Sample records for thermographic imaging observation

  1. Thermographic inspection of massive structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B.; Guimaraes, Maria; Scott, David B. [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive Evaluation of concrete structures is a growing concern for the nuclear industry as well as for many other industries. As critical concrete components continue to age, the ability to assess the health and suitability for continued service has become a key consideration. In some cases, repair of these structures is difficult and expensive, while replacement is prohibitively expensive or, in some cases, not feasible. Therefore, the ability to inspect these key assets is a primary concern, especially in the nuclear industry. Due to the large size of containment buildings, cooling towers, and other large concrete assets, the ability to rapidly inspect for defects of concern is very desirable. Thermographic inspection appears to have the required ability to rapidly inspect large structures to ascertain the location and size of many of the defects of concern. This ability was demonstrated by performing a thermographic inspection of a large concrete dam in 2 days.

  2. City of College Station's Thermographic Mobile Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear, C. K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first quarter of 1986, the City of College Station conducted a thermographic mobile scan of the entire city. A thermographic mobile scan is a process by which heat loss/heat gain data is accumulated by a vehicle traveling the city...

  3. A simple algorithm for beam profile diagnostics using a thermographic camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katagiri, Ken; Hojo, Satoru; Honma, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Noda, Akira; Noda, Koji [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)] [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new algorithm for digital image processing apparatuses is developed to evaluate profiles of high-intensity DC beams from temperature images of irradiated thin foils. Numerical analyses are performed to examine the reliability of the algorithm. To simulate the temperature images acquired by a thermographic camera, temperature distributions are numerically calculated for 20 MeV proton beams with different parameters. Noise in the temperature images which is added by the camera sensor is also simulated to account for its effect. Using the algorithm, beam profiles are evaluated from the simulated temperature images and compared with exact solutions. We find that niobium is an appropriate material for the thin foil used in the diagnostic system. We also confirm that the algorithm is adaptable over a wide beam current range of 0.11–214 ?A, even when employing a general-purpose thermographic camera with rather high noise (?T{sub NETD} ? 0.3 K; NETD: noise equivalent temperature difference)

  4. Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use as Thermographic Phosphors in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use as Thermographic Phosphors in Thermal Barrier Coatings Saunak K different europium-doped pyrochlores as thermographic phosphors ­ La2Zr2O7:Eu, La2Hf2O7:Eu, Nd2Zr2O7:Eu, oxynitrates, and glycine · Samples doped at 4 mol % with europium which substitutes into the A3+ site

  5. Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ satellite images the aurora in three different spectral regions. One of the channels of the spectrographic to spectrally discriminate between the proton and electron FUV aurora and to globally map the energetic protons

  6. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)] [Biostatistics Consulting, LLC, 10606 Wheatley Street, Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with ?15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance.Conclusions: In CT imaging of different sizes of low-contrast lesions (?15 HU), the performance of CHO with Gabor channels was highly correlated with human observer performance for the detection and localization tasks with uncertain lesion location in CT imaging at four clinically relevant dose levels. This suggests the ability of Gabor CHO model observers to meaningfully assess CT image quality for the purpose of optimizing scan protocols and radiation dose levels in detection and localization tasks for low-contrast lesions.

  7. INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL ATOMS AT 1 AU OBSERVED BY THE IMAGE/LENA IMAGER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Ghielmetti, A. G. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Wurz, P. [Physikalishes Institut, University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: Stephen.a.fuselier@lmco.com, E-mail: gmetti@mail.spasci.com, E-mail: peter.wurz@space.unibe.ch

    2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora: Global Exploration (IMAGE) Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager from 2005 are used to investigate characteristics of interstellar neutrals in the inner solar system. The LENA imager detected an interstellar neutral signal starting in 2004 December and extending to early 2005 April. Using the orientation of the field of view of the imager and the date of the loss of the interstellar neutral signal, it is concluded that the signal is consistent with a relatively compact (several degrees wide in ecliptic latitude and longitude) source of neutral helium and/or energetic (>150 eV) hydrogen originating from the solar apex direction. Observations later in 2005 are used to distinguish the composition and conclude that the relatively compact source likely contains some energetic hydrogen (in addition to the helium)

  8. Molecular and Ionized Hydrogen in 30 Doradus. I. Imaging Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sherry C C; Matzner, Christopher D; Pellegrini, Eric W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first fully calibrated H$_2$, 1-0 S(1) image of the entire 30 Doradus nebula. The observations were conducted using the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager on the CTIO 4-meter Blanco Telescope. Together with a NEWFIRM Br$\\gamma$ image of 30 Doradus, our data reveal the morphologies of the warm molecular gas and ionized gas in 30 Doradus. The brightest H$_2$-emitting area, which extends from the northeast to the southwest of R136, is a photodissociation region viewed face-on, while many clumps and pillar features located at the outer shells of 30 Doradus are photodissociation regions viewed edge-on. Based on the morphologies of H$_2$, Br$\\gamma$, $^{12}$CO, and 8$\\mu$m emission, the H$_2$ to Br$\\gamma$ line ratio and Cloudy models, we find that the H$_2$ emission is formed inside the photodissociation regions of 30 Doradus, 2 - 3 pc to the ionization front of the HII region, in a relatively low-density environment $<$ 10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$. Comparisons with Br$\\gamma$, 8$\\mu$m, and CO emissi...

  9. Characteristics of Magnetohydrodynamic Oscillations Observed with Michelson Doppler Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, A A; Bush, R I; Tarbell, T D

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the spatial distribution of magnetogram oscillatory power and phase angles between velocity and magnetogram signals as observed with the Michelson Doppler Imager. The dataset is 151.25 arcsec times 151.25 arcsec containing sunspot from Dec 2, 1997 with a temporal sampling interval of 60 seconds and spatial sampling of 0.605 arcsec. Simultaneously observed continuum intensity and surface velocity accompany the magnetic information. We focus on three frequency regimes: 0.5-1.0, 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz corresponding roughly to timescales of magnetic evolution, p-modes and the 3 minute resonant sunspot oscillation. Significant low frequency magnetogram power is found in lower flux pixels, 100-300 Gauss, in a striking ring with filamentary structure surrounding sunspot. Five minute magnetogram power peaks in extended regions of flux 600-800 Gauss. The 3 minute oscillation is observed in sunspot umbra in pixels whose flux measures 1300-1500 Gauss. Phase angles of approximately -90 degrees between veloc...

  10. Characteristics of Magnetohydrodynamic Oscillations Observed with Michelson Doppler Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Norton; R. K. Ulrich; R. I. Bush; T. D. Tarbell

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the spatial distribution of magnetogram oscillatory power and phase angles between velocity and magnetogram signals as observed with the Michelson Doppler Imager. The dataset is 151.25 arcsec times 151.25 arcsec containing sunspot from Dec 2, 1997 with a temporal sampling interval of 60 seconds and spatial sampling of 0.605 arcsec. Simultaneously observed continuum intensity and surface velocity accompany the magnetic information. We focus on three frequency regimes: 0.5-1.0, 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz corresponding roughly to timescales of magnetic evolution, p-modes and the 3 minute resonant sunspot oscillation. Significant low frequency magnetogram power is found in lower flux pixels, 100-300 Gauss, in a striking ring with filamentary structure surrounding sunspot. Five minute magnetogram power peaks in extended regions of flux 600-800 Gauss. The 3 minute oscillation is observed in sunspot umbra in pixels whose flux measures 1300-1500 Gauss. Phase angles of approximately -90 degrees between velocity and magnetic flux in the 3.0-3.5 and 5.5-6.0 mHz regimes are found in regions of significant cross amplitude.

  11. Fourier, Fresnel and Image CGHs of three-dimensional objects observed from many different projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Fourier, Fresnel and Image CGHs of three-dimensional objects observed from many different of synthesizing three types of computer-generated hologram (CGH); Fourier, Fresnel and image CGHs. These holograms in the computer as a Fourier hologram. Then, it can be converted to either Fresnel or image holograms by computing

  12. Observations of 6.7 GHz Methanol Masers with EAVN I: VLBI Images of the first Epoch of Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujisawa, Kenta; Motogi, Kazuhito; Hachisuka, Kazuya; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Matsumoto, Naoko; Sorai, Kazuo; Momose, Munetake; Saito, Yu; Takaba, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Hideo; Kimura, Kimihiro; Niinuma, Kotaro; Hirano, Daiki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Katsunori M; Honma, Mareki; Hirota, Tomoya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Doi, Akihiro; Mochizuki, Nanako; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xi; Xia, Bo; Li, Bin; Kim, Kee-Tae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) monitoring of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser allows us to measure the internal proper motions of the maser spots and therefore study the gas motion around high-mass young stellar objects. To this end, we have begun monitoring observations with the East-Asian VLBI Network. In this paper we present the results of the first epoch observation for 36 sources, including 35 VLBI images of the methanol maser. Since two independent sources were found in three images, respectively, images of 38 sources were obtained. In 34 sources, more than or equal to 10 spots were detected. The observed spatial scale of the maser distribution was from 9 to 4900 astronomical units, and the following morphological categories were observed: elliptical, arched, linear, paired, and complex. The position of the maser spot was determined to an accuracy of approximately 0.1 mas, sufficiently high to measure the internal proper motion from two years of monitoring observations. The VLBI observation, howeve...

  13. Category:Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelLists forMercury VaporTemplatespage?

  14. Oblique Aerial & Ground Visible Band & Thermographic Imaging | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,andOasys Water Jump to:Obetz,

  15. Shock aurora: Ground-based imager observations X.-Y. Zhou,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Shock aurora: Ground-based imager observations X.-Y. Zhou,1 K. Fukui,2 H. C. Carlson,3 J. I. Moen,4; published 23 December 2009. [1] This paper studies dayside shock aurora forms and their variations observed. The intensified green emissions were mainly diffuse aurora on closed field lines. They were latitudinally below

  16. Probing the Impact of Stellar Duplicity on Planet Occurrence with Spectroscopic and Imaging Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggenberger, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it is commonly agreed that the presence of a close stellar companion is likely to affect planet formation and evolution, the precise effects and their actual impact on planet occurrence and properties are still debated. In particular, observational constraints are sparse, a consequence of the discrimination against close binaries in Doppler planet searches. To bring observational constraints on the occurrence and properties of planets in binaries and multiple stars, we have been conducting two dedi. observing programs using both adaptive optics imaging and radial-velocity monitoring. In this chapter we explain our approach and present preliminary results from these two programs. A simplified statistical analysis of the data from our VLT/NACO imaging survey brings the first observational evidence that the occurrence of planets is reduced in binaries closer than ~120 AU. On the radial-velocity side, current results confirm that the use of two-dimensional correlation allows to search for circumprimary g...

  17. Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimwell, Timothy William

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Blind and Pointed Sunyaev-Zel’dovich Observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Timothy William Shimwell Cavendish Astrophysics and Churchill College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge... and use these to characterise the analysis. I then, for the first time, apply the analysis to data from the AMI blind cluster survey. I identify several previously unknown SZ decrements. Finally, I conduct pointed observations towards a high luminosity sub...

  18. Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation Q.-G. Zong a,b,*, TT) at Earth. Cusp proton aurora was caused by the leading phase of the CME. Cusp proton aurora generally of the cusp proton aurora shifted about 30° from dawnside to duskside when IMF By changed from À10 to 5 n

  19. Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    1 Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment S Institut Telecom - Telecom Bretagne, Brest, F-29200 France. Abstract. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do

  20. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

  1. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberoi, Divya

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9–201.6 MHz. ...

  2. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  3. Detection of facilities in satellite imagery using semi-supervised image classification and auxiliary contextual observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Neal R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawley, Norma H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balick, Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oyer, Alden [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detecting complex targets, such as facilities, in commercially available satellite imagery is a difficult problem that human analysts try to solve by applying world knowledge. Often there are known observables that can be extracted by pixel-level feature detectors that can assist in the facility detection process. Individually, each of these observables is not sufficient for an accurate and reliable detection, but in combination, these auxiliary observables may provide sufficient context for detection by a machine learning algorithm. We describe an approach for automatic detection of facilities that uses an automated feature extraction algorithm to extract auxiliary observables, and a semi-supervised assisted target recognition algorithm to then identify facilities of interest. We illustrate the approach using an example of finding schools in Quickbird image data of Albuquerque, New Mexico. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory's Genie Pro automated feature extraction algorithm to find a set of auxiliary features that should be useful in the search for schools, such as parking lots, large buildings, sports fields and residential areas and then combine these features using Genie Pro's assisted target recognition algorithm to learn a classifier that finds schools in the image data.

  4. Probing the Impact of Stellar Duplicity on Planet Occurrence with Spectroscopic and Imaging Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eggenberger; S. Udry

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it is commonly agreed that the presence of a close stellar companion is likely to affect planet formation and evolution, the precise effects and their actual impact on planet occurrence and properties are still debated. In particular, observational constraints are sparse, a consequence of the discrimination against close binaries in Doppler planet searches. To bring observational constraints on the occurrence and properties of planets in binaries and multiple stars, we have been conducting two dedicated observing programs using both adaptive optics imaging and radial-velocity monitoring. In this chapter we explain our approach and present preliminary results from these two programs. A simplified statistical analysis of the data from our VLT/NACO imaging survey brings the first observational evidence that the occurrence of planets is reduced in binaries closer than ~120 AU. On the radial-velocity side, current results confirm that the use of two-dimensional correlation allows to search for circumprimary giant planets in many types of spectroscopic binaries. Definitive results from our ongoing planet search in spectroscopic binaries should yield important constraints on the closest binaries susceptible of hosting circumprimary giant planets.

  5. Imaging and Spectral Observations of Quasi-Periodic Pulsations in a Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the Quasi-Periodic Pulsations (QPPs) in a solar flare observed by Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) on 2014 September 10. QPPs are identified as the regular and periodic peaks on the rapidly-varying components, which are the light curves after removing the slowly-varying components. The QPPs display only three peaks at the beginning on the hard X-ray (HXR) emissions, but ten peaks on the chromospheric and coronal line emissions, and more than seven peaks (each peak is corresponding to a type III burst on the dynamic spectra) at the radio emissions. An uniform quasi-period about 4 minutes are detected among them. AIA imaging observations exhibit that the 4-min QPPs originate from the flare ribbon, and tend to appear on the ribbon front. IRIS spectral observations show that each peak of the QPPs tends to a broad line width and a red Doppler velocity at C I, O IV, Si ...

  6. Wavelength Determination for Solar Features Observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown,C.; Hara, H.; Kamio, S.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.; Doschek, G.; Mariska, J.; Korendyke, C.; Lang, J.; Dere, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength calibration of solar lines observed by the high resolution EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode satellite is reported. Spectral features of the quiet sun and of two mildly active areas were measured and calibrated. A listing of the stronger observed lines with identification of the leading contributor ions is presented. 41 lines are reported, with 90% identified. Wavelength precisions (2{sigma}) of {+-}0.0031 Angstroms for the EIS short band and {+-}0.0029 Angstroms for the EIS long band are obtained. These lines, typical of 1-2x10{sup 6} K plasmas, are recommended as standards for the establishment of EIS wavelength scales. The temperature of EIS varies by about 1.5 C around the orbit and also with spacecraft pointing. The correlation of these temperature changes with wavelength versus pixel number scale changes is reported.

  7. Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

  8. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  9. Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae with the VERITAS Array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Konopelko; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the recently discovered galactic very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray sources are associated with Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which is the most populous Galactic source category at TeV energies. The extended synchrotron nebulae of these objects observed in the X-ray band are a hallmark of the relativistic winds, generated by the young, energetic neutron stars, that interact with the matter ejected by the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Relativistic electrons, or protons, accelerated in the pulsar winds, or at their shock boundaries, interact with the magnetic field and low energy seed photons to produce the observed VHE gamma-ray emission. The VERITAS array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes was designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy domain from about 100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. The sensitivity of the VERITAS array allows detailed studies of the morphology and spectral features of gamma-ray emission from PWNe. Three northern sky PWNe, G75.2+0.1, G106.6+2.9, and 3C58, were observed with VERITAS during 2006. No evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission at the position of the pu lsar associated with these PWNe is demonstrated.

  10. ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

  11. Saturn's inner satellites: Orbits, masses, and the chaotic motion of atlas from new Cassini imaging observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N. J.; Murray, C. D. [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Renner, S. [Université Lille 1, Laboratoire d'Astronomie de Lille (LAL), 1 impasse de l'Observatoire, F-59000 Lille (France); Evans, M. W. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present numerically derived orbits and mass estimates for the inner Saturnian satellites, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, and Epimetheus from a fit to 2580 new Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem astrometric observations spanning 2004 February to 2013 August. The observations are provided as machine-readable and Virtual Observatory tables. We estimate GM{sub Atlas} = (0.384 ± 0.001) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, a value 13% smaller than the previously published estimate but with an order of magnitude reduction in the uncertainty. We also find GM{sub Prometheus} = (10.677 ± 0.006) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Pandora} = (9.133 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, GM{sub Janus} = (126.51 ± 0.03) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, and GM{sub Epimetheus} = (35.110 ± 0.009) × 10{sup ?3} km{sup 3} s{sup ?2}, consistent with previously published values, but also with significant reductions in uncertainties. We show that Atlas is currently librating in both the 54:53 co-rotation-eccentricity resonance (CER) and the 54:53 inner Lindblad (ILR) resonance with Prometheus, making it the latest example of a coupled CER-ILR system, in common with the Saturnian satellites Anthe, Aegaeon, and Methone, and possibly Neptune's ring arcs. We further demonstrate that Atlas's orbit is chaotic, with a Lyapunov time of ?10 years, and show that its chaotic behavior is a direct consequence of the coupled resonant interaction with Prometheus, rather than being an indirect effect of the known chaotic interaction between Prometheus and Pandora. We provide an updated analysis of the second-order resonant perturbations involving Prometheus, Pandora, and Epimetheus based on the new observations, showing that these resonant arguments are librating only when Epimetheus is the innermost of the co-orbital pair, Janus and Epimetheus. We also find evidence that the known chaotic changes in the orbits of Prometheus and Pandora are not confined to times of apse anti-alignment.

  12. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of aof

  13. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA (United States); Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne [Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Williams, Andrew [Perth Observatory, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland, NM (United States); Allen, G. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW (Australia); Barnes, David [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Bernardi, Gianni [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bowman, Judd D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Briggs, Frank H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

  14. VLBA Imaging at 7 mm and Linear Polarimetric Observations at 6 cm and 3 mm of Sagittarius A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoffrey C. Bower; Heino Falcke; Don Backer; Melvyn Wright

    1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of 7 mm VLBA imaging of Sgr A* and discuss some of the difficulties of accurately constraining the size of Sgr A* with VLBI observations. Our imaging results are fully consistent with the hypothesis that the VLBA image of Sgr A* is a resolved elliptical Gaussian caused by the scattering of an intervening thermal plasma. We show that determination of the minor axis size at 7 mm with the VLBA is very unreliable. We also present new polarimetric observations from the VLA and from the BIMA array of Sgr A*. At 4.8 GHz, we find an upper limit to the polarization of 0.1%. At 86 GHz, we report a marginal detection of $1 \\pm 1$% linear polarization. We discuss the effects of interstellar propagation on the linear polarization and consider the significance of very low intrinsic linear polarization in Sgr A*.

  15. Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging the year, changes in precipitation patterns and greater health risks for the Caribbean region during the spring months. Keywords: MODIS, MODIS Conversion Toolkit, aerosols, Caribbean region INTRODUCTION

  16. Thermographic calorimetry of the neutral beam injectors heating beams at TJ-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.; Doncel, J.; Botija, J.; Wolfers, G.; Alonso, J.; Acedo, M.; Sanchez, E.; Marcon, G.; Weber, M.; Carrasco, R.; Sarasola, X.; Zurro, B.; Tera, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion/Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new beam diagnostic based on infrared thermography has been developed for the neutral beam injectors of the stellarator TJ-II. A highly anisotropic movable target intercepts the beam at its entrance into the stellarator. The thermal print of the beam is captured with a high resolution infrared camera. The infrared images of the target can be translated, with the appropriate analysis, into power density patterns of the beam. The system is calibrated in situ with two thermocouples adiabatically mounted in the target. The two-dimensional beam power density distribution can be accurately characterized allowing beam optimization with respect to the different parameters involved in the beam formation and transport.

  17. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observation of the 1809 keV line from Galactic 26Al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the central radian of the Galaxy by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI) have yielded a high-resolution measurement of the 1809 keV line from 26Al, detected at 11 sigma significance in nine months of data. The RHESSI result for the width of the cosmic line is 2.03 (+0.78, -1.21) keV FWHM. The best fit line width of 5.4 keV FWHM reported by Naya et al. (1996) using the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) balloon instrument is rejected with high confidence.

  18. HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

  19. BRIGHT POINTS AND JETS IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A.; Landi, E.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Harra, L. K., E-mail: george.doschek@nrl.navy.mi [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of polar coronal hole bright points (BPs) made with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The data consist of raster images of BPs in multiple spectral lines from mostly coronal ions, e.g., Fe X-Fe XV. The BPs are observed for short intervals and thus the data are snapshots of the BPs obtained during their evolution. The images reveal a complex unresolved temperature structure (EIS resolution is about 2''), with the highest temperature being about 2 x 10{sup 6} K. Some BPs appear as small loops with temperatures that are highest near the top. But others are more point-like with surrounding structures. However, the thermal time evolution of the BPs is an important factor in their appearance. A BP may appear quite different at different times. We discuss one BP with an associated jet that is bright enough to allow statistically meaningful measurements. The jet Doppler speed along the line of sight is about 15-20 km s{sup -1}. Electron densities of the BPs and the jet are typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, which implies path lengths along the line of sight on the order of a few arcsec. We also construct differential emission measure curves for two of the best observed BPs. High spatial resolution (significantly better than 1'') is required to fully resolve the BP structures.

  20. Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping August 2013; accepted 7 September 2013; published 13 November 2013. [1] 3-D Hydraulic tomography (3-D HT (primarily hydraulic conductivity, K) is estimated by joint inversion of head change data from multiple

  1. Observation of the structural phase transition in manganite films by magneto-optical imaging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crabtree, G. W.; Lin, Y.; Miller, D. J.; Nikitenko, V. I.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Welp, U.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution magneto-optical imaging technique is used to reveal the formation of twins occurring during a martensitic phase transition at {approximately}105K in LCMO films grown on STO substrates. The magnetic contrast arises due to the magneto-elastic tilts of the Mn - magnetic moments in the twins. Different magnetic structures are found in LCMO films grown on MgO, NGO, and LAO substrates showing the importance of the substrate material for the manganite film properties.

  2. SU-E-I-46: Sample-Size Dependence of Model Observers for Estimating Low-Contrast Detection Performance From CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, I; Lu, Z [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Recently, task-based assessment of diagnostic CT systems has attracted much attention. Detection task performance can be estimated using human observers, or mathematical observer models. While most models are well established, considerable bias can be introduced when performance is estimated from a limited number of image samples. Thus, the purpose of this work was to assess the effect of sample size on bias and uncertainty of two channelized Hotelling observers and a template-matching observer. Methods: The image data used for this study consisted of 100 signal-present and 100 signal-absent regions-of-interest, which were extracted from CT slices. The experimental conditions included two signal sizes and five different x-ray beam current settings (mAs). Human observer performance for these images was determined in 2-alternative forced choice experiments. These data were provided by the Mayo clinic in Rochester, MN. Detection performance was estimated from three observer models, including channelized Hotelling observers (CHO) with Gabor or Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels, and a template-matching observer (TM). Different sample sizes were generated by randomly selecting a subset of image pairs, (N=20,40,60,80). Observer performance was quantified as proportion of correct responses (PC). Bias was quantified as the relative difference of PC for 20 and 80 image pairs. Results: For n=100, all observer models predicted human performance across mAs and signal sizes. Bias was 23% for CHO (Gabor), 7% for CHO (LG), and 3% for TM. The relative standard deviation, ?(PC)/PC at N=20 was highest for the TM observer (11%) and lowest for the CHO (Gabor) observer (5%). Conclusion: In order to make image quality assessment feasible in the clinical practice, a statistically efficient observer model, that can predict performance from few samples, is needed. Our results identified two observer models that may be suited for this task.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  4. POLARIMETRIC IMAGING OF LARGE CAVITY STRUCTURES IN THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND PDS 70: OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, J.; Hayashi, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dong, R.; Zhu, Z.; Brandt, T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Honda, M. [Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); McClure, M. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Wisniewski, J. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fukagawa, M. [Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Goto, M. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Grady, C. A., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@nao.ac.jp [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high-resolution H-band polarized intensity (FWHM = 0.''1: 14 AU) and L'-band imaging data (FWHM = 0.''11: 15 AU) of the circumstellar disk around the weak-lined T Tauri star PDS 70 in Centaurus at a radial distance of 28 AU (0.''2) up to 210 AU (1.''5). In both images, a giant inner gap is clearly resolved for the first time, and the radius of the gap is {approx}70 AU. Our data show that the geometric center of the disk shifts by {approx}6 AU toward the minor axis. We confirm that the brown dwarf companion candidate to the north of PDS 70 is a background star based on its proper motion. As a result of spectral energy distribution fitting by Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling, we infer the existence of an optically thick inner disk at a few AU. Combining our observations and modeling, we classify the disk of PDS 70 as a pre-transitional disk. Furthermore, based on the analysis of L'-band imaging data, we put an upper limit of {approx}30 to {approx}50 M{sub J} on the mass of companions within the gap. Taking into account the presence of the large and sharp gap, we suggest that the gap could be formed by dynamical interactions of sub-stellar companions or multiple unseen giant planets in the gap.

  5. Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

  6. IMAGE and FAST observations of substorm recovery phase aurora Stephen B. Mende, Harald U. Frey, Charles W. Carlson, and J. McFadden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IMAGE and FAST observations of substorm recovery phase aurora Stephen B. Mende, Harald U. Frey aurora. In agreement with IMAGE, the highest intensity proton flux measured by FAST was concentrated latitude diffuse oval occasional structured auroras were embedded. These structured auroras were mostly

  7. ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT UPFLOW IN THE DIMMING REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imada, S.; Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zweibel, E. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously found a temperature-dependent upflow in the dimming region following a coronal mass ejection observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). In this paper, we reanalyzed the observations along with previous work on this event and provided boundary conditions for modeling. We found that the intensity in the dimming region dramatically drops within 30 minutes from the flare onset, and the dimming region reaches the equilibrium stage after {approx}1 hr. The temperature-dependent upflows were observed during the equilibrium stage by EIS. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube in the dimming region does not appear to expand significantly. From the observational constraints, we reconstructed the temperature-dependent upflow by using a new method that considers the mass and momentum conservation law and demonstrated the height variation of plasma conditions in the dimming region. We found that a super-radial expansion of the cross-sectional area is required to satisfy the mass conservation and momentum equations. There is a steep temperature and velocity gradient of around 7 Mm from the solar surface. This result may suggest that the strong heating occurred above 7 Mm from the solar surface in the dimming region. We also showed that the ionization equilibrium assumption in the dimming region is violated, especially in the higher temperature range.

  8. CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)] [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s{sup -1} upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s{sup -1} upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

  9. THREE-MINUTE OSCILLATIONS ABOVE SUNSPOT UMBRA OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY AND NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sych, R. A. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, NAOC, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: reznik@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-minute oscillations over a sunspot's umbra in AR 11131 were observed simultaneously in UV/EUV emission by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and in radio emission by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). We use 24 hr series of SDO and 8 hr series of NoRH observations to study spectral, spatial, and temporal variations of pulsations in the 5-9 mHz frequency range at different layers of the solar atmosphere. High spatial and temporal resolution of SDO/AIA in combination with long-duration observations allowed us to trace the variations of the cutoff frequency and spectrum of oscillations across the umbra. We found that higher frequency oscillations are more pronounced closer to the umbra's center, while the lower frequencies concentrate on the peripheral parts. We interpreted this discovery as a manifestation of variation of the magnetic field inclination across the umbra at the level of temperature minimum. Possible implications of this interpretation for the diagnostics of sunspot atmospheres are discussed.

  10. On Thermal-Pulse-Driven Plasma Flows in Coronal Funnels as Observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, A K; Murawski, K; Dwivedi, B N; Mohan, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using one-arcsecond-slit scan observations from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on 05 February 2007, we find the plasma outflows in the open and expanding coronal funnels at the eastern boundary of AR 10940. The Doppler velocity map of Fe XII 195.120 A shows that the diffuse close-loop system to be mostly red-shifted. The open arches (funnels) at the eastern boundary of AR exhibit blue-shifts with a maximum speed of about 10-15 km/s. This implies outflowing plasma through these magnetic structures. In support of these observations, we perform a 2D numerical simulation of the expanding coronal funnels by solving the set of ideal MHD equations in appropriate VAL-III C initial temperature conditions using the FLASH code. We implement a rarefied and hotter region at the footpoint of the model funnel, which results in the evolution of slow plasma perturbations propagating outward in the form of plasma flows. We conclude that the heating, which may result from magnetic reconnection, can trigger the observ...

  11. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observation of the Bullet-like cluster A2146 with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Davies, Matthew L; Fabian, Andy C; Feroz, Farhan; Franzen, Thomas M O; Grainge, Keith J B; Hobson, Michael P; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; N., Anthony N Lasenby; Pooley, Guy G; Russell, Helen R; Sanders, Jeremy S; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Schammel, Michel P; Scott, Paul F; Shimwell, Timothy W; Titterington, David J; Waldram, Elizabeth M; Zwart, Jonathan T L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 13.9-18.2 GHz observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect towards A2146 using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). The cluster is detected with a peak SNR ratio of 13 sigma in the radio source subtracted map. Comparison of the SZ and X-ray images suggests that they both have extended regions which lie approximately perpendicular to one another, with their emission peaks significantly displaced. These features indicate non-uniformities in the distributions of the gas temperature and pressure, indicative of a cluster merger. We use a Bayesian cluster analysis to explore the high-dimensional parameter space of the cluster-plus-sources model to obtain cluster parameter estimates in the presence of radio point sources, receiver noise and primordial CMB anisotropy; the probability of SZ + CMB primordial structure + radio sources + receiver noise to CMB + radio sources + receiver noise is 3 x 10^{6}:1. We compare the results from three different cluster models. Our preferred model exploits the o...

  12. High-resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot oscillations with the interface region imaging spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, H.; DeLuca, E.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Golub, L.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Weber, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, B.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Kleint, L.; Cheung, M.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Tarbell, T. D.; Wuelser, J. P. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V., E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); and others

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results of sunspot oscillations from observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. The strongly nonlinear oscillation is identified in both the slit-jaw images and the spectra of several emission lines formed in the transition region and chromosphere. We first apply a single Gaussian fit to the profiles of the Mg II 2796.35 Å, C II 1335.71 Å, and Si IV 1393.76 Å lines in the sunspot. The intensity change is ?30%. The Doppler shift oscillation reveals a sawtooth pattern with an amplitude of ?10 km s{sup –1} in Si IV. The Si IV oscillation lags those of C II and Mg II by ?6 and ?25 s, respectively. The line width suddenly increases as the Doppler shift changes from redshift to blueshift. However, we demonstrate that this increase is caused by the superposition of two emission components. We then perform detailed analysis of the line profiles at a few selected locations on the slit. The temporal evolution of the line core is dominated by the following behavior: a rapid excursion to the blue side, accompanied by an intensity increase, followed by a linear decrease of the velocity to the red side. The maximum intensity slightly lags the maximum blueshift in Si IV, whereas the intensity enhancement slightly precedes the maximum blueshift in Mg II. We find a positive correlation between the maximum velocity and deceleration, a result that is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating magnetoacoustic shock waves.

  13. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventyTechnologiesfacilityImaging

  14. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print The

  15. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print

  16. The time evolution of a vortex-flame interaction observed via planar imaging of CH and OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Paul, P.H.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging diagnostics of OH and CH are used to examine a premixed laminar flame subjected to a strong line-vortex pair. Results are reported for a fuel-rcih lamiar CH{sub 4}-air-N{sub 2} rod-stabilized flame. The flow studied was highly reproducible, which enabled the use of phase-sampled imaging to provide time-resolved image sequences. Image sequences are shown for a condition sufficient to produce localized extinction of the primary flame. Results indicate that a breakage in the CH front is not preceded by any distinct change in the OH front. The structure of the CH and OH profiles during the transient leading up to, and through the breakage of the CH front do not appear to be consistent with the concept of a strained laminar flame.

  17. The interaction of THz phonon-polariton waves with microstructures observed using quantitative, phase-sensitive imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werley, Christopher Alan

    We apply newly developed, phase-sensitive imaging to enable sharply focused visualization of terahertz waves in electro-optic media. This approach allows quantitative characterization of THz waves as they interact with ...

  18. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY—AN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Dept/A021S, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  19. Direct Observation of Cosmic Strings via their Strong Gravitational Lensing Effect: I. Predictions for High Resolution Imaging Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Alice Gasparini; Phil Marshall; Tommaso Treu; Eric Morganson; Florian Dubath

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension Gmu/c^2 can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0.14"), it is sufficient to survey of order a few square degrees -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime Gmu/c^2 ~ 10^{-7}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by a factor of two over that available from the cosmic microwave background. Future high resolution imaging surveys, covering a few hundred square degrees or more, either from space in the optical or from large-format radio telescopes on the ground, would be able to further lower this limit to Gmu/c^2 < 10^{-8}.

  20. Probing Hypergiant Mass Loss with Adaptive Optics Imaging & Polarimetry in the Infrared: MMT-Pol and LMIRCam observations of IRC +10420 & VY Canis Majoris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Dinesh P; Packham, Chris; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 2 - 5 micron adaptive optics (AO) imaging and polarimetry of the famous hypergiant stars IRC +10420 and VY Canis Majoris. The imaging polarimetry of IRC +10420 with MMT-Pol at 2.2 micron resolves nebular emission with intrinsic polarization of 30%, with a high surface brightness indicating optically thick scattering. The relatively uniform distribution of this polarized emission both radially and azimuthally around the star confirms previous studies that place the scattering dust largely in the plane of the sky. Using constraints on scattered light consistent with the polarimetry at 2.2 micron, extrapolation to wavelengths in the 3 - 5 micron band predicts a scattered light component significantly below the nebular flux that is observed in our LBT/LMIRCam 3 - 5 micron AO imaging. Under the assumption this excess emission is thermal, we find a color temperature of ~ 500 K is required, well in excess of the emissivity-modified equilibrium temperature for typical astrophysical dust. The nebular featur...

  1. Thermographic Inspections | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    at the same time as blower door tests. < Energy auditors may use thermography -- or infrared scanning -- to detect thermal defects and air leakage in building envelopes. How...

  2. Thermographic Inspections | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  3. Calibration of a thin metal foil for infrared imaging video bolometer to estimate the spatial variation of thermal diffusivity using a photo-thermal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Shwetang N., E-mail: pandya.shwetang@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Sano, Ryuichi [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Takashi [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Drapiko, Evgeny A. [Fusion Centre, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)] [Fusion Centre, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Alekseyev, Andrey G. [Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)] [Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Itomi, Muneji [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin metal foil is used as a broad band radiation absorber for the InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB), which is a vital diagnostic for studying three-dimensional radiation structures from high temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. The two-dimensional (2D) heat diffusion equation of the foil needs to be solved numerically to estimate the radiation falling on the foil through a pinhole geometry. The thermal, physical, and optical properties of the metal foil are among the inputs to the code besides the spatiotemporal variation of temperature, for reliable estimation of the exhaust power from the plasma illuminating the foil. The foil being very thin and of considerable size, non-uniformities in these properties need to be determined by suitable calibration procedures. The graphite spray used for increasing the surface emissivity also contributes to a change in the thermal properties. This paper discusses the application of the thermographic technique for determining the spatial variation of the effective in-plane thermal diffusivity of the thin metal foil and graphite composite. The paper also discusses the advantages of this technique in the light of limitations and drawbacks presented by other calibration techniques being practiced currently. The technique is initially applied to a material of known thickness and thermal properties for validation and finally to thin foils of gold and platinum both with two different thicknesses. It is observed that the effect of the graphite layer on the estimation of the thermal diffusivity becomes more pronounced for thinner foils and the measured values are approximately 2.5–3 times lower than the literature values. It is also observed that the percentage reduction in thermal diffusivity due to the coating is lower for high thermal diffusivity materials such as gold. This fact may also explain, albeit partially, the higher sensitivity of the platinum foil as compared to gold.

  4. Direct Observation of Cosmic Strings Via Their Strong Gravitational Lensing Effect. 1. Predictions for High Resolution Imaging Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasparini, Maria Alice; Marshall, Phil; Treu, Tommaso; /UC, Santa Barbara; Morganson, Eric; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dubath, Florian; /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the single most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension G{mu}/c{sup 2} can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0'.14), it is sufficient to survey of order a square degree -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -8}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by an order of magnitude on that available from the cosmic microwave background. At the resolution (0'.028) attainable with the next generation of large ground based instruments, both in the radio and the infra-red with adaptive optics, surveying a sky area of order ten square degrees will allow us to probe the G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -9} regime. These limits will not be improved significantly by increasing the solid angle of the survey.

  5. THE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORONA. I. OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN WITH THE EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the temperature and density structure of the solar corona provide critical constraints on theories of coronal heating. Unfortunately, the complexity of the solar atmosphere, observational uncertainties, and the limitations of current atomic calculations, particularly those for Fe, all conspire to make this task very difficult. A critical assessment of plasma diagnostics in the corona is essential to making progress on the coronal heating problem. In this paper, we present an analysis of temperature and density measurements above the limb in the quiet corona using new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. By comparing the Si and Fe emission observed with EIS we are able to identify emission lines that yield consistent emission measure distributions. With these data we find that the distribution of temperatures in the quiet corona above the limb is strongly peaked near 1 MK, consistent with previous studies. We also find, however, that there is a tail in the emission measure distribution that extends to higher temperatures. EIS density measurements from several density sensitive line ratios are found to be generally consistent with each other and with previous measurements in the quiet corona. Our analysis, however, also indicates that a significant fraction of the weaker emission lines observed in the EIS wavelength ranges cannot be understood with current atomic data.

  6. Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 ± 3 to 250 ± 10 ?V K{sup ?1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

  7. A NEW CEPHEID DISTANCE TO THE GIANT SPIRAL M101 BASED ON IMAGE SUBTRACTION OF HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shappee, Benjamin J.; Stanek, K. Z., E-mail: shappee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We accurately determine a new Cepheid distance to M101 (NGC 5457) using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I time series photometry of two fields within the galaxy. We make a slight modification to the ISIS image subtraction package to obtain optimal differential light curves from HST data. We discovered 827 Cepheids with periods between 3 and 80 days, the largest extragalactic sample of Cepheids observed with HST by a factor of two. With this large Cepheid sample, we find that the relative distance of M101 from the Large Magellanic Cloud is {Delta}{mu}{sub LMC} = 10.63 {+-} 0.04 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag. If we use the geometrically determined maser distance to NGC 4258 as our distance anchor, the distance modulus of M101 is {mu}{sub 0} = 29.04 {+-} 0.05 (random) {+-} 0.18 (systematic) mag or D = 6.4 {+-} 0.2 (random) {+-} 0.5 (systematic) Mpc. The uncertainty is dominated by the maser distance estimate ({+-}0.15 mag), which should improve over the next few years. We determine a steep metallicity dependence, {gamma}, for our Cepheid sample through two methods, yielding {gamma} = -0.80 {+-} 0.21 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1} and {gamma} = -0.72{sup +0.22}{sub -0.25} (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1}. We see marginal evidence for variations in the Wesenheit period-luminosity relation slope as a function of deprojected galactocentric radius. We also use the tip of the red giant branch method to independently determine the distance modulus to M101 of {mu}{sub 0} = 29.05 {+-} 0.06 (random) {+-} 0.12 (systematic) mag.

  8. Ground-Based CCD Astrometry with Wide Field Imagers. I. [Observations just a few years apart allow decontamination of field objects from members in two Globular clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Anderson; Luigi R. Bedin; Giampaolo Piotto; Ramakant Singh Yadav; Andrea Bellini; .

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of a series of papers in which we will apply the methods we have developed for high-precision astrometry (and photometry) with the Hubble Space Telescope to the case of wide-field ground-based images. In particular, we adapt the software originally developed for WFPC2 to ground-based, wide field images from the WFI at the ESO 2.2m telescope. In this paper, we describe in details the new software, we characterize the WFI geometric distortion, discuss the adopted local transformation approach for proper-motion measurements, and apply the new technique to two-epoch archive data of the two closest Galactic globular clusters: NGC 6121 (M4) and NGC 6397. The results of this exercise are more than encouraging. We find that we can achieve a precision of ~7 mas (in each coordinate) in a single exposure for a well-exposed star, which allows a very good cluster-field separation in both M4, and NGC 6397, with a temporal baseline of only 2.8, and 3.1 years, respectively.

  9. Ground-Based CCD Astrometry with Wide Field Imagers. I. [Observations just a few years apart allow decontamination of field objects from members in two Globular clusters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, J; Bellini, A; Piotto, G; Yadav, R S; Anderson, Jay; Bedin, Luigi R.; Bellini, Andrea; Piotto, Giampaolo; Yadav, Ramakant Singh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of a series of papers in which we will apply the methods we have developed for high-precision astrometry (and photometry) with the Hubble Space Telescope to the case of wide-field ground-based images. In particular, we adapt the software originally developed for WFPC2 to ground-based, wide field images from the WFI at the ESO 2.2m telescope. In this paper, we describe in details the new software, we characterize the WFI geometric distortion, discuss the adopted local transformation approach for proper-motion measurements, and apply the new technique to two-epoch archive data of the two closest Galactic globular clusters: NGC 6121 (M4) and NGC 6397. The results of this exercise are more than encouraging. We find that we can achieve a precision of ~7 mas (in each coordinate) in a single exposure for a well-exposed star, which allows a very good cluster-field separation in both M4, and NGC 6397, with a temporal baseline of only 2.8, and 3.1 years, respectively.

  10. Observational Mishaps - a Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; Kristin Chiboucas; Denise Hurley-Keller

    1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a World-Wide-Web-accessible database of astronomical images which suffer from a variety of observational problems, ranging from common occurences, such as dust grains on filters and/or the dewar window, to more exotic phenomena, such as loss of primary mirror support due to the deflation of the support airbags. Apart from its educational usefulness, the purpose of this database is to assist astronomers in diagnosing and treating errant images at the telescope, thus saving valuable telescope time. Every observational mishap contained in this on-line catalog is presented in the form of a GIF image, a brief explanation of the problem, and, when possible, a suggestion for improving the image quality.

  11. Very High Energy gamma-ray observations of Mrk 501 using TACTIC imaging gamma-ray telescope during 2005-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godambe, S V; Chandra, P; Yadav, K K; Tickoo, A K; Venugopal, K; Bhatt, N; Bhattacharya, S; Chanchalani, K; Dhar, V K; Goyal, H C; Kaul, R K; Kothari, M; Kotwal, S; Koul, M K; Koul, R; Sahaynathan, B S; Sharma, M; Thoudam, S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report on the Markarian 501 results obtained during our TeV $\\gamma$-ray observations from March 11 to May 12, 2005 and February 28 to May 7, 2006 for 112.5 hours with the TACTIC $\\gamma$-ray telescope. During 2005 observations for 45.7 hours, the source was found to be in a low state and we have placed an upper limit of 4.62 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at 3$\\sigma$ level on the integrated TeV $\\gamma$-ray flux above 1 TeV from the source direction. However, during the 2006 observations for 66.8h, detailed data analysis revealed the presence of a TeV $\\gamma$-ray signal from the source with a statistical significance of 7.5$\\sigma$ above $E_{\\gamma}\\geq$ 1 TeV. The time averaged differential energy spectrum of the source in the energy range 1-11 TeV is found to match well with the power law function of the form ($d\\Phi/dE=f_0 E^{-\\Gamma}$) with $f_0=(1.66\\pm0.52)\\times 10^{-11}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\\Gamma=2.80\\pm0.27$.

  12. Quasi-periodic Slipping Magnetic Reconnection During an X-class Solar Flare Observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We firstly report the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flare loops during an eruptive X-class flare on 2014 September 10. The slipping motion was investigated at a specific location along one of the two ribbons and can be observed throughout the impulsive phase of the flare. The apparent slipping velocity was 20-110 km/s and the associated period was 3$-$6 min. The footpoints of flare loops appeared as small-scale bright knots observed in 1400 {\\AA}, corresponding to fine structures of the flare ribbon. These bright knots were observed to move along the southern part of the longer ribbon and also exhibited a quasi-periodic pattern. The Si IV 1402.77 {\\AA} line was redshifted by 30-50 km/s at the locations of moving knots with a ~ 40-60 km/s line width, larger than other sites of the flare ribbon. We suggest that the quasi-periodic slipping reconnection is involved in this process and the redshift at the bright knots is probably indicative of reconnection downflow. The emission line of Si IV at the northern p...

  13. An evaluation of the variability of tumor-shape definition derived by experienced observers from CT images of supraglottic carcinomas (ACRIN protocol 6658)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)]. E-mail: jcooper@maimonidesmed.org; Mukherji, Suresh K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology Head Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Toledano, Alicia Y. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Beldon, Clifford [Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Albany Medical School, Albany, NY (United States); Schmalfuss, Ilona M. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida School of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sailer, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Loevner, Laurie A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kousouboris, Phil [Department of Radiology, Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, PA (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cormack, Jean [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Sicks, JoRean M.S. [Center for Statistical Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States)

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is considered essential for sophisticated, image-guided radiation therapy; however, relatively little information has been reported that measures our ability to identify the precise shape of targets accurately. We decided to assess the manner in which eight 'experts' interpreted the size and shape of tumors based on 'real-life' contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Four neuroradiologists and four radiation oncologists (the authors) with considerable experience and presumed expertise in treating head-and-neck tumors independently contoured, slice-by-slice, his/her interpretation of the precise gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of 20 sets of CT scans taken from 20 patients who previously were enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 91-11. Results: The average proportion of overlap (i.e., the degree of agreement) was 0.532 (95% confidence interval 0.457 to 0.606). There was a slight tendency for the proportion of overlap to increase with increasing average GTV. Conclusions: Our work suggests that estimation of tumor shape currently is imprecise, even for experienced physicians. In consequence, there appears to be a practical limit to the current trend of smaller fields and tighter margins.

  14. Galvanneal Thermometry with a Thermographic Phosphor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manges, W.W., Allison, S.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)], Vehec, J.R. [American Iron and Steel Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate determination of temperature of galvanneal sheet emerging from a zinc bath is a challenging process measurement. The line moves at high speeds, up to 900 feet per minute, and the emissivity varies widely as it moves through the radio-frequency (RF) induction heating ovens and subsequently cools. This presents a great source of error if the pyrometric approach is used since the accuracy is sensitive to emissivity variation. This problem has been circumvented by an approach described here which uses a thermally sensitive phosphor technique for temperature measurement. For this, a small amount of a phosphor material is deposited on the liquid surface of the sheet. When the small layer of phosphor moves to the measurement station, it is illuminated by a short laser pulse which produces fluorescence from the material. The time dependence of the fluorescence indicates the temperature. Introduction of the microgram quantities of material has been shown to have no detrimental impact on product quality! This presentation describes a phosphor-based system for measuring temperature on a galvanneal manufacturing line. To date, measurements with an accuracy of +/- 5 deg F have been made at National Steel=s Midwest facility. This effort is a part of the Advanced Process Controls Program. The overall goal of the project is to provide accurate on-line temperature information that can be used to increase the yield and quality of the product, thereby reducing energy consumption and time.

  15. EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

  16. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosztyla, Robert, E-mail: rkosztyla@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wilson, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Zhang, Susan [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Benard, Francois [Department of Functional Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Nichol, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV.

  17. Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleiss, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 12 sequential images sam- pled at 7.5Hz. Observations 2,distributions of six sam- ple image sequences selected from

  18. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  19. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  20. Image Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

  1. Scanning strategies for imaging arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kovacs

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-format (sub)millimeter wavelength imaging arrays are best operated in scanning observing modes rather than traditional position-switched (chopped) modes. The choice of observing mode is critical for isolating source signals from various types of noise interference, especially for ground-based instrumentation operating under a bright atmosphere. Ideal observing strategies can combat 1/f noise, resist instrumental defects, sensitively recover emission on large scales, and provide an even field coverage -- all under feasible requirements of telescope movement. This work aims to guide the design of observing patterns that maximize scientific returns. It also compares some of the popular choices of observing modes for (sub)millimeter imaging, such as random, Lissajous, billiard, spiral, On-The-Fly (OTF), DREAM, chopped and stare patterns. Many of the conclusions are also applicable other imaging applications and imaging in one dimension (e.g. spectroscopic observations).

  2. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  3. People Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

  4. Image alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  5. A New Method For Robust High-Precision Time-Series Photometry From Well-Sampled Images: Application to Archival MMT/Megacam Observations of the Open Cluster M37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new methods for robust high-precision photometry from well-sampled images of a non-crowded field with a strongly varying point-spread function. For this work, we used archival imaging data of the open cluster M37 taken by MMT 6.5m telescope. We find that the archival light curves from the original image subtraction procedure exhibit many unusual outliers, and more than 20% of data get rejected by the simple filtering algorithm adopted by early analysis. In order to achieve better photometric precisions and also to utilize all available data, the entire imaging database was re-analyzed with our time-series photometry technique (Multi-aperture Indexing Photometry) and a set of sophisticated calibration procedures. The merit of this approach is as follows: we find an optimal aperture for each star with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and also treat peculiar situations where photometry returns misleading information with more optimal photometric index. We also adopt photometric de-trending based on ...

  6. SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miga, Michael I.

    CT and SPECT (GE Hawkeye) SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 28 CT/PET System Combined CT and PET (Siemens Medical Imaging 2006 10 Computed Tomography (CT) 3D Tomography from multiple projections #12;6 SPIE: Scintillation Camera SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 26 PET and SPECT PET = Positron Emission Tomography SPECT

  7. ORNL researchers make first observation of atoms moving inside...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observation of atoms moving inside bulk material Selected frames from a sequence of scanning transmission electron microscope images showing the diffusion pathway of a Ce dopant...

  8. Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon Nanotube-Polycarbonate Composites W. Ding, A (MWCNT)-polycarbonate composites are presented. This sheathing was observed in images of the composite properties, increases in electrical conductivity3 and improved thermal properties4 are obtained with small

  9. Radio Observations of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Reich

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae release an enormous amount of energy into the interstellar medium. Their remnants can observationally be traced up to several ten-thousand years. So far more than 230 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) have been identified in the radio range. Detailed studies of the different types of SNRs give insight into the interaction of the blast wave with the interstellar medium. Shock accelerated particles are observed, but also neutron stars left from the supernova explosion make their contribution. X-ray observations in conjunction with radio data constrain models of supernova evolution. A brief review of the origin and evolution of SNRs is given, which are compared with supernova statistics and observational limitations. In addition the morphology and characteristics of the different types of SNRs are described, including some recent results and illustrated by SNRs images mostly obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope.

  10. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  11. The Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS) : investigating galaxy cores and black holes with gravitational lens central images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Edward R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS), a search for central images in gravitational lenses. We present the first four ELVIS targets, for which we have radio VLBI observations with resolutions ...

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging or Imaging Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    (nm) Cosmic Rays Gamma Rays X Rays Microwaves (Radar) Radio & Television WavesUV 105 106 107 108 109 the image cube by scanning through it. The conventional methods are whiskbroom (a), filter/Fourier transform Optics Scene FOVx X-Dimension Scanning Mechanism Focusing Optics #12;Whiskbroom Sensor Accumulation

  13. Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conger, James Lynn

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

  14. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  15. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  16. EIS - An Imaging Survey for VLT Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luiz da Costa

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The imaging data assembled by the recently completed ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) are reviewed and their scientific value briefly assessed. Among the various applications, the imaging data has been used to build a large sample of candidate distant clusters of galaxies in the Southern Hemisphere to be used for follow-up observations with the VLT as well as other space and ground-based facilities. Preliminary results from ongoing work to confirm these candidates are reported and the future prospects discussed.

  17. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  18. Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

  19. Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Images of Hybrid Vehicles Each of the householdsbetween hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles was observed in smallowned Honda Civic Hybrids, vehicles that are virtually

  20. Lensless imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearningLensless4 Lensless Imaging of

  1. ALMA's high-cadence imaging capabilities for solar observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedemeyer, Sven

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array offers an unprecedented view of our Sun at sub-/millimeter wavelengths. The high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution facilitates the measurement of gas temperatures and magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere with high precision. The anticipated results will revolutionize our understanding of the solar atmosphere and may in particular result in major steps towards solving the coronal heating problem. Based on state-of-the-art 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we calculate the emergent continuum intensity (and thus brightness temperature maps) in the wavelength range accessed by ALMA and simulate instrumental effects for different array configurations. First results show that the local gas temperature can be closely mapped with ALMA and that much of the complex small-scale chromospheric pattern can be resolved.

  2. Substorm expansion phase: Observations from Geotail, Polar and IMAGE network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    is not at the center of the sheet anymore, detects an ion velocity directed earthward but essentially field aligned Plasma Sheet (CPS) and Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL) and on the relation between this transport

  3. Observation of images in graded-index multimode fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begum, Sultana

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by dipping one end of the fiber in methanol. This is done so that when this end is fused to the pay-out single-mode fiber by applying an arc, the blue dye does not get inside the fiber when the cladding melts. A laser trimming system is used to mark... vary with time due to thenrial drifts in the wavelength of the laser 27 source, or to thermal or mechanical phase shifts in the fiber. If an aperture such as misaligned splice or mode-selective loss such as micro-or macro-bending is present...

  4. Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can in the heliosphere should have the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced

  5. Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced Alfvén speed, a high Mach

  6. Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

  7. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  8. Femtosecond Transient Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirmani, Ahmed (Ghulam Ahmed)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes a novel framework called transient imaging for image formation and scene understanding through impulse illumination and time images. Using time-of-flight cameras and multi-path analysis of global light ...

  9. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  10. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  11. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

  12. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  13. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  14. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  15. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  16. Initial Helioseismic Observations by Hinode/SOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Sekii; Alexander G. Kosovichev; Junwei Zhao; Saku Tsuneta; Hiromoto Shibahashi; Thomas E. Berger; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W. Lites; Shin'ichi Nagata; Toshifumi Shimizu; Richard A. Shine; Yoshinori Suematsu; Theodore D. Tarbell; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from initial helioseismic observations by Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode are reported. It has been demonstrated that intensity oscillation data from Broadband Filter Imager can be used for various helioseismic analyses. The k-omega power spectra, as well as corresponding time-distance cross-correlation function that promises high-resolution time-distance analysis below 6-Mm travelling distance, were obtained for G-band and CaII-H data. Subsurface supergranular patterns have been observed from our first time-distance analysis. The results show that the solar oscillation spectrum is extended to much higher frequencies and wavenumbers, and the time-distance diagram is extended to much shorter travel distances and times than they were observed before, thus revealing great potential for high-resolution helioseismic observations from Hinode.

  17. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  18. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . One group served as control subjects while the other group functioned as a treated group (observers). The observers were allowed to watch a correctly performed discrimination task prior to testing of a learning response using the same task.... Discrimination testing was conducted on all horses daily for 14 days with criterion set at seven out of eight responses correct with the last five consecutively correct. The maximum number of trials performed without reaching set criterion was limited...

  19. Ultraviolet imaging of hydrogen flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, G.J.; Wilke, M.; King, N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have assembled an ultraviolet-sensitive intensified camera for observing hydrogen combustion by imaging the OH, A/sup 2/..sigma.. - X/sup 2//Pi/ bandhead emissions near 309 nm. The camera consists of a quartz and CaF achromat lense-coupled to an ultraviolet image intensifier which is in turn fiber-coupled to a focus projection scan (FPS) vidicon. The emission band is selected with interference filters which serve to discriminate against background. The camera provides optical gain of 100 to 1000 and is capable of being shuttered at nanosecond speeds and of being framed at over 600 frames per second. We present data from observations of test flames in air at standard RS-170 video rates with varying background conditions. Enhanced images using background subtraction are presented. Finally, we discuss the use of polarizaton effects to further discrimination against sky background. This work began as a feasibility study to investigate ultraviolet technology to detect hydrogen fires for the NASA space program. 6 refs., 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  20. User Science Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Image: OBrianImageBig.png | png | 5 MB SlavaFull.png FES: Small Scale Experimental Plasma Research October 21, 2010 | Author(s): Vyacheslav Lukin (NRL) | Category: Fusion Energy |...

  1. Imaging in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The text contains details of recording media, image quality, sensitometry, processing and equipment used in radiotherapy for imaging. It reflects part of the syllabus for the College of Radiographers.

  2. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  3. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  4. INTEGRAL observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldoni, P; Laurent, P; Cassé, M; Paul, J; Sarazin, C L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster of galaxies are the largest concentrations of visible mass in the Universe and therefore a fundamental topic of cosmology and astrophysics. Recent radio, EUV, and X-ray observations suggest that clusters contain large populations of diffuse nonthermal relativistic and/or superthermal particles. These particles may be produced by acceleration in cluster merger shocks, AGNs, and/or supernovae in cluster galaxies. Models for the nonthermal populations in clusters indicate that they should produce substantial hard X-ray and $\\gamma$ luminosities. The possible role of nonthermal particles in the dynamics of clusters is one of the greatest uncertainties in their use as cosmological probes. INTEGRAL offers, for the first time, the possibility of simultaneous medium resolution imaging (~ 12 arcmin) and high resolution spectroscopy (DeltaE/E ~ 2 keV @ 1.3 MeV) with exceptional sensitivity in the hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray band. The spatial resolution will allow discrete sources, such as AGNs, to be separated fr...

  5. Consumers' Image of Broilers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtenay, Henry V.; Branson, Robert E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which they feel the product possesses. This research was designed to determine consumers' favorable and unfavorable images as to broilers, both in making purchases in stores and in serving them as a meat dish. These images, summarized briefly here... count. The Preparation and Cooking Image: The h0u.l wife's image of broilers focuses on one metliotl- frying. The major deterrent to preparing othci dishes was that these are either too difficult or canno* be prepared satisfactorily...

  6. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

  7. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  8. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

  9. Human Functional Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

  10. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  11. Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuch, Wolfgang

    Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

  12. Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlot, David J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

  13. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  14. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  15. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  16. ESO IMAGING SURVEY: Past Activities and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaggia, Simone

    . Introduction The ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) proj- ect is an ongoing effort to carry out pub- lic imaging surveys- erately deep, large-area survey (EIS- WIDE) and a deep optical/infrared sur- vey (EIS-DEEP), with the observations being conducted at the NTT. EIS has recently reached another milestone with the completion

  17. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP Update Information on new, existing, andObservations Projected

  18. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation ofEdge

  19. The world is a large place, and most of our planet is covered with water and inaccessible to direct observations. Acoustic sensors are the only tool filling this gap: by sending directed beams of sound, we can image the water column,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    problems (e.g. marine habitat mapping, effects of climate change, tsunami risks); To do that, we use our array Multibeam sounder Sidescan sonar ©GomezSichiandBlondel,2004;2006 Mapping tsunami risks in Europe of Almeria, right: offshore Lisbon) and sub-seabed imaging shows past evolution and potential risks. Seafloor

  20. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  1. SALT observations of southern post-novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomov, T; Mikolajewski, M; Ilkiewicz, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on recent optical observations of the stellar and the nebular remnants of 22 southern post-novae. In this study, for each of our targets, we obtained and analysed long-slit spectra in the spectral range 3500-6600 A and in H$\\alpha$+NII narrow-band images. The changes in the emission lines' equivalent widths with the time since the outburst agree with earlier published results of other authors. We estimated an average value $\\alpha$=2.37 for the exponent of the power law fitted to the post-novae continua. Our observations clearly show the two-component structure of the V842 Cen expanding nebulae, owing to the different velocities of the ejected matter. We discovered an expanding shell around V382 Vel with an outer diameter of about 12 arcsec.

  2. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  3. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

  4. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  5. BNL | ICS Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    due to the phase-contrast effect. This method will be useful for quantitative computed tomography applications of Thomson sources. High-resolution radiographic image of a wasp...

  6. Ferroelectric optical image comparator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

  7. Quantum Mirrors and Crossing Symmetry as Heart of Ghost Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Ion; M. L. Ion; L. Rusu

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper it is proved that the key to understanding the ghost imaging mystery are the crossing symmetric photon reactions in the nonlinear media. Hence, the laws of the plane quantum mirror (QM) and that of spherical quantum mirror, observed in the ghost imaging experiments, are obtained as natural consequences of the energy-momentum conservation laws. So, it is shown that the ghost imaging laws depend only on the energy-momentum conservation and not on the photons entanglement. The extension of these results to the ghost imaging with other kind of light is discussed. Some fundamental experiments for a decisive tests of the [SPDC-DFG]-quantum mirror are suggested.

  8. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

  9. Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann information from previously rendered images. Images predicted from prior images are combined with a residual-based rendering tech- nique provides accurate motion prediction and accelerates rendering at the same time

  10. Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

  11. Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1 D. L. Hysell,2 D. Lummerzheim,3 M of the E region radar aurora obtained with a 30 MHz imaging radar and the optical aurora (green line, the radar aurora in the vicinity of a stable evening auroral arc arises because of the arc's polarization

  12. Global VLBI Observations of Compact Radio Sources in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. McDonald; T. W. B. Muxlow; A. Pedlar; M. A. Garrett; K. A. Wills; S. T. Garrington; P. J. Diamond; P. N. Wilkinson

    2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the starburst galaxy, M82, have been made with a 20-station global VLBI array at $\\lambda$18cm. Maps are presented of the brightest young supernova remnants (SNR) in M82 and the wide-field mapping techniques used in making images over a field of view of $\\sim$1 arcminute with 3 milliarcsecond resolution are discussed. A limit has been placed on the power law deceleration of the young SNR, 43.31+592 with an index greater than 0.73 $\\pm$ 0.11 from observations with the European VLBI Network. Using the global array we have resolved compact knots of radio emission in the source which, with future global observations, will enable better constraints to be placed on the expansion parameters of this SNR. The latest global observations have also provided high resolution images of the most compact radio source in M82, 41.95+575. We determine an upper limit to the radial expansion rate along the major axis of 2000 km s$^{-1}$. However, the new images also show structure resembling that of collimated ejection which brings into question the previous explanation of the source as being due to the confinement of a supernova by a high density circumstellar medium. It is apparent that we are now able to image the brightest supernova remnants in M82 with a linear scale which allows direct comparison with galactic SNR such as Cassiopeia A.

  13. Lucky exposures: diffraction limited astronomical imaging through the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tubbs, Robert Nigel

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    brightness are circled in red in d). In panels a)—c) the blurring effect of the PSFs re-distributes the flux from the point sources over a wider area of the image leading to a substantial reduction in the peak pixel values in the images. can be improved... to this method as the Lucky Exposures technique. A number of other authors have published results using very similar methods, particularly 1.3. Performance of ground-based high resolution imaging techniques 11 for solar and planetary observations. Observations...

  14. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  15. Scandinavian Workshop on Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Barcode Imaging of Chocolate Milk Quan.fica.on of Microstructures in Freeze.on of Fat Content in Raw Beef Cut Meat Evalua.on by RGB-to-spectrum Imaging.on to Visualizing Meat Products Characteriza.on of Commercial Danish Apple Cul.var Using Novel

  16. Heart imaging method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  17. DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanibbi, Richard

    DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

  18. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  19. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  20. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  1. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: CSP Images & Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Images & Videos CSP Images & Videos Image Gallery Videos Concentrating Solar Power Image Gallery A picture says a thousand words, especially on the World Wide Web. Both Sandia...

  3. Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project: Observations and Source Lists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Getman; E. Flaccomio; P. S. Broos; N. Grosso; M. Tsujimoto; L. Townsley; G. P. Garmire; J. Kastner; J. Li; F. R. Harnden, Jr.; S. Wolk; S. S. Murray; C. J. Lada; A. A. Muench; M. J. McCaughrean; G. Meeus; F. Damiani; G. Micela; S. Sciortino; J. Bally; L. A. Hillenbrand; W. Herbst; T. Preibisch; E. D. Feigelson

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the data reduction methods and the derived catalog of more than 1600 X-ray point sources from the exceptionally deep January 2003 Chandra X-ray Observatory observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster and embedded populations around OMC-1. The observation was obtained with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and has been nicknamed the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP). With an 838 ks exposure made over a continuous period of 13.2 days, the COUP observation provides the most uniform and comprehensive dataset on the X-ray emission of normal stars ever obtained in the history of X-ray astronomy.

  4. Ghost Imaging with Blackbody Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjian Cai; Shiyao Zhu

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical study of ghost imaging by using blackbody radiation source. A Gaussian thin lens equation for the ghost imaging, which depends on both paths, is derived. The dependences of the visibility and quality of the image on the transverse size and temperature of the blackbody are studied. The main differences between the ghost imaging by using the blackbody radiation and by using the entangled photon pairs are image-forming equation, and the visibility and quality of the image

  5. The image of place in American popular music, 1970-1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiler, Leslie Carl

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the most important to this thesis, is Ford and Henderson's (1974) article on the image of place in American popular music. This article begins with the observation that people derive images of place from various sources, such as "geography courses..., particularly those in choosing desirable location. Hypothesizing that "songs both reflect and influence the images people have of places and that these songs and images have changed significantly over the years, " Ford and Henderson created a master list...

  6. Scanning computed confocal imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, John S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

  7. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

    1983-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

  8. Observing the CMB at High-l using the VSA and AMI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela C. Taylor

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss two experiments - the Very Small Array (VSA) and the Arcminute MicroKelvin Imager (AMI) - and their prospects for observing the CMB at high angular multipoles. Whilst the VSA is primarily designed to observe primary anisotropies in the CMB, AMI is designed to image secondary anisotropies via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The combined l-range of these two instruments is between l = 150 and ~10000.

  9. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  10. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  11. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  12. Overview of Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, R.B.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

  13. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  14. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

  15. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  16. Three Dimensional Molecular Imaging for Lignocellulosic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, Paul W.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high efficiency, inexpensive processing protocols to render biomass components into fermentable substrates for the sequential processing of cell wall components into fuels and important feedstocks for the biorefinery of the future is a key goal of the national roadmap for renewable energy. Furthermore, the development of such protocols depends critically on detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal infiltration of reagents designed to remove and separate the phenylpropenoid heteropolymer (lignin) from the processable sugar components sequestered in the rigid cell walls of plants. A detailed chemical and structural understanding of this pre-enzymatic processing in space and time was the focus of this program. We worked to develop new imaging strategies that produce real-time molecular speciation information in situ; extract sub-surface information about the effects of processing; and follow the spatial and temporal characteristics of the molecular species in the matrix and correlate this complex profile with saccharification. Spatially correlated SIMS and Raman imaging were used to provide high quality, high resolution subcellular images of Miscanthus cross sections. Furthermore, the combination of information from the mass spectrometry and Raman scattering allows specific chemical assignments of observed structures, difficult to assign from either imaging approach alone and lays the foundation for subsequent heterocorrelated imaging experiments targeted at more challenging biological systems, such as the interacting plant-microbe systems relevant to the rhizosphere.

  17. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  18. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  19. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  20. Imaging Tumour Hypoxia with Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Ian N.; Manavaki, Roido; Blower, Philip J.; West, Catharine; Williams, Kaye J.; Harris, Adrian L.; Domarkas, Juozas; Lord, Simon; Baldry, Claire; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    25 2ZD, UK 2Department of Radiology, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Box 218 - Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ, UK 3Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, 4th Floor, Lambeth Wing, St. Thomas... measurements in scans acquired two days apart (Okamoto et al, 2013). Other than 18F–FMISO, a study with 18F–FETNIM in oesophageal cancer patients observed similar uptake values between scans performed on separate days before concurrent chemoradioatherapy...

  1. BAYESIAN ENSEMBLE LEARNING FOR MEDICAL IMAGE DENOISING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Hyuntaek

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Medical images are often affected by random noise because of both image acquisition from the medical modalities and image transmission from modalities to workspace in the main computer. Medical image denoising removes noise from the CT or MR images...

  2. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUC{sub OBS1}=0.80 [0.73,0.86] vs AUC{sub ANN1}=0.88 [0.82,0.92]) as that of the second observer and the corresponding ANN (AUC{sub OBS2}=0.87 [0.83,0.91] vs AUC{sub ANN2}=0.90 [0.85,0.94]). Moreover, the ANN-predicted indices were generated in a fraction of the time required to obtain the observer-assigned indices. Conclusions: ANN-predicted assessability indices performed similar to observer-assigned assessability indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores from the physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using computerized methods for identifying images with diagnostic clinical indices in cardiac CT images.

  3. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  4. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHotSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingSpeedingOTYa

  5. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found

  6. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing mode

  7. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and Oil ResearchPublictearing

  8. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  9. Variable waveband infrared imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  10. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  11. METHYL CYANIDE OBSERVATIONS TOWARD MASSIVE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosero, V.; Hofner, P. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kurtz, S. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58090 (Mexico); Bieging, J. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Araya, E. D. [Physics Department, Western Illinois University, 1 University Circle, Macomb, IL 61455 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a survey in the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition toward a sample of massive proto-stellar candidates. The observations were carried out with the 10 m Submillimeter Telescope on Mount Graham, AZ. We detected this molecular line in 9 out of 21 observed sources. In six cases this is the first detection of this transition. We also obtained full beam sampled cross-scans for five sources which show that the lower K-components can be extended on the arcminute angular scale. The higher K-components, however, are always found to be compact with respect to our 36'' beam. A Boltzmann population diagram analysis of the central spectra indicates CH{sub 3}CN column densities of about 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}, and rotational temperatures above 50 K, which confirms these sources as hot molecular cores. Independent fits to line velocity and width for the individual K-components resulted in the detection of an increasing blueshift with increasing line excitation for four sources. Comparison with mid-infrared (mid-IR) images from the SPITZER GLIMPSE/IRAC archive for six sources show that the CH{sub 3}CN emission is generally coincident with a bright mid-IR source. Our data clearly show that the CH{sub 3}CN J = 12 {yields} 11 transition is a good probe of the hot molecular gas near massive protostars, and provide the basis for future interferometric studies.

  12. Chandra High Resolution Camera Imaging of GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETG observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. Based on the three HRC images and the HETG zero order image, the accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA = 18h 01m 12.39s, Dec = -25d 44m 36.1s (90% confidence radius = 0".45), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All three HRC images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc.

  13. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  14. High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Miller-Jones

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

  15. The Einstein Database of IPC Xray Observations of Optically and Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Belinda

    The Einstein Database of IPC X­ray Observations of Optically and Radio Selected Quasars. 1 Belinda February 22, 1995 Abstract We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein observatory. All were

  16. H$\\alpha$ and EUV observations of a partial CME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Damian J; Antolin, Patrick; Mathioudakis, Mihalis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained H$\\alpha$ high spatial and time resolution observations of the upper solar chromosphere and supplemented these with multi-wavelength observations from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and the {\\it Hinode} ExtremeUltraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The H$\\alpha$ observations were conducted on 11 February 2012 with the Hydrogen-Alpha Rapid Dynamics Camera (HARDcam) instrument at the National Solar Observatory's Dunn Solar Telescope. Our H$\\alpha$ observations found large downflows of chromospheric material returning from coronal heights following a failed prominence eruption. We have detected several large condensations ("blobs") returning to the solar surface at velocities of $\\approx$200 km s$^{-1}$ in both H$\\alpha$ and several SDO AIA band passes. The average derived size of these "blobs" in H$\\alpha$ is 500 by 3000 km$^2$ in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the direction of travel, respectively. A comparison of our "blob" widths to those found from coronal rain, indicate...

  17. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  18. 8, 88178846, 2008 Observed boundary-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H. Marsham et and Enviroment, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK 2 Institut f¨ur Meteorologie und Klimaforschung, Universit@env.leeds.ac.uk) 8817 #12;ACPD 8, 8817­8846, 2008 Observed boundary- layer/mesoscale impacts on Saharan dust J. H

  19. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  20. Wavelets in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H. [Sharda University, SET, Department of Electronics and Communication, Knowledge Park 3rd, Gr. Noida (India); University of Kocaeli, Department of Mathematics, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Istanbul Aydin University, Department of Computer Engineering, 34295 Istanbul (Turkey); Sharda University, SET, Department of Mathematics, 32-34 Knowledge Park 3rd, Greater Noida (India)

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  1. Fundamentals of Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem · The Fourier transform components · Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want to understand

  2. \\NeuroImage" Informatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Finn Ã?rup

    International Neuroimaging Consortium Introduction Author cocitation analysis describes a scienti#12;c #12;eld on data collected by the Institute of Scien- ti#12;c Information among a limited set of key au- thors within a #12;eld. Here we work on data from a single journal (the journal \\NeuroImage") down- loaded from

  3. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  4. Characterization of Diffraction-Enhanced Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, T.; Connor, D; Dilmanian, F; Faulconer, L; Liu, T; Parham, C; Pisano, E; Zhong, Z

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray imaging modality that has been shown to enhance contrast between normal and cancerous breast tissues. In this study, diffraction-enhanced imaging in computed tomography (DEI-CT) mode was used to quantitatively characterize the refraction contrasts of the organized structures associated with invasive human breast cancer. Using a high-sensitivity Si (3 3 3) reflection, the individual features of breast cancer, including masses, calcifications and spiculations, were observed. DEI-CT yields 14, 5 and 7 times higher CT numbers and 10, 9 and 6 times higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for masses, calcifications and spiculations, respectively, as compared to conventional CT of the same specimen performed using the same detector, x-ray energy and dose. Furthermore, DEI-CT at ten times lower dose yields better SNR than conventional CT. In light of the recent development of a compact DEI prototype using an x-ray tube as its source, these results, acquired at a clinically relevant x-ray energy for which a pre-clinical DEI prototype currently exists, suggest the potential of clinical implementation of mammography with DEI-CT to provide high-contrast, high-resolution images of breast cancer (Parham 2006 PhD Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill).

  5. Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging Junzhou Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in medical. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used in practical MR image

  6. Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

  7. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Fluids & Fractures - time lapse MTCSEM for fluid imaging - joint CSEM-MTseismic imaging ??? - use MEQ focal information with EM Imaging ScientificTechnical Approach...

  8. A Method for Weak Lensing Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nick Kaiser; Gordon Squires; Tom Broadhurst

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop and test a method for measuring the gravitational lensing induced distortion of faint background galaxies. We first describe how we locate the galaxies and measure a 2-component `polarisation' or ellipticity statistic $e_\\alpha$ whose expectation value should be proportional to the gravitational shear $\\gamma_\\alpha$. We then show that an anisotropic instrumental psf perturbs the polarisation by $\\delta e_\\alpha = P^s_{\\alpha\\beta} p_\\beta$, where $p_\\alpha$ is a measure of the psf anisotropy and $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ is the `linearised smear polarisability tensor'. By estimating $P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}$ for each object we can determine $p_\\alpha$ from the foreground stars and apply a correction $-P^s_{\\alpha\\beta}p_\\beta$ to the galaxies. We test this procedure using deep high-resolution images from HST which are smeared with an anisotropic psf and then have noise added to simulate ground-based observations. We find that the procedure works very well. A similar analysis yields a linear shear polarisability tensor $P^\\gamma_{\\alpha\\beta}$ which describes the response to a gravitational shear. This calibrates the polarisation-shear relation, but only for galaxies which are well resolved. To empirically calibrate the effect of seeing on the smaller galaxies we artificially stretch HST images to simulate lensing and then degrade them as before. These experiments provide a rigorous and exacting test of the method under realistic conditions. They show that it is possible to remove the effect of instrumental psf anisotropy, and that the method provides an efficient and quantitative measurement of the gravitational shear.

  9. Fourier Analysis of Ghost Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Yanfeng Bai; Shensheng Han

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier analysis of ghost imaging (FAGI) is proposed in this paper to analyze the properties of ghost imaging with thermal light sources. This new theory is compatible with the general correlation theory of intensity fluctuation and could explain some amazed phenomena. Furthermore we design a series of experiments to verify the new theory and investigate the inherent properties of ghost imaging.

  10. Automated Very Low Magnification Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the entire available imaging area on the grid. The VLM image can then be used as a reference map of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801. A typical TEM specimen grid provides approximately a 2x2 mm area that is available for imaging. In order to identify and locate suitable targets on the grid

  11. Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Michael I.

    1 Kalman Filtering with Intermittent Observations Bruno Sinopoli, Luca Schenato, Massimo within sensor networks, we consider the prob- lem of performing Kalman filtering with intermittent be neglected. We address this problem starting from the discrete Kalman filtering formulation, and modelling

  12. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  13. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  14. SU-E-I-43: Pediatric CT Dose and Image Quality Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, G; Singh, R [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To design an approach to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging, and to evaluate expected performance. Methods: A methodology was designed to quantify relative image quality as a function of CT image acquisition parameters. Image contrast and image noise were used to indicate expected conspicuity of objects, and a wide-cone system was used to minimize scan time for motion avoidance. A decision framework was designed to select acquisition parameters as a weighted combination of image quality and dose. Phantom tests were used to acquire images at multiple techniques to demonstrate expected contrast, noise and dose. Anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts were imaged on a 160mm CT system with tube voltage capabilities as low as 70kVp. Previously acquired clinical images were used in conjunction with simulation tools to emulate images at different tube voltages and currents to assess human observer preferences. Results: Examination of image contrast, noise, dose and tube/generator capabilities indicates a clinical task and object-size dependent optimization. Phantom experiments confirm that system modeling can be used to achieve the desired image quality and noise performance. Observer studies indicate that clinical utilization of this optimization requires a modified approach to achieve the desired performance. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential to optimize radiation dose and image quality for pediatric CT imaging. In addition, the methodology can be used in an automated parameter selection feature that can suggest techniques given a limited number of user inputs. G Stevens and R Singh are employees of GE Healthcare.

  15. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  16. Multimode imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for detecting and locating a source of gamma rays of energies ranging from 10-20 keV to several MeV's includes plural gamma ray detectors arranged in a generally closed extended array so as to provide Compton scattering imaging and coded aperture imaging simultaneously. First detectors are arranged in a spaced manner about a surface defining the closed extended array which may be in the form a circle, a sphere, a square, a pentagon or higher order polygon. Some of the gamma rays are absorbed by the first detectors closest to the gamma source in Compton scattering, while the photons that go unabsorbed by passing through gaps disposed between adjacent first detectors are incident upon second detectors disposed on the side farthest from the gamma ray source, where the first spaced detectors form a coded aperture array for two or three dimensional gamma ray source detection.

  17. Imaging the Antikythera Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malzbender, Tom (Hewlett Packard Laboratories) [Hewlett Packard Laboratories

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1900, a party of sponge divers chanced on the wreck of a Roman merchant vessel between Crete and mainland Greece. It was found to contain numerous ancient Greek treasures, among them a mysterious lump of clay that split open to reveal 'mathematical gears' as it dried out. This object is now known as the Antikythera Mechanism, one of the most enlightening artifacts in terms of revealing the advanced nature of ancient Greek science and technology. In 2005 we travelled to the National Archeological Museum in Athens to apply our Reflectance Imaging methods to the mechanism in the hopes of revealing ancient writing on the device. We were successful, and along with the results of Microfocus CT imaging, we are able to decipher 3000 characters compared with the original 800 known. This lead to an understanding that the device was a mechanical, astronomical computer from 150 B.C.E. capable of predicting solar and lunar eclipses along with other celestial events. This talk will overview both the imaging methods as well as what they reveal about the Antikythera Mechanism.

  18. Thermographic measurements on plant leaves Christoph S. Garbea, Ulrich Schurrb and Bernd Jhnea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    metabolism of the organs. As plants are sessile organism, they cannot escape from unfavorable environments a temperature most favorable for their metabolism, plants have developed a number of thermoreg- ulation is driven though the concentration gradient of water vapor in the leaf-internal gas space

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial multispectral thermographic Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Utah State University Collection: Engineering 2 Remote sensing as a technology can be said to have started with the Summary: photographs....

  20. Numerical analysis and thermographic investigation of induction heating Matej Kranjc, Anze Zupanic *, Damijan Miklavcic, Tomaz Jarm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    Thermography a b s t r a c t Induction heating process was investigated numerically and experimentally, a non-contact measurement method based on thermography can be used. Thermography is a form of infrared

  1. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use as Thermographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Europium-doped Pyrochlores for Use, Nashville, TN, 37235 Three europium-doped pyrochlores including La2Zr2O7:Eu, La2Hf2O7:Eu, and Nd2Zr2O7:Eu

  2. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The item youThe Discovery ofTechnology used in Additive

  3. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Lisa Marie (Rocky Point, NY); Smith, Randy J. (Wading River, NY); Warren, John B. (Port Jefferson, NY); Elliott, Donald (Hampton Bays, NY)

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  4. Doppler maps and surface differential rotation of EI Eri from the MUSICOS 1998 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zs. K?vári; A. Washuettl; B. H. Foing; K. Vida; J. Bartus; K. Oláh; the MUSICOS 98 team

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present time-series Doppler images of the rapidly-rotating active binary star EI Eri from spectroscopic observations collected during the MUSICOS multi-site campaign in 1998, since the critical rotation period of 1.947 days makes it impossible to obtain time-resolved images from a single site. From the surface reconstructions a weak solar-type differential rotation, as well as a tiny poleward meridional flow are measured.

  5. Speckle-free laser imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

  6. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  7. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  8. Fresnel interferometric arrays for space-based imaging: testbed results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Serre; Laurent Koechlin; Paul Deba

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a Fresnel Interferometric Array testbed. This new concept of imager involves diffraction focussing by a thin foil, in which many thousands of punched subapertures form a pattern related to a Fresnel zone plate. This kind of array is intended for use in space, as a way to realizing lightweight large apertures for high angular resolution and high dynamic range observations. The chromaticity due to diffraction focussing is corrected by a small diffractive achromatizer placed close to the focal plane of the array. The laboratory test results presented here are obtained with an 8 centimeter side orthogonal array, yielding a 23 meter focal length at 600 nm wavelength. The primary array and the focal optics have been designed and assembled in our lab. This system forms an achromatic image. Test targets of various shapes, sizes, dynamic ranges and intensities have been imaged. We present the first images, the achieved dynamic range, and the angular resolution.

  9. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF THE NOVA IN V407 CYGNI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Decerprit, G. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Duke, C., E-mail: daniel-d-gall@uiowa.edu, E-mail: kazuma-tsurusaki@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); and others

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  10. Staring 2-D hadamard transform spectral imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gentry, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Christine M. (Albuquerque, NM); Wehlburg, Joseph C. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark W. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Jody L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A staring imaging system inputs a 2D spatial image containing multi-frequency spectral information. This image is encoded in one dimension of the image with a cyclic Hadamarid S-matrix. The resulting image is detecting with a spatial 2D detector; and a computer applies a Hadamard transform to recover the encoded image.

  11. unWISE: Unblurred coadds of the WISE imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, Dustin, E-mail: dstn@cmu.edu [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite observed the full sky in four mid-infrared bands in the 2.8-28 ?m range. The primary mission was completed in 2010. The WISE team has done a superb job of producing a series of high-quality, well-documented, complete data releases in a timely manner. However, the 'Atlas Image' coadds that are part of the recent AllWISE and previous data releases were intentionally blurred. Convolving the images by the point-spread function while coadding results in 'matched-filtered' images that are close to optimal for detecting isolated point sources. But these matched-filtered images are sub-optimal or inappropriate for other purposes. For example, we are photometering the WISE images at the locations of sources detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey through forward modeling, and this blurring decreases the available signal-to-noise by effectively broadening the point-spread function. This paper presents a new set of coadds of the WISE images that have not been blurred. These images retain the intrinsic resolution of the data and are appropriate for photometry preserving the available signal-to-noise. Users should be cautioned, however, that the W3- and W4-band coadds contain artifacts around large, bright structures (large galaxies, dusty nebulae, etc.); eliminating these artifacts is the subject of ongoing work. These new coadds, and the code used to produce them, are publicly available at http://unwise.me.

  12. First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

  13. Total Dose Evaluation of Deep Submicron CMOS Imaging Technology Through Elementary Device and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    layer. Current-voltage character- istics were carried out at 23 using a low-current ( 10 fA) test bench. Bernard, and G. Rolland Abstract--Ionizing radiation effects on CMOS image sensors (CIS) manufactured to understand ionizing dose effects on devices and then on image sensors. The main degra- dations observed

  14. Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi, Chinese Academy of Sciences Abstract. Since 1986, we have made some improvements to the multichannel solar to it a multichannel infrared imaging solar spectrograph. The original spectrograph can be used to observe

  15. Fragmenting protostellar disks: properties and observational signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorobyov, Eduard; Dunham, Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we study the gravitational fragmentation of an unstable protostellar disc formed during the collapse of a pre-stellar core with a mass of 1.2 M_sun. The forming fragments span a mass range from about a Jupiter mass to very-low-mass protostars and are located at distances from a few tens to a thousand AU, with a dearth of objects at < 100 AU. We explore the possibility of observational detection of the fragments in discs viewed through the outflow cavity at a distance of 250 pc. We demonstrate that one hour of integration time with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) is sufficient to detect the fragments with masses as low as 1.5 M_Jup at orbital distances up to 800 AU from the protostar. The ALMA resolution sets the limit on the minimum orbital distance of detectable fragments. For the adopted resolution of our simulated ALMA images of 0.1", the fragments can be detected at distances down to 50 AU. At smaller distances, the fragments usually me...

  16. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safonova, Margarita; Mohan, Rekhesh; Sreejith, A G; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Arpit; Narayan, Rahul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Space astronomy in the last 40 years has largely been done from spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) for which the technology is proven and delivery mechanisms are readily available. However, new opportunities are arising with the surge in commercial aerospace missions. We describe here one such possibility: deploying a small instrument on the Moon. This can be accomplished by flying onboard the Indian entry to the Google Lunar X PRIZE competition, Team Indus mission, which is expected to deliver a nearly 30 kgs of payloads to the Moon, with a rover as its primary payload. We propose to mount a wide-field far-UV (130--180 nm) imaging telescope as a payload on the Team Indus lander. Our baseline operation is a fixed zenith pointing but with the option of a mechanism to allow observations of different attitudes. Pointing towards intermediate ecliptic latitude (50 deg or above) ensures that the Sun is at least 40 deg off the line of sight at all times. In this position, the telescope can cover higher galactic lat...

  17. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  18. Imaging Agents DOI: 10.1002/anie.201301135

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Jinming

    Takahashi, A. Dean Sherry, and Jinming Gao* Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful non- invasive a "reverse" pH gradient across the cell membrane is observed in cancer cells compared to normal cells.[11 19 F signal. b) Structural formula of three representative diblock copolymers containing different p

  19. The endcap Cherenkov ring imaging detector at SLD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hawegawa, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dolinsky, S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector in the endcap regions of the SLD detector and report initial performance. The endcap CRID was completed and commissioned in 1993 and is fully operational for the 1994 run. First Cherenkov rings have been observed. The endcap CRID detectors and fluid systems are described and initial operational experience is discussed.

  20. Key Science Observations of AGNs with KaVA Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kino, Motoki; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KaVA (KVN and VERA Array) is a new combined VLBI array with KVN (Korean VLBI Network) and VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry). First, we briefly review the imaging capabilities of KaVA array which actually achieves more than three times better dynamic range than that achieved by VERA alone. The KaVA images clearly show detailed structures of extended radio jets in AGNs. Next, we represent the key science program to be led by KaVA AGN sub working group. We will conduct the monitoring observations of Sgr A* and M87 because of the largeness of their central super-massive black hole angular sizes. The main science goals of the program are (i) testing magnetically-driven-jet paradigm by mapping velocity fields of the M87 jet, and (ii) obtaining tight constraints on physical properties of radio emitting region in Sgr A*.

  1. Associated particle imaging (API)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associated Particle Imaging (API) is an active neutron probe technique that provides a 3-D image with elemental composition of the material under interrogation, and so occupies a unique niche in the interrogation of unknown objects. The highly penetrating nature of neutrons enables API to provide detailed information about targets of interest that are hidden from view. Due to the isotropic nature of the induced reactions, radiation detectors can be set on the same side of the object as the neutron source, so that the object can be interrogated from a single side. At the heat of the system is a small generator that produces a continuous, monoenergetic flux of neutrons. By measuring the trajectory of coincident alpha particles that are produced as part of the process, the trajectory of the neutron can be inferred. Interactions between a neutron and the material in its path often produce a gamma ray whose energy is characteristic of that material. When the gamma ray is detected, its energy is measured and combined with the trajectory information to produce a 3-D image of the composition of the object being interrogated. During the course of API development, a number of improvements have been made. A new, more rugged sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and fabricated that is less susceptible to radiation damage and better able to withstand the rigors of fielding than earlier designs. A specialized high-voltage power supply for the STNG has also been designed and built. A complete package of software has been written for the tasks of system calibration, diagnostics and data acquisition and analysis. A portable system has been built and field tested, proving that API can be taken out of the lab and into real-world situations, and that its performance in the field is equal to that in the lab.

  2. Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    1 23 Climate Dynamics Observational, Theoretical and Computational Research on the Climate System.6, and -22.5 Wm-2 , respectively, indicating a net cooling effect of clouds on the TOA radiation budget-2 , respectively, resulting in a larger net cooling effect of 2.9 Wm-2 in the model simu- lations

  3. High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Accuray Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a clinical tomotherapy machine by increasing the LINAC pulse rate. Increasing the imaging dose results in increased CNRs; making it easier to distinguish the boundaries of low contrast objects. The imaging dose levels observed in this work are considered acceptable at our institution for SBRT treatments delivered in 3-5 fractions.

  4. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  5. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  6. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  7. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  8. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P., E-mail: mkennedy29@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  9. Extraplanar Dust in Spiral Galaxies: Observations and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent optical and submillimeter observations have begun to probe the existence of dust grains in the halos of spiral galaxies. I review our own work in this area which employs high-resolution optical images of edge-on spiral galaxies to trace high-z dust in absorption against the background stellar light of the galaxies. We have found that a substantial fraction of such galaxies (>50%) show extensive webs of dust-bearing clouds to heights z>2 kpc. Extraplanar dust in galaxies is statistically correlated with extraplanar diffuse ionized gas, though there is no evidence for a direct, physical relationship between these two phases of the high-z interstellar medium. The dense high-z clouds individually have masses estimated to be >10^5} to 10^6 solar masses. The detailed properties of the observed dust structures suggest the clouds seen in our images may represent the dense phase of a multiphase ISM at high-z. Such dense clouds can have an important effect on the observed light distribution in spiral galaxies. I discuss the effects such high-z dust can have on quantitative measures of the vertical structure of stars and ionized gas in edge-on systems.

  10. Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. W. Ray; E. Ruokokoski; S. Kandel; M. Möttönen; D. S. Hall

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum-mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

  11. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Hermann, Mark R. (San Ramon, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Tiszauer, Detlev H. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  12. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  13. Topics in genomic image processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jianping

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 A. Wavelet-based Medical Image Coding Schemes and M- FISH Image Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 B. Embedded M-FISH Image Coding (EMIC) . . . . . . . . . 12 1. Segmentation and Shape Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2. Integer... Wavelet Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 a. 2-D Shape-adaptive Integer Wavelet Transform . 14 b. 3-D Integer Wavelet Transform Structure . . . . . 15 3. Fractional Bit-plane Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 a. Object-based Coding...

  14. Document Imaging | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Converting Paper Documents into Electronic Files Converting paper documents into electronic files helps us manage, store, access and archive the organizational information...

  15. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this technique has been especially popular in imaging such complex structures as aerogels and yeast cells. When applying the CDI technique to a magnetic system, the same...

  16. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  17. Observations of the Icy Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, Adwin; Whittet, Douglas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Freeze-out of the gas phase elements onto cold grains in dense interstellar and circumstellar media builds up ice mantles consisting of molecules that are mostly formed in situ (H2O, NH3, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and more). This review summarizes the detected infrared spectroscopic ice features and compares the abundances across Galactic, extragalactic, and solar system environments. A tremendous amount of information is contained in the ice band profiles. Laboratory experiments play a critical role in the analysis of the observations. Strong evidence is found for distinct ice formation stages, separated by CO freeze out at high densities. The ice bands have proven to be excellent probes of the thermal history of their environment. The evidence for the long-held idea that processing of ices by energetic photons and cosmic rays produces complex molecules is weak. Recent state of the art observations show promise for much progress in this area with planned infrared facilities.

  18. Observation of an Antimatter Hypernucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear collisions recreate conditions in the universe microseconds after the Big Bang. Only a very small fraction of the emitted fragments are light nuclei, but these states are of fundamental interest. We report the observation of antihypertritons - composed of an antiproton, antineutron, and antilambda hyperon - produced by colliding gold nuclei at high energy. Our analysis yields 70 {+-} 17 antihypertritons ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and 157 {+-} 30 hypertritons ({sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H). The measured yields of {sub {Lambda}}{sup 3}H ({sub {bar {Lambda}}}{sup 3}{bar H}) and {sup 3}He ({sup 3}{ovr He}) are similar, suggesting an equilibrium in coordinate and momentum space populations of up, down, and strange quarks and antiquarks, unlike the pattern observed at lower collision energies. The production and properties of antinuclei, and nuclei containing strange quarks, have implications spanning nuclear/particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  19. VSOP imaging of S5 0836+710: a close-up on plasma instabilities in the jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Lobanov; T. P. Krichbaum; A. Witzel; A. Kraus; J. A. Zensus; S. Britzen; K. Otterbein; C. A. Hummel; K. Johnston

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminous high-redshift (z=2.17) quasar S5 0836+710 has been observed at 5GHz with the VSOP. We compare the properties of three images obtained from the observation: a low-resolution ground array image (dynamic range 4600:1), a full-resolution VSOP image (900:1), and an image made with only the space baselines (200:1). The space baselines alone are sufficient for a reliable recovery of the source structure, within the limits of the achieved spatial sampling of the visibility data. The curved jet ridge line observed in the images can be described by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities developing in a relativistic outflow with the Mach number of about 6. This description holds on the scales of up to 700h^-1 pc, and is shown to be consistent with variable apparent speeds observed in the jet.

  20. Odds of observing the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlen, A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts that our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound is given by the bubble nucleation rate times (H{sub O}/H{sub I}){sup 2}, where H{sub O} is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and H{sub I} is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel et al. using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here, it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well.

  1. Odds of observing the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Dahlen

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Eternal inflation predicts our observable universe lies within a bubble (or pocket universe) embedded in a volume of inflating space. The interior of the bubble undergoes inflation and standard cosmology, while the bubble walls expand outward and collide with other neighboring bubbles. The collisions provide either an opportunity to make a direct observation of the multiverse or, if they produce unacceptable anisotropy, a threat to inflationary theory. The probability of an observer in our bubble detecting the effects of collisions has an absolute upper bound set by the odds of being in the part of our bubble that lies in the forward light-cone of a collision; in the case of collisions with bubbles of identical vacua, this bound given by the bubble nucleation rate times ($H_{\\rm{O}}/H_{\\rm{I}})^2$, where $H_{\\rm{O}}$ is the Hubble scale outside the bubbles and $H_{\\rm{I}}$ is the scale of the second round of inflation that occurs inside our bubble. Similar results were obtained by Freigovel \\emph{et al.} using a different method for the case of collisions with bubbles of much larger cosmological constant; here it is shown to hold in the case of collisions with identical bubbles as well. A significant error in a previous draft was corrected in order to arrive at this result.

  2. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torre, Gabriele; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of the diffraction pattern associated to the telescope observations. Further, we suggest an interpolation-based method for determining the image background that allows the recovery of information also in the region of secondary saturation (blooming).

  3. Algorithms, Protocols & Systems for Remote Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ni

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    assist in waste cleanup using Point- and-Direct (PAD) commands. Users point to cleanup locations in a shared image and a robot excavates each location in turn. Recent developments in MOSR systems can be found in [26,27]. In [27] Goldberg et al. propose...ALGORITHMS, PROTOCOLS AND SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE OBSERVATION USING NETWORKED ROBOTIC CAMERAS A Dissertation by NI QIN Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  4. Chandra Observations of NGC 4636 - An Elliptical Galaxy in Turmoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Jones; W. Forman; A. Vikhlinin; M. Markevitch; L. David; A. Warmflash; S. Murray; P. E. J. Nulsen

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Chandra images show symmetric, 8 kpc long, arm-like features in the X-ray halo surrounding NGC 4636. The leading edges of these features are sharp and are accompanied by temperature increases of ~30%. These properties, along with their scale and symmetry, suggest that the arm-like structures are produced by nuclear outburst driven shocks. We interpret these observations as part of a cycle in which cooling gas originally fueled a nuclear outburst about 3 X 10^{6} years ago leading to shocks that reheat the cooling gas, thus preventing the accumulation of significant amounts of cooled gas in the galaxy center and temporarily starving the central AGN.

  5. Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University] [Clark University

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

  6. Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    . This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

  7. Exploring Interaction Between Images and Texts for Web Image Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    , Jingxuan Li1 , Tao Li1 1 School of Computing and Information Sciences Florida International University on a manually collected image dataset (consist- ing of images related to the events after disasters) demon users in mul- timedia databases is becoming more and more difficult and challenging. Particulary, web

  8. Using indium tin oxide material to implement the imaging of microwave plasma ignition process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Hou, Lingyun; Zhang, Guixin, E-mail: guixin@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang, Boya; Liu, Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Zhi; Huang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method is introduced to get global observation of microwave plasma ignition process at high pressure. A microwave resonator was designed with an indium tin oxide coated glass at bottom. Microwave plasma ignition was implemented in methane and air mixture at 10 bars by a 2?ms-3?kW-2.45?GHz microwave pulse, and the high speed images of the ignition process were obtained. The images visually proved that microwave plasma ignition could lead to a multi-point ignition. The system may also be applied to obtain Schlieren images, which is commonly used to observe the development of flame kernel in an ignition process.

  9. Processing Visual Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litke, Alan (UC Santa Cruz) [UC Santa Cruz

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The back of the eye is lined by an extraordinary biological pixel detector, the retina. This neural network is able to extract vital information about the external visual world, and transmit this information in a timely manner to the brain. In this talk, Professor Litke will describe a system that has been implemented to study how the retina processes and encodes dynamic visual images. Based on techniques and expertise acquired in the development of silicon microstrip detectors for high energy physics experiments, this system can simultaneously record the extracellular electrical activity of hundreds of retinal output neurons. After presenting first results obtained with this system, Professor Litke will describe additional applications of this incredible technology.

  10. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, Bryan L. (Tijeras, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  11. Geosciences 466/566 Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Geosciences 466/566 Digital Image Processing Winter 2007 Instructor Dr. Anne Nolin Wilkinson 120 This course focuses on the digital image processing of satellite image data. Topics include: data types, image://my.oregonstate.edu Textbook Jensen, J. R., Digital Image Processing: A Remote Sensing Perspective, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall

  12. Simultaneous acquisition of differing image types

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros G

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system in one embodiment includes an image forming device for forming an image from an area of interest containing different image components; an illumination device for illuminating the area of interest with light containing multiple components; at least one light source coupled to the illumination device, the at least one light source providing light to the illumination device containing different components, each component having distinct spectral characteristics and relative intensity; an image analyzer coupled to the image forming device, the image analyzer decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; and multiple image capture devices, each image capture device receiving one of the component parts of the image. A method in one embodiment includes receiving an image from an image forming device; decomposing the image formed by the image forming device into multiple component parts based on type of imaging; receiving the component parts of the image; and outputting image information based on the component parts of the image. Additional systems and methods are presented.

  13. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Neufeld; Joel D. Green; David J. Hollenbach; Paule Sonnentrucker; Gary J. Melnick; Edwin A. Bergin; Ronald L. Snell; William J. Forrest; Dan M. Watson; Michael J. Kaufman

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a factor 2 - 3 below the values obtained previously from observations of atomic deuterium in the local bubble and the Galactic halo. However, similarly low gas-phase deuterium abundances have been inferred previously for molecular gas clouds in the Orion region, and in atomic clouds along sight-lines within the Galactic disk to stars more distant than 500 pc from the Sun.

  14. Lensless Fourier-Transform Ghost Imaging with Classical Incoherent Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minghui Zhang; Qing Wei; Xia Shen; Yongfeng Liu; Honglin Liu; Jing Cheng; Shensheng Han

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourier-Transform ghost imaging of both amplitude-only and pure-phase objects was experimentally observed with classical incoherent light at Fresnel distance by a new lensless scheme. The experimental results are in good agreement with the standard Fourier-transform of the corresponding objects. This scheme provides a new route towards aberration-free diffraction-limited 3D images with classically incoherent thermal light, which have no resolution and depth-of-field limitations of lens-based tomographic systems.

  15. Image texture analysis of elastograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Fasahat

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, co-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, fractal analysis and granulomeay are used to extract a number of features from each image. The inclusions...-RESOLUTION FRACTAL ANALYSIS . . . . . . E. GRANULOMETRIC FEATURES . . F. DATA NORMALIZATION . G. SEPARABILITY MEASURE 13 13 . . . . . 14 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 29 33 36 36 IV TEXTURE ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED ELASTOGRAMS. . . . . . . . . . . 38 A. SIMULATION...

  16. Video surveillance with speckle imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrano, Carmen J. (Livermore, CA); Brase, James M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A surveillance system looks through the atmosphere along a horizontal or slant path. Turbulence along the path causes blurring. The blurring is corrected by speckle processing short exposure images recorded with a camera. The exposures are short enough to effectively freeze the atmospheric turbulence. Speckle processing is used to recover a better quality image of the scene.

  17. Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    54 Chapter IV Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns Through Satellites Marcelino Pereira to analyze satellite images and extract knowledge from this kind of data. The Amazonia deforestation problem of change on deforested areas of Amazonia. The purpose of the authors is to present relevant technologies

  18. CONSTRAINING THE PLANETARY SYSTEM OF FOMALHAUT USING HIGH-RESOLUTION ALMA OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, A. C.; Payne, M. J.; Ford, E. B.; Shabram, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Corder, S. [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical evolution of planetary systems leaves observable signatures in debris disks. Optical images trace micron-sized grains, which are strongly affected by stellar radiation and need not coincide with their parent body population. Observations of millimeter-sized grains accurately trace parent bodies, but previous images lack the resolution and sensitivity needed to characterize the ring's morphology. Here we present ALMA 350 GHz observations of the Fomalhaut debris ring. These observations demonstrate that the parent body population is 13-19 AU wide with a sharp inner and outer boundary. We discuss three possible origins for the ring and suggest that debris confined by shepherd planets is the most consistent with the ring's morphology.

  19. Monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light from in situ generated particles in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.; Brown, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collins, S.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the behavior of particles in plasmas because of the negative economic impact of contamination during processing of silicon for microelectronics manufacture. Here, spatially resolved images of particle distributions are measured in steady-state plasmas in a GEC (gaseous electronics conference) plasma reactor. Images are obtained by monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light using a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and a high-speed video camera. The observed distributions of particulates generated by adding small quantities of CHF{sub 3} to an argon plasma are extremely complex and diverse. The patterns observed are temporally varying, and rarely as simple as domes and rings observed in other reactors. The forces acting on the particles are sufficiently complex that reproducing specific spatial patterns by controlling processing parameters if often impossible.

  20. ASCA observations of two SNRs and NEI analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ming Sun; Zhenru Wang

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the data from the \\asca observation of SNRs Kes79 and W49B, we present here the analysis of their X-ray spectra and morphologies. The Kes79 spectrum can be well fitted by a single NEI component, and the narrow-band images of that source show an inhomogeneous distribution of heavy elements. The heavy elements are richest in the positions S, SE and SW of Kes79, where there may exist interaction between shocks and molecular clouds implied by radio observations. For W49B we present here the non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) analysis based on its emission line diagnostics, and the spectral fit using two NEI components. The reverse shock in W49B may be still hot and we don't find evidence for a hotter blast wave in \\asca spectra.

  1. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  2. Conformal Relativity: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Pervushin; V. Zinchuk; A. Zorin

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical and observational arguments are listed in favor of a new principle of relativity of units of measurements as the basis of a conformal-invariant unification of General Relativity and Standard Model by replacement of all masses with a scalar (dilaton) field. The relative units mean conformal observables: the coordinate distance, conformal time, running masses, and constant temperature. They reveal to us a motion of a universe along its hypersurface in the field space of events like a motion of a relativistic particle in the Minkowski space, where the postulate of the vacuum as a state with minimal energy leads to arrow of the geometric time. In relative units, the unified theory describes the Cold Universe Scenario, where the role of the conformal dark energy is played by a free minimal coupling scalar field in agreement with the most recent distance-redshift data from type Ia supernovae. In this Scenario, the evolution of the Universe begins with the effect of intensive creation of primordial W-Z-bosons explaining the value of CMBR temperature, baryon asymmetry, tremendous deficit of the luminosity masses in the COMA-type superclusters and large-scale structure of the Universe.

  3. Spitzer observations of hydrogen deuteride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, D A; Hollenbach, D J; Sonnentrucker, P; Melnick, G J; Bergin, E A; Snell, R L; Forrest, W J; Watson, D M; Kaufman, M J; Neufeld, David A.; Green, Joel D.; Hollenbach, David J.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Melnick, Gary J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Snell, Ronald L.; Forrest, William J.; Watson, Dan M.; Kaufman, and Michael J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of interstellar hydrogen deuteride (HD) toward the supernova remnant IC443, and the tentative detection of HD toward the Herbig Haro objects HH54 and HH7 and the star forming region GGD37 (Cepheus A West). Our detections are based upon spectral line mapping observations of the R(3) and R(4) rotational lines of HD, at rest wavelengths of 28.502 and 23.034 micron respectively, obtained using the Infrared Spectrograph onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The HD R(4)/R(3) line intensity ratio promises to be a valuable probe of the gas pressure in regions where it can be observed. The derived HD/H2 abundance ratios are 1.19(+0.35/-0.24)E-5, 1.80(+0.54/-0.32)E-5, and 1.41(+0.46/-0.33)E-5 respectively (68.3% confidence limits, based upon statistical errors alone) for IC443 (clump C), HH54, and HH7. If HD is the only significant reservoir of gas-phase deuterium in these sources, the inferred HD/H2 ratios are all consistent with a gas-phase elemental abundance [n(D)/n(H)](gas) ~ 7.5E-6, a facto...

  4. Fluid observers and tilting cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Coley; S. Hervik; W. C. Lim

    2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study perfect fluid cosmological models with a constant equation of state parameter $\\gamma$ in which there are two naturally defined time-like congruences, a geometrically defined geodesic congruence and a non-geodesic fluid congruence. We establish an appropriate set of boost formulae relating the physical variables, and consequently the observed quantities, in the two frames. We study expanding spatially homogeneous tilted perfect fluid models, with an emphasis on future evolution with extreme tilt. We show that for ultra-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma>4/3$), generically the tilt becomes extreme at late times and the fluid observers will reach infinite expansion within a finite proper time and experience a singularity similar to that of the big rip. In addition, we show that for sub-radiative equations of state (i.e., $\\gamma < 4/3$), the tilt can become extreme at late times and give rise to an effective quintessential equation of state. To establish the connection with phantom cosmology and quintessence, we calculate the effective equation of state in the models under consideration and we determine the future asymptotic behaviour of the tilting models in the fluid frame variables using the boost formulae. We also discuss spatially inhomogeneous models and tilting spatially homogeneous models with a cosmological constant.

  5. IMAGE FUV and in situ FAST particle observations of substorm aurorae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and of Alfven wave accelerated superthermal electrons. In two of the cases presented, the satellite passed that the superthermal wave accelerated component to be on the polar cap boundary of the surge, and that it could

  6. Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding...

  7. Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David Gerald

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be used to increase either the throughput or the speed of the MR imaging experiment. As such, parallel imaging may be accomplished either through a "parallelization" of the MR experiment, or by the use...

  8. Digital holographic imaging of aquatic species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domínguez-Caballero, José Antonio

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this thesis is to design, develop and implement a digital holographic imaging (DHI) system, capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) images of aquatic species. The images produced by this system are used in ...

  9. Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close Imaging Oxygen Molecules Up Close Released: March 20, 2011 ARRA-enabled upgrades enhance research capabilities STM images of the same TiO2(110)...

  10. Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highly sensitive to water and hydrocarbonsfuel * Can image carbon soot layer due to absorption of water and HC - Image is based on absence of neutrons * X-ray imaging relies upon...

  11. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  12. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  13. Shock aurora: FAST and DMSP observations X.-Y. Zhou,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Shock aurora: FAST and DMSP observations X.-Y. Zhou,1 R. J. Strangeway,2 P. C. Anderson,3 D. G of the aurora caused by interplanetary shocks/pressure pulses have been studied in recent years using ultraviolet imager data from polar orbiting spacecraft. The signatures include the occurrence of the aurora

  14. Observation of sound focusing and defocusing due to propagating nonlinear internal waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observation of sound focusing and defocusing due to propagating nonlinear internal waves J. Luo, M@coas.oregonstate.edu Abstract: Fluctuations of the low frequency sound field in the presence of an internal solitary wave packet image data were collected simultaneously before, during, and after a strong internal solitary wave

  15. Direct Observations of Plasma Upflows and Condensation in a Catastrophically Cooling Solar Transition Region Looop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orange, N B; Oluseyi, H M; Hesterly, K; Patel, M; Champey, P R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models, as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the {\\it EUV Imaging Spectrometer} (EIS) onboard {\\it Hinode}, we observe fast upflows ($v_\\lambda$\\,$\\le$\\,$-$10 km s$^{-1}$) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8\\,$\\le$\\,$\\log T$\\,$\\le$ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop ($\\log T$\\,$\\le$\\,6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of $+$\\,5 km s$^{-1}$ and $-$\\,60 km s$^{-1}$ are observed at footpoint sites. These flows speeds and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at site of upflows only) derived from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}'s (SDOs) { \\it Helioseismic Magnetic Imager}'s (HMI) line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30\\% mass in-flux at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic coo...

  16. RADIO SUBMILLIMETER AND -RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE 2003 OCTOBER 28 SOLAR FLARE G. Trottet,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI ) to investigate high-energy particle acceleration. The other component is impulsive and starts simultaneously with high-energy (>200 MeV nucleonÃ?1 ) proton Radio observations at 210 GHz taken by the Bernese Multibeam Radiometer for KOSMA (BEMRAK) are com

  17. AN EXTENDED FIELD OF CRATER STRUCTURES IN EGYPT: OBSERVATIONS AND HYPOTHESES. Ph. Pail-, B. Reynard2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AN EXTENDED FIELD OF CRATER STRUCTURES IN EGYPT: OBSERVATIONS AND HYPOTHESES. Ph. Pail- lou1 , B Analysis: Having initially located a possible crater field in southwestern Egypt using JERS- 1 radar images, 225 × 215 km in size, is located in Southwest Egypt, in the vicinity of the Gilf Kebir plateau (Figure

  18. Observation of Cosmic Ray Positrons with the CAPRICE98 Balloon-borne Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    at energies above 5 GeV. The RICH was complemented with a silicon-tungsten imaging calorimeter. Together primary production sites. Hence, the positron fraction / ( + ) is a sensitive quantity for studying production and propagation of electrons and positrons. Previous observations (see, e.g., Golden et al. 1987

  19. Medical Image Registration: A Quick Win

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansorge, Richard

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Medical Image Registration A Quick Win Richard Ansorge The problem CT, MRI, PET and Ultrasound produce 3D volume images Typically 256 x 256 x 256 = 16,777,216 image voxels. Combining modalities (inter modality) gives extra information. Repeated... imaging over time same modality, e.g. MRI, (intra modality) equally important. Have to spatially register the images. Example – brain lesion CT MRI PET PET-MR Fusion The PET image shows...

  20. Image indexing using color correlograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jing (Ossining, NY); Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi (San Jose, CA); Mitra, Mandar (Calcutta, IN); Zhu, Wei-Jing (Ossining, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A color correlogram is a three-dimensional table indexed by color and distance between pixels which expresses how the spatial correlation of color changes with distance in a stored image. The color correlogram may be used to distinguish an image from other images in a database. To create a color correlogram, the colors in the image are quantized into m color values, c.sub.i . . . c.sub.m. Also, the distance values k.epsilon.[d] to be used in the correlogram are determined where [d] is the set of distances between pixels in the image, and where dmax is the maximum distance measurement between pixels in the image. Each entry (i, j, k) in the table is the probability of finding a pixel of color c.sub.i at a selected distance k from a pixel of color c.sub.i. A color autocorrelogram, which is a restricted version of the color correlogram that considers color pairs of the form (i,i) only, may also be used to identify an image.

  1. Small Scale Magnetic Flux Emergence Observed with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenichi Otsuji; Kazunari Shibata; Reizaburo Kitai; Satoru Ueno; Shin'ichi Nagata; Takuma Matsumoto; Tahei Nakamura; Hiroko Watanabe; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Yukio Katsukawa; Theodore D. Tarbell; Bruce W. Lites; Richard A. Shine; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed small scale magnetic flux emergence in a sunspot moat region by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. We analyzed filtergram images observed in the wavelengths of Fe 6302 angstrom, G-band and Ca II H. In Stokes I images of Fe 6302 angstrom, emerging magnetic flux were recognized as dark lanes. In G-band, they showed their shapes almost the same as in Stokes I images. These magnetic flux appeared as dark filaments in Ca II H images. Stokes V images of Fe 6302 angstrom showed pairs of opposite polarities at footpoints of each filament. These magnetic concentrations are identified to correspond to bright points in G-band/Ca II H images. From the analysis of time-sliced diagrams, we derived following properties of emerging flux, which are consistent with the previous works. (1) Two footpoints separate each other at a speed of 4.2 km/s during the initial phase of evolution and decreases to about 1 km/s in 10 minutes later. (2) Ca II H filaments appear almost simultaneously with the formation of dark lanes in Stokes I in the observational cadence of 2 minutes. (3) The lifetime of the dark lanes in Stokes I and G-band is 8 minutes, while that of Ca filament is 12 minutes. An interesting phenomena was observed that an emerging flux tube expands laterally in the photosphere with a speed of 3.8 km/s. Discussion on the horizontal expansion of flux tube will be given with refernce to previous simulation studies.

  2. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  3. Nuclear medicine imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gerald W. (East Moriches, NY); Brill, A. Bertrand (Shoreham, NY); Bizais, Yves J. C. (Upton, NY); Rowe, R. Wanda (Upton, NY); Zubal, I. George (Upton, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

  4. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  5. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Charles; Veras, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Geraldo; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocular fundus images can provide information about retinal, ophthalmic, and even systemic diseases such as diabetes. Microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest sign of Diabetic Retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Robust detection of MAs in digital color fundus images is critical in the development of automated screening systems for this kind of disease. Automatic grading of these images is being considered by health boards so that the human grading task is reduced. In this paper we describe segmentation and the feature extraction methods for candidate MAs detection.We show that the candidate MAs detected with the methodology have been successfully classified by a MLP neural network (correct classification of 84percent).

  6. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  7. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Buck, Edgar C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryo-electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in the collapse of hydrated gel-like EPS into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  8. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D.J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , {approximately} 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ``Sun-Earth Connections`` science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science.

  9. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

  10. Flow Imaging Using MRI: Quantification and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiraraksopakun, Yuttapong

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics (CFD) and the conventional optimal flow imaging based on particle image velocimetry (PIV). The results demonstrated the improvement from the quantification using solely the conventional HARP method....

  11. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Abstract: The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can...

  12. ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    865.574.7308 ORNL microscopy directly images problematic lithium dendrites in batteries ORNL electron microscopy captured the first real-time nanoscale images of the nucleation and...

  13. Image Storage in Hot Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

  14. Observing Conditions and Mid-IR Data Quality Rachel Masona, Andre Wonga, b, Tom Geballea, Kevin Volka, Tom Haywardc, Matt Dillmana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    . These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected. Keywords: infrared radiation, infrared

  15. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DETECTED BY SWIFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Christiansen, J. L. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 94307 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 16 Swift-triggered Gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations taken with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) telescope array from 2007 January to 2009 June. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations were 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter timescale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t{sup -1.5} time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. No significant very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VHE emission must have less power than the keV emission, placing constraints on inverse Compton models of VHE emission.

  16. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)] [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kobayashi, Ken [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States); DeForest, Craig [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from H? and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  17. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  18. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  19. Motion Estimation from Disparity Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirdjian, D.

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for 3D rigid motion estimation from stereo is proposed in this paper. The appealing feature of this method is that it directly uses the disparity images obtained from stereo matching. We assume that the stereo ...

  20. VAX-based ''IMAGE'' backup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.D.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing usage of the Applicon IMAGE systems at Bendix Kansas City Division (BKC) conflicts with the need to do daily backup of changed AGS files. This paper describes a VAX-based method for automated, unattended, off-shift backup.

  1. Imaging atoms in 3-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ercius, Peter

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Peter Ercius discusses "Imaging atoms in 3-D" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas

  2. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  3. Thomas Jefferson: image and ideology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Gaye N. S. B.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the public image of Thomas Jefferson as recorded in his major life portraits. It consults the traditions that surrounded eighteenth-century portraiture and the history of the portrait as a means of ...

  4. Identifying structural damage from images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, ZhiQiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pattern Recognition, 26 PDC. Paci?c disater center, 2008.which were acquired from the Paci?c Disaster Center (PDC) (PDC, 2008). These images cover Banda Aceh and its

  5. The Difference Imaging Pipeline for the Transient Search in the Dark Energy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, R; Childress, M; Covarrubias, R; D'Andrea, C B; Finley, D A; Fischer, J; Foley, R J; Goldstein, D; Gupta, R R; Kuehn, K; Marcha, M; Nichol, R C; Papadopoulos, A; Sako, M; Scolnic, D; Smith, M; Sullivan, M; Wester, W; Yuan, F; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, R C; Tucker, D; Walker, A R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the difference imaging pipeline (DiffImg) used to detect transients in deep images from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova program (DES-SN) in its first observing season from Aug 2013 through Feb 2014. DES-SN is a search for transients in which ten 3-deg^2 fields are repeatedly observed in the g,r,i,z passbands with a cadence of about 1 week. The observing strategy has been optimized to measure high-quality light curves and redshifts for thousands of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with the goal of measuring dark energy parameters. The essential DiffImg functions are to align each search image to a deep reference image, do a pixel-by-pixel subtraction, and then examine the subtracted image for significant positive detections of point-source objects. The vast majority of detections are subtraction artifacts, but after selection requirements and image filtering with an automated scanning program, there are 130 detections per deg^2 per observation in each band, of which only 25% are artifacts. Of the 7500 tr...

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Mark A. (West Lafayette, IN); Tsang, Brenda W. (Lafayette, IN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  8. 12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 1 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 2 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10keV Electrons 3 #12;12 August 2005 Observing Optical Transition Radiation from 10

  9. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    ), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  10. Programming Infinite Objects by Observations Andreas Abel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    (experiment), and observe its result (behavior). Application is the defining principle of functions [Granstr¨om

  11. Geospatial Visualization of Global Satellite Images with Vis-EROS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Standart, G. D.; Stulken, K. R.; Zhang, Xuesong; Zong, Ziliang

    2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center of U.S. Geological Survey is currently managing and maintaining the world largest satellite images distribution system, which provides 24/7 free download service for researchers all over the globe in many areas such as Geology, Hydrology, Climate Modeling, and Earth Sciences. A large amount of geospatial data contained in satellite images maintained by EROS is generated every day. However, this data is not well utilized due to the lack of efficient data visualization tools. This software implements a method for visualizing various characteristics of the global satellite image download requests. More specifically, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files are generated which can be loaded into an earth browser such as Google Earth. Colored rectangles associated with stored satellite scenes are painted onto the earth browser; and the color and opacity of each rectangle is varied as a function of the popularity of the corresponding satellite image. An analysis of the geospatial information obtained relative to specified time constraints provides an ability to relate image download requests to environmental, political, and social events.

  12. Prediction of human observer performance in a 2-alternative forced choice low-contrast detection task using channelized Hotelling observer: Impact of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Lifeng; Leng Shuai; Chen Lingyun; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carter, Rickey E. [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Efficient optimization of CT protocols demands a quantitative approach to predicting human observer performance on specific tasks at various scan and reconstruction settings. The goal of this work was to investigate how well a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) can predict human observer performance on 2-alternative forced choice (2AFC) lesion-detection tasks at various dose levels and two different reconstruction algorithms: a filtered-backprojection (FBP) and an iterative reconstruction (IR) method. Methods: A 35 Multiplication-Sign 26 cm{sup 2} torso-shaped phantom filled with water was used to simulate an average-sized patient. Three rods with different diameters (small: 3 mm; medium: 5 mm; large: 9 mm) were placed in the center region of the phantom to simulate small, medium, and large lesions. The contrast relative to background was -15 HU at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times using automatic exposure control each at 60, 120, 240, 360, and 480 quality reference mAs on a 128-slice scanner. After removing the three rods, the water phantom was again scanned 100 times to provide signal-absent background images at the exact same locations. By extracting regions of interest around the three rods and on the signal-absent images, the authors generated 21 2AFC studies. Each 2AFC study had 100 trials, with each trial consisting of a signal-present image and a signal-absent image side-by-side in randomized order. In total, 2100 trials were presented to both the model and human observers. Four medical physicists acted as human observers. For the model observer, the authors used a CHO with Gabor channels, which involves six channel passbands, five orientations, and two phases, leading to a total of 60 channels. The performance predicted by the CHO was compared with that obtained by four medical physicists at each 2AFC study. Results: The human and model observers were highly correlated at each dose level for each lesion size for both FBP and IR. The Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients were 0.986 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.958-0.996] for FBP and 0.985 (95% CI: 0.863-0.998) for IR. Bland-Altman plots showed excellent agreement for all dose levels and lesions sizes with a mean absolute difference of 1.0%{+-} 1.1% for FBP and 2.1%{+-} 3.3% for IR. Conclusions: Human observer performance on a 2AFC lesion detection task in CT with a uniform background can be accurately predicted by a CHO model observer at different radiation dose levels and for both FBP and IR methods.

  13. Abstract--Recent brain imaging studies on primates revealed that a network of brain areas is activated both during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trahanias, Panos

    9 Abstract-- Recent brain imaging studies on primates revealed that a network of brain areas and constitutes an efficient behavior of mammals. Recent brain imaging studies investigate where and how observed to this direction [23]. Additional studies [10],[16] indicate the existence of a much wider network of brain areas

  14. Frequency Dependence of Radio Images of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Karnaushenko; E. Yu. Bannikova; V. M. Kontorovich

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio images of supernova remnants in the framework of diffusion model are discussed. The distribution profiles of synchrotron radiation intensity for spherical injection source of relativistic electrons are reduced at different frequencies. An explanation of the observational data obtained on UTR-2, according to which the size of the supernova remnant at decametric waves is larger than the remnant size at high frequencies, is given.

  15. Image description. Cover Image End of image description. NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    a context for examining the data they submitted to IPEDS. Our goal is to produce a report that is useful University 2 #12;Image description. Bar chart with 10 groups with 2 items per group.Y scale titled Percent

  16. BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND DEBLURRING IN IMAGE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Peihua

    BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND DEBLURRING IN IMAGE ANALYSIS Peter Hall 1 and Peihua Qiu 1.2 ABSTRACT. Blind deconvolution problems arise in image analysis when both the extent of image blur, and the true from image data. This is a blind deconvolution problem and is, of course, significantly more

  17. Image Based Gisting in CLIR Mark Sanderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanderson, Mark

    from the Rosch [1] paper. These search terms were entered into the Google Image search engine in order the ability of subjects to derive the search term that might have been used to return a set of images from on subjects' abilities in this respect. Search terms were defined and images found using an online image

  18. Image Fusion: Principles, Methods, and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sroubek, Filip

    different sensors (visible and infrared, CT and NMR, or panchromatic and multispectral satellite images fusion is used to achieve high spatial and spectral resolutions by combining images from two sensors, one applications have appeared in medical imaging like simultaneous evaluation of CT, MRI, and/or PET images

  19. Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images Chenyu Wu, Ce Liu, Heung-Yueng Shum, Member, IEEE an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel

  20. ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

  1. Image processing applications in NDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) can be defined as a technique or collection of techniques that permits one to determine some property of a material or object without damaging the object. There are a large number of such techniques and most of them use visual imaging in one form or another. They vary from holographic interferometry where displacements under stress are measured to the visual inspection of an objects surface to detect cracks after penetrant has been applied. The use of image processing techniques on the images produced by NDE is relatively new and can be divided into three general categories: classical image enhancement; mensuration techniques; and quantitative sensitometry. An example is discussed of how image processing techniques are used to nondestructively and destructively test the product throughout its life cycle. The product that will be followed is the microballoon target used in the laser fusion program. The laser target is a small (50 to 100 ..mu..m - dia) glass sphere with typical wall thickness of 0.5 to 6 ..mu..m. The sphere may be used as is or may be given a number of coatings of any number of materials. The beads are mass produced by the millions and the first nondestructive test is to separate the obviously bad beads (broken or incomplete) from the good ones. After this has been done, the good beads must be inspected for spherocity and wall thickness uniformity. The microradiography of the glass, uncoated bead is performed on a specially designed low-energy x-ray machine. The beads are mounted in a special jig and placed on a Kodak high resolution plate in a vacuum chamber that contains the x-ray source. The x-ray image is made with an energy less that 2 keV and the resulting images are then inspected at a magnification of 500 to 1000X. Some typical results are presented.

  2. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  3. THE FAINTEST RADIO SOURCE YET: EXPANDED VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRAVITATIONAL LENS SDSS J1004+4112

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, N. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new radio observations of the large-separation gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1004+4112, taken in a total of 6 hr of observations with the Expanded Very Large Array. The maps reach a thermal noise level of approximately 4 {mu}Jy. We detect four of the five lensed images at the 15-35 {mu}Jy level, representing a source of intrinsic flux density, after allowing for lensing magnification, of about 1 {mu}Jy, intrinsically probably the faintest radio source yet detected. This reinforces the utility of gravitational lensing in potentially allowing us to study nJy-level sources before the advent of the Square Kilometre Array. In an optical observation taken three months after the radio observation, image C is the brightest image, whereas the radio map shows flux density ratios consistent with previous optical observations. Future observations separated by a time delay will give the intrinsic flux ratios of the images in this source.

  4. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

  5. STAR Images: Image gallery from the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors allow final statements to be made about the collision. The gallery of STAR images makes available a small collection of event-generated images from Gold-Beam experiments, a simulation of TCP Drift, and a library of STAR instrument and construction photos.

  6. Ornithological Observations 1 GUIDELINES TO AUTHORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Ornithological Observations 1 GUIDELINES TO AUTHORS Ornithological Observations is a semi flush left (no tabs or indents) and paragraphs must be separated by a line space. Authors are requested

  7. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  8. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg \\Lambda Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  9. Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Observation and Control for Debugging Distributed Computations Vijay K. Garg Parallel and Distributed Systems Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department The University of Texas for observing and controlling a distributed computation and its applications to distributed debugging

  10. HST Observations of BL Lacertae Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Pesce; C. M. Urry; M. O'Dowd; R. Scarpa; R. Falomo; A. Treves

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze images of BL Lacertae objects obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} WFPC2 and the F814W filter. The nine objects cover a redshift range of 0.19 to 0.997. The relatively deep images are sufficient to detect galaxies at least one magnitude below M$^{*}_{I}$ (--21.4) and in most cases to three magnitudes below M$^{*}$. Galaxy enhancement over the average background is found around four out of the nine objects. Results for some cases are confirmed by ground-based imaging. In the other cases, the redshifts of the target BL Lac objects may be incorrect or they are truly isolated. These findings reinforce the idea that on average, BL Lac objects are found in regions of above average galaxy density. However, isolated objects apparently can host BL Lac nuclei too, a result that has implications for the processes that trigger/fuel the nuclear activity.

  11. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sitter, Jr., David N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  12. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  13. Rhodium Mossbauer Superradiance of Observable Gravitational Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2007-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the experimental observations of three case studies on the long-lived rhodium Mossbauer Effect. Extraordinary observations reported in this work manifest the open-up of photonic band gap in analogy to the superconducting gap. Observable gravitational effect is manifested by the superradiance of different sample orientations corresponding to the earth gravity. These observations are of potential importance for detecting gravitational waves and development of the two-photon gamma laser.

  14. Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

  15. Spectral imaging with a cid camera. Final report, 4 February 1982-14 September 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, T.D.

    1985-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a program of spectral imaging observations of the solar atmosphere using the Sacromento Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope. The observations were obtained with Lockheed instruments including: an active tilt mirror for image motion compensation; polarization analyzer; narrowband tunable birefringent filter; photoelectric cid array camera; digital video image processor; and a microcomputer controller. Five observing runs were made, three of them with the entire system in operation. The images obtained were processed to measure magnetic and velocity fields in the solar photosphere with very high spatial resolution - 0.5 arcseconds on the best frames. Sets of these images have been studied to address three scientific problems; (1) The relationship among small magnetic flux tubes, downdrafts and granulation; (2) The puzzling flux changes in isolated magnetic features in a decaying active region; (3) The temporal power spectrum of the magnetogram signal in isolated flux tubes. Examples of the narrowband images are included in the report, along with abstracts and manuscripts of papers, resulting from this research.

  16. TANAMI - Multiwavelength and Multimessenger Observations of Active Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadler, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extragalactic jets launched from the immediate vicinity of supermassive black holes in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are key objects in modern astronomy and astroparticle physics. AGN jets carry a fraction of the total gravitational energy released during the accretion of matter onto supermassive black holes and are prime suspects as possible sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and the recently detected extraterrestrial neutrinos at PeV energies. TANAMI (Tracking Active galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry) is a multiwavelength program monitoring AGN jets of the southern sky. It combines high-resolution imaging and spectral monitoring at radio wavelengths with higher-frequency observations at IR, optical/UV, X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray energies. We review recent results of the TANAMI program, highlighting AGN candidate neutrino-emitters in the error circles of the IceCube PeV neutrino events.

  17. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  18. Belief space planning assuming maximum likelihood observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Perez, Tomas

    observations are modelled as Gaussian noise. Given this model of the dynamics, two planning and control methods-locating the sensors with the contacts this way complicates planning and control because it forces the system to trade of the partially observable control problem, often modeled as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP

  19. Observational determination of the time delays in gravitational lens system Q2237+030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Vakulik; R. Schild; V. Dudinov; S. Nuritdinov; V. Tsvetkova; O. Burkhonov; T. Akhunov

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new brightness monitoring observations of the 4 components of gravitationally lensed system Q2237+0305, which show detection of an intrinsic quasar brightness fluctuation at a time of subdued microlensing activity, between June 27 and October 12, 2003. These data were used to determine the time delays between the arrivals of the four images. The measured delays are -6, 35, and 2 hours for images B, C and D relative to A, respectively, so they confirm that the long history of brightness monitoring has produced significant detection of microlensing. However the error bars associated with the delays, of order 2 days, are too large to discriminate between competing macro-imaging models. Moreover, our simulations show that for the amplitude of this intrinsic fluctuation and for photometric errors intrinsic to optical monitoring from our 1.5-m telescope or from the OGLE monitoring, a daily sampled brightness record cannot produce reliable lags for model discrimination. We use our simulations to devise a strategy for future delay determination with optical data. Nevertheless, we regard these first estimates to be significant, since they are the first direct measurements of time delays made for this system from ground-based observations in the visual wavelengths. Our results provide the most convincing confirmation of the gravitational-lens nature of Q2237+0305, and give observational justification to the extensive literature which attributes the quasar's previously observed brightness fluctuations to microlensing.

  20. Tunable Imaging Filters in Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bland-Hawthorn

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    While tunable filters are a recent development in night time astronomy, they have long been used in other physical sciences, e.g. solar physics, remote sensing and underwater communications. With their ability to tune precisely to a given wavelength using a bandpass optimized for the experiment, tunable filters are already producing some of the deepest narrowband images to date of astrophysical sources. Furthermore, some classes of tunable filters can be used in fast telescope beams and therefore allow for narrowband imaging over angular fields of more than a degree over the sky.

  1. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  2. Multispectral imaging method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Vargo, T.D.; Lockhart, R.R.; Descour, M.R.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multispectral imaging method and apparatus are described which are adapted for use in determining material properties, especially properties characteristic of abnormal non-dermal cells. A target is illuminated with a narrow band light beam. The target expresses light in response to the excitation. The expressed light is collected and the target's response at specific response wavelengths to specific excitation wavelengths is measured. From the measured multispectral response the target's properties can be determined. A sealed, remote probe and robust components can be used for cervical imaging. 5 figs.

  3. Buried object detection in GPR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  4. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  5. The image quality of ion computed tomography at clinical imaging dose levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@oncology.au.dk [Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Bassler, Niels [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School,Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurately predicting the range of radiotherapy ions in vivo is important for the precise delivery of dose in particle therapy. Range uncertainty is currently the single largest contribution to the dose margins used in planning and leads to a higher dose to normal tissue. The use of ion CT has been proposed as a method to improve the range uncertainty and thereby reduce dose to normal tissue of the patient. A wide variety of ions have been proposed and studied for this purpose, but no studies evaluate the image quality obtained with different ions in a consistent manner. However, imaging doses ion CT is a concern which may limit the obtainable image quality. In addition, the imaging doses reported have not been directly comparable with x-ray CT doses due to the different biological impacts of ion radiation. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust methodology for comparing the image quality of ion CT with respect to particle therapy, taking into account different reconstruction methods and ion species. Methods: A comparison of different ions and energies was made. Ion CT projections were simulated for five different scenarios: Protons at 230 and 330 MeV, helium ions at 230 MeV/u, and carbon ions at 430 MeV/u. Maps of the water equivalent stopping power were reconstructed using a weighted least squares method. The dose was evaluated via a quality factor weighted CT dose index called the CT dose equivalent index (CTDEI). Spatial resolution was measured by the modulation transfer function. This was done by a noise-robust fit to the edge spread function. Second, the image quality as a function of the number of scanning angles was evaluated for protons at 230 MeV. In the resolution study, the CTDEI was fixed to 10 mSv, similar to a typical x-ray CT scan. Finally, scans at a range of CTDEI’s were done, to evaluate dose influence on reconstruction error. Results: All ions yielded accurate stopping power estimates, none of which were statistically different from the ground truth image. Resolution (as defined by the modulation transfer function = 10% point) was the best for the helium ions (18.21 line pairs/cm) and worst for the lower energy protons (9.37 line pairs/cm). The weighted quality factor for the different ions ranged from 1.23 for helium to 2.35 for carbon ions. For the angle study, a sharp increase in absolute error was observed below 45 distinct angles, giving the impression of a threshold, rather than smooth, limit to the number of angles. Conclusions: The method presented for comparing various ion CT modalities is feasible for practical use. While all studied ions would improve upon x-ray CT for particle range estimation, helium appears to give the best results and deserves further study for imaging.

  6. Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and software training from Siemens Medical Solutions; research funding through the Siemens-MIT Alliance and Technology (HST). 2 Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. #12;Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemens-MIT Alliance, HST Martinos Catalyst Fund. Project Staff: Audrey P. Fan

  7. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  8. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  9. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D$_{2}$O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar $\

  10. Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

  11. Quantum Computing, Metrology, and Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang Lee; Pavel Lougovski; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Information science is entering into a new era in which certain subtleties of quantum mechanics enables large enhancements in computational efficiency and communication security. Naturally, precise control of quantum systems required for the implementation of quantum information processing protocols implies potential breakthoughs in other sciences and technologies. We discuss recent developments in quantum control in optical systems and their applications in metrology and imaging.

  12. Covered Product Category: Imaging Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including imaging equipment, which is covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  13. Image Compression by Back Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    CHAPTER 9 Image Compression by Back Propagation: An Example of Extensional Programming* GARRISON W the case with the computatiolls associated with basic cognitive pro- cesses such as vision and audition techniques. The technique we employ is known as back propagation. developed by l1umelhart, Hinton

  14. Image Processing Apr. 16, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdem, Erkut

    - The Discrete Fourier transform Log power spectrum #12;Review - The Convolution Theorem · The Fourier frequency components · Fourier (1807): Periodic functions could be represented as a weighted sum of sines and cosines Image courtesy of Technology Review #12;Review - Fourier Transform We want

  15. Enlarge Image Peer pressure. Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thywissen, Joseph

    to stick it to your refrigerator, but an ultra-cold gas magnetizes itself just as do metals such as ironEnlarge Image Peer pressure. Magnetic domains in steel (vertical bans) arise when neighboring electrons point their magnetic poles in the same direction. CREDIT: ZUREKS, CHRIS VARDON

  16. Enlarge Image Peer pressure. Magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enlarge Image Peer pressure. Magnetic domains in steel (vertical bans) arise when neighboring electrons point their magnetic poles in the same direction. CREDIT: ZUREKS, CHRIS VARDON/WIKIMEDIA By Adrian Cho ScienceNOW Daily News 18 September 2009 It would be tough to stick it to your refrigerator

  17. Medical Imaging Computed Tomography (CT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 10 Medical Imaging · X-rays · Computed Tomography (CT) · Positron Emission Tomography (PET Sources PET-TOF #12;Four Sources PET #12;Four Sources PET-TOF #12;PET Scan MRI CT scan #12;Endocrine Gland,000 pixels! #12;Modern Example of CT Scan with the addition of Surface Shading Standard CT With Surface

  18. Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. The TACTIC atmospheric Cherenkov Imaging telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Koul; A. K. Tickoo; S. K. Kaul; S. R. Kaul; N. Kumar; K. K. Yadav; N. Bhatt; K. Venugopal; H. C. Goyal; M. Kothari; P. Chandra; R. C. Rannot; V. K. Dhar; M. K. Koul; R. K. Kaul; S. Kotwal; K. Chanchalani; S. Thoudam; N. Chouhan; M. Sharma; S. Bhattacharyya; S. Sahayanathan

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The TACTIC $\\gamma$-ray telescope, equipped with a light collector of area $\\sim$9.5m$^2$ and a medium resolution imaging camera of 349-pixels, has been in operation at Mt.Abu, India since 2001. This paper describes the main features of its various subsystems and its overall performance with regard to (a) tracking accuracy of its 2-axes drive system, (b) spot size of the light collector, (c) back-end signal processing electronics and topological trigger generation scheme, (d) data acquisition and control system and (e) relative and absolute gain calibration methodology. Using a trigger field of view of 11$\\times$11 pixels ($\\sim$ 3.4$^\\circ$$\\times3.4^\\circ$), the telescope records a cosmic ray event rate of $\\sim$2.5 Hz at a typical zenith angle of 15$^\\circ$. Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented in the paper for comparing the expected performance of the telescope with actual observational results. The consistent detection of a steady signal from the Crab Nebula above $\\sim$1.2 TeV energy, at a sensitivity level of $\\sim5.0\\sigma$ in $\\sim$25 h, alongwith excellent matching of its energy spectrum with that obtained by other groups, reassures that the performance of the TACTIC telescope is quite stable and reliable. Furthermore, encouraged by the detection of strong $\\gamma$-ray signals from Mrk 501 (during 1997 and 2006 observations) and Mrk 421 (during 2001 and 2005-2006 observations), we believe that there is considerable scope for the TACTIC telescope to monitor similar TeV $\\gamma$-ray emission activity from other active galactic nuclei on a long term basis.

  1. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  2. Direct Observations of Magnetic Reconnection Outflow and CME Triggering in a Small Erupting Solar Prominence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Katharine K; Tian, Hui

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine a small prominence eruption that occurred on 2014 May 1 at 01:35 UT and was observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Pre- and post-eruption images were taken by the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode. Pre-eruption, a dome-like structure exists above the prominence, as demarcated by coronal rain. As the eruption progresses, we find evidence for reconnection between the prominence magnetic field and the overlying field. Fast flows are seen in AIA and IRIS, indicating reconnection outflows. Plane-of-sky flows of ~300 km s$^{-1}$ are observed in the AIA 171 A channel along a potentially reconnected field line. IRIS detects intermittent fast line-of-sight flows of ~200 km s$^{-1}$ coincident with the AIA flows. Differential emission measure calculations show heating at the origin of the fast flows. Post-eruption XRT images show hot loops probably due to reconfiguration of magnetic fields during the erupt...

  3. Non-Destructive Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters Non-Destructive Neutron Imaging to Analyze Particulate Filters Non-destructive, non-invasive imaging is being employed in the...

  4. Viewable image size Max view area (W x H)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Power management Ergonomics Emission standards Environmental Preset resolutions Dual image resolution to portrait (requires image rotation support from graphics controller, do not support image rotation under

  5. MAUI: Modeling, Analysis, and Ultrafast Imaging | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Science Modeling and Simulation Multimodal Imaging MAUI: Modeling, Analysis, and Ultrafast Imaging MAUI: Modeling, Analysis, and Ultrafast Imaging Project Goals...

  6. advanced image processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max 12;Signals and Images Wavelets Image processing Models Lakey, Joseph D. 9 Advance Digital Imaging Process for Tungsten Alloys Liquid-Phase Sintered in Microgravity W. B...

  7. annular array imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glenn H. 26 The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays MIT - DSpace Summary: The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as...

  8. arrayed imaging reflectometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glenn H. 25 The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays MIT - DSpace Summary: The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as...

  9. Search Log Analysis of the ARTstor Cultural Heritage Image Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Heather Ann

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns in a Digital Image Database. Information RetrievalCultural Heritage Image Database A thesis submitted inCultural Heritage Image Database by Heather Ann Lowe Master

  10. advanced imaging catheter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  11. angiographic image segmentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  12. automatic image segmentation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

  13. New Mesoscale Multimodal Imaging of Cellular Communication Between...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    New Mesoscale Multimodal Imaging Bioimaging Technology Bioimaging Technology Home About Research Small Worlds New Mesoscale Multimodal Imaging Adaptive Biosystems Imaging Systems...

  14. Imaging Spectroscopy for Extrasolar Planet Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William B. Sparks; Holland C. Ford

    2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronagraphic imaging in combination with moderate to high spectral resolution may prove more effective in both detecting extrasolar planets and characterizing them than a standard coronagraphic imaging approach. We envisage an integral-field spectrograph coupled to a coronagraph to produce a 3D datacube. For the idealised case where the spectrum of the star is well-known and unchanging across the field, we discuss the utility of cross-correlation to seek the extrasolar planet signal, and describe a mathematical approach to completely eliminate stray light from the host star (although not its Poisson noise). For the case where the PSF is dominated by diffraction and scattering effects, and comprises a multitude of speckles within an Airy pattern typical of a space-based observation, we turn the wavelength dependence of the PSF to advantage and present a general way to eliminate the contribution from the star while preserving both the flux and spectrum of the extrasolar planet. We call this method `spectral deconvolution'. We illustrate the dramatic gains by showing an idealized simulation that results in a 20-sigma detection of a Jovian planet at 2 pc with a 2-m coronagraphic space telescope, even though the planet's peak flux is only 1% that of the PSF wings of the host star. This scales to detection of a terrestrial extrasolar planet at 2 pc with an 8-m coronagraphic Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) in ~7 hr (or less with appropriate spatial filtering). Data on the spectral characteristics of the extrasolar planet and hence on its atmospheric constituents and possible biomarkers are obtained naturally as part of this process.

  15. EIS/Hinode observations of Doppler flow seen through the 40 arcsec wide slit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Innes; R. Attie; H. Hara; M. S. Madjarska

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode is the first solar telescope to obtain wide slit spectral images that can be used for detecting Doppler flows in transition region and coronal lines on the Sun and to relate them to their surrounding small scale dynamics. We select EIS lines covering the temperature range 6x10^4 K to 2x10^6 K that give spectrally pure images of the Sun with the 40 arcsec slit. In these images Doppler shifts are seen as horizontal brightenings. Inside the image it is difficult to distinguish shifts from horizontal structures but emission beyond the image edge can be unambiguously identified as a line shift in several lines separated from others on their blue or red side by more than the width of the spectrometer slit (40 pixels). In the blue wing of He II, we find a large number of events with properties (size and lifetime) similar to the well-studied explosive events seen in the ultraviolet spectral range. Comparison with X-Ray Telescope (XRT) images shows many Doppler shift events at the footpoints of small X-ray loops. The most spectacular event observed showed a strong blue shift in transition region and lower corona lines from a small X-ray spot that lasted less than 7 min. The emission appears to be near a cool coronal loop connecting an X-ray bright point to an adjacent region of quiet Sun. The width of the emission implies a line-of-sight velocity of 220 km/s. In addition, we show an example of an Fe XV shift with a velocity about 120 km/s, coming from what looks like a narrow loop leg connecting a small X-ray brightening to a larger region of X-ray emission.

  16. Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

  17. Thermal ghost imaging with averaged speckle patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    We present theoretical and experimental results showing that a thermal ghost imaging system can produce images of high quality even when it uses detectors so slow that they respond only to intensity-averaged (that is, ...

  18. Automatic caption generation for news images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yansong

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the task of automatically generating captions for images, which is important for many image-related applications. Automatic description generation for video frames would help security ...

  19. Predicting gene function from images of cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Thouis Raymond, 1971-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation shows that biologically meaningful predictions can be made by analyzing images of cells. In particular, groups of related genes and their biological functions can be predicted using images from large ...

  20. Image fusion for a nighttime driving display

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrington, William Frederick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

  1. Image sense disambiguation : a multimodal approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saenko, Ekaterina, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If a picture is worth a thousand words, can a thousand words be worth a training image? Most successful object recognition algorithms require manually annotated images of objects to be collected for training. The amount ...

  2. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  3. Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    Information efficiency in hyperspectral imaging systems Stephen E. Reichenbach University develop a method for assessing the in- formation density and efficiency of hyperspectral imaging systems width can efficiently gather information about a scene by allocating bandwidth among the bands according

  4. Foreword,xiii SECTION 1:BASIC IMAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide: Imaging Synaptogenesis by Measuring Accumulation of Synaptic Proteins, 225 C. Dean and F! Scheiffele A Practical Guide: Imaging Retinotectal Synaptic Connectivity,229 S. Cohen-Corey A Practical Guide

  5. AUTOMATIC IMAGE DECOMPOSTION Kedar A. Patwardhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    of modifying an image in a non-detectable form [2, 3, 5, 7, 10]. Following work by Meyer [11], Vese and Osher Marcelo Bertalmio, Vicent Caselles, and Liron Yatziv for conversations on image inpainting and Stanley

  6. Integrated computational system for portable retinal imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boggess, Jason (Jason Robert)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis introduces a system to improve image quality obtained from a low-light CMOS camera-specifically designed to image the surface of the retina. The retinal tissue, as well as having various diseases of its own, ...

  7. Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highly sensitive to water and hydrocarbonsfuel * Can image carbon soot layer due to absorption of water and HC - Image is based on absence of neutrons * X-ray absorption increases...

  8. Method for imaging a concealed object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James R [Idaho Falls, ID; Partin, Judy K [Idaho Falls, ID; Sawyers, Robert J [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for imaging a concealed object is described and which includes a step of providing a heat radiating body, and wherein an object to be detected is concealed on the heat radiating body; imaging the heat radiating body to provide a visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body; and determining if the visibly discernible infrared image of the heat radiating body is masked by the presence of the concealed object.

  9. SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    SEISMIC IMAGING WITH THE GENERALIZED RADON. TRANSFORM AND DOUBLE BEAMFORMING: A CURVELET. TRANSFORM PERSPECTIVE. M V DE ...

  10. Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron Microscopy . Imaging Hydrated Microbial Extracellular Polymers: Comparative Analysis by Electron...

  11. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 60 33 Phase sensitive reconstruction of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real... of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image reconstructed with in- verted polarity. This example demonstrates the problem of global polarity determination...

  12. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561 A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar II: Results for the second observing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesley N. Colley; Rudolph E. Schild; Cristina Abajas; David Alcalde; Zeki Aslan; Ilfan Bikmaev; Vahram Chavushyan; Luis Chinarro; Jean-Philippe Cournoyer; Richard Crowe; Vladimir Dudinov; Anna Kathinka; Dalland Evans; Young-Beom Jeon; Luis J. Goicoechea; Orhan Golbasi; Irek Khamitov; Kjetil Kjernsmo; Hyun Ju Lee; Jonghwan Lee; Ki Won Lee; Myung Gyoon Lee; Omar Lopez-Cruz; Evencio Mediavilla; Anthony F. J. Moffatt; Raul Mujica; Aurora M. Ullan; Alexander Oscoz; Myeong-Gu Park; Norman Purves; Nail Sakhibullin; Igor Sinelnikov; Rolf Stabell; Alan Stockton; Jan Teuber; Roy Thompson; Hwa-Sung Woo; Alexander Zheleznyak

    2002-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an observing campaign in March 2001 to monitor the brightness of the later arriving Q0957+561 B image in order to compare with the previously published brightness observations of the (first arriving) A image. The 12 participating observatories provided 3543 image frames which we have analyzed for brightness fluctuations. From our classical methods for time delay determination, we find a 417.09 +/- 0.07 day time delay which should be free of effects due to incomplete sampling. During the campaign period, the quasar brightness was relatively constant and only small fluctuations were found; we compare the structure function for the new data with structure function estimates for the 1995--6 epoch, and show that the structure function is statistically non-stationary. We also examine the data for any evidence of correlated fluctuations at zero lag. We discuss the limits to our ability to measure the cosmological time delay if the quasar's emitting surface is time resolved, as seems likely.

  13. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561 A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar II Results for the second observing season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colley, W N; Abajas, C; Alcalde, D; Aslan, Z; Bikmaev, I F; Chavushyan, V H; Chinarro, L; Cournoyer, J P; Crowe, R; Dudinov, V; Kathinka, A; Evans, D; Jeon, Y B; Goicoechea, L J; Golbasi, O; Khamitov, I; Kjernsmo, K; Lee, H J; Lee, J; Lee, K W; Lee, M G; López-Cruz, O; Mediavilla, E; Moffatt, A F J; Mujica, R; Ullán, M; Oscoz, A; Park, M G; Purves, N; Sakhibullin, N A; Sinelnikov, I; Stabell, R; Stockton, A; Teuber, J; Thompson, R; Woo, H S; Zheleznyak, A T; Colley, Wesley N.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Abajas, Cristina; Alcalde, David; Aslan, Zeki; Bikmaev, Ilfan; Chavushyan, Vahram; Chinarro, Luis; Cournoyer, Jean-Philippe; Crowe, Richard; Dudinov, Vladimir; Kathinka, Anna; Evans, Dalland; Jeon, Young-Beom; Goicoechea, Luis J.; Golbasi, Orhan; Khamitov, Irek; Kjernsmo, Kjetil; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jonghwan; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Mediavilla, Evencio; Moffatt, Anthony F.J.; Mujica, Raul; Ullan, Aurora M.; Oscoz, Alexander; Park, Myeong-Gu; Purves, Norman; Sakhibullin, Nail; Sinelnikov, Igor; Stabell, Rolf; Stockton, Alan; Teuber, Jan; Thompson, Roy; Woo, Hwa-Sung

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on an observing campaign in March 2001 to monitor the brightness of the later arriving Q0957+561 B image in order to compare with the previously published brightness observations of the (first arriving) A image. The 12 participating observatories provided 3543 image frames which we have analyzed for brightness fluctuations. From our classical methods for time delay determination, we find a 417.09 +/- 0.07 day time delay which should be free of effects due to incomplete sampling. During the campaign period, the quasar brightness was relatively constant and only small fluctuations were found; we compare the structure function for the new data with structure function estimates for the 1995--6 epoch, and show that the structure function is statistically non-stationary. We also examine the data for any evidence of correlated fluctuations at zero lag. We discuss the limits to our ability to measure the cosmological time delay if the quasar's emitting surface is time resolved, as seems likely.

  14. HST/STIS Ultraviolet Imaging of Polar Aurora on Ganymede

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Feldman; Melissa A. McGrath; Darrell F. Strobel; H. Warren Moos; Kurt D. Retherford; Brian C. Wolven

    2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new observations of the spectrum of Ganymede in the spectral range 1160 - 1720 A made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on HST on 1998 October 30. The observations were undertaken to locate the regions of the atomic oxygen emissions at 1304 and 1356 A, previously observed with the GHRS on HST, that Hall et al. (1998) claimed indicated the presence of polar aurorae on Ganymede. The use of the 2" wide STIS slit, slightly wider than the disk diameter of Ganymede, produced objective spectra with images of the two oxygen emissions clearly separated. The OI emissions appear in both hemispheres, at latitudes above 40 degrees, in accordance with recent Galileo magnetometer data that indicate the presence of an intrinsic magnetic field such that Jovian magnetic field lines are linked to the surface of Ganymede only at high latitudes. Both the brightness and relative north-south intensity of the emissions varied considerably over the four contiguous orbits (5.5 hours) of observation, presumably due to the changing Jovian plasma environment at Ganymede. However, the observed longitudinal non-uniformity in the emission brightness at high latitudes, particularly in the southern hemisphere, and the lack of pronounced limb brightening near the poles are difficult to understand with current models. In addition to observed solar HI Lyman-alpha reflected from the disk, extended Lyman-alpha emission resonantly scattered from a hydrogen exosphere is detected out to beyond two Ganymede radii from the limb, and its brightness is consistent with the Galileo UVS measurements of Barth et al. (1997).

  15. Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jetcloud interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jet­cloud interactions P. N. Best,1 C. L form 1997 August 27 A B S T R AC T High-resolution, deep radio images are presented for two distant radio galaxies, 3C 324 (z ¼ 1:206) and 3C 368 (z ¼ 1:132), which are both prime examples of the radio

  16. Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

  17. FAST EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DIMMING ASSOCIATED WITH A CORONAL JET SEEN IN MULTI-WAVELENGTH AND STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Innes, D. E. [Max Plank Institute for Solar System Research, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)] [Max Plank Institute for Solar System Research, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Shibata, K. [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)] [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Park, Y.-D., E-mail: lksun@khu.ac.kr [Solar and Space Weather Research Group, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated a coronal jet observed near the limb on 2010 June 27 by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT), EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS), and Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), and by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and on the disk by STEREO-A/EUVI. From EUV (AIA and EIS) and soft X-ray (XRT) images we have identified both cool and hot jets. There was a small loop eruption seen in Ca II images of the SOT before the jet eruption. We found that the hot jet preceded its associated cool jet by about 2 minutes. The cool jet showed helical-like structures during the rising period which was supported by the spectroscopic analysis of the jet's emission. The STEREO observation, which enabled us to observe the jet projected against the disk, showed dimming at 195 A along a large loop connected to the jet. We measured a propagation speed of {approx}800 km s{sup -1} for the dimming front. This is comparable to the Alfven speed in the loop computed from a magnetic field extrapolation of the photospheric field measured five days earlier by the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the loop densities obtained from EIS Fe XIV {lambda}264.79/274.20 line ratios. We interpret the dimming as indicating the presence of Alfvenic waves initiated by reconnection in the upper chromosphere.

  18. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  19. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  20. Observational Window Functions in Planet Transit Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar von Braun; David R. Ciardi

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Window functions describe, as a function of orbital period, the probability that an existing planetary transit is detectable in one's data for a given observing strategy. We show the dependence of this probability upon several strategy and astrophysical parameters, such as length of observing run, observing cadence, length of night, and transit duration. The ability to detect a transit is directly related to the intrinsic noise of the observations. In our simulations of the window function, we explicitly address non-correlated (gaussian or white) noise and correlated (red) noise and discuss how these two different noise components affect window functions in different manners.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment mission Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers &...

  2. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  3. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print An international team of scientists performing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments at ALS Beamline 7.0.1...

  4. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  5. A general perspective on time observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose a general geometric framework in which to discuss the existence of time observables. This frameworks allows one to describe a local sense in which time observables always exist, and a global sense in which they can sometimes exist subject to a restriction on the vector fields that they generate. Pauli's prohibition on quantum time observables is derived as a corollary to this result. I will then discuss how time observables can be regained in modest extensions of quantum theory beyond its standard formulation.

  6. EGRET observations of bursts at MeV energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catelli, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dingus, B. L. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop Grumman Co., MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

    1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from the analysis of 16 bright bursts that have been observed by the EGRET NaI calorimeter, or TASC. Seven bursts have been imaged in the EGRET spark chamber above 30 MeV, but in most cases the TASC data gives the highest energy spectra available for these bursts. The TASC can obtain spectral and rate information for bursts well outside the field of view of the EGRET spark chambers, and is sensitive in the energy range from 1 to 200 MeV. The spectra for these bursts are mostly consistent with a simple power law with spectral index in the range from 1.7 to 3.7, with several of the brighter bursts showing emission past 100 MeV. No high energy cutoff has been observed. These high energy photons offer important clues to the physical processes involved at the origin of burst emission. For bursts at cosmological distances extremely high bulk Lorentz factors are implied by the presence of MeV and GeV photons which have not been attenuated by pair production with the lower energy photons from the source.

  7. Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Reconstruction and Restoration of PET Images. Ph.D. Thesis Peter Alshede Philipsen LYNGBY 1998 IMM with reconstruction and restoration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images carried out at the Section of Digital contains a short introduction to PET imaging. The second part, chapters 2 to 4, describe the PET scanner

  8. Digital image library development in academic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corran, Ruth

    1 Digital image library development in academic environment: designing and testing usability@aup.fr Keywords: Digital image library, usability, student projects, participatory design Abstract Case study Purpose By reporting the experience gained in the development of a digital image library in academic

  9. HDR CFA IMAGE RENDERING David Alleysson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alleysson, David

    HDR CFA IMAGE RENDERING David Alleysson,1 Laurence Meylan,2 and Sabine S¨usstrunk2 1Laboratory of the already demosaiced image. This render- ing is closer to retinal processing where an image is acquired framework, demosaicing is the final step of the rendering. Our method, inspired by retinal sampling

  10. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  11. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 6 Image Classification Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2. ­ Unsupervised classification. · Accuracy assessment. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Classification of image pixels is based on their digital numbers/grey values in one or more spectral bands. Remote Sensing

  12. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  13. CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockman, Jay

    CAN REMOTE OBSERVING BE GOOD OBSERVING? REFLECTIONS ON PROCRUSTES AND ANTAEUS 1 Felix J. Lockman National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, WV 24944 USA ABSTRACT Remote observing seeks to simulate, written in 1992 for a conference proceedings on remote observing, is reprinted here with only slight

  14. RADIO IMAGING OF SHOCK-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS ASSOCIATED WITH AN ERUPTING PLASMOID ON 2010 NOVEMBER 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bain, H. M.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, Saem; Lin, R. P., E-mail: hbain@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of a metric type II solar radio burst that occurred on the 3rd of November 2010 in association with an erupting plasmoid. The eruption was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, while the burst occurred in the frequency range of the Nancay Radioheliograph (NRH). Such events, where the type II emission occurs in the NRH frequency range, allowing us to image the burst, are infrequent. Combining these data sets, we find that the type II is located ahead of the hot ({approx}11 MK) core of the plasmoid, which is surrounded by a well-defined envelope of cool (few MK) plasma. Using two methods, we determine the propagation velocity of the shock: (1) fitting the type II emission observed in PHOENIX and HUMAIN radio spectrogram data; (2) direct imaging of the type II source location using NRH observations. We use LASCO C2 polarized brightness images to normalize our coronal density model. However, we find that information from imaging is required in order to fine-tune this normalization. We determine a shock propagation velocity between 1900 km s{sup -1} and 2000 km s{sup -1}. This is faster than the plasmoid observed at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths by AIA (v = 670-1440 km s{sup -1}, where the cooler plasma propagates faster than the hot core). The positioning of the type II, ahead of the plasmoid, suggests that the electrons are accelerated in a piston-driven shock.

  15. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution, and accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, David

    Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution States Available online 11 September 2004 Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse optical imaging currently being made and issues to consider for improving optical image quality. These include the optimal

  16. Supplemental Material for "Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    D MR images: cardiac, brain, chest and artery respectively. Figure 1, 2, 3 and 4 shows the visual complexity. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Fig. 1. Cardiac MR image reconstruction from 20% sampling (a) OriginalSupplemental Material for "Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging" Paper ID

  17. The use of MRI to observe fractures in concrete E. Marfisi*, C. J. Burgoyne*, M. H. G. Amin and L. D. Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    of aggregate can clearly be seen. The third paper 2 reports on the testing of a rein- forced concrete beamThe use of MRI to observe fractures in concrete E. Marfisi*, C. J. Burgoyne*, M. H. G. Amin and L resonance imaging (MRI) of water allows the internal crack pattern of hardened concrete to be observed along

  18. Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the June

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the June 2012 Venus transit A. Hauchecorne1 , M. Meftah1 , A. Irbah1 , S of Venus provided a rare opportunity to determine the radius of the Sun using solar imagers observing

  19. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described. 22 figs.

  20. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described.

  1. VISAR: Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; George, M.J.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) was applied to measure velocity across the diameter of a metal plate explosively accelerated to 5.5 km/s. Amplified, single- frequency laser light was focused to illuminate a line on the metal surface. The line's image was focused through the interferometer to a streak camera that swept in time and recorded directly on film. During the experiment, the Doppler-shift caused motion of the interference fringes. Analysis of the digitized film record yielded a continuum of time-resolved velocity histories. Velocity gradients across the plate that first swept radially inward, then reflected outward, were clearly measured. Increased power provided by the laser amplifier greatly improved the signal-to-noise ratio compared to our previous line VISAR experiments. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  3. Non-parametric PSF estimation from celestial transit solar images using blind deconvolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Adriana; Jacques, Laurent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: Characterization of instrumental effects in astronomical imaging is important in order to extract accurate physical information from the observations. Optics are never perfect and the non-ideal path through the telescope is usually represented by the convolution of an ideal image with a Point Spread Function (PSF). Other sources of noise (read-out, Photon) also contaminate the image acquisition process. The problem of estimating both the PSF filter and a denoised image is called blind deconvolution and is ill-posed. Aims: We propose a blind deconvolution scheme that relies on image regularization. Contrarily to most methods presented in the literature, it does not assume a parametric model of the PSF and can thus be applied to any telescope. Methods: Our scheme uses a wavelet analysis image prior model and weak assumptions on the PSF filter's response. We use the observations from a celestial body transit where such object can be assumed to be a black disk. Such constraints limits the interchangeabil...

  4. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  5. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Barreiro; J. W. R. Tabosa; H. Failache; A. Lezama

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle/EIT coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  6. ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORTPERIOD COMETS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    1 ISO SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SHORT­PERIOD COMETS \\Lambda J. Crovisier 1 , T. Encrenaz 1 , E 4 , E. van Dishoeck 5 , R. Knacke 6 , T.Y. Brooke 7 1 Observatoire de Paris, Meudon, France 2 ISO are found in a short­period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter­family comet P/Hartley 2, presum

  7. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Weili [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Fiddy, Michael A. [The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  8. VLBI Imaging of Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Ulvestad

    2003-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of the Very Long Baseline Array and its phase-referencing capability have enabled milliarcsecond-scale imaging of radio sources at sub-millijansky sensitivity, opening the door to high-resolution imaging of Seyfert galaxies. Over the last few years, this has led to a number of interesting new results that shed light on the characteristics of the inner cores of Seyfert galaxies. These include the following: (1) classical Seyfert galaxies with steep radio spectra have a strong tendency to exhibit radio jets at milliarcsecond scales, sometimes with considerable curvature in the jets; (2) apparent speeds of jets imaged at multiple epochs generally are considerably less than c, often in the vicinity of 0.1c or less, although there sometimes are faster motions seen after strong outbursts; and (3) lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies have a much stronger tendency to show flat or somewhat inverted radio spectra, usually are unresolved on milliarcsecond scales, and probably are dominated by a combination of low-radiative-efficiency accretion flows and very compact radio jets. This paper discusses some examples that illustrate these properties, and summarizes some of what we have learned about weak active galaxies on milliarcsecond scales.

  9. Towards observable signatures of other bubble universes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.; Shomer, Assaf [SCIPP, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the possibility of observable effects arising from collisions between vacuum bubbles in a universe undergoing false-vacuum eternal inflation. Contrary to conventional wisdom, we find that under certain assumptions most positions inside a bubble should have access to a large number of collision events. We calculate the expected number and angular size distribution of such collisions on an observer's 'sky', finding that for typical observers the distribution is anisotropic and includes many bubbles, each of which will affect the majority of the observer's sky. After a qualitative discussion of the physics involved in collisions between arbitrary bubbles, we evaluate the implications of our results, and outline possible detectable effects. In an optimistic sense, then, the present paper constitutes a first step in an assessment of the possible effects of other bubble universes on the cosmic microwave background and other observables.

  10. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Mid-infrared Observations of IC133 HODARI-SADIKI JAMES*, EMILY WORINKENG and DR. TRACY HODGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    LOGOLOGO Mid-infrared Observations of IC133 HODARI-SADIKI JAMES*, EMILY WORINKENG and DR. TRACY to earth with an abundance of giant HII Region (GRH's). We have examined infrared spectral images ratio of the different emission lines found within the mid-infrared. The figures needed to construct

  12. Current Theoretical Models and Future High Resolution Solar Observations: Preparing for ATST ASP Conference Series, Vol. ???, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observatory, China derived with a solar scintillometer (Seykora 1992) and a Solar Differential Image MotionCurrent Theoretical Models and Future High Resolution Solar Observations: Preparing for ATST ASP-Site Observatory Carsten Denker New Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar Research 323 Martin Luther

  13. Imaging the Expanding Shell of SN 2011dh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Witt, A; Kamble, A; Soderberg, A M; Brunthaler, A; Zauderer, B; Bartel, N; Rupen, M P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on third epoch VLBI observations of the radio-bright supernova SN 2011dh located in the nearby galaxy (7.8 Mpc) M51. The observations took place at $t=453$ d after the explosion and at a frequency of 8.4 GHz. We obtained a fairly well resolved image of the shell of SN 2011dh, making it one of only six recent supernovae for which resolved images of the ejecta are available. By fitting a spherical shell model directly to the visibility measurements we determine the angular radius of SN 2011dh's radio emission to be $636 \\pm 29$ $\\mu$as . At a distance of 7.8 Mpc, this angular radius corresponds to a linear radius of $(7.4 \\pm 0.3) \\times 10^{16}$ cm and an average expansion velocity since the explosion of $18900^{+2800}_{-2400}$ kms$^{-1}$. We also calculated more precise radius measurements for the earlier VLBI observations and we show that all the measured values of the radius of the emission region, up to $t=453$ d, are still almost perfectly consistent with those derived from fitting synchrotron s...

  14. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan [Royal Observatory of Belgium-SIDC, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Shearer, Paul [Department of Mathematics, 2074 East Hall, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043 (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  15. Image display device in digital TV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Seung Jong (Seoul, KR)

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  16. SU-E-I-12: Characterization of Edge Effects in a Commercial Low-Dose Image Processing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R; Silosky, M [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Minimizing radiation dose while preserving image quality is critical in fluoroscopic imaging. One recent development is a noise reduction system (Allura Clarity) offered by Philips. Others have reported approximately 50% reduction in air kerma when using Clarity. These studies, however, provide only a cursory look at how the Clarity system affects image quality. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of Clarity on the appearance of high-frequency image information. Methods: A lead attenuator with a smooth edge was imaged on two Philips Allura FD20 detectors: one with Clarity and one without. The edge was positioned in the center of the field of view and images were obtained under the following conditions: 40cm and 11cm fields of view, single shot and continuous fluoroscopy modes, and using abdomen and cardiac protocols, for a total of sixteen imaging conditions. Profiles were drawn perpendicular to the edge across 80% of its length, averaged to reduce noise, normalized to the maximum pixel value, and plotted as a function of distance. Results: For all single-shot acquisitions and most fluoroscopic images, overshoot of the edge was observed. This effect was more substantial for single-shot acquisitions (?20%) than for fluoroscopic images (?50%). For fluoroscopic acquisition, the overshoot decayed more quickly with the Clarity system. However, the system with Clarity introduced a ringing effect for both single-shot and fluoroscopic images that is not present on the non-Clarity system. Conclusion: Previous reports have demonstrated a substantial dose reduction when using Clarity but the impact this has on image appearance has not been characterized. One demonstrated difference is the change in appearance of high-frequency image information. It remains to be determined whether this effect may impact clinical images adversely.

  17. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  18. PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Goemoery, P. [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Warren, H. P., E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

  19. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh and PITT PACC, PA (United States). Dept of Physics and Astronomy; Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Abate, Alexandra [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Abdalla, Filipe B. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Allam, Sahar [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Allen, Steven W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ansari, Reza [LAL Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barkhouse, Wayne A. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observations, Tucson, AZ (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Univ. of Missouri at Kansas City, Kansas City, MO (United States); Brownstein, Joel R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Brunner, Robert J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Carrasco-Kind, Matias [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Cervantes-Cota, Jorge [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Escandon (Mexico); Chisari, Nora Elisa [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Colless, Matthew [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Comparat, Johan [Campus of International Excellence UAM and CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Coupon, Jean [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Astronomical Observatory; Cheu, Elliott [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Cunha, Carlos E. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; de la Macorra, Alex [UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Fisica Teorica and Inst. Avanzado de Cosmologia; Dell’Antonio, Ian P. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Frye, Brenda L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Gawiser, Eric J. [State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gehrels, Neil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Grady, Kevin [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Hagen, Alex [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Hall, Patrick B. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada); Hearin, Andrew P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Inst. fuer Astronomie, Bonn (Germany); Hirata, Christopher M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Ho, Shirley [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). McWilliams Center for Cosmology; Honscheid, Klaus [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huterer, Dragan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ivezic, Zeljko [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Kneib, Jean -Paul [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Swizerland); Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (France); Kruk, Jeffrey W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lahav, Ofer [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Mandelbaum, Rachel [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). McWilliams Center for Cosmology; Marshall, Jennifer L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Matthews, Daniel J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh and PITT PACC, PA (United States). Dept of Physics and Astronomy; Menard, Brice [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Miquel, Ramon [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. de Fisica d'Altes Energies (IFAE); Moniez, Marc [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Moos, H. W. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Moustakas, John [Siena College, Loudonville, NY (United States); Papovich, Casey [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Peacock, John A. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. for Astronomy, Royal Observatory; Park, Changbom [Korea Inst. for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Lab./Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large sets of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter further, enhancing the science return from planned experiments greatly (increasing the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by up to ~50%); Options: This spectroscopy will most efficiently be done by covering as much of the optical and near-infrared spectrum as possible at modestly high spectral resolution (?/?? > ~3000), while maximizing the telescope collecting area, field of view on the sky, and multiplexing of simultaneous spectra. The most efficient instrument for this would likely be either the proposed GMACS/MANIFEST spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope or the OPTIMOS spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope, depending on actual properties when built. The PFS spectrograph at Subaru would be next best and available considerably earlier, c. 2018; the proposed ngCFHT and SSST telescopes would have similar capabilities but start later. Other key options, in order of increasing total time required, are the WFOS spectrograph at TMT, MOONS at the VLT, and DESI at the Mayall 4 m telescope (or the similar 4MOST and WEAVE projects); of these, only DESI, MOONS, and PFS are expected to be available before 2020. Table 2-3 of this white paper summarizes the observation time required at each facility for strawman training samples. To attain secure redshift measurements for a high fraction of targeted objects and cover the full redshift span of future experiments, additional near-infrared spectroscopy will also be required; this is best done from space, particularly with WFIRST-2.4 and JWST; Calibration: The first several moments of redshift distributions (the mean, RMS redshift dispersion, etc.), must be known to high accuracy for cosmological constraints not to be systematics-dominated (equivalently, the moments of the distribution of differences between photometric and true redshifts could be determined instead). The ultimate goal of calibration is to characterize these moments for every subsample used in analyses - i.e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the moments themselve

  20. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large setsmore »of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce scatter further, enhancing the science return from planned experiments greatly (increasing the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by up to ~50%); Options: This spectroscopy will most efficiently be done by covering as much of the optical and near-infrared spectrum as possible at modestly high spectral resolution (?/?? > ~3000), while maximizing the telescope collecting area, field of view on the sky, and multiplexing of simultaneous spectra. The most efficient instrument for this would likely be either the proposed GMACS/MANIFEST spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope or the OPTIMOS spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope, depending on actual properties when built. The PFS spectrograph at Subaru would be next best and available considerably earlier, c. 2018; the proposed ngCFHT and SSST telescopes would have similar capabilities but start later. Other key options, in order of increasing total time required, are the WFOS spectrograph at TMT, MOONS at the VLT, and DESI at the Mayall 4 m telescope (or the similar 4MOST and WEAVE projects); of these, only DESI, MOONS, and PFS are expected to be available before 2020. Table 2-3 of this white paper summarizes the observation time required at each facility for strawman training samples. To attain secure redshift measurements for a high fraction of targeted objects and cover the full redshift span of future experiments, additional near-infrared spectroscopy will also be required; this is best done from space, particularly with WFIRST-2.4 and JWST; Calibration: The first several moments of redshift distributions (the mean, RMS redshift dispersion, etc.), must be known to high accuracy for cosmological constraints not to be systematics-dominated (equivalently, the moments of the distribution of differences between photometric and true redshifts could be determined instead). The ultimate goal of calibration is to characterize these moments for every subsample used in analyses - i.e., to minimize the uncertainty in their mean redshift, RMS dispersion, etc. – rather than to make the m

  1. Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Hao, E-mail: haonan@stanford.edu; Arbabian, Amin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17?dB in SNR is demonstrated.

  2. Pore level imaging of fluid transport using synchrotron x-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Hazlett, R.D.; Muegge, E.L. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Spanne, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Soll, W.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMI) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical Cr scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples has previously been shown to provide excellent two- and three-dimensional high resolution descriptions of pore structure and mineral distributions of core material. Recently, computed microtomographic endpoint saturation images of a fluid filled sandstone core sample were obtained using a microtomographic apparatus and a high energy X-ray beam produced by a superconducting wiggler at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Images of a 6 mm subsection of the one inch diameter core sample were obtained prior and subsequent to flooding to residual oil. Both oil and brine phases were observable within the imaged rock matrix. The rock matrix image data was used as input to a fluid transport simulator and the results compared with the end point saturation images and data. These high resolution images of the fluid filled pore space have not been previously available to researchers and will provide valuable insight to fluid flow, and provide data as input into and validation of high resolution porous media flow simulators, such as percolation-network and Lattice Boltzmann models.

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springsemployed in CONTRACT!D

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springsemployed in CONTRACT!D

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