted the BT image volumes in cine-mode at a fixed image sequence speed. The required threshold contrast (S{sub t}) to achieve a detectability index (d') of 2.5 (i.e., 92.5% correct decisions) was determined. Results: The S{sub t} for mass detection in DM was approximately a factor of 2 higher than required in BT indicating that the detection of masses was improved under BT conditions compared to DM. S{sub t} for microcalcification detection was higher for BT than for DM at both BT dose levels (BT{sub 25} and BT{sub 13}), with a statistically significant difference in S{sub t} between DM and BT{sub 13}. These results indicate a dose-dependent decrease in detection performance in BT for detection of microcalcifications. Conclusions: In agreement with previous investigations, masses of size 8 mm can be detected with less contrast in BT than in DM indicating improved detection performance for BT. However, for the investigated microcalcifications, the results of this study indicate potentially worse performance for BT than for DM at the same dose level.

  1. RECONSTRUCTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH COORDINATED IMAGING AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS: GLOBAL STRUCTURE, KINEMATICS, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SPACE WEATHER FORECASTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Ying; Luhmann, Janet G.; Lin, Robert P.; Bale, Stuart D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Thernisien, Arnaud [Universities of Space Research Association, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States); Vourlidas, Angelos [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.ed [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-20

    We reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using coordinated imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. A forward modeling technique, which assumes a rope-like morphology for CMEs, is used to determine the global structure (including orientation and propagation direction) from coronagraph observations. We reconstruct the corresponding structure from in situ measurements at 1 AU with the Grad-Shafranov method, which gives the flux-rope orientation, cross section, and a rough knowledge of the propagation direction. CME kinematics (propagation direction and radial distance) during the transit from the Sun to 1 AU are studied with a geometric triangulation technique, which provides an unambiguous association between solar observations and in situ signatures; a track fitting approach is invoked when data are available from only one spacecraft. We show how the results obtained from imaging and in situ data can be compared by applying these methods to the 2007 November 14-16 and 2008 December 12 CMEs. This merged imaging and in situ study shows important consequences and implications for CME research as well as space weather forecasting: (1) CME propagation directions can be determined to a relatively good precision as shown by the consistency between different methods; (2) the geometric triangulation technique shows a promising capability to link solar observations with corresponding in situ signatures at 1 AU and to predict CME arrival at the Earth; (3) the flux rope within CMEs, which has the most hazardous southward magnetic field, cannot be imaged at large distances due to expansion; (4) the flux-rope orientation derived from in situ measurements at 1 AU may have a large deviation from that determined by coronagraph image modeling; and (5) we find, for the first time, that CMEs undergo a westward migration with respect to the Sun-Earth line at their acceleration phase, which we suggest is a universal feature produced by the magnetic field connecting the Sun and ejecta. The importance of having dedicated spacecraft at L4 and L5, which are well situated for the triangulation concept, is also discussed based on the results.

  2. Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimwell, Timothy William

    2011-11-08

    unknown SZ decrements. Finally, I conduct pointed observations towards a high luminosity subsample of eight clusters from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). For each of these I provide probability distributions of parameters such as mass...

  3. Hubble Space Telescope Cycle 5 General Observer Pro* Imaging of Two Dwarf Galaxies in Tidal Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    Hubble Space Telescope Cycle 5 General Observer Pro* *posal Woodlawn Drive Honolulu, HI 96822 Telephone: 808:Galaxies & Clusters Instruments: WFPC2 Cycle 5 primary orbits:11 Cycle 5 parallel orbits:0 Abstract

  4. the atmosphere (31, 32). The style of activity imaged requires that the observed slipfaces are not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolussi, Kurt

    can only be determined with future multiyear observations. In locations where wind energy that grainflow formation and remobilization of sediment by wind may be ap- proximately in equilibrium they indicate migration of martian dune forms or simply represent the crestline maintenance of nonmobile dunes

  5. SU-E-I-46: Sample-Size Dependence of Model Observers for Estimating Low-Contrast Detection Performance From CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, I; Lu, Z [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recently, task-based assessment of diagnostic CT systems has attracted much attention. Detection task performance can be estimated using human observers, or mathematical observer models. While most models are well established, considerable bias can be introduced when performance is estimated from a limited number of image samples. Thus, the purpose of this work was to assess the effect of sample size on bias and uncertainty of two channelized Hotelling observers and a template-matching observer. Methods: The image data used for this study consisted of 100 signal-present and 100 signal-absent regions-of-interest, which were extracted from CT slices. The experimental conditions included two signal sizes and five different x-ray beam current settings (mAs). Human observer performance for these images was determined in 2-alternative forced choice experiments. These data were provided by the Mayo clinic in Rochester, MN. Detection performance was estimated from three observer models, including channelized Hotelling observers (CHO) with Gabor or Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels, and a template-matching observer (TM). Different sample sizes were generated by randomly selecting a subset of image pairs, (N=20,40,60,80). Observer performance was quantified as proportion of correct responses (PC). Bias was quantified as the relative difference of PC for 20 and 80 image pairs. Results: For n=100, all observer models predicted human performance across mAs and signal sizes. Bias was 23% for CHO (Gabor), 7% for CHO (LG), and 3% for TM. The relative standard deviation, ?(PC)/PC at N=20 was highest for the TM observer (11%) and lowest for the CHO (Gabor) observer (5%). Conclusion: In order to make image quality assessment feasible in the clinical practice, a statistically efficient observer model, that can predict performance from few samples, is needed. Our results identified two observer models that may be suited for this task.

  6. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  7. MEM imaging of multi-wavelength VLBA polarisation observations of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlan, Colm P

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a C++ implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) suitable for deconvolving VLBI polarisation data. The first results of this implementation are presented and compared with CLEAN-based deconvolutions of the same data. We present Faraday rotation measure and intrinsic polarisation maps of AGN which have been made from MEM deconvolutions of multi-wavelength observations of Stokes parameters I, Q and U. The advantages of using MEM are demonstrated, in particular its enhanced resolution over the CLEAN algorithm.

  8. HOMOLOGOUS FLUX ROPES OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2013-12-01

    We present the first Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of four homologous flux ropes in the active region (AR) 11745 on 2013 May 20-22. The four flux ropes are all above the neutral line of the AR, with endpoints anchoring at the same region, and have a generally similar morphology. The first three flux ropes rose with a velocity of less than 30 km s{sup –1} after their appearance, and subsequently their intensities at 131 Å decreased and the flux ropes became obscure. The fourth flux rope erupted last, with a speed of about 130 km s{sup –1} and formed a coronal mass ejection (CME). The associated filament showed an obvious anti-clockwise twist motion at the initial stage, and the twist was estimated at 4?. This indicates that kink instability possibly triggers the early rise of the fourth flux rope. The activated filament material was spatially within the flux rope and showed consistent evolution in the early stages. Our findings provide new clues for understanding the characteristics of flux ropes. Firstly, multiple flux ropes are successively formed at the same location during an AR evolution process. Secondly, a slow-rise flux rope does not necessarily result in a CME, and a fast-eruption flux rope does result in a CME.

  9. High-resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot oscillations with the interface region imaging spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, H.; DeLuca, E.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Golub, L.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Weber, M.; De Pontieu, B.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Kleint, L.; Cheung, M.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Tarbell, T. D.; Wuelser, J. P.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V.; and others

    2014-05-10

    We present the first results of sunspot oscillations from observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. The strongly nonlinear oscillation is identified in both the slit-jaw images and the spectra of several emission lines formed in the transition region and chromosphere. We first apply a single Gaussian fit to the profiles of the Mg II 2796.35 Å, C II 1335.71 Å, and Si IV 1393.76 Å lines in the sunspot. The intensity change is ?30%. The Doppler shift oscillation reveals a sawtooth pattern with an amplitude of ?10 km s{sup –1} in Si IV. The Si IV oscillation lags those of C II and Mg II by ?6 and ?25 s, respectively. The line width suddenly increases as the Doppler shift changes from redshift to blueshift. However, we demonstrate that this increase is caused by the superposition of two emission components. We then perform detailed analysis of the line profiles at a few selected locations on the slit. The temporal evolution of the line core is dominated by the following behavior: a rapid excursion to the blue side, accompanied by an intensity increase, followed by a linear decrease of the velocity to the red side. The maximum intensity slightly lags the maximum blueshift in Si IV, whereas the intensity enhancement slightly precedes the maximum blueshift in Mg II. We find a positive correlation between the maximum velocity and deceleration, a result that is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating magnetoacoustic shock waves.

  10. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of a filament channel and the implications for the nature of counter-streamings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Harra, L. K.

    2014-03-20

    The dynamics of a filament channel are observed with imaging and spectroscopic telescopes before and during the filament eruption on 2011 January 29. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral observations reveal that there are no EUV counterparts of the H? counter-streamings in the filament channel, implying that the ubiquitous H? counter-streamings found by previous research are mainly due to longitudinal oscillations of filament threads, which are not in phase between each other. However, there exist larger-scale patchy counter-streamings in EUV along the filament channel from one polarity to the other, implying that there is another component of unidirectional flow (in the range of ±10 km s{sup –1}) inside each filament thread in addition to the implied longitudinal oscillation. Our results suggest that the flow direction of the larger-scale patchy counter-streaming plasma in the EUV is related to the intensity of the plage or active network, with the upflows being located at brighter areas of the plage and downflows at the weaker areas. We propose a new method to determine the chirality of an erupting filament on the basis of the skewness of the conjugate filament drainage sites. This method suggests that the right-skewed drainage corresponds to sinistral chirality, whereas the left-skewed drainage corresponds to dextral chirality.

  11. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doe logo CH2M-WG logoImaging

  12. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print The

  13. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print

  14. The Anatomy of the Perseus Spiral Arm: 12 CO and IRAS Imaging Observations of the W3/4/5 Cloud Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Anatomy of the Perseus Spiral Arm: 12 CO and IRAS Imaging Observations of the W3/4/5 Cloud content of the interstellar gas and dust components contained within a 9 ffi arc of the Perseus spiral arm:1) and atomic (2.5:1) gas components determined within the arm and interarm velocity intervals demonstrate

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  16. The interaction of THz phonon-polariton waves with microstructures observed using quantitative, phase-sensitive imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werley, Christopher Alan

    We apply newly developed, phase-sensitive imaging to enable sharply focused visualization of terahertz waves in electro-optic media. This approach allows quantitative characterization of THz waves as they interact with ...

  17. Image reconstruction for observations with a high dynamic range: LINC-NIRVANA simulations of a stellar jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertero, Mario

    of a stellar jet Andrea La Cameraa, Simone Antoniuccib, Mario Berteroa, Patrizia Boccaccia, Dario Lorenzettib of a simulation and reconstruction of observations of a young stellar object (YSO) jet with the LINC-NIRVANA (LN performed in order to investigate the ability of observing the weak diffuse jet line emission against

  18. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY—AN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-10

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  19. A method to determine fault vectors in 4H-SiC from stacking sequences observed on high resolution transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Fangzhen; Wang, Huanhuan; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Mueller, Stephan G.; Chung, Gil; Sanchez, Edward K.; Hansen, Darren; Loboda, Mark J.; Zhang, Lihua; Su, Dong; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric

    2014-09-14

    A new method has been developed to determine the fault vectors associated with stacking faults in 4H-SiC from their stacking sequences observed on high resolution TEM images. This method, analogous to the Burgers circuit technique for determination of dislocation Burgers vector, involves determination of the vectors required in the projection of the perfect lattice to correct the deviated path constructed in the faulted material. Results for several different stacking faults were compared with fault vectors determined from X-ray topographic contrast analysis and were found to be consistent. This technique is expected to applicable to all structures comprising corner shared tetrahedra.

  20. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Ly? BLOB 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Martin, D.; Chang, Daphne; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-05-10

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Ly? blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Ly? emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Ly? emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ?}, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ?}. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and coaligned angular momentum, strengthening the case for their association.

  1. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  2. A NEW CEPHEID DISTANCE TO THE GIANT SPIRAL M101 BASED ON IMAGE SUBTRACTION OF HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shappee, Benjamin J.; Stanek, K. Z. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2011-06-01

    We accurately determine a new Cepheid distance to M101 (NGC 5457) using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I time series photometry of two fields within the galaxy. We make a slight modification to the ISIS image subtraction package to obtain optimal differential light curves from HST data. We discovered 827 Cepheids with periods between 3 and 80 days, the largest extragalactic sample of Cepheids observed with HST by a factor of two. With this large Cepheid sample, we find that the relative distance of M101 from the Large Magellanic Cloud is {Delta}{mu}{sub LMC} = 10.63 {+-} 0.04 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag. If we use the geometrically determined maser distance to NGC 4258 as our distance anchor, the distance modulus of M101 is {mu}{sub 0} = 29.04 {+-} 0.05 (random) {+-} 0.18 (systematic) mag or D = 6.4 {+-} 0.2 (random) {+-} 0.5 (systematic) Mpc. The uncertainty is dominated by the maser distance estimate ({+-}0.15 mag), which should improve over the next few years. We determine a steep metallicity dependence, {gamma}, for our Cepheid sample through two methods, yielding {gamma} = -0.80 {+-} 0.21 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1} and {gamma} = -0.72{sup +0.22}{sub -0.25} (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1}. We see marginal evidence for variations in the Wesenheit period-luminosity relation slope as a function of deprojected galactocentric radius. We also use the tip of the red giant branch method to independently determine the distance modulus to M101 of {mu}{sub 0} = 29.05 {+-} 0.06 (random) {+-} 0.12 (systematic) mag.

  3. Thermographic Inspections | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotionHeatEnergy Solar Training for Veterans to a NewTestimony

  4. Thermographic Inspections | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuildingTheEasements &AInnovative1 of

  5. X6.9-CLASS FLARE-INDUCED VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATIONS IN A LARGE-SCALE PLASMA CURTAIN AS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, A. K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002 (India); Goossens, M. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-11-01

    We present rare observational evidence of vertical kink oscillations in a laminar and diffused large-scale plasma curtain as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The X6.9-class flare in active region 11263 on 2011 August 9 induces a global large-scale disturbance that propagates in a narrow lane above the plasma curtain and creates a low density region that appears as a dimming in the observational image data. This large-scale propagating disturbance acts as a non-periodic driver that interacts asymmetrically and obliquely with the top of the plasma curtain and triggers the observed oscillations. In the deeper layers of the curtain, we find evidence of vertical kink oscillations with two periods (795 s and 530 s). On the magnetic surface of the curtain where the density is inhomogeneous due to coronal dimming, non-decaying vertical oscillations are also observed (period ? 763-896 s). We infer that the global large-scale disturbance triggers vertical kink oscillations in the deeper layers as well as on the surface of the large-scale plasma curtain. The properties of the excited waves strongly depend on the local plasma and magnetic field conditions.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-20

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

  7. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  8. Magellan Adaptive Optics first-light observations of the exoplanet beta Pic b. II. 3-5 micron direct imaging with MagAO+Clio, and the empirical bolometric luminosity of a self-luminous giant planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morzinski, Katie M; Skemer, Andy J; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Phil M; Rodigas, T J; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Bailey, Vanessa P; Follette, Katherine B; Kopon, Derek; Weinberger, Alycia J; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Young giant exoplanets are a unique laboratory for understanding cool, low-gravity atmospheres. A quintessential example is the massive extrasolar planet $\\beta$ Pic b, which is 9 AU from and embedded in the debris disk of the young nearby A6V star $\\beta$ Pictoris. We observed the system with first light of the Magellan Adaptive Optics (MagAO) system. In Paper I we presented the first CCD detection of this planet with MagAO+VisAO. Here we present four MagAO+Clio images of $\\beta$ Pic b at 3.1 $\\mu$m, 3.3 $\\mu$m, $L^\\prime$, and $M^\\prime$, including the first observation in the fundamental CH$_4$ band. To remove systematic errors from the spectral energy distribution (SED), we re-calibrate the literature photometry and combine it with our own data, for a total of 22 independent measurements at 16 passbands from 0.99--4.8 $\\mu$m. Atmosphere models demonstrate the planet is cloudy but are degenerate in effective temperature and radius. The measured SED now covers $>$80\\% of the planet's energy, so we approach ...

  9. Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemami, Sheila S.

    Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment David M. Rouse , Romuald information to humans, and this paper investigates the utility assessment task, where human observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image as a surrogate for a reference. Current QA algorithms implicitly assess utility

  10. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  11. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  12. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  13. Image alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  14. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  15. NATURAL IMAGE UTILITY ASSESSMENT USING IMAGE CONTOURS David M. Rouse and Sheila S. Hemami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemami, Sheila S.

    NATURAL IMAGE UTILITY ASSESSMENT USING IMAGE CONTOURS David M. Rouse and Sheila S. Hemami Visual to a reference. For the utility assessment task, observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image cannot generally predict the perceived utility of a natural image. This paper examines variations

  16. High speed imaging television system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William O. (Silver Spring, MD); Rabenhorst, David W. (Silver Spring, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

  17. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  18. Observation of objects under intense plasma background illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buzhinsky, R. O.; Savransky, V. V.; Zemskov, K. I.; Isaev, A. A.; Buzhinsky, O. I.

    2010-12-15

    Experiments on the observation of a brightness-amplified image of an object through a masking arc discharge are presented. The copper-vapor laser active medium was used as an image brightness amplifier. It is shown that the image quality does not worsen under plasma background illumination.

  19. Imaging Scatterometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical metrology system for characterization of topography of micro/nano-structures on a surface or embedded in a semi-transparent material. Based on the principles of scatterometry, where the intensity of scattered light is used as a 'fingerprint' to reconstruct a surface, this new imaging scatterometer can easily find areas of interest on the cm scale and measure multiple segments simultaneously. The imaging scatterometer measures structural features, such as height, width, and sidewall angle of a grating locally on few um2 areas with nm resolution. We demonstrate two imaging scatterometers, one built into an optical microscope and one in a split configuration. The two scatterometers are targeted characterization of mm2 and cm2 areas, respectively, and both setups are validated using nano-textured samples.

  20. Multi-frequency imaging in VLBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Likhachev

    2004-12-17

    The new technique, multi-frequency imaging (MFI) is developed. In VLBI, Multi-Frequency Imaging (MFI) consists of multi-frequency synthesis (MFS) and multi-frequency analysis (MFA) of the VLBI data obtained from observations on various frequencies. A set of linear deconvolution MFI algorithms is described. The algorithms make it possible to obtain high quality images interpolated on any given frequency inside any given bandwidth, and to derive reliable estimates of spectral indexes for radio sources with continuum spectrum. Thus MFI approach makes it is possible not only to improve the quality and fidelity of the images and also essentially to derive the morphology of the observed radio sources.

  1. Nuclear Imaging | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Jefferson Lab's Radiation Detector and Imaging Group Members of Jefferson Lab's Radiation Detector & Medical Imaging Group design and build unique imaging devices based on...

  2. Image enhancement for improving visibility and feature recognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubair, Juwairia

    2008-10-10

    Researchers analyze images in areas such as geology, bat cardiovascular systems and art studies to verify their observations. Some images are hard to study as their details are not vivid; hence there is a need to enhance ...

  3. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  4. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  5. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  6. Spectral observations of the di use FUV background with DUVE (the Di use UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    battery was depleted. Observational Results The successful mission resulted in 19 images containing 4151 calibrations of the instrument background. The shutter opened images were examined for stellar contamination corrected. Where no correction was possible, the images were discarded. The sum of these images

  7. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  8. RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelizzari, Charles A.

    RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion and limitations) ·Where do we need to go? (future directions) #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Terminology

  9. Image Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdaho NationalA pIlyaImage

  10. RHESSI observation of flare elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2006-02-14

    RHESSI observations of elementary flare bursts are presented. These solar flare elements are distinct emission peaks of a duration of some tens of seconds present in the hard X-ray light curves. They are characterized by consistent soft-hard-soft spectral behavior, which can be described in a quantitative way and compared which predictions from acceleration models. A detailed analysis of hard X-ray images for an M5 class flare shows that elementary flare bursts do not occur at distinct locations, but as twin X-ray sources move smoothly along an arcade of magnetic loops. This observation apparently contradicts the predictions of standard translation invariant 2.5-dimensional reconnection models.

  11. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  12. Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins* (Received for publication, April 15 enables bonding details of electron distributions in proteins to be revealed experimentally for the first time. We move one step closer to imaging directly the fine details of the electronic structure on which

  13. Observation of images in graded-index multimode fiber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begum, Sultana

    1992-01-01

    . As the length of the multimode fiber changes, the reflection from the multimode fiber end also changes periodically with a constant beat length. This is accomplished by hand polishing the multimode fiber on I tun grit size aluminium oxide paper. The experiment... holds the glued tubing and it goes inside another block of materials which has a threaded cylindrical brass block (32 threads per inch) at the bottom and a marked aluminium round slab at the top. The slab has a total of 12g divisions along its...

  14. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is...

  15. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for integration with CMOS logic. Citation Detailsand

  16. Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wandell, Brian A.

    Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell Psychology Department Stanford reproduction pipeline, spanning image capture, processing and display, must be designed to account for the properties of the human observer. In designing an image pipeline, three principles of human vision

  17. FIRST IMAGES FROM THE FOCUSING OPTICS X-RAY SOLAR IMAGER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay; Turin, Paul; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Fermin, Jose; Lin, Robert; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Takaaki; White, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the first time on 2012 November 2, producing the first focused images of the Sun above 5 keV. To enable hard X-ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy via direct focusing, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. On its first flight, FOXSI observed several targets that included active regions, the quiet Sun, and a GOES-class B2.7 microflare. This Letter provides an introduction to the FOXSI instrument and presents its first solar image. These data demonstrate the superiority in sensitivity and dynamic range that is achievable with a direct HXR imager with respect to previous, indirect imaging methods, and illustrate the technological readiness for a spaceborne mission to observe HXRs from solar flares via direct focusing optics.

  18. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  19. Atomic-Scale Observations Aid Mesoscale Catalyst Design | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Atomic-Scale Observations Aid Mesoscale Catalyst Design April 08, 2015 Fig.1. Z-contrast STEM image shows the Mo-V-Te-Ta oxide catalyst. (a) "M1-like"...

  20. Sandia Energy - Advanced Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Imaging Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Advanced Imaging Advanced ImagingAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:47:37+00:00...

  1. Image Georeferencing Lesson 4: Image Georeferencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    vector digitizing. You should read the section "Coordinate Transformation", in Chapter 4 of the GIS georeferencing, also known as image registration or image transformation. We'll then update a data layers through mapping vegetation, wetlands, and land use change. While many images are provided in digital formats

  2. Fermilab | Press Room | Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fermilab constructs pioneering accelerator test facility: photos, videos & graphics Click on links below images for medium and high-resolution jpeg images. When using this...

  3. Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr. Tom Frank tdfrank@uiuc.edu www.sdal.uiuc.edu 333-7248 321 Davenport Hall #12;Geography 478 Techniques Perspective #12;Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science

  4. High-resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot oscillations with the interface region imaging spectrograph Re-direct Destination: We present the first results of...

  5. Figure 1. A result from a 14-year old subject with sleep related breathing disorder. (a,b) Axial MR image frames representing that there is (a) no apneic event and (b) central apnea. A marked reduction of the airway cross-sectional area is observed in (b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    imaging (MRI) is non-invasive, involves no ionizing radiation, and can provide detailed anatomical gradient amplifier overheating and radiofrequency tissue heating, 3) facilitating patient comfort to enable

  6. Probabilistic Web Image Gathering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    1 Probabilistic Web Image Gathering 1. Objective & background 2. Related work 3. Method 4, JAPAN (UEC) (Long-term) Objective of our Web Image Gathering Gather several hundreds of images associated with one concept from the Web without human intervention It's not image search. Non

  7. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  8. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to...

  9. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  10. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  11. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  12. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  13. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  14. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  15. Image registration method for medical image sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

    2013-03-26

    Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

  16. ISSN 18458319 COMMON SPHINX AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrozek, Tomasz

    V energy resolution. SphinX data overlap with the low-energy end of the Ramaty High Energy Solar. Observational Data The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is a rotating FourierISSN 1845­8319 COMMON SPHINX AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES T. MROZEK1,2 , S. GBUREK1 , M

  17. Initial Helioseismic Observations by Hinode/SOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Sekii; Alexander G. Kosovichev; Junwei Zhao; Saku Tsuneta; Hiromoto Shibahashi; Thomas E. Berger; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W. Lites; Shin'ichi Nagata; Toshifumi Shimizu; Richard A. Shine; Yoshinori Suematsu; Theodore D. Tarbell; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-12

    Results from initial helioseismic observations by Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode are reported. It has been demonstrated that intensity oscillation data from Broadband Filter Imager can be used for various helioseismic analyses. The k-omega power spectra, as well as corresponding time-distance cross-correlation function that promises high-resolution time-distance analysis below 6-Mm travelling distance, were obtained for G-band and CaII-H data. Subsurface supergranular patterns have been observed from our first time-distance analysis. The results show that the solar oscillation spectrum is extended to much higher frequencies and wavenumbers, and the time-distance diagram is extended to much shorter travel distances and times than they were observed before, thus revealing great potential for high-resolution helioseismic observations from Hinode.

  18. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  19. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  20. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  1. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  2. Observing Iceland's Eyjafjallajkull 2010 eruptions with the autonomous NASA Volcano Sensor Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    Observing Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions with the autonomous NASA Volcano Sensor Web, the Hyperion hyperspectral imager and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA's Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft by using the autonomously operating NASA Volcano Sensor Web (VSW). The VSW incorporates notifications

  3. Practical image based lighting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaemin

    2003-01-01

    information is lighting. Image based lighting that is developed to recover illumination information of the real world from photographs has recently been popular in computer graphics. In this thesis we present a practical image based lighting method. Our...

  4. Computational ghost imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    A computational ghost-imaging arrangement that uses only a single-pixel detector is described. It affords a new 3D sectioning capability and matches the resolution of pseudothermal ghost imaging.

  5. User Science Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research | URL: https:www.fin.ucar.edunetpubserver.np?find&siteimagelibrary&catalogcatalog&templatedetail.np&fielditemid&opmatches&value3438 Download Image:...

  6. Analyzing and improving image quality in reflective ghost imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Nicholas D. (Nicholas David)

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a transverse imaging technique that relies on the correlation between a pair of light fields, one that has interacted with the object to be imaged and one that has not. Most ghost imaging experiments have ...

  7. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  8. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  9. Image Sensor Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ; #12; #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2 and Statistics #12; Image Sensor Lens Metadata Actions Flash ... Application Processor Con gure 1 Expose 2

  10. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  11. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  12. Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlot, David J.

    2012-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

  13. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dominguez@ttu.edu; Peralta, Luis Grave de [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Bernussi, Ayrton A. [Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  14. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  15. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  16. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  17. Phase-sensitive fluorescent imaging with coherent reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Jeffrey J; Bartels, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging plays a critical role in advancing our understanding of three dimensional dynamics of biological systems. Coherent imaging (CI) methods exploit spatial phase information, encoded through propagation of coherent signal light emerging from a specimen, to extract a three-dimensional representation of the object from a single high-speed measurement. Until now, CI methods could not be applied to incoherent light, severely limiting their ability to image the most powerful biological probes available - fluorescent molecules - with sufficient speed and volume to observe important processes, such as neural processing in live specimens. We introduce a new imaging technique that transfers the spatial propagation phase of coherent illumination light to incoherent fluorescent light emission. The transfer of propagation phase allows CI techniques to be applied to fluorescent light imaging, and leads to large increases in imaging speed and depth of field. With this advance, biological imaging of fluorescent ...

  18. ASTR 270 Lecture 4 Imaging Systems in Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Quentin A.

    1 ASTR 270 Lecture 4 #12;2 Imaging Systems in Astronomy #12;3 Direct Imaging #12;4 A UKST 6 pc (in diameter) Distance: about 2.4 kpc. Age: 430 years. The SN was observed by the Danish the resolving power of a much larger instrument #12;27 The VLA (Very Large Array) in New Mexico The 27 dishes

  19. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  20. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  1. Imaging Mechanical Vibrations in Suspended Graphene Sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Imaging Mechanical Vibrations in Suspended Graphene Sheets D. Garcia-Sanchez,, A. M. van der Zande was electrostatically driven at resonance using applied radio frequency voltages. The mechanical vibrations were of the shape of the mechanical eigenmodes. In as many as half the resonators measured, we observed a new class

  2. Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Keri Marie

    2013-07-22

    was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

  3. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  4. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  5. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  6. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  7. VLBI polarimetric observations of 3C147

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rossetti; F. Mantovani; D. Dallacasa

    2004-12-29

    We present multi-frequency VLBI observations of the Compact Steep-spectrum Quasar 3C147 (0538+498) made with the VLBA at the four frequencies in the available 5 GHz band and at 8.4 GHz (still under analysis), from which we derived millarcsecond-resolution images of the total intensity, polarization, and rotation measure distributions. The source shows a core-jet structure, with a compact feature and a jet, extending about 200 mas to the South-West. We detect polarized emission in two bright features in the inner jet; the rotation measure of this features (aprox -1630 rad m(-2), aprox -540 rad m(-2)).

  8. Forming images using conditioned partial measurements from reference arm in ghost imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianming Wen

    2012-08-29

    A recent thermal ghost imaging experiment by Wu's group constructed positive and negative images using a novel algorithm. This algorithm allows to form the images with use of partial measurements from the reference arm, even which never passes through the object, conditioned on the object arm. In this paper, we present a simple theory which explains the experimental observation, and provides an in-depth understanding of conventional ghost imaging. In particular, we theoretically show that the visibility of formed images through such an algorithm is not bounded by the standard value 1/3. In fact, it can ideally grow up to unity (with reduced imaging quality). Thus, the algorithm described here not only offers an alternative way to decode spatial correlation of thermal light, but also mimics a "bandpass filter" to remove the constant background such that the visibility or imaging contrast is improved. We further show that conditioned on one still object present in the test arm, it is possible to construct its image by sampling the available reference data.

  9. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  10. Graphics and Image Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For EERE websites and applications, follow these requirements and best practices for designing graphics and developing images. This includes making them Section 508-compliant.

  11. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  12. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  13. Fermilab | Press Room | Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When using these images, please credit Fermilab. Return to Press Release Med Res | Hi Res According to the Standard Model of particles and forces, the Higgs mechanism gives...

  14. Fermilab | Press Room | Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using these images, please credit them as specified. Return to Press Release Med Res | Hi Res The Standard Model describes the interactions of the fundamental particle of the...

  15. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  16. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  17. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  18. Direct Exoplanet Detection with Binary Differential Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodigas, Timothy J; Mamajek, Eric E; Males, Jared R; Close, Laird M; Morzinski, Katie; Hinz, Philip M; Kaib, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Binaries are typically excluded from direct imaging exoplanet surveys. However, the recent findings of Kepler and radial velocity programs show that planets can and do form in binary systems. Here, we suggest that visual binaries offer unique advantages for direct imaging. We show that Binary Differential Imaging (BDI), whereby two stars are imaged simultaneously at the same wavelength within the isoplanatic patch at high Strehl ratio, offers improved point spread function (PSF) subtraction that can result in increased sensitivity to planets close to each star. We demonstrate this by observing a young visual binary separated by 4\\asec ~with MagAO/Clio-2 at 3.9 \\microns, where the Strehl ratio is high, the isoplanatic patch is large, and giant planets are bright. Comparing BDI to angular differential imaging (ADI), we find that BDI's 5$\\sigma$ contrast is \\about 0.5 mags better than ADI's within \\about 1\\asec ~for the particular binary we observed. Because planets typically reside close to their host stars, BD...

  19. Scandinavian Workshop on Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Barcode Imaging of Chocolate Milk Quan.fica.on of Microstructures in Freeze.on of Fat Content in Raw Beef Cut Meat Evalua.on by RGB-to-spectrum Imaging.on to Visualizing Meat Products Characteriza.on of Commercial Danish Apple Cul.var Using Novel

  20. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  1. COVER IMAGE Mechanical metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    COVER IMAGE Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures whose properties originate from a range of structural deformations. Letter p153; News & Views p95 IMAGE: JAYSON PAULOSE COVER DESIGN in elementary optical excitations of monolayer WSe2 Ajit Srivastava, Meinrad Sidler, Adrien V. Allain, Dominik S

  2. Heart imaging method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  3. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  4. Content-Aware Image enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    Content-Aware Image enhancement R. Schettini www.ivl.disco.unimib.it #12;8 Faculties, 61 Degree Recognition Content-based retrieval Quality Assessment #12;Content-Aware Image Enhancement Presentation Image Processing Content aware image enhancement We focus here on image based features. And show how

  5. Image forming apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satoh, Hisao (Hachioji, JP); Haneda, Satoshi (Hachioji, JP); Ikeda, Tadayoshi (Hachioji, JP); Morita, Shizuo (Hachioji, JP); Fukuchi, Masakazu (Hachioji, JP)

    1996-01-01

    In an image forming apparatus having a detachable process cartridge in which an image carrier on which an electrostatic latent image is formed, and a developing unit which develops the electrostatic latent image so that a toner image can be formed, both integrally formed into one unit. There is provided a developer container including a discharge section which can be inserted into a supply opening of the developing unit, and a container in which a predetermined amount of developer is contained, wherein the developer container is provided to the toner supply opening of the developing unit and the developer is supplied into the developing unit housing when a toner stirring screw of the developing unit is rotated.

  6. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  7. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  8. Optimization of X-ray Radiographic Imaging Birsen Yazici, Il-Young Son, An Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    Visible Human CT data set. To produce a realistic image, the software simulates quantum noise, blurring effects to the patient. All radiographic x-ray examinations require the selection of beam parameters, which affect both by an observer with respect to a quantitative image quality criteria and determine if the images meet

  9. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  10. Mountains on Titan: Modeling and observations Giuseppe Mitri,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountains on Titan: Modeling and observations Giuseppe Mitri,1 Michael T. Bland,2 Adam P. Showman,3. Showman, J. Radebaugh, B. Stiles, R. M. C. Lopes, J. I. Lunine, and R. T. Pappalardo (2010), Mountains. Introduction [2] The Cassini Radar instrument has imaged mountainous topography on Saturn's moon Titan

  11. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  12. Colour Image Segmentation Wladyslaw Skarbek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koschan, Andreas

    Colour Image Segmentation A Survey Wladyslaw Skarbek Institute of Computer Science Polish Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 4.2.1 Colour image segmentation and labeling through multiediting and condensing

  13. Observation of GRBs by the MAGIC Telescope, Status and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bastieri; N. Galante; M. Garczarczyk; M. Gaug; F. Longo; S. Mizobuchi; V. Scapin

    2007-09-10

    Observation of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Very High Energy (VHE) domain will provide important information on the physical conditions in GRB outflows. The MAGIC telescope is the best suited Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) for these observations. Thanks to its fast repositioning time and low energy threshold, MAGIC is able to start quickly the follow-up observation, triggered by an alert from the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN), and observe the prompt emission and early afterglow phase from GRBs. In the last two years of operation several GRB follow-up observations were performed by MAGIC, however, until now without successful detection of VHE gamma rays above threshold energies >100 GeV. In this paper we revise the expectations for the GRB observations with MAGIC, based on the experience from the last years of operation.

  14. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  15. A digital video system for observing and recording occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, M A; Pavlov, Hristo; Hanna, William; McEwan, Alistair; Filipovic, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids and outer solar system bodies can offer ground based observers with modest telescopes and camera equipment the opportunity to probe the shape, size, atmosphere and attendant moons or rings of these distant objects. The essential requirements of the camera and recording equipment are: good quantum efficiency and low noise, minimal dead time between images, good horological faithfulness of the image time stamps, robustness of the recording to unexpected failure, and low cost. We describe the Astronomical Digital Video occultation observing and recording System (ADVS) which attempts to fulfil these requirements and compare the system with other reported camera and recorder systems. Five systems have been built, deployed and tested over the past three years, and we report on three representative occultation observations: one being a 9 +/-1.5 second occultation of the trans-Neptunian object 28978 Ixion (mv=15.2) at 3 seconds per frame, one being a 1.51 +/-0.017 second occultation ...

  16. Imaging through scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satat, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we demonstrate novel methods to overcome optical scattering in order to resolve information about hidden scenes, in particular for biomedical applications. Imaging through scattering media has long been a ...

  17. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  18. Quantum-mimetic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatraman, Dheera

    2015-01-01

    Many recent experiments have explored the use of nonclassical states of light to perform imaging or sensing. Although these experiments require quantum descriptions of light to explain their behavior, the advantages they ...

  19. Building an urban image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russin, Andrew J

    1992-01-01

    This design project explores the principles of "urban legibility" and "shared space". The readability, or imageability (in Kevin Lynch's term) of a city results from the recognition of larger urban patterns, organizations, ...

  20. Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project: Observations and Source Lists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getman, K V; Broos, P S; Grosso, N; Tsujimoto, M; Townsley, L K; Garmire, G P; Kästner, J H; Li, J; Harnden, F R; Wolk, S; Murray, S S; Lada, C J; Münch, A; McCaughrean, M J; Meeus, G; Damiani, F; Micela, G; Sciortino, S; Bally, J; Hillenbrand, L A; Herbst, W; Preibisch, T; Feigelson, E D

    2004-01-01

    We present a description of the data reduction methods and the derived catalog of more than 1600 X-ray point sources from the exceptionally deep January 2003 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster and embedded populations around OMC-1. The observation was obtained with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and has been nicknamed the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). With an 838 ks exposure made over a continuous period of 13.2 days, the COUP observation provides the most uniform and comprehensive dataset on the X-ray emission of normal stars ever obtained in the history of X-ray astronomy.

  1. Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project: Observations and Source Lists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Getman; E. Flaccomio; P. S. Broos; N. Grosso; M. Tsujimoto; L. Townsley; G. P. Garmire; J. Kastner; J. Li; F. R. Harnden, Jr.; S. Wolk; S. S. Murray; C. J. Lada; A. A. Muench; M. J. McCaughrean; G. Meeus; F. Damiani; G. Micela; S. Sciortino; J. Bally; L. A. Hillenbrand; W. Herbst; T. Preibisch; E. D. Feigelson

    2004-10-06

    We present a description of the data reduction methods and the derived catalog of more than 1600 X-ray point sources from the exceptionally deep January 2003 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster and embedded populations around OMC-1. The observation was obtained with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and has been nicknamed the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). With an 838 ks exposure made over a continuous period of 13.2 days, the COUP observation provides the most uniform and comprehensive dataset on the X-ray emission of normal stars ever obtained in the history of X-ray astronomy.

  2. A VERY DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF A1795: THE COLD FRONT AND COOLING WAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehlert, Steven

    We present a new analysis of very deep Chandra observations of the galaxy cluster A1795. Utilizing nearly 750 ks of net ACIS imaging, we are able to resolve the thermodynamic structure of the intracluster medium (ICM) on ...

  3. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  4. The SDSS Imaging Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Lupton; James E. Gunn; Zeljko Ivezic; Gillian R. Knapp; Stephen Kent; Naoki Yasuda

    2001-05-24

    We summarise the properties of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) project, discuss our software infrastructure, and outline the architecture of the SDSS image processing pipelines. We then discuss two of the algorithms used in the SDSS image processing; the KL-transform based modelling of the spatial variation of the PSF, and the use of galaxy models in star/galaxy separation. We conclude with the first author's personal opinions on the challenges that the astronomical community faces with major software projects.

  5. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  6. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Attempting to Image EGS Fracture & Fluid Networks; Employing joint Geophysical Imaging Technologies.

  7. Content-Aware Image enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    1 Content-Aware Image enhancement R. Schettini www.ivl.disco.unimib.it 8 Faculties, 61 Degree Recognition Content-based retrieval Quality Assessment Content-Aware Image Enhancement Presentation Outline Processing Content aware image enhancement We focus here on image based features. And show how to exploit

  8. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  9. BAYESIAN ENSEMBLE LEARNING FOR MEDICAL IMAGE DENOISING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Hyuntaek

    2012-08-31

    Medical images are often affected by random noise because of both image acquisition from the medical modalities and image transmission from modalities to workspace in the main computer. Medical image denoising removes noise from the CT or MR images...

  10. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  11. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  12. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  13. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  14. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  15. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  16. NIR imaging and modeling of the core of M100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; R. F. Peletier; I. Shlosman; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; R. S. de Jong

    1995-09-29

    High-resolution NIR and optical images are used to constrain a dynamical model of the circumnuclear star forming (SF) region in the barred galaxy M100 (=NGC 4321). Subarcsecond resolution allowed us to distinguish important morphological details which are easily misinterpreted when using images at lower resolution. Small leading arms observed in our K-band image of the nuclear region are reproduced in the gas flow in our model, and lead us to believe that part of the K light comes from young stars, which trace the gas flow.

  17. Chandra High Resolution Camera Imaging of GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

    2002-08-19

    We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETG observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. Based on the three HRC images and the HETG zero order image, the accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA = 18h 01m 12.39s, Dec = -25d 44m 36.1s (90% confidence radius = 0".45), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All three HRC images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc.

  18. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  19. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  20. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  1. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  2. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  3. Image Charge Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f organic molecules such as heavy crude oils. Heavy crudes are some of the most complex organic mixtures found in nature. As the crude oil industry grows in size and demand for crude oil increases, techniques

  4. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  5. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  6. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  7. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  8. Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

  9. Array combination for parallel imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Dan Kenrick

    2007-09-17

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging, the time required to generate an image is proportional to the number of steps used to encode the spatial information. In rapid imaging, an array of coil elements and receivers are used to reduce the number of encoding...

  10. Flattening filter removal for improved image quality of megavoltage fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, James D.; Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Removal of the linear accelerator (linac) flattening filter enables a high rate of dose deposition with reduced treatment time. When used for megavoltage imaging, an unflat beam has reduced primary beam scatter resulting in sharper images. In fluoroscopic imaging mode, the unflat beam has higher photon count per image frame yielding higher contrast-to-noise ratio. The authors’ goal was to quantify the effects of an unflat beam on the image quality of megavoltage portal and fluoroscopic images.Methods: 6 MV projection images were acquired in fluoroscopic and portal modes using an electronic flat-panel imager. The effects of the flattening filter on the relative modulation transfer function (MTF) and contrast-to-noise ratio were quantified using the QC3 phantom. The impact of FF removal on the contrast-to-noise ratio of gold fiducial markers also was studied under various scatter conditions.Results: The unflat beam had improved contrast resolution, up to 40% increase in MTF contrast at the highest frequency measured (0.75 line pairs/mm). The contrast-to-noise ratio was increased as expected from the increased photon flux. The visualization of fiducial markers was markedly better using the unflat beam under all scatter conditions, enabling visualization of thin gold fiducial markers, the thinnest of which was not visible using the unflat beam.Conclusions: The removal of the flattening filter from a clinical linac leads to quantifiable improvements in the image quality of megavoltage projection images. These gains enable observers to more easily visualize thin fiducial markers and track their motion on fluoroscopic images.

  11. Instruments High-resolution imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    Instruments & Methods High-resolution imaging of gynecologic neoplasms using optical coherence and Gynecologists.) Diagnostic imaging methods available to gynecologists include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

  12. Image texture analysis of elastograms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Fasahat

    1999-01-01

    and developed to make it a commercial product. 'This research applies image texture analysis to computer generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, no-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, frontal analysis...

  13. Topics in genomic image processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jianping

    2006-04-12

    The image processing methodologies that have been actively studied and developed now play a very significant role in the flourishing biotechnology research. This work studies, develops and implements several image processing techniques for M...

  14. Digital holographic imaging of microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Michael Trevor

    2006-01-01

    Imaging aquatic microorganisms in 3D space is of interest to biologists and ocean scientists seeking to understand the behavior of these organisms in their natural environments. In this research, digital holographic imaging ...

  15. Contribution of the MODIS instrument to observations of deep convective storms and stratospheric moisture detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Pao K.

    . The present work focuses on storm top observations utilizing the MODIS data. The MODIS instrument (availableContribution of the MODIS instrument to observations of deep convective storms and stratospheric/AVHRR and GOES I-M imager instruments have documented the link between certain storm top features referred

  16. STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD JONGCHUL CHAE1 June 1998; accepted 17 July 1998) Abstract. We have developed a method of stray-light correction which is applicable to filter-based magnetograph observations. Stray-light-corrected Stokes images are obtained

  17. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE OBSERVATIONS OF MICROFLARES Jiong Qiu,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , we study solar microflares using the coordinated hard X-ray and microwave observations obtainedHARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE OBSERVATIONS OF MICROFLARES Jiong Qiu,1, 2 Chang Liu,2 Dale E. Gary,2 Gelu by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) during its open-shutter operation mode

  18. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2015-10-28

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  19. Observational Study PAUL R. ROSENBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    . Howell John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 2005 #12;Observational Study Observational Studies Defined describing the subjects before treatment. As a consequence, random assignment tends to make the groups comparable both in terms of measured char- acteristics and characteristics that were not or could

  20. Fourier Analysis of Ghost Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Yanfeng Bai; Shensheng Han

    2006-09-28

    Fourier analysis of ghost imaging (FAGI) is proposed in this paper to analyze the properties of ghost imaging with thermal light sources. This new theory is compatible with the general correlation theory of intensity fluctuation and could explain some amazed phenomena. Furthermore we design a series of experiments to verify the new theory and investigate the inherent properties of ghost imaging.

  1. Chester F. Carlson Imaging Science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    GRADUATE STUDIES Chester F. Carlson CENTERfor IMAGING SCIENCE GORITHM 60 (b) #12;What is Imaging Science? Imaging Scientists work with science and technology that is focused on the creation. Research areas include: Remote Sensing Vision and Perception Astronomy and Space Science Computational

  2. Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish locomotion Brooke E. Flammang1,*, George V. Lauder1, Daniel stability in a complex fluid environ- ment. We used a new approach, a volumetric velocimetry imaging system into the caudal fin vortex wake. These results show that volumetric imaging of biologi- cally generated flow

  3. Multimode imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M

    2013-08-27

    Apparatus for detecting and locating a source of gamma rays of energies ranging from 10-20 keV to several MeV's includes plural gamma ray detectors arranged in a generally closed extended array so as to provide Compton scattering imaging and coded aperture imaging simultaneously. First detectors are arranged in a spaced manner about a surface defining the closed extended array which may be in the form a circle, a sphere, a square, a pentagon or higher order polygon. Some of the gamma rays are absorbed by the first detectors closest to the gamma source in Compton scattering, while the photons that go unabsorbed by passing through gaps disposed between adjacent first detectors are incident upon second detectors disposed on the side farthest from the gamma ray source, where the first spaced detectors form a coded aperture array for two or three dimensional gamma ray source detection.

  4. A Method for Weak Lensing Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Kaiser; Gordon Squires; Tom Broadhurst

    1994-11-01

    We develop and test a method for measuring the gravitational lensing induced distortion of faint background galaxies. We first describe how we locate the galaxies and measure a 2-component `polarisation' or ellipticity statistic $e_\\alpha$ whose expectation value should be proportional to the gravitational shear $\\gamma_\\alpha$. We then show that an anisotropic instrumental psf perturbs the polarisation by $\\delta e_\\alpha = P^s_{\\alpha\\beta} p_\\beta$, where $p_\\alpha$ is a measure of the psf anisotropy and $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ is the `linearised smear polarisability tensor'. By estimating $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ for each object we can determine $p_\\alpha$ from the foreground stars and apply a correction $-P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}p_\\beta$ to the galaxies. We test this procedure using deep high-resolution images from HST which are smeared with an anisotropic psf and then have noise added to simulate ground-based observations. We find that the procedure works very well. A similar analysis yields a linear shear polarisability tensor $P^\\gamma_{\\alpha\\beta}$ which describes the response to a gravitational shear. This calibrates the polarisation-shear relation, but only for galaxies which are well resolved. To empirically calibrate the effect of seeing on the smaller galaxies we artificially stretch HST images to simulate lensing and then degrade them as before. These experiments provide a rigorous and exacting test of the method under realistic conditions. They show that it is possible to remove the effect of instrumental psf anisotropy, and that the method provides an efficient and quantitative measurement of the gravitational shear.

  5. Image Processing Erkut Erdem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    ®. T urning to B razil and Mexico, O rtner made it clear that it would be almost impossible for those corrupted observation. ·Optimal estimate of under iid Gaussian noise ·Efficient and scalable often contain missing observations, corruptions, or subject to unknown deformation or misalignment

  6. Fast Algorithms for Image Reconstruction with Application to Partially Parallel MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    Fast Algorithms for Image Reconstruction with Application to Partially Parallel MR Imaging Yunmei. Key words. Image reconstruction, Variable splitting, TV denoising, Nonlinear optimization 1 from an emerging magnetic resonance (MR) medical imaging technique known as partially parallel imaging

  7. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  8. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  9. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  10. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  11. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  12. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image. Remondino, N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision ­ 1. Measurement in images (b) Camera calibration of Photogrammetry and Machine Vision Fully understand: 1. Image based 3D and 4D measurement 2. Image based 3D

  13. Fresnel interferometric arrays for space-based imaging: testbed results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Serre; Laurent Koechlin; Paul Deba

    2008-08-07

    This paper presents the results of a Fresnel Interferometric Array testbed. This new concept of imager involves diffraction focussing by a thin foil, in which many thousands of punched subapertures form a pattern related to a Fresnel zone plate. This kind of array is intended for use in space, as a way to realizing lightweight large apertures for high angular resolution and high dynamic range observations. The chromaticity due to diffraction focussing is corrected by a small diffractive achromatizer placed close to the focal plane of the array. The laboratory test results presented here are obtained with an 8 centimeter side orthogonal array, yielding a 23 meter focal length at 600 nm wavelength. The primary array and the focal optics have been designed and assembled in our lab. This system forms an achromatic image. Test targets of various shapes, sizes, dynamic ranges and intensities have been imaged. We present the first images, the achieved dynamic range, and the angular resolution.

  14. Task-Based Optimization of Computed Tomography Imaging Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Adrian A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to provide a framework for the use of task-based metrics of image quality to aid in the design, implementation, and evaluation of CT image reconstruction algorithms and CT systems in general. We support the view that task-based metrics of image quality can be useful in guiding the algorithm design and implementation process in order to yield images of objectively superior quality and higher utility for a given task. Further, we believe that metrics such as the Hotelling observer (HO) SNR can be used as summary scalar metrics of image quality for the evaluation of images produced by novel reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we aim to construct a concise and versatile formalism for image reconstruction algorithm design, implementation, and assessment. The bulk of the work focuses on linear analytical algorithms, specifically the ubiquitous filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. However, due to the demonstrated importance of optimization-based algorithms in a wide variety of CT...

  15. Quasar Image Shifts due to Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis; Rodrigo A. Ibata

    1998-02-23

    Gravitational microlensing of quasars by stars in external galaxies can introduce fluctuations in the centroid of the ``point-like'' macro--images. The induced shifts are extremely small, on micro--arcsecond scales, below the limits of current optical observations. However, such shifts will become measurable with the proposed ``Space Interferometry'' mission, due to fly in 2005. The degree of the centroid shifts and their application as probes of both quasar structure and the stellar mass function in the lensing galaxy are discussed.

  16. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  17. Total Dose Evaluation of Deep Submicron CMOS Imaging Technology Through Elementary Device and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    layer. Current-voltage character- istics were carried out at 23 using a low-current ( 10 fA) test bench. Bernard, and G. Rolland Abstract--Ionizing radiation effects on CMOS image sensors (CIS) manufactured to understand ionizing dose effects on devices and then on image sensors. The main degra- dations observed

  18. Imaging Agents DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Takahashi, A. Dean Sherry, and Jinming Gao* Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful non- invasive a "reverse" pH gradient across the cell membrane is observed in cancer cells compared to normal cells.[11 19 F signal. b) Structural formula of three representative diblock copolymers containing different p

  19. Partnerships Drive Informatics Solutions for Biological Imaging at Ocean Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    combined with new sensor technologies Unprecedented observing capabilities Unprecedented "big data resolution Metadata Web services Post- processing Accession New system components interoperate with existing links to images, metadata, raw data Updated in near- real time as new data is collected http

  20. Text Detection in Images and Videos Marios Anthimopoulos *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    of Informatics and Telecommunications National Centre for Scientific Research "Demokritos anthimop on the designing and development of techniques for the spatial detection of text in images and videos as well uses different criteria while both of them are based on intuitively correct observations. Finally

  1. MULTISPECTRAL THERMAL IMAGER - OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. WEBER

    2001-03-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager satellite fills a new and important role in advancing the state of the art in remote sensing sciences. Initial results with the full calibration system operating indicate that the system was already close to achieving the very ambitious goals which we laid out in 1993, and we are confident of reaching all of these goals as we continue our research and improve our analyses. In addition to the DOE interests, the satellite is tasked about one-third of the time with requests from other users supporting research ranging from volcanology to atmospheric sciences.

  2. Multiprocessor computing for images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantoni, V. ); Levialdi, S. )

    1988-08-01

    A review of image processing systems developed until now is given, highlighting the weak points of such systems and the trends that have dictated their evolution through the years producing different generations of machines. Each generation may be characterized by the hardware architecture, the programmability features and the relative application areas. The need for multiprocessing hierarchical systems is discussed focusing on pyramidal architectures. Their computational paradigms, their virtual and physical implementation, their programming and software requirements, and capabilities by means of suitable languages, are discussed.

  3. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  4. The Cosmic Background Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Padin; M. C. Shepherd; J. K. Cartwright; R. G. Keeney; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; W. L. Schaal; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Yamasaki; W. L. Holzapfel; J. E. Carlstrom; M. Joy; S. T. Myers; A. Otarola

    2001-10-05

    Design and performance details are given for the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), an interferometer array that is measuring the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) for multipoles in the range 400 switching scheme is used to reject cross-talk and low-frequency pick-up in the signal processing system. The CBI has a 3-axis mount which allows the tracking platform to be rotated about the optical axis, providing improved (u,v) coverage and a powerful discriminant against false signals generated in the receiving electronics. Rotating the tracking platform also permits polarization measurements when some of the antennas are configured for the orthogonal polarization.

  5. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  6. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  7. User Defined Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentat LENA|Upcoming Purchasing andUser Defined Images User

  8. ImageJ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdaho NationalAImageJ ImageJ

  9. VERITAS Observations of the Nova in V407 Cygni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Dwarkadas, V V; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lee, K; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Teši?, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles, due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 \\times 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  10. Chandra Observations of SNR RCW 103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Kari A; Park, Sangwook

    2015-01-01

    We analyze three Chandra observations, with a combined exposure time of 99 ks, of the Galactic supernova remnant RCW 103, a young supernova remnant, previously with no clear detection of metal-rich ejecta. Based on our imaging and spectral analyses of these deep Chandra data, we find evidence for metal-rich ejecta emission scattered throughout the remnant. X-ray emission from the shocked ejecta is generally weak, and the shocked circumstellar medium (CSM) is a largely dominant component across the entire remnant. The CSM component shows abundances of ~0.5 solar, while Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe abundances of the ejecta are up to a few times solar. Comparison of these ejecta abundances with yields from supernova nucleosynthesis models suggests, together with the existence of a central neutron star, a progenitor mass of ~18-20 M$_\\odot$, though the Fe/Si ratios are larger than predicted. The shocked CSM emission suggests a progenitor with high mass-loss rate and subsolar metallicity.

  11. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  12. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Hermann, Mark R. (San Ramon, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Tiszauer, Detlev H. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  13. Image-based occupancy sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  14. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying...

  15. Hybrid tomography for conductivity imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Widlak; O. Scherzer

    2012-03-20

    Hybrid imaging techniques utilize couplings of physical modalities -- they are called hybrid, because, typically, the excitation and measurement quantities belong to different modalities. Recently there has been an enormous research interest in this area because these methods promise very high resolution. In this paper we give a review on hybrid tomography methods for \\emph{electrical conductivity} imaging. The reviewed imaging methods utilize couplings between electric, magnetic and ultrasound modalities. By this it is possible to perform high-resolution electrical impedance imaging and to overcome the low-resolution problem of electric impedance tomography.

  16. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this technique has been especially popular in imaging such complex structures as aerogels and yeast cells. When applying the CDI technique to a magnetic system, the same...

  17. Observations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Thomas J.

    & Assessment Design & interpretation of monitoring & assessment methods cannot be divorced from processObservations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment & Performance Monitoring T.J. Harris Queen's University harrist@post.queensu.ca Control Systems 2004 #12;Acknowledge Contributions of NSERC Imperial Oil

  18. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  19. Observational evidence for return currents in solar flare loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Battaglia; Arnold O. Benz

    2008-06-11

    Context: The common flare scenario comprises an acceleration site in the corona and particle transport to the chromosphere. Using satellites available to date it has become possible to distinguish between the two processes of acceleration and transport, and study the particle propagation in flare loops in detail, as well as complete comparisons with theoretical predictions. Aims: We complete a quantitative comparison between flare hard X-ray spectra observed by RHESSI and theoretical predictions. This enables acceleration to be distinguished from transport and the nature of transport effects to be explored. Methods: Data acquired by the RHESSI satellite were analyzed using full sun spectroscopy as well as imaging spectroscopy methods. Coronal source and footpoint spectra of well observed limb events were analyzed and quantitatively compared to theoretical predictions. New concepts are introduced to existing models to resolve discrepancies between observations and predictions. Results: The standard thin-thick target solar flare model cannot explain the observations of all events. In the events presented here, propagation effects in the form of non-collisional energy loss are of importance to explain the observations. We demonstrate that those energy losses can be interpreted in terms of an electric field in the flare loop. One event seems consistent with particle propagation or acceleration in lower than average density in the coronal source. Conclusions: We find observational evidence for an electric field in flare loops caused by return currents.

  20. Toponome Imaging System (TIS): imaging the proteome with functional resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    established as an automated imaging technology capable of high- performance, high-content applications at continuous intensity levels for the first time.TIS directly addresses protein-network architecture. A breakthrough in fluorescence imaging has been reported using multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) technology

  1. MANSFIELD ET AL.: TRANSFORMING IMAGE COMPLETION 1 Transforming Image Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Pushmeet

    .K. Abstract Image completion is an important photo-editing task which involves synthetically filling a hole-of-the-art techniques. 1 Introduction Image completion is an important photo-editing task which involves synthetically the pixel traversal order critical. A number of user-driven [12] and intelligent [3] heuristics have been

  2. Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

    2012-09-21

    . This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

  3. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P., E-mail: mkennedy29@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  4. Nonlinear digital imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jen-Tang; Fleischer, Jason W

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging systems can surpass the limits of linear optics, but to date they have all relied on physical media (e.g. crystals) to work. These materials are all constrained by their physical properties, such as frequency selectivity, environmental sensitivity, time behavior, and fixed nonlinear response. Here, we show that electro-optic spatial light modulators (SLMs) can take the place of traditional nonlinear media, provided that there is a feedback between the shape of the object and the pattern on the modulator. This feedback creates a designer illumination that generalizes the field of adaptive optics to include object-dependent patterns. Unlike physical media, the SLM response can provide arbitrary mathematical functions, operate over broad bandwidths at high speeds, and work equally well at high power and single-photon levels. We demonstrate the method experimentally for both coherent and incoherent light.

  5. Processing Visual Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litke, Alan (UC Santa Cruz) [UC Santa Cruz

    2006-03-27

    The back of the eye is lined by an extraordinary biological pixel detector, the retina. This neural network is able to extract vital information about the external visual world, and transmit this information in a timely manner to the brain. In this talk, Professor Litke will describe a system that has been implemented to study how the retina processes and encodes dynamic visual images. Based on techniques and expertise acquired in the development of silicon microstrip detectors for high energy physics experiments, this system can simultaneously record the extracellular electrical activity of hundreds of retinal output neurons. After presenting first results obtained with this system, Professor Litke will describe additional applications of this incredible technology.

  6. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Bryan L. (Tijeras, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  7. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian

    2014-02-17

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2?ms-3?kW-2.45?GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  8. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  9. Complete measurements of quantum observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2012-06-12

    We define a complete measurement of a quantum observable (POVM) as a measurement of the maximally refined version of the POVM. Complete measurements give information from the multiplicities of the measurement outcomes and can be viewed as state preparation procedures. We show that any POVM can be measured completely by using sequential measurements or maximally refinable instruments. Moreover, the ancillary space of a complete measurement can be chosen to be minimal.

  10. Image Processing Feb. 26, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    : Partial Differential Equations and the Calculus ofVariations, G. Aubert and P. Kornprobst, 2nd Edition later #12;About BIL717 · This course provides a comprehensive overview of fundamental topics in image ForVision And Image Processing, Edited by A. Blake, P. Kohli and C. Rother, MIT Press, 2011 #12

  11. Astronomical Image and Signal Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starck, Jean-Luc

    of the amount of information in the image. Shannon [38], in the framework of communication theory, suggested and where, and the statistical one, which gives a quantity rela- tive to the amount of information. Another to measure the informa- tion in an astronomical image, in both a statistical and a deterministic way

  12. Video surveillance with speckle imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrano, Carmen J. (Livermore, CA); Brase, James M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-07-17

    A surveillance system looks through the atmosphere along a horizontal or slant path. Turbulence along the path causes blurring. The blurring is corrected by speckle processing short exposure images recorded with a camera. The exposures are short enough to effectively freeze the atmospheric turbulence. Speckle processing is used to recover a better quality image of the scene.

  13. Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros G

    2012-10-09

    A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

  14. The Environments of Supernovae in Post-Refurbishment Hubble Space Telescope Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Dyk, S D; Barth, A J; Filippenko, A V

    1999-01-01

    The locations of supernovae in the local stellar and gaseous environment in galaxies contain important clues to their progenitor stars. Access to this information, however, has been hampered by the limited resolution achieved by ground-based observations. High spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of galaxy fields in which supernovae had been observed can improve the situation considerably. We have examined the immediate environments of a few dozen supernovae using archival post-refurbishment HST images. Although our analysis is limited due to signal-to-noise ratio and filter bandpass considerations, the images allow us for the first time to resolve individual stars in, and to derive detailed color-magnitude diagrams for, several environments. We are able to place more rigorous constraints on the masses of these supernovae. A search was made for late-time emission from supernovae in the archival images, and for the progenitor stars in presupernova images of the host galaxies. We have detected...

  15. The Standardisation and Sequencing of Solar Eclipse Images for the Eclipse Megamovie Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krista, Larisza

    2015-01-01

    We present a new tool, the Solar Eclipse Image Standardisation and Sequencing (SEISS), developed to process multi-source total solar eclipse images by adjusting them to the same standard of size, resolution, and orientation. Furthermore, by analysing the eclipse images we can determine the relative time between the observations and order them to create a movie of the observed total solar eclipse sequence. We successfully processed images taken at the 14 November 2012 total solar eclipse that occurred in Queensland, Australia, and created a short eclipse proto-movie. The SEISS tool was developed for the Eclipse Megamovie Project (EMP: https://www.eclipsemegamovie.org), with the goal of processing thousands of images taken by the public during solar eclipse events. EMP is a collaboration among multiple institutes aiming to engage and advance the public interest in solar eclipses and the science of the Sun-Earth connection.

  16. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ?11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (?100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  17. Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University] [Clark University

    2014-05-19

    The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

  18. LOCALIZED PLASMA DENSITY ENHANCEMENTS OBSERVED IN STEREO COR1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2009-08-20

    Measurements of solar wind speed in the solar corona, where it is primarily accelerated, have proven elusive. One of the more successful attempts has been the tracking of outward-moving density inhomogeneities in white-light coronagraph images. These inhomogeneities, or 'blobs', have been treated as passive tracers of the ambient solar wind. Here we report on the extension of these observations to lower altitudes using the STEREO COR1 coronagraph, and discuss the implications of these measurements for theories about the origin of these features.

  19. Lensless Fourier-Transform Ghost Imaging with Classical Incoherent Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minghui Zhang; Qing Wei; Xia Shen; Yongfeng Liu; Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Shensheng Han

    2006-05-22

    The Fourier-Transform ghost imaging of both amplitude-only and pure-phase objects was experimentally observed with classical incoherent light at Fresnel distance by a new lensless scheme. The experimental results are in good agreement with the standard Fourier-transform of the corresponding objects. This scheme provides a new route towards aberration-free diffraction-limited 3D images with classically incoherent thermal light, which have no resolution and depth-of-field limitations of lens-based tomographic systems.

  20. SU-E-T-225: It Is Necessary to Contouring the Brainstem On MRI Images in Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Liu, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the error in contouring the brainstem for patients with head and neck cancer who underwent radiotherapy based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. Methods: 20 brain tumor and 17 nasopharyngeal cancer patients were randomly selected. Each patient underwent MR and CT scanning. For each patient, one observer contoured the brainstem on CT and MR images for 10 times, and 10 observers from five centers delineated the brainstem on CT and MR images only one time. The inter- and intra-observers volume and outline variations were compared. Results: The volumes of brainstem contoured by inter- and intra-observers on CT and MR images were similar (p>0.05). The reproducibility of contouring brainstem on MR images was better than that on CT images (p<0.05) for both inter- and intra-observer variability. The inter- and intra-observer for contouring on CT images reached mean values of 0.81±0.05 (p>0.05) and of 0.85±0.05 (p>0.05), respectively, while on MR images these respective values were 0.90±0.05 (p>0.05) and 0.92±0.04 (p>0.05). Conclusion: Contouring the brainstem on MR images was more accurate and reproducible than that on CT images. Precise information might be more helpful for protecting the brainstem radiation injury the patients whose lesion were closed to brainstem.

  1. Observational Astronomy Gain of a CCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    . The electronics cart will be set up nearby. Locate the battery power-pack and plug in the lamp. Turn it up so you. A centered and well-focused image is very important. · Flip the mirror out of the optical path, turn down the lamp brightness, and take some practice images of the step wedge. Adjust the brightness of the lamp

  2. Pixel-level Image Fusion Algorithms for Multi-camera Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    Pixel-level Image Fusion Algorithms for Multi-camera Imaging System A Thesis Presented of image fusion technologies in the multi sensor image fusion system and applications. With specific focus on pixel level image fusion, the process after the image registration is processed, we develop graphic user

  3. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  4. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncInc JumpObamaObservation

  5. Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate is reflected in the line profiles of explosive events, and a magnetic cancellation rate of 3 × 1015 Mx s-1 ob to 25 km s-1 were determined. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated

  6. Observing the invisible through imaging mass spectrometry, a window into the metabolic exchange patterns of microbes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    patterns of microbes David J. Gonzalezi, 1 , Yuquan Xua, 1 , Yu-Liang Yanga, 1 , Eduardo Esquenazia, d, United States A R T I C L E I N F O A B S T R A C T Many microbes can be cultured as single patterns of a diverse array of microbes, including thermophilic and mesophilic fungi, cyanobacteria, marine

  7. Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2009-05-15

    Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding...

  8. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  9. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gerald W. (East Moriches, NY); Brill, A. Bertrand (Shoreham, NY); Bizais, Yves J. C. (Upton, NY); Rowe, R. Wanda (Upton, NY); Zubal, I. George (Upton, NY)

    1986-01-01

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  10. Image indexing using color correlograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jing (Ossining, NY); Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi (San Jose, CA); Mitra, Mandar (Calcutta, IN); Zhu, Wei-Jing (Ossining, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A color correlogram is a three-dimensional table indexed by color and distance between pixels which expresses how the spatial correlation of color changes with distance in a stored image. The color correlogram may be used to distinguish an image from other images in a database. To create a color correlogram, the colors in the image are quantized into m color values, c.sub.i . . . c.sub.m. Also, the distance values k.epsilon.[d] to be used in the correlogram are determined where [d] is the set of distances between pixels in the image, and where dmax is the maximum distance measurement between pixels in the image. Each entry (i, j, k) in the table is the probability of finding a pixel of color c.sub.i at a selected distance k from a pixel of color c.sub.i. A color autocorrelogram, which is a restricted version of the color correlogram that considers color pairs of the form (i,i) only, may also be used to identify an image.

  11. Imaging algorithms in radio interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Sault; T. A. Oosterloo

    2007-01-08

    The paper reviews progress in imaging in radio interferometry for the period 1993-1996. Unlike an optical telescope, the basic measurements of a radio interferometer (correlations between antennas) are indirectly related to a sky brightness image. In a real sense, algorithms and computers are the lenses of a radio interferometer. In the last 20 years, whereas interferometer hardware advances have resulted in improvements of a factor of a few, algorithm and computer advances have resulted in orders of magnitude improvement in image quality. Developing these algorithms has been a fruitful and comparatively inexpensive method of improving the performance of existing telescopes, and has made some newer telescopes possible. In this paper, we review recent developments in the algorithms used in the imaging part of the reduction process. What constitutes an `imaging algorithm'? Whereas once there was a steady `forward' progression in the reduction process of editing, calibrating, transforming and, finally, deconvolving, this is no longer true. The introduction of techniques such as self-calibration, and algorithms that go directly from visibilities to final images, have made the dividing lines less clear. Although we briefly consider self-calibration, for the purposes of this paper calibration issues are generally excluded. Most attention will be directed to the steps which form final images from the calibrated visibilities.

  12. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  13. Observing the Rosensweig instability of a quantum ferrofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadau, Holger; Wenzel, Matthias; Wink, Clarissa; Maier, Thomas; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Ferrofluids show unusual hydrodynamic effects due to the magnetic nature of their constituents. For increasing magnetization a classical ferrofluid undergoes a Rosensweig instability and creates self-organized ordered surface structures or droplet crystals. A Bose-Einstein condensate with strong dipolar interactions is a quantum ferrofluid that also shows superfluidity. The field of dipolar quantum gases is motivated by the search for new phases that break continuous symmetries. The simultaneous breaking of continuous symmetries like the phase invariance for the superfluid state and the translational symmetry for a crystal provides the basis of novel states of matter. However, interaction-induced crystallization in a superfluid has not been observed. Here we use in situ imaging to directly observe the spontaneous transition from an unstructured superfluid to an ordered arrangement of droplets in an atomic dysprosium Bose-Einstein condensate. By utilizing a Feshbach resonance to control the interparticle inter...

  14. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  15. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  16. Structured representation of images for language generation and image retrieval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Desmond

    2015-06-29

    A photograph typically depicts an aspect of the real world, such as an outdoor landscape, a portrait, or an event. The task of creating abstract digital representations of images has received a great deal of attention ...

  17. Image Storage in Hot Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

    2007-10-22

    We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

  18. Imaging Lithium Air Electrodes | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging Reveals Lithium Distribution in Lithium-Air Electrodes Agatha Bardoel - January 01, 2013 Image produced by neutron-computed tomography. The next step in...

  19. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most...

  20. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Charles; Veras, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Geraldo; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela

    2008-08-29

    Ocular fundus images can provide information about retinal, ophthalmic, and even systemic diseases such as diabetes. Microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest sign of Diabetic Retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Robust detection of MAs in digital color fundus images is critical in the development of automated screening systems for this kind of disease. Automatic grading of these images is being considered by health boards so that the human grading task is reduced. In this paper we describe segmentation and the feature extraction methods for candidate MAs detection.We show that the candidate MAs detected with the methodology have been successfully classified by a MLP neural network (correct classification of 84percent).

  1. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  2. Imaging an event horizon: mitigation of scattering toward Sagittarius A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Lu, Ru-Sen; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh; Vertatschitsch, Laura E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bouman, Katherine L.; Zoran, Daniel; Freeman, William T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Psaltis, Dimitrios [Astronomy and Physics Departments, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Street, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Broderick, Avery E. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gwinn, Carl R., E-mail: vfish@haystack.mit.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    The image of the emission surrounding the black hole in the center of the Milky Way is predicted to exhibit the imprint of general relativistic (GR) effects, including the existence of a shadow feature and a photon ring of diameter ?50 ?as. Structure on these scales can be resolved by millimeter-wavelength very long baseline interferometry. However, strong-field GR features of interest will be blurred at ? ? 1.3 mm due to scattering by interstellar electrons. The scattering properties are well understood over most of the relevant range of baseline lengths, suggesting that the scattering may be (mostly) invertible. We simulate observations of a model image of Sgr A* and demonstrate that the effects of scattering can indeed be mitigated by correcting the visibilities before reconstructing the image. This technique is also applicable to Sgr A* at longer wavelengths.

  3. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  4. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Correction to "Precursor activation and substorm expansion associated with observations of a dipolarization front by Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Correction to "Precursor activation and substorm expansion associated with observations of a dipolarization front by Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS)" C. L. Tang, V. Angelopoulos, A. Runov, C. T, K. H. Fornacon, and Z. Y. Li (2010), Correction to "Precursor activation and substorm expansion

  6. Direct Observations of Plasma Upflows and Condensation in a Catastrophically Cooling Solar Transition Region Looop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orange, N B; Oluseyi, H M; Hesterly, K; Patel, M; Champey, P R

    2015-01-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models, as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the {\\it EUV Imaging Spectrometer} (EIS) onboard {\\it Hinode}, we observe fast upflows ($v_\\lambda$\\,$\\le$\\,$-$10 km s$^{-1}$) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8\\,$\\le$\\,$\\log T$\\,$\\le$ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop ($\\log T$\\,$\\le$\\,6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of $+$\\,5 km s$^{-1}$ and $-$\\,60 km s$^{-1}$ are observed at footpoint sites. These flows speeds and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at site of upflows only) derived from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}'s (SDOs) { \\it Helioseismic Magnetic Imager}'s (HMI) line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30\\% mass in-flux at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic coo...

  7. Snow water equivalent in the Sierra Nevada: Blending snow sensor observations with snowmelt model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Snow water equivalent in the Sierra Nevada: Blending snow sensor observations with snowmelt model 2013. [1] We estimate the spatial distribution of daily melt-season snow water equivalent (SWE) over snow cover images with a spatially distributed snowmelt model and a blended method in which

  8. Observations of Earth space by self-powered stations in Antarctica S. B. Mende,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Observations of Earth space by self-powered stations in Antarctica S. B. Mende,1 W. Rachelson,1 R is the generation of power and heat for a sizable ground station that can accommodate an optical imaging instrument-coil magnetometers, and ELF/VLF and LM/MF/HF receivers. Originally these stations were powered by propane fuelled

  9. High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study Keywords: Io Remote sensing Instruments a b s t r a c t We present modeled images of Io at a variety objectives that could be achieved from missions engaged in long range remote-sensing of Io during

  10. High-Spatial Resolution Observations of Pores and the Formation of a Rudimentary Penumbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    images derived from Local Correlation Tracking is different from the previous observations. Also. Subject headings: Sun: activity, Sun: magnetic fields, Sun: sunspots, techniques: high angular resolution 1. Introduction A sunspot is a complex magnetic concentration on the surface of the Sun

  11. MICROWAVE AND HARD XRAY OBSERVATIONS OF FOOTPOINT EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    MICROWAVE AND HARD X­RAY OBSERVATIONS OF FOOTPOINT EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES M. R. KUNDU Dept radio and X­ray imaging data for two solar flares in order to test the idea that asymmetric microwaves and hard x­rays (HXR) has been known to exist for a long time. This connection is manifested

  12. Image credit: Dreamstime Technology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through development of superconducting magnet technology. Without that research today's high- resolutionImage credit: Dreamstime Technology for research saves lives Technology developed to advance STFC in particle physics technology not only supported important experiments at CERN but pioneered early

  13. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  14. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying...

  15. Motion Estimation from Disparity Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirdjian, D.

    2001-05-07

    A new method for 3D rigid motion estimation from stereo is proposed in this paper. The appealing feature of this method is that it directly uses the disparity images obtained from stereo matching. We assume that the stereo ...

  16. Methods for functional brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

  17. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  18. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2014-06-27

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  19. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  20. Thomas Jefferson: image and ideology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Gaye N. S. B.

    2012-11-30

    This thesis explores the public image of Thomas Jefferson as recorded in his major life portraits. It consults the traditions that surrounded eighteenth-century portraiture and the history of the portrait as a means of ...

  1. Computational time-resolved imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirmani, Ghulam A. (Ghulam Ahmed)

    2015-01-01

    Classical photography uses steady-state illumination and light sensing with focusing optics to capture scene reflectivity as images; temporal variations of the light field are not exploited. This thesis explores the use ...

  2. Small Scale Magnetic Flux Emergence Observed with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenichi Otsuji; Kazunari Shibata; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoru Ueno; Shin'ichi Nagata; Takuma Matsumoto; Tahei Nakamura; Hiroko Watanabe; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-20

    We observed small scale magnetic flux emergence in a sunspot moat region by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. We analyzed filtergram images observed in the wavelengths of Fe 6302 angstrom, G-band and Ca II H. In Stokes I images of Fe 6302 angstrom, emerging magnetic flux were recognized as dark lanes. In G-band, they showed their shapes almost the same as in Stokes I images. These magnetic flux appeared as dark filaments in Ca II H images. Stokes V images of Fe 6302 angstrom showed pairs of opposite polarities at footpoints of each filament. These magnetic concentrations are identified to correspond to bright points in G-band/Ca II H images. From the analysis of time-sliced diagrams, we derived following properties of emerging flux, which are consistent with the previous works. (1) Two footpoints separate each other at a speed of 4.2 km/s during the initial phase of evolution and decreases to about 1 km/s in 10 minutes later. (2) Ca II H filaments appear almost simultaneously with the formation of dark lanes in Stokes I in the observational cadence of 2 minutes. (3) The lifetime of the dark lanes in Stokes I and G-band is 8 minutes, while that of Ca filament is 12 minutes. An interesting phenomena was observed that an emerging flux tube expands laterally in the photosphere with a speed of 3.8 km/s. Discussion on the horizontal expansion of flux tube will be given with refernce to previous simulation studies.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Mark A. (West Lafayette, IN); Tsang, Brenda W. (Lafayette, IN)

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  5. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa (Albuquerque, NM); Sackos, John Theodore (Albuquerque, NM); Bradley, Bart Davis (Albuquerque, NM); Nellums, Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  6. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government...

  7. Unsuspected Pulmonary Embolism in Observation Unit Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limkakeng, Alexander T.; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Chandra, Abhinav

    2009-01-01

    department observation unit. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2001;ED) managed acute care unit on ED overcrowding and emergencyof a chest pain observation unit compared with routine care.

  8. Observed Communication in Distressed Couples' Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baucom, Katherine Jane Williams

    2012-01-01

    A. (2011). Observed communication in couples two years afterA. (2011). Observed communication in couples two years afterA. (1996). The Communication Patterns Questionnaire: The

  9. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  10. Noise Reduction in CMOS Image Sensors for High Quality Imaging: The Autocorrelation Function Filter on Burst Image Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Frank

    Noise Reduction in CMOS Image Sensors for High Quality Imaging: The Autocorrelation Function Filter-hiro@waseda.jp Abstract We propose a new method for image noise detection and reduction in complementary metal oxide semi- conductor (CMOS) image sensors inspired from audio noise cancelling techniques. Our algorithm is based

  11. High speed imager test station

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, G.J.; Albright, K.L.; Turko, B.T.

    1995-11-14

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment. 12 figs.

  12. High speed imager test station

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, George J. (Santa Fe, NM); Albright, Kevin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Turko, Bojan T. (Moraga, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A test station enables the performance of a solid state imager (herein called a focal plane array or FPA) to be determined at high image frame rates. A programmable waveform generator is adapted to generate clock pulses at determinable rates for clock light-induced charges from a FPA. The FPA is mounted on an imager header board for placing the imager in operable proximity to level shifters for receiving the clock pulses and outputting pulses effective to clock charge from the pixels forming the FPA. Each of the clock level shifters is driven by leading and trailing edge portions of the clock pulses to reduce power dissipation in the FPA. Analog circuits receive output charge pulses clocked from the FPA pixels. The analog circuits condition the charge pulses to cancel noise in the pulses and to determine and hold a peak value of the charge for digitizing. A high speed digitizer receives the peak signal value and outputs a digital representation of each one of the charge pulses. A video system then displays an image associated with the digital representation of the output charge pulses clocked from the FPA. In one embodiment, the FPA image is formatted to a standard video format for display on conventional video equipment.

  13. Quantum fluctuations in the image of a Bose gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Negretti; Carsten Henkel; Klaus Molmer

    2008-08-27

    We analyze the information content of density profiles for an ultracold Bose gas of atoms and extract resolution limits for observables contained in these images. Our starting point is density correlations that we compute within the Bogoliubov approximation, taking into account quantum and thermal fluctuations beyond mean-field theory. This provides an approximate way to construct the joint counting statistics of atoms in an array of pixels covering the gas. We derive the Fisher information of an image and the associated Cramer-Rao sensitivity bound for measuring observables contained in the image. We elaborate on our recent study on position measurements of a dark soliton [Negretti et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 043606 (2008)] where a sensitivity scaling with the atomic density as n^{-3/4} was found. We discuss here a wider class of soliton solutions and present a detailed analysis of the Bogoliubov excitations and the gapless (Goldstone) excitation modes. These fluctuations around the mean field contribute to the noise in the image, and we show how they can actually improve the ability to locate the position of the soliton.

  14. The Difference Imaging Pipeline for the Transient Search in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, R; Childress, M; Covarrubias, R; D'Andrea, C B; Finley, D A; Fischer, J; Foley, R J; Goldstein, D; Gupta, R R; Kuehn, K; Marcha, M; Nichol, R C; Papadopoulos, A; Sako, M; Scolnic, D; Smith, M; Sullivan, M; Wester, W; Yuan, F; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01

    We describe the difference imaging pipeline (DiffImg) used to detect transients in deep images from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN) in its first observing season from Aug 2013 through Feb 2014. DES-SN is a search for transients in which ten 3-deg^2 fields are repeatedly observed in the g,r,i,z passbands with a cadence of about 1 week. The observing strategy has been optimized to measure high-quality light curves and redshifts for thousands of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with the goal of measuring dark energy parameters. The essential DiffImg functions are to align each search image to a deep reference image, do a pixel-by-pixel subtraction, and then examine the subtracted image for significant positive detections of point-source objects. The vast majority of detections are subtraction artifacts, but after selection requirements and image filtering with an automated scanning program, there are 130 detections per deg^2 per observation in each band, of which only 25% are artifacts. Of the 7500 tr...

  15. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merry, W.R. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4{plus_minus}0.1 times the mass of a free electron (m{sub e}). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00{plus_minus}0.05) {center_dot} m{sub e} was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30{plus_minus}0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90{plus_minus}0.1) {center_dot} m{sub e}.

  16. Image potential states at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merry, W.R. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Angle-resolved two-photon laser photoemission was used to observe the image potential electronic states on the (111) face of a silver single crystal. The transient image potential states were excited from the occupied bulk bands with photons whose energy was tunable around 4 eV. Photoemission of the image potential states was accomplished with photons of energy tunable around 2 eV. Image potential states were found to persist in the presence of physisorbed adlayers of xenon and cyclohexane. On clean Ag(111), the effective mass of the n=1 image potential state was found to be 1.4{plus minus}0.1 times the mass of a free electron (m{sub e}). A binding energy of 0.77 eV, measured by earlier workers, was assumed in analysis of the data for the clean surface. On Ag(111), at 75 K covered by one monolayer of xenon, the binding energy of the n=1 image potential state was unchanged relative to its value on the clean surface. An effective mass of (1.00{plus minus}0.05) {center dot} m{sub e} was obtained. On Ag(111) at 167 K, covered by one monolayer of cyclohexane, the binding energy of the n=2 member of the image potential series was 0.30{plus minus}0.05 eV. The energy of the n=1 state was again unchanged by deposition of the adsorbate. The effective masses of both states were (0.90{plus minus}0.1) {center dot} m{sub e}.

  17. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-20

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from H? and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  18. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (z approx 0.5 +- 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically...

  19. THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY ARISING IN BRAIN IMAGING ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-21

    THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY ARISING IN BRAIN IMAGING. PLAMEN STEFANOV AND GUNTHER UHLMANN. ABSTRACT. We study the mathematical ...

  20. Image Based Gisting in CLIR Mark Sanderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Mark

    from the Rosch [1] paper. These search terms were entered into the Google Image search engine in order the ability of subjects to derive the search term that might have been used to return a set of images from on subjects' abilities in this respect. Search terms were defined and images found using an online image

  1. RESTORATION OF CHOPPED AND NODDED IMAGES BY JIAN-FENG CAI, RAYMOND CHAN, LIXIN SHEN, AND ZUOWEI SHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Raymond

    RESTORATION OF CHOPPED AND NODDED IMAGES BY FRAMELETS JIAN-FENG CAI, RAYMOND CHAN, LIXIN SHEN, AND ZUOWEI SHEN§ Abstract. In infrared astronomy, an observed image from a chop and nod process can the efficiency of our method over the projected Landweber method. Key words. Tight frame, chopped and nodded

  2. ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method the method to a solar flare observed on 2002 February 20 by the RHESSI instrument. The event is characterized

  3. IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE@mail.ucf.edu ABSTRACT The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new imaging technology microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

  4. ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

  5. Robust Aerial Object Tracking in Images with Lens Flare Andreas Nussberger1, Helmut Grabner1 and Luc Van Gool1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabner, Helmut

    often result in a high number of false detections. Depending on the solar radiation lens flares are very the date, time, position and attitude of the observer we predict the lens flare direction within the image

  6. Interpretation of HRTEM images by image simulation: An introduction to theory and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Keefe, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This tutorial describes the use of image simulation as an aid to interpretation of high-resolution transmission electron microscope images. Topics include some image processing as well as image simulation. Image processing is the manipulation of experimental images in order to extract some desired information. Image simulation is the generation of a computed or simulated image from a model structure. It requires a detailed knowledge of the process of image formation in the high-resolution transmission electron microscope. This tutorial concentrates on image simulation, with examples of image processing appearing only as required as illustrations. Because this is an introduction, the theory of image simulation is described, but not explored in depth. The practice of image simulation is covered in sufficient detail to enable the student to understand the functions of the various steps in the computations, and the parameters necessary for their evaluation.

  7. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  8. A Model of Image Representation and Indexing in Image Database Systems \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    A Model of Image Representation and Indexing in Image Database Systems \\Lambda G. Sheikholeslami Buffalo, NY 14260 Abstract Image database systems need to be built to support effective and efficient­oriented image decomposition structures to be used as a fundamental data model for representing image content

  9. Interpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    a corresponding out-of-focus image recorded from a similar wire [2]. These images cannot be interpreted usingInterpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field, image simulation Electron holography is well suited to the investigation of electric and magnetic

  10. STAR Images: Image gallery from the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors allow final statements to be made about the collision. The gallery of STAR images makes available a small collection of event-generated images from Gold-Beam experiments, a simulation of TCP Drift, and a library of STAR instrument and construction photos.

  11. Thermographic measurements on plant leaves Christoph S. Garbea, Ulrich Schurrb and Bernd Jhnea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    metabolism of the organs. As plants are sessile organism, they cannot escape from unfavorable environments a temperature most favorable for their metabolism, plants have developed a number of thermoreg- ulation is driven though the concentration gradient of water vapor in the leaf-internal gas space

  12. Temperature Dependent Fluorescence Ce-doped Garnets for Use as Thermographic Phosphors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    structure with a lattice constant of ~1.20 nm was produced via the simple combustion method. The addition. These results suggest that YAG:Cr is a potential material for low temperature range TGP . ·Combustion synthesis N2 Laser Excitation Pulse ex =337nm Thermocouple Data Acquisition System Phosphor Sample

  13. Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use as Thermographic Phosphors in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    for thermal barrier coatings must be developed to provide insulation for gas turbines operating above 1200° C and effects of heat fatigue · Insulation for components in gas turbines allows for higher operating thermal barrier coating material · YSZ can not be used reliably for temperatures > 1200° C · New materials

  14. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use as Thermographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    the lifetimes of the protected components. In addition, deposition of these coatings on the components in a gas transformations occur in the material that lead to the formation of cracks in the coating3 . The development of new gas turbines operating at higher temperatures than 1200º C poses the need for the development

  15. Numerical analysis and thermographic investigation of induction heating Matej Kranjc, Anze Zupanic *, Damijan Miklavcic, Tomaz Jarm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    with thermocouples can be difficult to achieve on a production line. An- other major constraint is the thermocouple for device operators, easy maintainability of the equipment, quality assurance, automation capability

  16. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decaysArticle) | SciTech Connect Thermodynamics

  17. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. JeffreyThermal Multi-layer4Study of the

  18. Optics design for J-TEXT ECE imaging with field curvature adjustment lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Liu, W. D.; Xie, J., E-mail: jlxie@ustc.edu.cn [School of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Hu, X.; Muscatello, C. M.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Chen, M.; Ren, X. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Tobias, B. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Zhuang, G.; Yang, Z. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas. Of particular importance has been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) for imaging T{sub e} fluctuations. Key to the success of ECEI is a large Gaussian optics system constituting a major portion of the focusing of the microwave radiation from the plasma to the detector array. Both the spatial resolution and observation range are dependent upon the imaging optics system performance. In particular, it is critical that the field curvature on the image plane is reduced to decrease crosstalk between vertical channels. The receiver optics systems for two ECEI on the J-TEXT device have been designed to ameliorate these problems and provide good performance with additional field curvature adjustment lenses with a meniscus shape to correct the aberrations from several spherical surfaces.

  19. Hard X-Ray Imaging of Individual Spectral Components in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Krucker, Säm

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities wi...

  20. LOFAR tied-array imaging and spectroscopy of solar S bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morosan, D E; Zucca, P; O'Flannagain, A; Fallows, R; Reid, H; Magdalenic, J; Mann, G; Bisi, M M; Kerdraon, A; Konovalenko, A A; MacKinnon, A L; Rucker, H O; Thide, B; Vocks, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brouw, W N; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; Eisloffel, J; Falcke, H; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Griessmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Scaife, A M M; Sluman, J; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission that is often associated with energetic phenomena ranging from nanoflares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (solar S bursts (where S stands for short). To date, these have neither been studied extensively nor imaged because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims. Here, Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) observations were used to study the spectral and spatial characteristics of a multitude of S bursts, as well as their origin and possible emission mechanisms. Methods. We used 170 simultaneous tied-array beams for spectroscopy and imaging of S bursts. Since S bursts have short timescales and fine frequency structures, high cadence (~50 ms) tied-array images were used instead of standard interferometric imaging, that is currently limited to one image per second. Results. On 9 July 2013, over 3000 S bursts were ob...

  1. Extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Jackson, D. P.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration for a two-dimensional (2D) imaging x-ray spectrograph based on a conically bent crystal is introduced: extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph (ELICS). The ELICS configuration has important advantages over spectrographs that are based on cylindrically and spherically bent crystals. The main advantages are that a wide variety of large-aperture crystals can be used, and any desired magnification in the spatial direction (the direction orthogonal to spectral dispersion) can be achieved by the use of different experimental arrangements. The ELICS can be set up so that the detector plane is almost perpendicular to the incident rays, a good configuration for time-resolved spectroscopy. ELICSs with mica crystals of 45x90 mm{sup 2} aperture have been successfully used for imaging on the XP and COBRA pulsed power generators, yielding spectra with spatial resolution in 2D of Z pinches and X pinches.

  2. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  3. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sitter, Jr., David N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  4. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  5. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, Jon O. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  6. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  7. Multispectral imaging method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Vargo, T.D.; Lockhart, R.R.; Descour, M.R.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-06

    A multispectral imaging method and apparatus are described which are adapted for use in determining material properties, especially properties characteristic of abnormal non-dermal cells. A target is illuminated with a narrow band light beam. The target expresses light in response to the excitation. The expressed light is collected and the target's response at specific response wavelengths to specific excitation wavelengths is measured. From the measured multispectral response the target's properties can be determined. A sealed, remote probe and robust components can be used for cervical imaging. 5 figs.

  8. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  9. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingInImaging and

  10. THE FAINTEST RADIO SOURCE YET: EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL LENS SDSS J1004+4112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, N.

    2011-09-20

    We present new radio observations of the large-separation gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112, taken in a total of 6 hr of observations with the Expanded Very Large Array. The maps reach a thermal noise level of approximately 4 {mu}Jy. We detect four of the five lensed images at the 15-35 {mu}Jy level, representing a source of intrinsic flux density, after allowing for lensing magnification, of about 1 {mu}Jy, intrinsically probably the faintest radio source yet detected. This reinforces the utility of gravitational lensing in potentially allowing us to study nJy-level sources before the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. In an optical observation taken three months after the radio observation, image C is the brightest image, whereas the radio map shows flux density ratios consistent with previous optical observations. Future observations separated by a time delay will give the intrinsic flux ratios of the images in this source.

  11. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

    2014-10-29

    The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

  12. Image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, James L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lassahn, Gordon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-01-05

    Aspects of the invention relate to image change detection systems, methods, and articles of manufacture. According to one aspect, a method of identifying differences between a plurality of images is described. The method includes loading a source image and a target image into memory of a computer, constructing source and target edge images from the source and target images to enable processing of multiband images, displaying the source and target images on a display device of the computer, aligning the source and target edge images, switching displaying of the source image and the target image on the display device, to enable identification of differences between the source image and the target image.

  13. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  14. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  15. The image quality of ion computed tomography at clinical imaging dose levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@oncology.au.dk [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bassler, Niels [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurately predicting the range of radiotherapy ions in vivo is important for the precise delivery of dose in particle therapy. Range uncertainty is currently the single largest contribution to the dose margins used in planning and leads to a higher dose to normal tissue. The use of ion CT has been proposed as a method to improve the range uncertainty and thereby reduce dose to normal tissue of the patient. A wide variety of ions have been proposed and studied for this purpose, but no studies evaluate the image quality obtained with different ions in a consistent manner. However, imaging doses ion CT is a concern which may limit the obtainable image quality. In addition, the imaging doses reported have not been directly comparable with x-ray CT doses due to the different biological impacts of ion radiation. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust methodology for comparing the image quality of ion CT with respect to particle therapy, taking into account different reconstruction methods and ion species. Methods: A comparison of different ions and energies was made. Ion CT projections were simulated for five different scenarios: Protons at 230 and 330 MeV, helium ions at 230 MeV/u, and carbon ions at 430 MeV/u. Maps of the water equivalent stopping power were reconstructed using a weighted least squares method. The dose was evaluated via a quality factor weighted CT dose index called the CT dose equivalent index (CTDEI). Spatial resolution was measured by the modulation transfer function. This was done by a noise-robust fit to the edge spread function. Second, the image quality as a function of the number of scanning angles was evaluated for protons at 230 MeV. In the resolution study, the CTDEI was fixed to 10 mSv, similar to a typical x-ray CT scan. Finally, scans at a range of CTDEI’s were done, to evaluate dose influence on reconstruction error. Results: All ions yielded accurate stopping power estimates, none of which were statistically different from the ground truth image. Resolution (as defined by the modulation transfer function = 10% point) was the best for the helium ions (18.21 line pairs/cm) and worst for the lower energy protons (9.37 line pairs/cm). The weighted quality factor for the different ions ranged from 1.23 for helium to 2.35 for carbon ions. For the angle study, a sharp increase in absolute error was observed below 45 distinct angles, giving the impression of a threshold, rather than smooth, limit to the number of angles. Conclusions: The method presented for comparing various ion CT modalities is feasible for practical use. While all studied ions would improve upon x-ray CT for particle range estimation, helium appears to give the best results and deserves further study for imaging.

  16. The Central Region in M100: Observations and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Knapen; J. E. Beckman; C. H. Heller; I. Shlosman; R. S. de Jong

    1995-06-19

    We present new high-resolution observations of the center of the late-type spiral M100 (NGC 4321) supplemented by 3D numerical modeling of stellar and gas dynamics, including star formation (SF). NIR imaging has revealed a stellar bar, previously inferred from optical and 21 cm observations, and an ovally-shaped ring-like structure in the plane of the disk. The K isophotes become progressively elongated and skewed to the position angle of the bar (outside and inside the `ring') forming an inner bar-like region. The galaxy exhibits a circumnuclear starburst in the inner part of the K `ring'. Two maxima of the K emission have been observed to lie symmetrically with respect to the nucleus and equidistant from it slightly leading the stellar bar. We interpret the twists in the K isophotes as being indicative of the presence of a double inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) and test this hypothesis by modeling the gas flow in a self-consistent gas + stars disk embedded in a halo, with an overall NGC4321-like mass distribution. We have reproduced the basic morphology of the region (the bar, the large scale trailing shocks, two symmetric K peaks corresponding to gas compression maxima which lie at the caustic formed by the interaction of a pair of trailing and leading shocks in the vicinity of the inner ILR, both peaks being sites of SF, and two additional zones of SF corresponding to the gas compression maxima, referred usually as `twin peaks').

  17. The Galactic cosmic-ray Sun shadow observed by HAWC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enriquez, O

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Solar corona is difficult to measure directly. However, indirect observations of the solar corona are possible using the deficit in flux of cosmic rays coming from the direction of the Sun. Low-energy cosmic rays (~GeV) are deflected by the inner magnetic field of the Sun and the interplanetary magnetic field frozen into the solar wind. In contrast, high-energy cosmic rays (~TeV and above) are absorbed in the Sun's photosphere producing a shadow in the Sun's nominal position viewed from Earth. Several ground-based instruments have observed the effects of the heliospheric magnetic field on the size of the sun shadow and its position. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is an air shower array located in the central region of Mexico that observes TeV cosmic rays at a rate of about 15 kHz. in this work, we present preliminary images of the sun shadow from data collected by HAWC during 2013 and 2014 for different energy ranges.

  18. Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Kil Joong; Lee, Kyoung Ho

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

  19. Spectral imaging with a cid camera. Final report, 4 February 1982-14 September 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, T.D.

    1985-03-22

    This report describes a program of spectral imaging observations of the solar atmosphere using the Sacromento Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope. The observations were obtained with Lockheed instruments including: an active tilt mirror for image motion compensation; polarization analyzer; narrowband tunable birefringent filter; photoelectric cid array camera; digital video image processor; and a microcomputer controller. Five observing runs were made, three of them with the entire system in operation. The images obtained were processed to measure magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere with very high spatial resolution - 0.5 arcseconds on the best frames. Sets of these images have been studied to address three scientific problems; (1) The relationship among small magnetic flux tubes, downdrafts and granulation; (2) The puzzling flux changes in isolated magnetic features in a decaying active region; (3) The temporal power spectrum of the magnetogram signal in isolated flux tubes. Examples of the narrowband images are included in the report, along with abstracts and manuscripts of papers, resulting from this research.

  20. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  1. BULGARIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES CYBERNETICS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES Volume 12, No 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    statistics, theory of digital processing of one-dimensional and multidimensional signals, wavelet-transforms in an analog form via its transformation into a one-dimensional signal by the respective scan. Digital thermographs approaches for the digital image processing technique. Keywords: Technological diagnostics

  2. The 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    The 6th International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces Kyoto, Japan, May 17-21, 2010 A new approach for 3C3D measurements of aqueous boundary layer ows relative to the wind-wave undulated thermographic images of the air-water interface show coherent pat- terns, probably generated by Langmuir

  3. Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab and Bernd Jhneab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    Measuring important parameters for air-sea heat exchange Christoph S. Garbeab, Uwe Schimpfab Exchange, Heat flux, Digital Image Processing, Surface Renewal 1. INTRODUCTION Thermographic techniques-water heat exchange. A driving force in air sea interactions is the net sea surface heat flux. It is a vital

  4. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin + November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such ``physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  5. ALMA observations of the kinematics and chemistry of disc formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindberg, Johan E; Brinch, Christian; Haugbølle, Troels; Bergin, Edwin A; Harsono, Daniel; Persson, Magnus V; Visser, Ruud; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Context: The R CrA cloud hosts a handful of Class 0/I low-mass young stellar objects. The chemistry and physics at scales $>500$ AU in this cloud are dominated by the irradiation from the nearby Herbig Be star R CrA. The luminous large-scale emission makes it necessary to use high-resolution spectral imaging to study the chemistry and dynamics of the inner envelopes and discs of the protostars. Aims: We aim to better understand the structure of the inner regions of these protostars and in particular the interplay between the chemistry and the presence of discs. Methods: Using Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) high-resolution spectral imaging interferometry observations, we study the molecular line and dust continuum emission at submillimetre wavelengths. Results: We detect dust continuum emission from four circumstellar discs around Class 0/I objects within the R CrA cloud. Towards IRS7B we detect C$^{17}$O emission showing a rotation curve consistent with a Keplerian disc with a well-define...

  6. Observations of 2D Doppler backscattering on MAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, D A; Freethy, S J; Huang, B K; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2015-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic has conducted proof-of-principle 2D Doppler backscattering (DBS) experiments on MAST. SAMI actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (+-40 degrees vertical and horizontal) and tuneable (10-35.5 GHz) beam. The Doppler backscattered signal is digitised in vector form using an array of eight Vivaldi PCB antennas. This allows the receiving array to be focused in any direction within the field of view simultaneously to an angular range of 6-24 degrees FWHM at 10-34.5 GHz. This capability is unique to SAMI and is an entirely novel way of conducting DBS experiments. In this paper the feasibility of conducting 2D DBS experiments is explored. Initial measurements of phenomena observed on conventional DBS experiments are presented; such as momentum injection from neutral beams and an abrupt change in power and turbulence velocity coinciding with the onset of H-mode. In addition, being able to carry out 2D DBS imaging allows a measurement of magnetic pitch an...

  7. Discrimination of quantum observables using limited resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Ziman; Teiko Heinosaari

    2008-02-18

    We address the problem of unambiguous discrimination and identification among quantum observables. We set a general framework and investigate in details the case of qubit observables. In particular, we show that perfect discrimination with two shots is possible only for sharp qubit observables (e.g. Stern-Gerlach apparatuses) associated with mutually orthogonal directions. We also show that for sharp qubit observables associated to nonorthogonal directions unambiguous discrimination with an inconclusive result is always possible.

  8. Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

    2012-10-30

    Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

  9. Image Compression by Back Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    CHAPTER 9 Image Compression by Back Propagation: An Example of Extensional Programming* GARRISON W the case with the computatiolls associated with basic cognitive pro- cesses such as vision and audition techniques. The technique we employ is known as back propagation. developed by l1umelhart, Hinton

  10. Aspherical lens design and imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristian E. Gutierrez; Ahmad Sabra

    2015-07-29

    We design freeform lenses refracting an arbitrarily given incident field into a given fixed direction. In the near field case, we study the existence of lenses refracting a given bright object into a predefined image. We also analyze the existence of systems of mirrors that solve the near field and the far field problems for reflection.

  11. Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    -range area G Environment monitoring Volcano, ecology, vegetation, global warming, pollution G R&D Evaluation is a fixed installation type infrared thermal imaging camera to monitor important facilities Production line monitoring Quality anomalies in production processes G Facility monitoring Anomalies

  12. Imaging Science Israel J. Vaughn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Imaging Science Israel J. Vaughn Advanced Sensing Laboratory College of Optical Sciences University.D. in Optical Sciences Vaughn,Tyo (ASL ­ OSC ­ UA) August 6, 2013 2 / 9 #12;Some personal info B.S. in Math M.S. in Math Ph.D. in Optical Sciences Vaughn,Tyo (ASL ­ OSC ­ UA) August 6, 2013 2 / 9 #12;Some personal info

  13. Medical Image Segmentation Xiaolei Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    . The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) holds the copyright to the DICOM standard. Medical (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Ultrasound, and X-Ray, in standard DICOM formats are often and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is created as a cooperative international standard for communication

  14. HAWC Observation of Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui, C M

    2015-01-01

    The majority of Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources are pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs), and the most common association for unidentified sources is PWN. Many of these sources were discovered in TeV by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes using overlapping pointed observations over sections of the Galactic plane. The HAWC observatory is a survey type instrument in the Northern hemisphere with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV. Preliminary analysis of data recorded with the partially completed HAWC array taken since 2013 shows extended detections that are coincident with known TeV SNRs and PWNe. The full array became operational in early 2015 and has been steadily surveying the Northern sky since. I will discuss detections in HAWC data taken since 2013 associated with PWNe and SNRs.

  15. Astrometrical Observations of Pluto - Charon System with the Automated Telescopes of Pulkovo Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devyatkin, Alexander V; Slesarenko, Vyacheslav Yu

    2015-01-01

    The space probe 'New Horizon' was launched on 19th of January 2006 in order to study Pluto and its moons. Spacecraft will fly by Pluto as close as 12500 km in the middle of July 2015 and will get the most detailed images of Pluto and its moon until this moment. At the same time, observation obtained by the ground-based telescopes may also be helpful for the research of such distant system. Thereby, the Laboratory of observational astrometry of Pulkovo Observatory of RAS made a decision to reprocess observations obtained during last decade. More than 350 positional observations of Pluto - Charon system were carried out with the mirror astrograph ZA-320M at Pulkovo and Maksutov telescope MTM-500M near Kislovodsk. These observations were processed by means of software system APEX-II developed in Pulkovo observatory and numerical simulation was performed to calculate the differences between positions of photocenter and barycenter of Pluto - Charon system.

  16. Observability and Computability in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhash Kak

    2012-06-26

    This paper considers the relevance of the concepts of observability and computability in physical theory. Observability is related to verifiability which is essential for effective computing and as physical systems are computational systems it is important even where explicit computation is not the goal. Specifically, we examine two problems: observability and computability for quantum computing, and remote measurement of time and frequency.

  17. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  18. Real time synchrotron X-ray observations of solidification in hypoeutectic Al–Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogita, Kazuhiro [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yasuda, Hideyuki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Prasad, Arvind [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); McDonald, Stuart D., E-mail: s.mcdonald1@uq.edu.au [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Nagira, Tomoya; Nakatsuka, Noriaki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); StJohn, David H. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    This paper demonstrates how recent advances in synchrotron technology have allowed for the real-time X-ray imaging of solidification in Al–Si alloys, despite the small difference in atomic number of these elements. The experiments performed at the SPring-8 synchrotron, involved imaging the solidification of Al–1wt.%Si and Al–4wt.%Si alloys under a low-temperature gradient and a cooling rate of around 0.3 °C/s. The nucleation and growth of the primary aluminum grains as well as the onset of eutectic solidification were clearly observed. In the alloys containing Al–4wt.%Si, contrast was sufficient to characterize the nucleation rate and growth velocity of the aluminum grains. The importance of improving observation of solidification in the Al–Si system by increasing the time resolution during critical events is discussed. - Highlights: • A synchrotron technique was used to observe solidification of Al-Si alloys. • Nucleation, coarsening, and the onset of eutectic solidification were observed. • Images captured are suitable for quantitative analysis. • The resolution that was obtained should be possible for most aluminum alloys.

  19. The Phoenix Deep Survey: Optical and near infrared imaging catalogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark Sullivan; Andrew Hopkins; Jose Afonso; Antonis Georgakakis; Ben Chan; Lawrence Cram; Bahram Mobasher; Cesario Almeida

    2004-11-19

    The Phoenix Deep Survey is a multi-wavelength galaxy survey based on deep 1.4 GHz radio imaging (Hopkins et al., 2003). The primary goal of this survey is to investigate the properties of star formation in galaxies and to trace the evolution in those properties to a redshift z=1, covering a significant fraction of the age of the Universe. By compiling a sample of star-forming galaxies based on selection at radio wavelengths we eliminate possible biases due to dust obscuration, a significant issue when selecting objects at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. In this paper, we present the catalogs and results of deep optical (UBVRI) and near-infrared (Ks) imaging of the deepest region of the existing decimetric radio imaging. The observations and data-processing are summarised and the construction of the optical source catalogs described, together with the details of the identification of candidate optical counterparts to the radio catalogs. Based on our UBVRIKs imaging, photometric redshift estimates for the optical counterparts to the radio detections are explored.

  20. Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Project at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Deep Sky Astronomical Image Database Key Challenges: Develop, store, analyze, and make available an astronomical image database of...

  1. Magic of Numbers in Networks of Wireless Image Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Mohammed; Ahmadian, Shaun; Zats, David; Laufer, Rafael; Estrin, D

    2006-01-01

    are solved on the battery- operated image sensor nodes andwith wireless battery-operated image sensors, we havedepicts a network of battery- operated image sensors placed

  2. Search Log Analysis of the ARTstor Cultural Heritage Image Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Heather Ann

    2013-01-01

    Patterns in a Digital Image Database. Information RetrievalCultural Heritage Image Database A thesis submitted inCultural Heritage Image Database by Heather Ann Lowe Master

  3. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Charles

    2010-01-01

    retinal images. International Conference on Image Processing,retinal angiograms of diabetic patients. In International Conference on Image Analysis and Processing (

  4. What do iris observations of Mg II k tell us about the solar plage chromosphere?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart

    2015-01-01

    We analyze observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph of the Mg II k line, the Mg II UV subordinate lines, and the O I 135.6 nm line to better understand the solar plage chromosphere. We also make comparisons with observations from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope of the H{\\alpha} line, the Ca II 8542 line, and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations of the coronal 19.3 nm line. To understand the observed Mg II profiles, we compare these observations to the results of numerical experiments. The single-peaked or flat-topped Mg II k profiles found in plage imply a transition region at a high column mass and a hot and dense chromosphere of about 6500 K. This scenario is supported by the observed large-scale correlation between moss brightness and filled-in profiles with very little or absent self-reversal. The large wing width found in plage also implies a hot and dense chromosphere with a steep chromospheric temperature rise. The absence of emission in the Mg II subo...

  5. SIP : a smart digital image processing library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Mengyao

    2005-01-01

    The Smart Image Processing (SIP) library was developed to provide automated real-time digital image processing functions on camera phones with integer microprocessors. Many of the functions are not available on commercial ...

  6. Gradient characterization in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Joseph Yitan

    2007-01-01

    Special magnetic resonance (MR) scans, such as spiral imaging and echo-planar imaging, require speed and gradient accuracy while putting high demands on the MR gradient system that may cause gradient distortion. Additionally, ...

  7. Thermal ghost imaging with averaged speckle patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    We present theoretical and experimental results showing that a thermal ghost imaging system can produce images of high quality even when it uses detectors so slow that they respond only to intensity-averaged (that is, ...

  8. A Visual Category Filter Google Images , Zisserman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisserman, Andrew

    image returned Google's image search a number object categories including bottles, camels, cars, horses a contaminated training a minimal amount supervi­ sion. therefore method Fergus [10], extending it allow

  9. Integrated computational system for portable retinal imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggess, Jason (Jason Robert)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis introduces a system to improve image quality obtained from a low-light CMOS camera-specifically designed to image the surface of the retina. The retinal tissue, as well as having various diseases of its own, ...

  10. Image sense disambiguation : a multimodal approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenko, Ekaterina, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    If a picture is worth a thousand words, can a thousand words be worth a training image? Most successful object recognition algorithms require manually annotated images of objects to be collected for training. The amount ...

  11. Data visualization of biological microscopy image analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scelfo, Tony (Tony W.)

    2006-01-01

    The Open Microscopy Environment (OME) provides biologists with a framework to store, analyze and manipulate large sets of image data. Current microscopes are capable of generating large numbers of images and when coupled ...

  12. Perceptually inspired image estimation and enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuanzhen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we present three image estimation and enhancement algorithms inspired by human vision. In the first part of the thesis, we propose an algorithm for mapping one image to another based on the statistics of a ...

  13. Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems Stephen E. Reichenbach University develop a method for assessing the in- formation density and efficiency of hyperspectral imaging systems width can efficiently gather information about a scene by allocating bandwidth among the bands according

  14. BIOMEDICAL MATHEMATICS: Promising Directions in Imaging,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Censor, Yair

    BIOMEDICAL MATHEMATICS: Promising Directions in Imaging, Therapy Planning, and Inverse Problems #12;BIOMEDICAL MATHEMATICS: Promising Directions in Imaging, Therapy Planning, and Inverse Problems Yair Censor, Ming Jiang, Ge Wang Editors The Huangguoshu International Interdisciplinary Conference on Biomedical

  15. Automatic caption generation for news images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yansong

    2011-06-30

    This thesis is concerned with the task of automatically generating captions for images, which is important for many image-related applications. Automatic description generation for video frames would help security ...

  16. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar

    2005-11-01

    Imaging. (August 2005) Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar, B.E., Gujarat University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jim Ji Inversion Recovery (IR) is a powerful tool for contrast manipulation in Mag- netic Resonance Imaging (MRI). IR can provide strong...

  17. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation, texturing (b) Camera, noise) 2N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation

  18. Low Light Image Enhancement via Sparse Representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    Low Light Image Enhancement via Sparse Representations Konstantina Fotiadou , Grigorios,greg,tsakalid}@ics.forth.gr Abstract. Enhancing the quality of low light images is a critical pro- cessing function both from images captured under low illumination conditions based on the mathematical framework of Sparse

  19. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Advancing Methods for Labeling, Staining, Imaging of Neurosciences University of California, San Diego Abstract A grand goal in neuroscience research will highlight development and application of new contrasting methods and imaging tools that have allowed us

  20. Chemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or with light-source capabilities to image materials of importance to the nation's energy and environmentalChemical Imaging Initiative Delivering New Capabilities for In Situ, Molecular-Scale Imaging A complete, precise and realistic view of chemical, materials and biochemical processes and an understanding

  1. Imaging passive seismic data Brad Artman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imaging passive seismic data Brad Artman brad@sep.stanford.edu Submitted to Geophysics March 2005, CA 94305-2215 ABSTRACT Passive seismic imaging is the process of synthesizing the wealth to produce a subsurface image. For passively acquired data, migration is even more important than for active

  2. Fundamentals of 3D Laplacian Image pyramids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Frank

    is efficient for sampling as it removes high-frequency components. (sample at fewer positions.) Gaussian kernel: Application to blending Multiband blending. Blending two overlapping images using their pyramids Compute) with the rightmost half of L (I2). Reconstruct blended images from the Laplacian pyramid L r. #12;Laplacian image

  3. McCausland Center For Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    .mricro.com). he Siemens 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imag- ing system at the McCausland Center for Brain Imaging the Palmetto Richland Memorial Hospi- tal. The Siemens 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imag- ing system is fitted brain remains one of the great scientific challenges of our generation. With approximately 100 billion

  4. Image Analysis Model-Based Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Model-Based Methods Comparing and Evaluating Models Summary Further Reading Data Collection ScientificImage Analysis Model-Based Methods Comparing and Evaluating Models Summary Further Reading Fully Low-Count Image Analysis #12;Image Analysis Model-Based Methods Comparing and Evaluating Models

  5. Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials (IFIM) Guiding the design of materials tailored Kalman filters New methods Bigdata Imaging Electronic Structure Molecular Dynamics Multiscale Ab Initio dynamics electrons to materials and architectures #12;3 Imaging: The big picture ORNL has unique strengths

  6. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  7. Locating Secret Messages in Images Ian Davidson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ian

    Locating Secret Messages in Images Ian Davidson Computer Science, SUNY Albany 1400 Washington in innocuous media such as images, while steganalysis is the field of detecting these secret messages contributing the most to the energy calculations of an image are deemed outliers. Typically, of the top third

  8. Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images Thomas C. M. Lee tlee with Alex Young and the SaFeDe Solar Imaging Group JSM 2007 ­ p. 1/2 #12;Outline Title: Automatic Detection and Classification of Sunspot Images JSM 2007 ­ p. 2/2 #12;Outline Title: Automatic Detection and Classification

  9. POSTDOCTORAL POSITION Biomedical Image Computing Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    POSTDOCTORAL POSITION Biomedical Image Computing Group University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Departments of Pediatrics, Bioengineering and Radiology www.depts.washington.edu/bicg The Biomedical Image to acquire, process and analyze biomedical imaging data of the developing brain. The postdoctoral researcher

  10. Photographing paintings by image fusion Gloria Haro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photographing paintings by image fusion Gloria Haro Dept. of Information and Communications a quality photograph of a painting by multi-image fusion methods. The problem is particularly challenging in most photographs of paintings. A fully automatic image processing chain is described that, starting

  11. Errors in Quantitative Image Analysis due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    ; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate the ability of various software (SW different SW tools to measure compartment-specific region-of-interest intensity. RESULTS: Images generated for by the majority of tested quantitative image analysis SW tools. Incorrect image scaling leads to intensity

  12. Image-Guided Fracture David Mould

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, David

    Image-Guided Fracture David Mould Department of Computer Science University of Saskatchewan Abstract We present an image filter that transforms an input line drawing into an image of a fractured of an uncracked texture. Key words: Non-photorealistic rendering, fracture, tex- ture synthesis 1 Introduction Non

  13. Digital image library development in academic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corran, Ruth

    1 Digital image library development in academic environment: designing and testing usability@aup.fr Keywords: Digital image library, usability, student projects, participatory design Abstract Case study Purpose By reporting the experience gained in the development of a digital image library in academic

  14. Systematic Microwave Source Motions along Flare-arcade Observed by Nobeyama Radioheliograph and AIA/SDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sujin; Masuda, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    We found systematic microwave source motions along a flare-arcade using Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) 17 GHz images. The motions were associated with a X-class disk flare which occurred on 15th February 2011. For this study, we also used EUV images from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and magnetograms from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory, and multi-channel microwave data from Nobeyama Radiopolarimeters (NoRP) and Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL). We traced centroids of the microwave source observed by NoRH 17 GHz during the flare and found two episodes of the motion with several facts: 1) The microwave source moved systematically along the flare-arcade, which was observed by the AIA 94 A in a direction parallel to the neutral line. 2) The period of each episode was 5 min and 14 min, respectively. 3) Estimated parallel speed was 34 km/s for the first episode and 22 km/s for the second episode. The spectral slope of microwave flux above 10 GHz obtained by N...

  15. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution, and accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, David

    Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution States Available online 11 September 2004 Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse optical imaging currently being made and issues to consider for improving optical image quality. These include the optimal

  16. Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion Beyond for Latent Variables", Feb. 2-4 2015 1 / 64 #12;Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion Context Multi School "Search for Latent Variables", Feb. 2-4 2015 2 / 64 #12;Bayesian fusion of multi-band image fusion

  17. Supplemental Material for "Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    D MR images: cardiac, brain, chest and artery respectively. Figure 1, 2, 3 and 4 shows the visual complexity. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Fig. 1. Cardiac MR image reconstruction from 20% sampling (a) OriginalSupplemental Material for "Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging" Paper ID

  18. Abstract Title: Image Informatics Tools for the Analysis of Retinal Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA. Keywords: 682 retinal detachment, 541 image processing, 543 imagingAbstract Title: Image Informatics Tools for the Analysis of Retinal Images Presentation Start/End Time: Wednesday, May 03, 2006, 11:15 AM - 1:00 PM Location: Hall B/C Reviewing Code: 289 retinal

  19. Nanodiamond Landmarks for Subcellular Multimodal Optical and Electron Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurbuchen, Mark A; Kohan, Sirus A; Leung, Belinda; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for biolabels that can be used in both optical and electron microscopies, are non-cytotoxic, and do not photobleach. Such biolabels could enable targeted nanoscale imaging of sub-cellular structures, and help to establish correlations between conjugation-delivered biomolecules and function. Here we demonstrate a subcellular multi-modal imaging methodology that enables localization of inert particulate probes, consisting of nanodiamonds having fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers. These are functionalized to target specific structures, and are observable by both optical and electron microscopies. Nanodiamonds targeted to the nuclear pore complex are rapidly localized in electron-microscopy diffraction mode to enable "zooming-in" to regions of interest for detailed structural investigations. Optical microscopies reveal nanodiamonds for in-vitro tracking or uptake-confirmation. The approach is general, works down to the single nanodiamond level, and can leverage the unique capabilities of...

  20. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  1. Astrometric positions for 18 irregular satellites of giant planets from 23 years of observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes-Júnior, A R; Vieira-Martins, R; Arlot, J -E; Camargo, J I B; Braga-Ribas, F; Neto, D N da Silva; Andrei, A H; Dias-Oliveira, A; Morgado, B E; Benedetti-Rossi, G; Duchemin, Y; Desmars, J; Lainey, V; Thuillot, W

    2015-01-01

    The irregular satellites of the giant planets are believed to have been captured during the evolution of the solar system. Knowing their physical parameters, such as size, density, and albedo is important for constraining where they came from and how they were captured. The best way to obtain these parameters are observations in situ by spacecrafts or from stellar occultations by the objects. Both techniques demand that the orbits are well known. We aimed to obtain good astrometric positions of irregular satellites to improve their orbits and ephemeris. We identified and reduced observations of several irregular satellites from three databases containing more than 8000 images obtained between 1992 and 2014 at three sites (Observat\\'orio do Pico dos Dias, Observatoire de Haute-Provence, and European Southern Observatory - La Silla). We used the software PRAIA (Platform for Reduction of Astronomical Images Automatically) to make the astrometric reduction of the CCD frames. The UCAC4 catalog represented the Inte...

  2. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-12-30

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described. 22 figs.

  3. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1996-11-19

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

  4. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Kimbrough, Joseph R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO.sub.2 insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron's generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO.sub.2 layer.

  5. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  6. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561 A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar II Results for the second observing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colley, W N; Abajas, C; Alcalde, D; Aslan, Z; Bikmaev, I F; Chavushyan, V H; Chinarro, L; Cournoyer, J P; Crowe, R; Dudinov, V; Kathinka, A; Evans, D; Jeon, Y B; Goicoechea, L J; Golbasi, O; Khamitov, I; Kjernsmo, K; Lee, H J; Lee, J; Lee, K W; Lee, M G; López-Cruz, O; Mediavilla, E; Moffatt, A F J; Mujica, R; Ullán, M; Oscoz, A; Park, M G; Purves, N; Sakhibullin, N A; Sinelnikov, I; Stabell, R; Stockton, A; Teuber, J; Thompson, R; Woo, H S; Zheleznyak, A T; Colley, Wesley N.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Abajas, Cristina; Alcalde, David; Aslan, Zeki; Bikmaev, Ilfan; Chavushyan, Vahram; Chinarro, Luis; Cournoyer, Jean-Philippe; Crowe, Richard; Dudinov, Vladimir; Kathinka, Anna; Evans, Dalland; Jeon, Young-Beom; Goicoechea, Luis J.; Golbasi, Orhan; Khamitov, Irek; Kjernsmo, Kjetil; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jonghwan; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Mediavilla, Evencio; Moffatt, Anthony F.J.; Mujica, Raul; Ullan, Aurora M.; Oscoz, Alexander; Park, Myeong-Gu; Purves, Norman; Sakhibullin, Nail; Sinelnikov, Igor; Stabell, Rolf; Stockton, Alan; Teuber, Jan; Thompson, Roy; Woo, Hwa-Sung

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observing campaign in March 2001 to monitor the brightness of the later arriving Q0957+561 B image in order to compare with the previously published brightness observations of the (first arriving) A image. The 12 participating observatories provided 3543 image frames which we have analyzed for brightness fluctuations. From our classical methods for time delay determination, we find a 417.09 +/- 0.07 day time delay which should be free of effects due to incomplete sampling. During the campaign period, the quasar brightness was relatively constant and only small fluctuations were found; we compare the structure function for the new data with structure function estimates for the 1995--6 epoch, and show that the structure function is statistically non-stationary. We also examine the data for any evidence of correlated fluctuations at zero lag. We discuss the limits to our ability to measure the cosmological time delay if the quasar's emitting surface is time resolved, as seems likely.

  7. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561 A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar II: Results for the second observing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesley N. Colley; Rudolph E. Schild; Cristina Abajas; David Alcalde; Zeki Aslan; Ilfan Bikmaev; Vahram Chavushyan; Luis Chinarro; Jean-Philippe Cournoyer; Richard Crowe; Vladimir Dudinov; Anna Kathinka; Dalland Evans; Young-Beom Jeon; Luis J. Goicoechea; Orhan Golbasi; Irek Khamitov; Kjetil Kjernsmo; Hyun Ju Lee; Jonghwan Lee; Ki Won Lee; Myung Gyoon Lee; Omar Lopez-Cruz; Evencio Mediavilla; Anthony F. J. Moffatt; Raul Mujica; Aurora M. Ullan; Alexander Oscoz; Myeong-Gu Park; Norman Purves; Nail Sakhibullin; Igor Sinelnikov; Rolf Stabell; Alan Stockton; Jan Teuber; Roy Thompson; Hwa-Sung Woo; Alexander Zheleznyak

    2002-10-17

    We report on an observing campaign in March 2001 to monitor the brightness of the later arriving Q0957+561 B image in order to compare with the previously published brightness observations of the (first arriving) A image. The 12 participating observatories provided 3543 image frames which we have analyzed for brightness fluctuations. From our classical methods for time delay determination, we find a 417.09 +/- 0.07 day time delay which should be free of effects due to incomplete sampling. During the campaign period, the quasar brightness was relatively constant and only small fluctuations were found; we compare the structure function for the new data with structure function estimates for the 1995--6 epoch, and show that the structure function is statistically non-stationary. We also examine the data for any evidence of correlated fluctuations at zero lag. We discuss the limits to our ability to measure the cosmological time delay if the quasar's emitting surface is time resolved, as seems likely.

  8. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01

    eastern Pacific Ocean weather systems are ea. sy to observe on visual and infrared satellite images. However, it is difficult to quantify their moisture fields due to the great scarcity of conventional data. . In addition, it is difficult to examine... rainfall over the eastern part of the tropical Pacific Ocean because there are few island stations or ship reports available. Satellite passive microwave instruments have been used to determine precip- itable water, liquid water and precipitation over...

  9. Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jetcloud interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jet­cloud interactions P. N. Best,1 C. L form 1997 August 27 A B S T R AC T High-resolution, deep radio images are presented for two distant radio galaxies, 3C 324 (z ¼ 1:206) and 3C 368 (z ¼ 1:132), which are both prime examples of the radio

  10. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S.; Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.

    2014-05-15

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  11. Observations of LSI+61303 with Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Holder; A. Falcone; D. Morris

    2007-09-18

    The TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary system LSI+61303 was observed with the Swift satellite from early September 2006 to early January 2007. Many of these observations were contemporaneous with TeV observations. The data consist of observations on 24 separate days with durations ranging between 700s and 4700s, and partially cover 4.5 orbital periods of the binary system. We present here an analysis of the 0.2 to 10keV X-ray data from the Swift-XRT instrument. Contemporaneous optical data from UVOT are also available.

  12. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  13. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  14. Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucalyptus grandis observations..................................................... 13 Eucalyptus grandis), Eucalyptus grandis, African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and arboreal Leucaenas found on Oahu, Maui, Hawai

  15. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  16. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    during hydraulic fracturing of Bunter sandstones, Proc. NearSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  17. Cluster Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plagge, Thomas Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope during the last stages ofwater vapor at the South Pole relative to two otherSZ Survey Instrument . 3 The South Pole Telescope Observing

  18. Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods and Observations from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods & Observations from Savannah River Site Dennis Jackson P.E. & Timothy Jannik - Savannah River National Laboratory Teresa Eddy - Savannah...

  19. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Weili; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2012-03-31

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  20. Heating and cooling of coronal loops observed by SDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Leping; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Context: One of the most prominent processes suggested to heat the corona to well above 10^6 K builds on nanoflares, short bursts of energy dissipation. Aims: We compare observations to model predictions to test the validity of the nanoflare process. Methods: Using extreme UV data from AIA/SDO and HMI/SDO line-of-sight magnetograms we study the spatial and temporal evolution of a set of loops in active region AR 11850. Results: We find a transient brightening of loops in emission from Fe xviii forming at about 7.2 MK while at the same time these loops dim in emission from lower temperatures. This points to a fast heating of the loop that goes along with evaporation of material that we observe as apparent upward motions in the image sequence. After this initial phases lasting for some 10 min, the loops brighten in a sequence of AIA channels showing cooler and cooler plasma, indicating the cooling of the loops over a time scale of about one hour. A comparison to the predictions from a 1D loop model shows that t...

  1. CASSINI VIMS OBSERVATIONS SHOW ETHANE IS PRESENT IN TITAN'S RAINFALL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Baines, Kevin H.; Sotin, Christophe; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Brown, Robert H.; Barnes, Jason W.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2012-12-20

    Observations obtained over two years by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem suggest that rain showers fall on the surface. Using measurements obtained by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, we identify the main component of the rain to be ethane, with methane as an additional component. We observe five or six probable rainfall events, at least one of which follows a brief equatorial cloud appearance, suggesting that frequent rainstorms occur on Titan. The rainfall evaporates, sublimates, or infiltrates on timescales of months, and in some cases it is associated with fluvial features but not with their creation or alteration. Thus, Titan exhibits frequent 'gentle rainfall' instead of, or in addition to, more catastrophic events that cut rivers and lay down large fluvial deposits. Freezing rain may also be present, and the standing liquid may exist as puddles interspersed with patches of frost. The extensive dune deposits found in the equatorial regions of Titan imply multi-season arid conditions there, which are consistent with small, but possibly frequent, amounts of rain, in analogy to terrestrial deserts.

  2. Observation of a crossover in kinetic aggregation of Palladium colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ghafari; M. Ranjbar; S. Rouhani

    2014-12-27

    We use field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) to investigate the growth of palladium colloids over the surface of thin films of WO3/glass. The film is prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at different temperatures. A PdCl2 (aq) droplet is injected on the surface and in the presence of steam hydrogen the droplet is dried through a reduction reaction process. Two distinct aggregation regimes of palladium colloids are observed over the substrates. We argue that the change in aggregation dynamics emerges when the measured water drop Contact Angel (CA) for the WO3/glass thin films passes a certain threshold value, namely CA = 46 degrees, where a crossover in kinetic aggregation of palladium colloids occurs. Our results suggest that the mass fractal dimension of palladium aggregates follows a power-law behavior. The fractal dimension (Df) in the fast aggregation regime, where the measured CA values vary from 27 up to 46 degrees, according to different substrate deposition temperatures, is Df = 1.75 (0.02). This value of Df is in excellent agreement with kinetic aggregation of other colloidal systems in fast aggregation regime. Whereas for the slow aggregation regime, with CA = 58 degrees, the fractal dimension changes abruptly to Df=1.92 (0.03). We have also used a modified Box-Counting method to calculate fractal dimension of gray-level images and observe that the crossover at around CA = 46 degrees remains unchanged.

  3. A Method for Extracting Light Echo Fluxes Using the NN2 Difference Imaging Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew B. Newman; Armin Rest

    2006-10-19

    Light echoes are interesting because of the wealth of information they offer about their progenitors and the reflecting dust. Due to their faint surface brightnesses, difference imaging is necessary to separate most light echoes from the sky background. However, difference images reveal only the relative fluxes between two epochs. Obtaining absolute fluxes for individual epochs has traditionally relied on a single template image that is free of light echoes. Since such an observation is normally unavailable, a light echo-free template must be constructed by a complicated and usually subjective process. Here we present an application of the NN2 method of Barris et al. to extract the relative fluxes of light echoes across a range of epochs directly from a series of difference images. This method requires no privileged image and makes maximal use of the observational data. Statistical methods to estimate the zero-flux level and thus the absolute flux are also presented. The efficacy of the technique is demonstrated by an application to the light echoes around SN 1987A. The resulting images reveal new detail and faint light echo structures. This method can be adapted and applied to other extended variable light sources, such as stellar outflows and supernova remnants.

  4. Image display device in digital TV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Seung Jong (Seoul, KR)

    2006-07-18

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  5. Observations of Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae: A VERITAS Key Science Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humensky, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The study of supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae was one of the Key Science Projects for the first two years of VERITAS observations. VERITAS is an array of four imaging Cherenkov telescopes located at the Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona. Supernova remnants are widely considered to be the strongest candidate for the source of cosmic rays below the knee at around 10^15 eV. Pulsar wind nebulae are synchrotron nebulae powered by the spin-down of energetic young pulsars, and comprise one of the most populous very-high-energy gamma-ray source classes. This poster will summarize the results of this observation program.

  6. Image Registration for Stability Testing of MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Blake, Peter N; Morey, Peter A; Landsman, Wayne B; Chambers, Victor J; Moseley, Samuel H; 10.1117/12.872076

    2013-01-01

    Image registration, or alignment of two or more images covering the same scenes or objects, is of great interest in many disciplines such as remote sensing, medical imaging, astronomy, and computer vision. In this paper, we introduce a new application of image registration algorithms. We demonstrate how through a wavelet based image registration algorithm, engineers can evaluate stability of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS). In particular, we applied image registration algorithms to assess alignment stability of the MicroShutters Subsystem (MSS) of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This work introduces a new methodology for evaluating stability of MEMS devices to engineers as well as a new application of image registration algorithms to computer scientists.

  7. Heartbeat of a Nest: Using Imagers as Biological Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    servers send periodic battery reading, image con- ?gurationcon?guration, image acquisition and reading of the battery

  8. L.J. van Vliet, F.R. Boddeke, D. Sudar, and I.T. Young, Image Detectors for Digital Image Microscopy, in: M.H.F. Wilkinson, F. Schut (eds.), Digital Image Analysis of Microbes; Imaging, Morphometry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Microscopy, in: M.H.F. Wilkinson, F. Schut (eds.), Digital Image Analysis of Microbes; Imaging, Morphometry

  9. Image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RTINEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303...

  10. Image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-5608 RE: CLASS 1 MODIFICATION, AUGUST 29, 2013 WIPP HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITY PERMIT EPA I.D. NUMBER NM4890139088 Dear Messrs....

  11. Image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work 11 * 04300 - Unit Masonry System. 12 1.3 Reference Documents 13 "Reference Stratigraphy and Rock Properties for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project" 14 by R.D....

  12. Image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Governor July 29, 2013 Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo...

  13. Image

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFBIdea OneIllumitex Jump to:

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to Apply for an SES PositionISAHybrids and All-ElectricSnyder, Ph.D.

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to Apply for an SES PositionISAHybrids and All-ElectricSnyder, Ph.D.

  17. imaging

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afed feedholiday |hpc

  18. Image

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71- Particulate: Columns 59 and RLos Alamos

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    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71- Particulate: Columns 59 and RLos Alamos

  20. Image

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71- Particulate: Columns 59 and RLos Alamos

  1. Image

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia NationalSecurityNuclearH-canyon |I 1 2.9/%2A enITEM NO.

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingREnergy Tools forEnergy IllinoisIlluminated

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation Standards andEnergy Illinois State

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation Standards andEnergy Illinois State

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelBConservation Standards andEnergy Illinois State

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT 2<

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT 2<

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT 2<

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT 2<

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