National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermoelectric power plants

  1. Modeling water use at thermoelectric power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutberg, Michael J. (Michael Jacob)

    2012-01-01

    The withdrawal and consumption of water at thermoelectric power plants affects regional ecology and supply security of both water and electricity. The existing field data on US power plant water use, however, is of limited ...

  2. Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. JeffreyThermal Multi-layer4Study of the Use of

  3. Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. JeffreyThermal Multi-layer4Study of the Use

  4. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology Presents module and system requirements for...

  5. Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Critical aspects of technology...

  6. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as...

  7. Institutional impediments to using alternative water sources in thermoelectric power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.

    2011-08-03

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Obtaining adequate water supplies for cooling and other operations at a reasonable cost is a key factor in siting new and maintaining existing thermoelectric power plant operations. One way to reduce freshwater consumption is to use alternative water sources such as reclaimed (or recycled) water, mine pool water, and other nontraditional sources. The use of these alternative sources can pose institutional challenges that can cause schedule delays, increase costs, or even require plants to abandon their plans to use alternative sources. This report identifies and describes a variety of institutional challenges experienced by power plant owners and operators across the country, and for many of these challenges it identifies potential mitigating approaches. The information comes from publically available sources and from conversations with power plant owners/operators familiar with using alternative sources. Institutional challenges identified in this investigation include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Institutional actions and decisions that are beyond the control of the power plant. Such actions can include changes in local administrative policies that can affect the use of reclaimed water, inaccurate growth projections regarding the amount of water that will be available when needed, and agency workloads and other priorities that can cause delays in the permitting and approval processes. (2) Developing, cultivating, and maintaining institutional relationships with the purveyor(s) of the alternative water source, typically a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), and with the local political organizations that can influence decisions regarding the use of the alternative source. Often a plan to use reclaimed water will work only if local politics and power plant goals converge. Even then, lengthy negotiations are often needed for the plans to come to fruition. (3) Regulatory requirements for planning and developing associated infrastructure such as pipelines, storage facilities, and back-up supplies that can require numerous approvals, permits, and public participation, all of which can create delays and increased costs. (4) Permitting requirements that may be difficult to meet, such as load-based discharge limits for wastewater or air emissions limitations for particulate matter (which will be in the mist of cooling towers that use reclaimed water high in dissolved solids). (5) Finding discharge options for cooling tower blowdown of reclaimed water that are acceptable to permitting authorities. Constituents in this wastewater can limit options for discharge. For example, discharge to rivers requires National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits whose limits may be difficult to meet, and underground injection can be limited because many potential injection sites have already been claimed for disposal of produced waters from oil and gas wells or waters associated with gas shale extraction. (6) Potential liabilities associated with using alternative sources. A power plant can be liable for damages associated with leaks from reclaimed water conveyance systems or storage areas, or with mine water that has been contaminated by unscrupulous drillers that is subsequently discharged by the power plant. (7) Community concerns that include, but are not limited to, increased saltwater drift on farmers fields; the possibility that the reclaimed water will contaminate local drinking water aquifers; determining the 'best' use of WWTP effluent; and potential health concerns associated with emissions from the cooling towers that use recycled water. (8) Interveners that raise public concerns about the potential for emissions of emergi

  8. Concentrated Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a concentrated solar hydroelectric power project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by MIT, is working to demonstrate concentrating solar thermoelectric generators with >10% solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency while limiting optical concentration to less than a factor of 10 and potentially less than 4. When combined with thermal storage, CSTEGs have the potential to provide electricity day and night using no moving parts at both the utility and distributed scale.

  9. Total thermoelectric-power withdrawals Freshwater thermoelectric-power withdrawals Saline-water thermoelectric-power withdrawals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Total thermoelectric-power withdrawals Freshwater thermoelectric-power withdrawals Saline-water thermoelectric-power withdrawals Louisiana New Hampshire Florida Idaho Washington Oregon Nevada California New,000 9,000 to 13,000 Thermoelectric-power withdrawals by water quality and State, 2005. Estimated Use

  10. Green thermoelectrics: Observation and analysis of plant thermoelectric response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goupil, C; Khamsing, A; Apertet, Y; Bouteau, F; Mancuso, S; Patino, R; Lecoeur, Ph

    2015-01-01

    Plants are sensitive to thermal and electrical effects; yet the coupling of both, known as thermoelectricity, and its quantitative measurement in vegetal systems never were reported. We recorded the thermoelectric response of bean sprouts under various thermal conditions and stress. The obtained experimental data unambiguously demonstrate that a temperature difference between the roots and the leaves of a bean sprout induces a thermoelectric voltage between these two points. Basing our analysis of the data on the force-flux formalism of linear response theory, we found that the strength of the vegetal equivalent to the thermoelectric coupling is one order of magnitude larger than that in the best thermoelectric materials. Experimental data also show the importance of the thermal stress variation rate in the plant's electrophysiological response. Therefore, thermoelectric effects are sufficiently important to partake in the complex and intertwined processes of energy and matter transport within plants.

  11. Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Developing integrated TE system configurations...

  12. Thermoelectric Applications to Truck Essential Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John C. Bass; Norbert B. Elsner

    2001-12-12

    The subjects covered in this report are: thermoelectrics, 1-kW generator for diesel engine; self-powered heater; power for wireless data transmission; and quantum-well thermoelectrics.

  13. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Cove Fort Power Plant Roosevelt Power Plant Borax Lake

  14. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants: Evaluation of the combined cost of makeup water treatment and increased condenser fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Michael E.; Theregowda, Ranjani B.; Safari, Iman; Abbasian, Javad; Arastoopour, Hamid; Dzombak, David A.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Miller, David C.

    2013-10-01

    A methodology is presented to calculate the total combined cost (TCC) of water sourcing, water treatment and condenser fouling in the recirculating cooling systems of thermoelectric power plants. The methodology is employed to evaluate the economic viability of using treated municipal wastewater (MWW) to replace the use of freshwater as makeup water to power plant cooling systems. Cost analyses are presented for a reference power plant and five different tertiary treatment scenarios to reduce the scaling tendencies of MWW. Results indicate that a 550 MW sub-critical coal fired power plant with a makeup water requirement of 29.3 ML/day has a TCC of $3.0 - 3.2 million/yr associated with the use of treated MWW for cooling. (All costs USD 2009). This translates to a freshwater conservation cost of $0.29/kL, which is considerably lower than that of dry air cooling technology, $1.5/kL, as well as the 2020 conservation cost target set by the U.S. Department of Energy, $0.74/kL. Results also show that if the available price of freshwater exceeds that of secondary-treated MWW by more than $0.13-0.14/kL, it can be economically advantageous to purchase secondary MWW and treat it for utilization in the recirculating cooling system of a thermoelectric power plant.

  15. Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radisav Vidic; David Dzombak; Ming-Kai Hsieh; Heng Li; Shih-Hsiang Chien; Yinghua Feng; Indranil Chowdhury; Jason Monnell

    2009-06-30

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three impaired waters - secondary treated municipal wastewater, passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD), and effluent from ash sedimentation ponds at power plants - for use as makeup water in recirculating cooling water systems at thermoelectric power plants. The evaluation included assessment of water availability based on proximity and relevant regulations as well as feasibility of managing cooling water quality with traditional chemical management schemes. Options for chemical treatment to prevent corrosion, scaling, and biofouling were identified through review of current practices, and were tested at bench and pilot-scale. Secondary treated wastewater is the most widely available impaired water that can serve as a reliable source of cooling water makeup. There are no federal regulations specifically related to impaired water reuse but a number of states have introduced regulations with primary focus on water aerosol 'drift' emitted from cooling towers, which has the potential to contain elevated concentrations of chemicals and microorganisms and may pose health risk to the public. It was determined that corrosion, scaling, and biofouling can be controlled adequately in cooling systems using secondary treated municipal wastewater at 4-6 cycles of concentration. The high concentration of dissolved solids in treated AMD rendered difficulties in scaling inhibition and requires more comprehensive pretreatment and scaling controls. Addition of appropriate chemicals can adequately control corrosion, scaling and biological growth in ash transport water, which typically has the best water quality among the three waters evaluated in this study. The high TDS in the blowdown from pilot-scale testing units with both passively treated mine drainage and secondary treated municipal wastewater and the high sulfate concentration in the mine drainage blowdown water were identified as the main challenges for blowdown disposal. Membrane treatment (nanofiltration or reverse osmosis) can be employed to reduce TDS and sulfate concentrations to acceptable levels for reuse of the blowdown in the cooling systems as makeup water.

  16. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  17. Powering Curiosity: Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of power is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) - essentially a nuclear battery that reliably converts heat into electricity. The Department of Energy and NASA...

  18. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power Generation Modules Home Author: T. Hogan, A. Downey, J. Short, S. D. Mahanti, H. Schock, E. Case Year: 2007...

  19. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid Vehicles Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid...

  20. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Presents progress in government- and...

  1. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Ren, Zhifeng

    2015-07-09

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate in the lab that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) can exceed 10% solar-to-electricity efficiency, and STEGs can be integrated with phase-change materials (PCM) for thermal storage, providing operation beyond daylight hours. This project achieved significant progress in many tasks necessary to achieving the overall project goals. An accurate Themoelectric Generator (TEG) model was developed, which included realistic treatment of contact materials, contact resistances and radiative losses. In terms of fabricating physical TEGs, high performance contact materials for skutterudite TE segments were developed, along with brazing and soldering methods to assemble segmented TEGs. Accurate measurement systems for determining device performance (in addition to just TE material performance) were built for this project and used to characterize our TEGs. From the optical components’ side, a spectrally selective cermet surface was developed with high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance, with thermal stability at high temperature. A measurement technique was also developed to determine absorptance and total hemispherical emittance at high temperature, and was used to characterize the fabricated spectrally selective surfaces. In addition, a novel reflective cavity was designed to reduce radiative absorber losses and achieve high receiver efficiency at low concentration ratios. A prototype cavity demonstrated that large reductions in radiative losses were possible through this technique. For the overall concentrating STEG system, a number of devices were fabricated and tested in a custom built test platform to characterize their efficiency performance. Additionally, testing was performed with integration of PCM thermal storage, and the storage time of the lab scale system was evaluated. Our latest testing results showed a STEG efficiency of 9.6%, indicating promising potential for high performance concentrated STEGs.

  2. Body powered thermoelectric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settaluri, Krishna Tej

    2012-01-01

    Great interest exists for and progress has be made in the effective utilization of the human body as a possible power supply in hopes of powering such applications as sensors and continuously monitoring medical devices ...

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Iridium- and Cobalt-based Skutterudites for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Daniel Jay

    2014-01-01

    for thermoelectric power generation,” 235th ACS Nationalfor Thermoelectric Power Generation A dissertation submittedfor Thermoelectric Power Generation by Daniel Jay King, Jr.

  5. Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amatya, Reja

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

  6. Heat Management in Thermoelectric Power Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebarjadi, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generators are used to convert heat into electricity. Like any other heat engine, the performance of a thermoelectric generator increases as the temperature difference on the sides increases. It is generally assumed that as more heat is forced through the thermoelectric legs, their performance increases. Therefore, insulations are typically used to minimize the heat losses and to confine the heat transport through the thermoelectric legs. In this paper we show that to some extend it is beneficial to purposely open heat loss channels in order to establish a larger temperature gradient and therefore to increase the overall efficiency and achieve larger electric power output. We define a modified Biot number (Bi) as an indicator of requirements for sidewall insulation. We show that if Bi1, it lowers the conversion efficiency.

  7. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  8. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bel,; Lon E. (Altadena, CA); Crane, Douglas Todd (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-10-27

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  9. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting

  10. Thermoelectric power generator for variable thermal power source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2015-04-14

    Traditional power generation systems using thermoelectric power generators are designed to operate most efficiently for a single operating condition. The present invention provides a power generation system in which the characteristics of the thermoelectrics, the flow of the thermal power, and the operational characteristics of the power generator are monitored and controlled such that higher operation efficiencies and/or higher output powers can be maintained with variably thermal power input. Such a system is particularly beneficial in variable thermal power source systems, such as recovering power from the waste heat generated in the exhaust of combustion engines.

  11. Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1 Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1 Ralph D. Lorenz, Lunar for electrical power generation for planetary exploration applications using thermoelectric conversion of the vehicle. Proof-of-concept experiments are described using off-the-shelf thermoelectric CPU cooling plates

  12. Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Optimizing Thermoelectric Power Factor by Means of a Potential Barrier Neophytos Neophytou}@iue.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Large efforts in improving thermoelectric energy conversion are devoted to energy filtering design, ~40% improvement in the thermoelectric power factor can be achieved if the following conditions

  13. Thermoelectric Power Generation Allison Duh and Joel Dungan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Thermoelectric Power Generation Allison Duh and Joel Dungan May 15, 2013 #12;Introduction A thermoelectric generator (TEG) is a device that converts heat energy directly into electrical energy. Thermoelectric systems capitalize on semiconductor charge carriers excited by a temperature difference to convert

  14. Project Profile: Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rohsenow-Kendall Heat Transfer Lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology(MIT), under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D FOA, is developing concentrated solar thermoelectric generators (CSTEGs) for CSP systems. This innovative distributed solution contains no moving parts and converts heat directly into electricity. Thermal storage can be integrated into the system, creating a reliable and flexible source of electricity.

  15. High Reliability, High TemperatureThermoelectric Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Technologies Key technologies and system approaches to excellent record of thermoelectric power sources in deep space missions and development of higher performance TE...

  16. High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation 2005 Diesel Engine...

  17. High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

  18. Diameter dependence of thermoelectric power of semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Nguyen T.

    We calculate the thermoelectric power (or thermopower) of many semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) within a diameter range 0.5–1.5 nm by using the Boltzmann transport formalism combined with an extended ...

  19. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  20. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, M.M.

    1995-04-18

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

  1. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Mark M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  2. Thermoelectric powered wireless sensors for spent fuel monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carstens, T.; Corradini, M.; Blanchard, J. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Ma, Z. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes using thermoelectric generators to power wireless sensors to monitor spent nuclear fuel during dry-cask storage. OrigenArp was used to determine the decay heat of the spent fuel at different times during the service life of the dry-cask. The Engineering Equation Solver computer program modeled the temperatures inside the spent fuel storage facility during its service life. The temperature distribution in a thermoelectric generator and heat sink was calculated using the computer program Finite Element Heat Transfer. From these temperature distributions the power produced by the thermoelectric generator was determined as a function of the service life of the dry-cask. In addition, an estimation of the path loss experienced by the wireless signal can be made based on materials and thickness of the structure. Once the path loss is known, the transmission power and thermoelectric generator power requirements can be determined. This analysis estimates that a thermoelectric generator can produce enough power for a sensor to function and transmit data from inside the dry-cask throughout its service life. (authors)

  3. On thermoelectric power conversion from heat re-circulating combustion systems F. J. Weinberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On thermoelectric power conversion from heat re-circulating combustion systems F. J. Weinberg Fax: 4420 7594 5604 Word count: 3750 Diags. equivalent: 1600 5350 #12;On thermoelectric power the absolute maximum efficiency of energy conversion by thermoelectric devices that operate as part of the heat

  4. Power-Aware Deployment and Control of Forced-Convection and Thermoelectric Coolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Power-Aware Deployment and Control of Forced-Convection and Thermoelectric Coolers Mohammad Javad Angeles, CA, USA {dousti, pedram}@usc.edu ABSTRACT Advances in the thermoelectric cooling technology have made it one of the promising solutions for spot cooling in VLSI circuits. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs

  5. Freshwater Availability and Constraints on Thermoelectric Power Generation in the Southeast U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Feldman; Amanda Slough; Gary Garrett

    2008-06-01

    There is a myriad of uses to which our country's freshwater supply is currently committed. Together with increasing quantities of consumption, there are growing constraints on water availability. In our future there will be two elements of consumption at the forefront of concern: availability and efficiency. Availability of freshwater is the most important of these and is the subject of this report. To use water efficiently, we must first have it. Efficiency is key to ensuring availability for future needs. As population grows and economic and technology demands increase - especially for thermoelectric power - needs for freshwater will also increase. Thus, using our limited supplies of freshwater must be done as efficiently as possible. Thermoelectric generating industry is the largest user of our nation's water resources, including fresh, surface, ground, and saline water. Saline water use accounts for approximately 30% of thermoelectric use, while the remaining 70% is from freshwater sources. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that thermoelectric generation accounts for roughly 136,000 million gallons per day (MGD), or 39% of freshwater withdrawals. This ranks slightly behind agricultural irrigation as the top source of freshwater withdrawals in the U.S. in 2000. For Americans to preserve their standard of living and maintain a thriving economy it is essential that greater attention be paid to freshwater availability in efforts to meet energy demands - particularly for electric power. According to projections by the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO 2006) anticipated growth of thermoelectric generating capacity will be 22% between 2005 and 2030. In the 2007 Report, EIA estimates that capacity to grow from approximately 709 GW in 2005 to 862 GW in 20303. These large increases in generating capacity will result in increased water demands by thermoelectric power plants and greater competition over water between the energy sector and domestic, commercial, agricultural, industrial, and instream use sectors. The implications of these increased demands have not been adequately researched. This report is a preliminary effort to explore these implications. In addition, since this report was completed in draft form in 2007, there have been several updates and important issues brought to bear on water for energy that should be mentioned. Uncertainties include drought and climate change impacts. Policies such as commitments to Coal-to-Liquids (CTL) quotas; Ethanol production requirements; Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) mandates; increasing nuclear power plant construction; valuing carbon and carbon dioxide emissions all have significant implications on water use and on the need for water in the power sector by 2025.

  6. Gated Si nanowires for large thermoelectric power factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neophytou, Neophytos, E-mail: N.Neophytou@warwick.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kosina, Hans [Institute for Microelectronics, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27-29/E360, Vienna A-1040 (Austria)

    2014-08-18

    We investigate the effect of electrostatic gating on the thermoelectric power factor of p-type Si nanowires (NWs) of up to 20?nm in diameter in the [100], [110], and [111] crystallographic transport orientations. We use atomistic tight-binding simulations for the calculation of the NW electronic structure, coupled to linearized Boltzmann transport equation for the calculation of the thermoelectric coefficients. We show that gated NW structures can provide ?5× larger thermoelectric power factor compared to doped channels, attributed to their high hole phonon-limited mobility, as well as gating induced bandstructure modifications which further improve mobility. Despite the fact that gating shifts the charge carriers near the NW surface, surface roughness scattering is not strong enough to degrade the transport properties of the accumulated hole layer. The highest power factor is achieved for the [111] NW, followed by the [110], and finally by the [100] NW. As the NW diameter increases, the advantage of the gated channel is reduced. We show, however, that even at 20?nm diameters (the largest ones that we were able to simulate), a ?3× higher power factor for gated channels is observed. Our simulations suggest that the advantage of gating could still be present in NWs with diameters of up to ?40?nm.

  7. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature...

  8. Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Documents & Publications TEG On-Vehicle Performance & Model Validation Thermoelectric Generator Performance for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for...

  9. Atomic-Scale Mapping of Thermoelectric Power on Graphene: Role of Defects and Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Atomic-Scale Mapping of Thermoelectric Power on Graphene: Role of Defects and Boundaries Jewook University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA Abstract The spatially resolved thermoelectric power is studied on epitaxial graphene on SiC with direct correspondence to graphene atomic structures by a scanning tunneling

  10. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced power cycles. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  11. Physical Plant Power Plant - 43 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    with higher efficiency / R&D Climate friendly Power Plants Build coal fired Power Plants with CCS-technology 4 B a c k u p va W GGEHEN ESL-IC-08-10-27 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany..., October 20-22, 2008 RWE Energy / Energieeffizienz bei Immobilien / U. K?nig / ICEBO '08 SEITE 9 Electricity Production: All Energy Sources have to be included! Lignite Power Plant (BoA) produces 8,8 TWh = appr. 12% of the annual demand for electricity...

  12. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  13. Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials and High Efficiency Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to

  14. Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor with Highly Mismatched Isoelectronic Doping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    We investigate the effect of O impurities on the thermoelectric properties of ZnSe from a combination

  15. Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaltz, Erik

    Aalborg Universitet Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Tracking for a Thermoelectric Generator Systems. Poster session presented at The 31st International & 10th Generator Systems Casper Vadstrup (cvdst08@student.aau.dk), Min Chen (mch@et.aau.dk), Erik Schaltz (esc

  16. Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor with Highly Mismatched Isoelectronic Doping Joo-Hyoung Lee,1,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Enhancing the Thermoelectric Power Factor with Highly Mismatched Isoelectronic Doping Joo; published 8 January 2010) We investigate the effect of O impurities on the thermoelectric properties of Zn performance thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.016602 PACS numbers: 72.20.Pa, 71.15.Àm

  17. Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    how the down-hole CO 2 plumes may evolve over time (geomodeling with TOUGH2), what engineering and other resources would be required to develop a water extraction and...

  18. Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient in Bone's Nanostructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced thermoelectric materials could be used to develop vehicle exhaust systems that convert exhaust heat into electricity, concentrate solar energy for power generation and recover waste heat from industrial processes.

  19. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Applications Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy...

  20. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls, OR. Constructing a geothermal power plant on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus.

  1. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    The thermoelectric generator shorting system provides the capability to monitor and short-out individual thermoelectric couples in the event of failure. This makes the series configured thermoelectric generator robust to individual thermoelectric couple failure. Open circuit detection of the thermoelectric couples and the associated short control is a key technique to ensure normal functionality of the TE generator under failure of individual TE couples. This report describes a five-year effort whose goal was the understanding the issues related to the development of a thermoelectric energy recovery device for a Class-8 truck. Likely materials and important issues related to the utility of this generator were identified. Several prototype generators were constructed and demonstrated. The generators developed demonstrated several new concepts including advanced insulation, couple bypass technology and the first implementation of skutterudite thermoelectric material in a generator design. Additional work will be required to bring this system to fruition. However, such generators offer the possibility of converting energy that is otherwise wasted to useful electric power. Uur studies indicate that this can be accomplished in a cost-effective manner for this application.

  2. Profiling the Thermoelectric Power of Semiconductor Junctions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components or hazardous working fluids. Developing new thermoelectric mate- rials with high figures of merit S is governed by local carrier statistics, SThEM allows us to profile precise elec- tronic junction locations

  3. Oxide based thermoelectric materials for large scale power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Yang, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    The thermoelectric (TE) devices are based on the Seebeck and Peltier effects, which describe the conversion between temperature gradient and electricity. The effectiveness of the material performance can be described by ...

  4. Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric...

  5. Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Thermoelectric Couple Demonstration of (In,...

  6. Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07

    The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ~4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

  7. Thermoelectric power factor enhancement by ionized nanoparticle scattering Je-Hyeong Bahk, Zhixi Bian, Mona Zebarjadi, Parthiban Santhanam, Rajeev Ram, and Ali Shakouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Rajeev J.

    Thermoelectric power factor enhancement by ionized nanoparticle scattering Je-Hyeong Bahk, Zhixi 15:21:35 #12;Thermoelectric power factor enhancement by ionized nanoparticle scattering Je 2011) We show theoretically that the thermoelectric power factor can be enhanced in degenerate

  8. Thermoelectric effect in very thin film Pt/Au thermocouples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvadori, M.C.; Vaz, A.R.; Teixeira, F.S.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I.G.

    2006-01-01

    TABLE I. Measured thermoelectric power S for samples ofThermoelectric effect in very thin film Pt/Au thermocouplesthickness dependence of the thermoelectric power of Pt films

  9. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  10. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Ramesh, Ramamoorthy (Moraga, CA); Yu, Choongho (College Station, TX); Scullin, Matthew L. (Berkeley, CA); Huijben, Mark (Enschede, NL)

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  11. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hong; Sun, Wenhao; Ceder, Gerbrand; Armiento, Rickard; Lazic, Predrag

    2014-02-24

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance.

  12. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  17. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  18. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  4. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  5. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  6. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  8. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  9. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  10. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  12. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  14. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  15. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  16. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. Large Thermoelectric Power Factor in P-type Si (110)/[110] Ultra-Thin-Layers Compared to Differently Oriented Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Large Thermoelectric Power Factor in P-type Si (110)/[110] Ultra-Thin-Layers Compared the thermoelectric power factor of ultra-thin-body p-type Si layers of thicknesses from W=3nm up to 10nm. We show improvement in 2D thin- layers of zincblende semiconductors. Keywords: low-dimensional thermoelectrics

  18. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  19. Design of bulk thermoelectric modules for integrated circuit thermal management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukutani, K; Shakouri, A

    2006-01-01

    cooling enhancement with thermoelectric coolers,” Trans.M. S. Dresselhaus, “Thermoelectric ?gure of merit of a one-A. Shakouri, “Improved thermoelectric power factor in metal-

  20. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh, E-mail: daryoosh.vashaee@okstate.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74106 (United States); Tahmasbi Rad, Armin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74106 (United States); Tayebi, Lobat, E-mail: daryoosh.vashaee@okstate.edu [School of Chemical Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (?500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  1. A quantitative application of the thermoelectric method for measuring water uptake by cotton plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naghshineh-Pour, Bahman

    1965-01-01

    they measured sap veloc- ties in intact plants with a minimum of injury (8). Dixon (9) measured flow rates in a branch of a young ash tree by using a thermocouple arrangement for detecting heat f'low. His results indicated mass flow in the stem both upward... oxy- gen and carbon dioxide levels within the soil could be detected. The thermoelectric method is based on the assumption that since Personal Communication. most of the water absorbed by plants is transpired, the rate of sap flow in the stem is a...

  2. Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, 501 Deacon Blvd., Winston Salem, North Carolina 27105 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4??VK{sup ?1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50?K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing OF ST. LUCIE-2 at FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY · Robert E. Uhrig 1974-1986 ­ Vice President, Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  4. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  5. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru??xIrxSe? (x ? 0.2). RuSe? is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe? exceeds -200 µV/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru?.?Ir?.?Se? shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb?.

  7. Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery System Based on Zintl Phase Materials with Embedded Nanoparticles Thermoelectrics Partnership: High Performance Thermoelectric...

  8. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  9. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global) .................................................................... 14 4.4 High Temperature Gas Reactor

  10. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  11. Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

  12. Finding the quantum thermoelectric with maximal efficiency and minimal entropy production at given power output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Whitney

    2015-03-16

    We investigate the nonlinear scattering theory for quantum systems with strong Seebeck and Peltier effects, and consider their use as heat-engines and refrigerators with finite power outputs. This article gives detailed derivations of the results summarized in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130601 (2014). It shows how to use the scattering theory to find (i) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum possible power output, and (ii) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum efficiency at given power output. The latter corresponds to a minimal entropy production at that power output. These quantities are of quantum origin since they depend on system size over electronic wavelength, and so have no analogue in classical thermodynamics. The maximal efficiency coincides with Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decreases with increasing power output. This gives a fundamental lower bound on entropy production, which means that reversibility (in the thermodynamic sense) is impossible for finite power output. The suppression of efficiency by (nonlinear) phonon and photon effects is addressed in detail; when these effects are strong, maximum efficiency coincides with maximum power. Finally, we show in particular limits (typically without magnetic fields) that relaxation within the quantum system does not allow the system to exceed the bounds derived for relaxation-free systems, however, a general proof of this remains elusive.

  13. Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool down an integrated circuit to maintain its performance. The maximum cooling power of microscale TECs is significantly reduced by the interfacial resistance. For our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICT 2008 1 Abstract Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool act as a good guideline for two-dimensional analysis and assembly of TECs. Key Words - Thermoelectric by the thermal power at the hotspot regions. Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) or Thermoelectric

  14. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive...

  15. Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference Proc., Vancouver, BC, Canada, 992569 (1999) Miniaturized Thermoelectric Power Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    is the discovery and infusion of novel thermoelectric materials more efficient above room temperature than

  16. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  17. Power and efficiency analysis of a realistic resonant tunneling diode thermoelectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Akshay; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran, E-mail: bm@ee.iitb.ac.in [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India)

    2014-07-07

    Low-dimensional systems with sharp features in the density of states have been proposed as a means for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Quantum dot systems, which offer the sharpest density of states achievable, however, suffer from low power outputs while bulk (3-D) thermoelectrics, while displaying high power outputs, offer very low efficiencies. Here, we analyze the use of a resonant tunneling diode structure that combines the best of both aspects, that is, density of states distortion with a finite bandwidth due to confinement that aids the efficiency and a large number of current carrying transverse modes that enhances the total power output. We show that this device can achieve a high power output (?0.3?MW?m{sup 2}) at efficiencies of ?40% of the Carnot efficiency due to the contribution from these transverse momentum states at a finite bandwidth of kT?2. We then provide a detailed analysis of the physics of charge and heat transport with insights on parasitic currents that reduce the efficiency. Finally, a comparison between the resonant tunneling diode and a quantum dot device with comparable bandwidth reveals that a similar performance requires ultra-dense areal quantum dot densities of ?10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}.

  18. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofof the Thesis SOLAR POWER PLANT DESIGN , Study Guidelines a.Reference Solar Power Plant Design e. Power Plant

  19. Increasing the thermoelectric figure of merit of tetrahedrites by Co-doping with nickel and zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, X; Morelli, DT; Xia, Y; Ozolins, V

    2015-01-01

    Increasing  the  Thermoelectric  Figure  of  Merit  of  increase   in   the   thermoelectric   figure   of   merit  coefficient  and  thermoelectric  power  factor;  and  2)  

  20. Sandia Energy » thermo-electric power conversion technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of the University of2013 DomeniciTwo

  1. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, H. W.; Kistner, R.

    1999-11-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised i n debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  2. Financing solar thermal power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kistner, R.; Price, H.

    1999-07-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been built following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply states, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects form the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  3. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  4. Interface Driven Energy Filtering of Thermoelectric Power in Spark Plasma Sintered Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 Nanoplatelet Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    -ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermoelectric, and thermal transport measurements illustrateInterface Driven Energy Filtering of Thermoelectric Power in Spark Plasma Sintered Bi2Te2.7Se0 that the pellet sintered at 250 °C shows a minimum grain growth and an optimal number of interfaces for efficient

  5. Enhancement of automotive exhaust heat recovery by thermoelectric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermoelectric power output were examined. The results indicate that thermoelectric power production is increased at higher gas inlet temperature or flow rate. However,...

  6. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT Nuclear power plants have safety and security procedures in place and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENTS Nuclear power plants have safety and security procedures in place and are closely monitored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). An accident at a nuclear power plant could of nuclear power plant accidents? Radioactive materials in the plume from the nuclear power plant can settle

  7. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    storage can provide solar power plant energy storage for aconfiguration for a solar power plant without energy storagefor a solar power plant greatly influences the plant energy

  8. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

    2007-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

  9. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  10. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  11. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  12. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  13. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  14. Automating An Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, D. R.; McCowen, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    ,OOO/year. The upgrading process began with a search for a design/ build contractor that could provide complete turn key capability, beginning with a site survey and ending with operator acceptanoe. The contractor was selected through. a group...ATING AN INDUSTRIAL POWER PLANT DAVID R. WILLIAMS, P.E. Energy Coordi?nator John Deere Component Works Waterloo, Iowa ABSTRACT The need for an upgrade of boiler and turbine controls in the 15 MW coal-fired cogeneration plant at the John Deere Component Works...

  15. The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , such as wind turbines and solar photovoltaic sources, it may also promote the retrofitting of coal-fired power power plant is for the cooling system that condenses steam and carries away the waste heat as part of a Rankine steam cycle. The total water requirements of such a plant depend on a number of factors, including

  16. Utilization of municipal wastewater for cooling in thermoelectric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safari, Iman; Walker, Michael E.; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Dzombak, David A.; Liu, Wenshi; Vidic, Radisav D.; Miller, David C.; Abbasian, Javad

    2013-09-01

    A process simulation model has been developed using Aspen Plus® with the OLI (OLI System, Inc.) water chemistry model to predict water quality in the recirculating cooling loop utilizing secondary- and tertiary-treated municipal wastewater as the source of makeup water. Simulation results were compared with pilot-scale experimental data on makeup water alkalinity, loop pH, and ammonia evaporation. The effects of various parameters including makeup water quality, salt formation, NH3 and CO2 evaporation mass transfer coefficients, heat load, and operating temperatures were investigated. The results indicate that, although the simulation model can capture the general trends in the loop pH, experimental data on the rates of salt precipitation in the system are needed for more accurate prediction of the loop pH. It was also found that stripping of ammonia and carbon dioxide in the cooling tower can influence the cooling loop pH significantly. The effects of the NH3 mass transfer coefficient on cooling loop pH appear to be more significant at lower values (e.g., kNH3 < 4×10-3 m/s) when the makeup water alkalinity is low (e.g., <90 mg/L as CaCO3). The effect of the CO2 mass transfer coefficient was found to be significant only at lower alkalinity values (e.g., kCO2<4×10-6 m/s).

  17. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project discusses preliminary experimental results to find how thermoelectrics can be applied ot future hybrid vehicles and the optimum design of such equipment using heat pipes

  18. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

  19. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step...

  20. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Efficiency Investments to Power Plants J. Koorney, A.H.Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan Koorney,Pollution, and Avoid Power Plant Construction. Testimony

  1. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01

    technologies applicable to power plant gas streams) and thecapacity of power plants whose flue gases are treated withat some power plants burning oil or natural gas, including

  2. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01

    2004) ‘Experience curves for power plant emission controlLtd. Experience curves for power plant emission controlInc. Experience curves for power plant emission control

  3. Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan W.; Rosemeier, Cory A.; Mayers, David; Singh, Jogender

    2013-12-02

    Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

  4. Powering a Cat Warmer Using Thin-Film Thermoelectric Conversion of Microprocessor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    towards one end, creating a difference in potential. The efficiency of thermo- electric generators (TEG of Thermoelectric Generation 1A phonon is a fundamental quantum mechanical vibration mode of a material that is used efficiencies when converting heat to electricity using the thermoelectric ef- fect. Applied to microprocessors

  5. System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowery, Jr., Alfred L. (Potomac, MD)

    1993-01-01

    By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

  6. Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  7. Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric...

  8. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in an Over the Road Diesel Powered Engine System by the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste...

  9. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using thermoelectrics on a OTR truck schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  10. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  11. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ace067goodson2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Novel...

  12. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Solar Power Plant . . Important Sources of Cost Estimation Datasolar power plant. These data were used to estimate costs

  13. Efficiency combined cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel, J.; Meyers, G.A.; Baldwin, T.S.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a method of operating a combined cycle power plant. It comprises: flowing exhaust gas from a combustion turbine through a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG); flowing feed water through an economizer section of the HRSG at a flow rate and providing heated feed water; flowing a first portion of the heated feed water through an evaporator section of the HRSG and producing saturated steam at a production rate, the flow rate of the feed water through the economizer section being greater than required to sustain the production rate of steam in the evaporator section; flowing fuel for the turbine through a heat exchanger; and, flowing a second portion of the heated feed water provided by the economizer section through the heat exchanger then to an inlet of the economizer section, thereby heating the fuel flowing through the heat exchanger.

  14. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  15. Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC...

  16. Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 8, 2010 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to...

  17. Organizational learning at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John S.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

  18. Electric Power Reliability in Chemical Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    at plants across the country? Has the quality and reliability of utility-generated power deteriorated over the past five or ten years? Or, has the perception of what constitutes reliable power changed with the advent, installation, and increasing usage...

  19. Thermoelectric energy conversion using nanostructured materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    High performance thermoelectric materials in a wide range of temperatures are essential to broaden the application spectrum of thermoelectric devices. This paper presents experiments on the power and efficiency characteristics ...

  20. A Survey of Power Plant Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ervin, Elizabeth K.

    to produce steam. The steam spins the turbine, which drives the generator. Source: Tennessee Valley Authority) www.ent.ohiou.edu/~thermo/ index.html The General James M Gavin Steam Power Plant near Cheshire, Ohio University #12;Combustion Turbine Power Plant Open System The turbine burns either natural gas or oil. Fuel

  1. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  2. Nanowire-Composite based Flexible Thermoelectric Nanogenerators and Self-Powered Temperature Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    in harvesting electricity from waste heat with a temperature gradient relative to environmental temperature [2, 3], such as in cars, aircrafts, and power plants. Nanomaterials with higher performance are more and energy-dependent scat- tering of electrical carriers occur in the presence of nanoscale interfaces [4

  3. Thermoelectric power source utilizing ambient energy harvesting for remote sensing and transmitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSteese, John G

    2010-11-16

    A method and apparatus for providing electrical energy to an electrical device wherein the electrical energy is originally generated from temperature differences in an environment having a first and a second temperature region. A thermoelectric device having a first side and a second side wherein the first side is in communication with a means for transmitting ambient thermal energy collected or rejected in the first temperature region and the second side is in communication with the second temperature region thereby producing a temperature gradient across the thermoelectric device and in turn generating an electrical current.

  4. Water vulnerabilities for existing coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Kuiper, J.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-19

    This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the Existing Plants Research Program's overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. Water consumption by all users in the United States over the 2005-2030 time period is projected to increase by about 7% (from about 108 billion gallons per day [bgd] to about 115 bgd) (Elcock 2010). By contrast, water consumption by coal-fired power plants over this period is projected to increase by about 21% (from about 2.4 to about 2.9 bgd) (NETL 2009b). The high projected demand for water by power plants, which is expected to increase even further as carbon-capture equipment is installed, combined with decreasing freshwater supplies in many areas, suggests that certain coal-fired plants may be particularly vulnerable to potential water demand-supply conflicts. If not addressed, these conflicts could limit power generation and lead to power disruptions or increased consumer costs. The identification of existing coal-fired plants that are vulnerable to water demand and supply concerns, along with an analysis of information about their cooling systems and related characteristics, provides information to help focus future research and development (R&D) efforts to help ensure that coal-fired generation demands are met in a cost-effective manner that supports sustainable water use. This study identified coal-fired power plants that are considered vulnerable to water demand and supply issues by using a geographical information system (GIS) that facilitated the analysis of plant-specific data for more than 500 plants in the NETL's Coal Power Plant Database (CPPDB) (NETL 2007a) simultaneously with 18 indicators of water demand and supply. Two types of demand indicators were evaluated. The first type consisted of geographical areas where specific conditions can generate demand vulnerabilities. These conditions include high projected future water consumption by thermoelectric power plants, high projected future water consumption by all users, high rates of water withdrawal per square mile (mi{sup 2}), high projected population increases, and areas projected to be in a water crisis or conflict by 2025. The second type of demand indicator was plant specific. These indicators were developed for each plant and include annual water consumption and withdrawal rates and intensities, net annual power generation, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The supply indictors, which are also area based, include areas with low precipitation, high temperatures, low streamflow, and drought. The indicator data, which were in various formats (e.g., maps, tables, raw numbers) were converted to a GIS format and stored, along with the individual plant data from the CPPDB, in a single GIS database. The GIS database allowed the indicator data and plant data to be analyzed and visualized in any combination. To determine the extent to which a plant would be considered 'vulnerable' to a given demand or supply concern (i.e., that the plant's operations could be affected by water shortages represented by a potential demand or supply indicator), criteria were developed to categorize vulnerability according to one of three types: major, moderate, or not vulnerable. Plants with at least two major demand indicator values and/or at least four moderate demand indicator values were considered vulnerable to demand concerns. By using this approach, 144 plants were identified as being subject to demand concerns only. Plants with at least one major supply indicator value and/or at least two moderate supply indicator values were considered vulnerable to supply concerns. By using this approach, 64 plants were identified as being subject to supply concerns only. In addition, 139 plants were identified as subject to both demand and supply concerns. Therefore, a total of 347 plants were considere

  5. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

  6. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A

    2007-01-01

    1/2, 2004 Experience curves for power plant emission controlcoal-fired electric power plants. In particular, we focus on2004) ‘Experience curves for power plant emission control

  7. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

  9. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    18% of the installed solar power plant costs. The costs forthe operations and costs for this solar power plant and forenergy generation and cost, The proposed solar power plant

  10. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    efficiency of a solar power plant with gas-turbine toppingon the Solar Power Plant Heat~Transfer Gas Properties Modelfor a solar power plant with Brayton-cycle gas turbine

  11. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01

    emissions from coal-fired power plants have been the subjectrequired on all new coal-fired power plants in the US andof FGD at coal-burning power plants can be traced back to

  12. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A

    2007-01-01

    a standardised coal-fired power plant (500 MWe, 3.5% sulphura standardised coal-fired power plant (500 MWe, 3.5% sulphurfor a standard coal-fired power plant (500 MWe, Another

  13. On Line Power Plant Performance Monitoring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.; Priestley, R. R.

    1990-01-01

    PERFORMANCE MONITORING DAVID J. AHNER Manager, Power PrOduction Engineering Power Technologies, Inc. Schenectady, NY ABSTRACT Maintaining efficient and reliable plant operation is a prime objective in the generation of power. These are important... stream_source_info ESL-IE-90-06-24.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 30080 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-90-06-24.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ON LINE POWER PLANT...

  14. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  15. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT COMMISSIONDECISION ENERGY COMMISSION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT GAS TURBINE PLANT SMALL POWER PLANT EXEMPTION DOCKET NO. 06-SPPE-1 The California Energy Commission

  16. Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01

    EFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEFFICIENCY INVESTMENTS TO POWER PLANTS: APPLICATIONS TOEfficiency Investments to Power Plants: Applications to

  17. Approach to nitinol power plant cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNichols, J.L. Jr.; Cory, J.S.; Curtis, E.H.

    1982-11-01

    The objective of this paper is tof provide a method for cost evaluation of low grade thermal energy conversion by Nitinol power plants. To accomplish this objective Nitinol power plant costs are subdivided int those which can be obtained through conventional cost analysis, and those which are associated with the Nitino heat engine and are not subject to conventional analysis. Analytic expressions are provided for the Nitinol heat engine capital costs and Nitinol replacement costs in terms of Nitinol performance, heat engine configuration, plant operating factors, material costs, and the cost of capital. Nitinol working material factors are identified that require further definition before firm and reliable costs can be determined. Where data are lacking, plausible assumptions and estimates are utilized tof perform a first-cut analysis. It is found that the Nitinol heat engine capital costs per unit power generating capacity are approximately $0.15/W, and that the cost of produced energy for the Nitinol heat engine portion of the power plant is approximately 0.74 /kWh, includin operation, maintenance, Nitinol replacements and the cost of capital for the heat engine. It is concluded tha Nitinol power plants for the conversion of low grade thermal energy may have a significant economical advantage over conventionally fueled power plants.

  18. EIS-0308: Southpoint Power Plant Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs’ proposed lease of acreage on the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation in Mohave County, Arizona for development of a natural gas-fired 500 megawatt combined cycle power plant. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) is a cooperating agency, and the plant would supply power to the WAPA grid. The proposed Southpoint power plant would require construction of an off-site substation and two 230 kV transmission lines in order to wheel power to WAPA’s distribution grid. An Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed substation and transmission line was prepared with the Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management as lead agency and WAPA as a cooperating agency, and a Finding of No Significant Impact was approved on December 2, 1997.

  19. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plant fact sheet | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Plant fact sheet Argonne National Laboratory's Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant, expected to be operational in June 2016, will provide electricity...

  20. World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California February 19, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Ivanpah,...

  1. Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate Electricity Using Geothermal Water Resources Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...

  2. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

  3. NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title list of documents made publicly available, January 1-31, 1998 NONE 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS;...

  4. Calculated transport properties of CdO: thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power factor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-01

    We present first principles calculations of the thermal and electronic transport properties of the oxide semiconductor CdO. In particular, we find from theory that the accepted thermal conductivity ? value of 0.7 Wm-1K-1 is approximately one order of magnitude too small; our calculations of ? of CdO are in good agreement with recent measurements. We also find that alloying of MgO with CdO is an effective means to reduce the lattice contribution to ?, despite MgO having a much larger thermal conductivity. We further consider the electronic structure of CdO in relation to thermoelectric performance, finding that large thermoelectric powermore »factors may occur if the material can be heavily doped p-type. This work develops insight into the nature of thermal and electronic transport in an important oxide semiconductor.« less

  5. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  6. White Paper for U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force: Waste Heat Recovery with Thermoelectric and Lithium-Ion Hybrid Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-11-26

    By harvesting waste heat from engine exhaust and storing it in light-weight high-capacity modules, it is believed that the need for energy transport by convoys can be lowered significantly. By storing this power during operation, substantial electrical power can be provided during long periods of silent operation, while the engines are not operating. It is proposed to investigate the potential of installing efficient thermoelectric generators on the exhaust systems of trucks and other vehicles to generate electrical power from the waste heat contained in the exhaust and to store that power in advanced power packs comprised of polymer-gel lithium ion batteries. Efficient inexpensive methods for production of the thermoelectric generator are also proposed. The technology that exists at LLNL, as well as that which exists at industrial partners, all have high technology readiness level (TRL). Work is needed for integration and deployment.

  7. Materials Physics for Thermoelectric and Related Energetic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Shuang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectrics study the direct inter-conversion between heat flow and electrical power, which has a wide range of applications including power generation and refrigeration. The performance of thermoelectricity generation ...

  8. Mobile power plants : waste body heat recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Scott), 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Novel methods to convert waste metabolic heat into useful and useable amounts of electricity were studied. Thermoelectric, magneto hydrodynamic, and piezo-electric energy conversions at the desired scope were evaluated to ...

  9. Simulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coal-fired power plants are greater than those from oil or natural gas. If we must use more coal, howSimulation of the Visual Effects of Power Plant Plumes1 2 Evelyn F. Treiman, / 3 David B. Champion-fired power plant with six 500 MW coal-fired power plants located at hypothetical sites in southeastern Utah

  10. Thermoelectric module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kortier, William E. (Columbus, OH); Mueller, John J. (Columbus, OH); Eggers, Philip E. (Columbus, OH)

    1980-07-08

    A thermoelectric module containing lead telluride as the thermoelectric mrial is encapsulated as tightly as possible in a stainless steel canister to provide minimum void volume in the canister. The lead telluride thermoelectric elements are pressure-contacted to a tungsten hot strap and metallurgically bonded at the cold junction to iron shoes with a barrier layer of tin telluride between the iron shoe and the p-type lead telluride element.

  11. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cbiomass. Figure 1: Biomass Gasification to Power Process

  12. Fossil Power Plant Applications of Expert Systems: An EPRI Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Divakaruni, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    the role of expert systems in the electric power industry, with particular emphasis on six fossil power plant applications currently under development by the Electric Power Research Institute....

  13. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  14. Abstract-The Chilean Electricity Law introduced an obligation to power traders, from 2010 to 2014, to certify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    % thermoelectric system with coal fired, natural gas and diesel plants. Recent events concerning energy security composed by large hydro and thermoelectric power plants, mainly coal fired and natural gas. SING is a 100 to permit efficient access for renewable energies. One of these is the natural barrier to entry for new

  15. Strategies in tower solar power plant optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos, A

    2012-01-01

    A method for optimizing a central receiver solar thermal electric power plant is studied. We parametrize the plant design as a function of eleven design variables and reduce the problem of finding optimal designs to the numerical problem of finding the minimum of a function of several variables. This minimization problem is attacked with different algorithms both local and global in nature. We find that all algorithms find the same minimum of the objective function. The performance of each of the algorithms and the resulting designs are studied for two typical cases. We describe a method to evaluate the impact of design variables in the plant performance. This method will tell us what variables are key to the optimal plant design and which ones are less important. This information can be used to further improve the plant design and to accelerate the optimization procedure.

  16. Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New p-type and n-type multiple-rattler skutterudite thermoelectric materials design, synthesis, fabrication, and characterization for power generation using vehicle exhaust waste...

  17. Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT PRESIDINGMEMBER (06-SPPE-1) Imperial County NILAND GAS TURBINE PLANT PRESIDINGMEMBER Exemption (SPPE). The Energy Commission Committee assigned to the Niland Gas Turbine Plant Project

  18. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

  19. Modeling the thermoelectric properties of bulk and nanocomposite thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnich, Austin (Austin Jerome)

    2008-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials are materials which are capable of converting heat directly into electricity. They have long been used in specialized fields where high reliability is needed, such as space power generation. Recently, ...

  20. Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Philip Robert

    2012-01-01

    and thermoelectric power generation. Energy Conversion &assembled for optimal power generation and system efficiencySeebeck Voltage. The power generation efficiency will reach

  1. Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

  2. Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

  3. Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load SouthernCombined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

  4. SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

  5. Configuration management in nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    Configuration management (CM) is the process of identifying and documenting the characteristics of a facility's structures, systems and components of a facility, and of ensuring that changes to these characteristics are properly developed, assessed, approved, issued, implemented, verified, recorded and incorporated into the facility documentation. The need for a CM system is a result of the long term operation of any nuclear power plant. The main challenges are caused particularly by ageing plant technology, plant modifications, the application of new safety and operational requirements, and in general by human factors arising from migration of plant personnel and possible human failures. The IAEA Incident Reporting System (IRS) shows that on average 25% of recorded events could be caused by configuration errors or deficiencies. CM processes correctly applied ensure that the construction, operation, maintenance and testing of a physical facility are in accordance with design requirements as expressed in the d...

  6. NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery NSFDOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development for commercialization of...

  7. Enhanced Thermoelectric Power and Electronic Correlations in RuSe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A.M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-04-01

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru1-xIrxSe2 (x ? 0:2). RuSe2 is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe2 exceeds -200 ?#22;V/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru0.8Ir0.2Se2 shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb2.

  8. Wind Power Plant Voltage Stability Evaluation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2014-09-01

    Voltage stability refers to the ability of a power system to maintain steady voltages at all buses in the system after being subjected to a disturbance from a given initial operating condition. Voltage stability depends on a power system's ability to maintain and/or restore equilibrium between load demand and supply. Instability that may result occurs in the form of a progressive fall or rise of voltages of some buses. Possible outcomes of voltage instability are the loss of load in an area or tripped transmission lines and other elements by their protective systems, which may lead to cascading outages. The loss of synchronism of some generators may result from these outages or from operating conditions that violate a synchronous generator's field current limit, or in the case of variable speed wind turbine generator, the current limits of power switches. This paper investigates the impact of wind power plants on power system voltage stability by using synchrophasor measurements.

  9. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  10. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-10-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  11. Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant)

  12. Modeling of solar thermal selective surfaces and thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEnaney, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    A thermoelectric generator is a solid-state device that converts a heat flux into electrical power via the Seebeck effect. When a thermoelectric generator is inserted between a solar-absorbing surface and a heat sink, a ...

  13. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  14. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  15. Thermoelectric system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiners, Eric A. (Washington, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL); Fei, Dong (Peoria, IL); McGilvray, Andrew N. (East Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-30

    In one particular embodiment, an internal combustion engine is provided. The engine comprises a block, a head, a piston, a combustion chamber defined by the block, the piston, and the head, and at least one thermoelectric device positioned between the combustion chamber and the head. In this particular embodiment, the thermoelectric device is in direct contact with the combustion chamber. In another particular embodiment, a cylinder head configured to sit atop a cylinder bank of an internal combustion engine is provided. The cylinder head comprises a cooling channel configured to receive cooling fluid, valve seats configured for receiving intake and exhaust valves, and thermoelectric devices positioned around the valve seats.

  16. Coal Power Plant Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to: navigation, searchClover Hill HighPower Plant Database

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-08-13

    Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1985 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1985. This Report, which is updated annually, was prepared to respond to the numerous requests received by the Energy Information Administration for the data collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction.''

  18. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-24

    Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

  19. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  20. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  1. Sinem Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de Provence SASSinem Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  2. Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cinvolved in the gasification of biomass to produce gas are

  3. Thermoelectric generator for motor vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bass, John C. (6121 La Pintra Dr., La Jolla, CA 92037)

    1997-04-29

    A thermoelectric generator for producing electric power for a motor vehicle from the heat of the exhaust gasses produced by the engine of the motor vehicle. The exhaust gasses pass through a finned heat transfer support structure which has seat positions on its outside surface for the positioning of thermoelectric modules. A good contact cylinder provides a framework from which a spring force can be applied to the thermoelectric modules to hold them in good contact on their seats on the surface of the heat transfer support structure.

  4. COMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................. 14 Transmission Line Safety & Nuisance...................................................... 15 to review and license proposals to construct and operate large electric power plants, includingCOMMISSIONDECISION Small Power Plant Exemption (06-SPPE-2) Imperial County Order No: 07

  5. Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to...

  6. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  7. Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico Construction Underway on First Geothermal Power Plant in New Mexico September 10, 2008 - 4:38pm Addthis Photo of...

  8. California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand California Geothermal Power Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand September 20, 2012 - 1:15pm Addthis Ever...

  9. Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

    2007-01-01

    oxides (NO x ) from coal-fired electric power plants. InFGD Installations on Coal-Fired Plants, IEA Coal Research,control modeling of coal-fired power systems’, Journal of

  10. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

  11. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended...

  12. Power plant productivity improvement in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-03-01

    The New York Public Service Commission (PSC), under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE), began a joint program in September 1978 to improve the productivity of coal and nuclear electric generating units in New York State. The project had dual objectives: to ensure that the utilities in New York State have or develop a systematic permanent, cost-effective productivity improvement program based on sound engineering and economic considerations, and to develop a model program for Power Plant Productivity Improvement, which, through DOE, can also be utilized by other regulatory commissions in the country. To accomplish these objectives, the program was organized into the following sequence of activities: compilation and analysis of power plant performance data; evaluation and comparison of utility responses to outage/derating events; power plant productivity improvement project cost-benefit analysis; and evaluation of regulatory procedures and policies for improving productivity. The program that developed for improving the productivity of coal units is substantially different than for nuclear units. Each program is presented, and recommendations are made for activities of both the utilities and regulatory agencies which will promote improved productivity.

  13. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain in their power plants. This paper proposes significant extensions to the electric power supply chain network generators faced with a portfolio of power plant options and subject to pollution taxes. We then demonstrate

  14. Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

  15. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Water Quality and Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. geothermal power plants can easily meet federal, state, and local water quality and conservation standards.

  16. Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SUPERHEATING; THERMODYNAMICS; WELL TEMPERATURE; WELLHEADS; WESTERN REGION; HEATING; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POWER PLANTS; RESERVOIR TEMPERATURE;...

  17. Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    Hybrid Modeling and Control of a Hydroelectric Power Plant Giancarlo Ferrari-Trecate, Domenico,mignone,castagnoli,morari}@aut.ee.ethz.ch Abstract In this work we present the model of a hydroelectric power plant in the framework of Mixed Logic with a model predictive control scheme. 1 Introduction The outflow control for hydroelectric power plants

  18. Sensor Fault Detection in Power Plants Andrew Kusiak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Sensor Fault Detection in Power Plants Andrew Kusiak1 and Zhe Song2 Abstract: This paper presents models; Diagnosis; Combustion; Power plants; Probe instruments. Introduction Measurements in industrial and Soroush 2003 . Any false reading could lead to di- sastrous outcomes. In a coal-fired power plant, faulty

  19. POWER PLANT IMPACT ASSESSMENT: A SIMPLE FISHERY PRODUCTION MODEL APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POWER PLANT IMPACT ASSESSMENT: A SIMPLE FISHERY PRODUCTION MODEL APPROACH ALECD. MACCALL,' KEITHR power plant entrainment mortality as a fraction (Rc) of the abundance ofthat cohort in the absence of power plant impact can be calculated by Rc = exp (-Ejtj) wheretj is the duration oflife stagei, and

  20. THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    THE ARIES-CS COMPACT STELLARATOR FUSION POWER PLANT F. NAJMABADI* and A. R. RAFFRAY Center stellarator power plants, ARIES-CS, has been conducted to explore attrac- tive compact stellarator by earlier stellarator power plant studies had led to cost projections much higher than those of the advanced

  1. ASSESSMENT OF TOKAMAK PLASMA OPERATION MODES AS FUSION POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSMENT OF TOKAMAK PLASMA OPERATION MODES AS FUSION POWER PLANTS: THE STARLITE STUDY Farrokh of operation for a tokamak power plant and the critical plasma physics and technology issues. During for fusion power plants was made. Five different regimes of operation were considered: (1) steady

  2. Corrosion Investigations at Masned Combined Heat and Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction In Denmark, straw and other types of biomass are used for generating energy in power plants. StrawCorrosion Investigations at Masnedø Combined Heat and Power Plant Part VII Melanie Montgomery AT MASNEDØ COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT PART VII CONTENTS 1. Introduction

  3. Aalborg Universitet Remote and Centralized Monitoring of PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sera, Dezso

    Aalborg Universitet Remote and Centralized Monitoring of PV Power Plants Kopacz, Csaba; Spataru., & Kerekes, T. (2014). Remote and Centralized Monitoring of PV Power Plants. In Proceedings of the 14th from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Remote and Centralized Monitoring of PV Power Plants Csaba Kopacz

  4. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    hours for periods with high electricity tariff Sasolburg Gas Engine Power Plant 18 Wärtsila 34 SG statement · Gas engine power plant ­ 18 identical engines with generation capacity = 10 MW ­ Only 1Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Power Plant with Seasonal Electricity Tariffs Pedro M. Castro

  5. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    gas-cooled central receiver and a steam-cycle power plant.gas turbines or Rankine-cycle steam turbines in the solar power plant.gas temperature required for steam Figure 6-3 shows the flowsheet for an alternative solar power plant

  6. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

  7. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  8. Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

  9. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants Matthew Lave, Jansolar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output given a singleproduce a simulated power plant output. The WVM is validated

  10. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01

    2004. Experience curves for power plant emission controlassessments of fossil fuel power plants with CO 2 capturethe future cost of power plants with CO 2 capture Edward S.

  11. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

  12. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

  13. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants AEnergy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by

  14. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications Afor Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications by Melina

  15. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010, Graz,STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.heat transfer in solar thermal power plants utilizing phase

  16. A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

    2013-01-01

    Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants Matthew Lave, Jansimulating solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant output giventhe power output of a solar photovoltaic (PV) plant was

  17. An air-breathing, portable thermoelectric power generator based on a microfabricated silicon combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marton, Christopher Henry

    2011-01-01

    The global consumer demand for portable electronic devices is increasing. The emphasis on reducing size and weight has put increased pressure on the power density of available power storage and generation options, which ...

  18. Efficiency Improvement in an Over the Road Diesel Powered Engine System by the Application of Advanced Thermoelectric Systems Implemented in a Hybrid Configuration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hybridization of heavy-duty truck propulsion with thermoelectric generator and potential efficiency enhancement

  19. Germencik Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpen EnergyGermencik Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  20. Irem Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13RenewableIrem Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  1. Ndunga Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to:InformationNdunga Geothermal Power Plant Jump to:

  2. Niigata Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire: Energy ResourcesNiigata Geothermal Power Plant Jump

  3. Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Relative Movements for Design of Commodities in Nuclear Power Plants Javad Moslemian, Vice President, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC Nezar Abraham, Senior Associate II, Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent & Lundy LLC

  4. Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

    2013-01-01

    The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

  5. Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    Photo-Thermoelectric Effect at a Graphene Interface Junction Xiaodong Xu, Nathaniel M. Gabor increase at the cryogenic temperature as compared to room temperature. Assuming the thermoelectric power predictions. KEYWORDS Graphene, photocurrent, photo-thermoelectric effect D evices that convert photons

  6. Modular stellarator reactor: a fusion power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Heck, F.M.; Green, L.; Karbowski, J.S.; Murphy, J.H.; Tupper, R.B.; DeLuca, R.A.; Moazed, A.

    1983-07-01

    A comparative analysis of the modular stellarator and the torsatron concepts is made based upon a steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, reactor embodiment of each concept for use as a central electric-power station. Parametric tradeoff calculations lead to the selection of four design points for an approx. 4-GWt plant based upon Alcator transport scaling in l = 2 systems of moderate aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-aspect ratio. The four design points represent high-(0.08) and low-(0.04) beta versions of the modular stellarator and torsatron concepts. The physics basis of each design point is described together with supporting engineering and economic analyses. The primary intent of this study is the elucidation of key physics and engineering tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties with respect to the ultimate power reactor embodiment.

  7. Geek-Up[6.10.2011]: Thermoelectrics' Great Power, Key Ingredient...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    concentrate solar energy for power generation and recover waste heat from industrial processes. Controlled thermal conductivity can be applied to deep-space probes that use heat...

  8. Biomass power plant feedstock procurement: Modeling transportation cost zones and the potential for competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kizha., Anil R; Han, Han-Sup; Montgomery, Timothy; Hohl, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    transportation network Green Leaf Power plants Total* $Blue Lake Power and Green Leaf power plants have shut downElectric Company Green Leaf Power Pacific Gas & Electric

  9. Ryazan power plant feasibility study. Volume 2. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This study was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Ryazan Power Plant Joint Stock Company to assess the feasibility of rehabilitating the Ryazan Power Plant in Novomichurinsk, Russia. The scope of this study includes reviewing plant equipment and operations as well as making recommendations for upgrade to present day plant standards. The main emphasis of the report is on boiler analysis, but also includes all equipment from coal entering the plant to electrical power leaving the plant. This is the second of two volumes and is divided into the following sections: (C) Technical - Sections 6-18; (D) Commercial; (E) Socioeconomic Considerations; (F) Conclusions.

  10. Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes for Electric Power Supply Chains with Power Plants Anna Nagurney for the determination of optimal carbon taxes applied to electric power plants in the con- text of electric power supply portion of such policy inter- ventions directed at the electric power industry. The general framework

  11. Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

    2008-09-30

    A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

  12. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah (Sarah Omer)

    2010-01-01

    Post-combustion capture retrofits are expected to a near-term option for mitigating CO 2 emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. Much of the literature proposes using power from the existing coal plant and thermal ...

  13. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2015-12-22

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  14. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  15. Bibliography of the Maryland Power Plant Research Program, fifteenth edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, R.I.

    1994-02-01

    The Power Plant Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program to insure that demands for electric power would be met in a timely manner at a reasonable cost while assuring that the associated environmental impact would be acceptable. The scope of the Program extends to estimating the impact of proposed new generating facilities, evaluating the acceptability of proposed tranmission line routes, assessing the impact of existing generation facilities, and investigating generic issues related to power plant site evaluation and associated environmental and land use considerations. The bibliography is a compilation of all the studies performed for and or by the Power Plant and Environmental Review Division since its inception.

  16. Oscillation Damping: A Comparison of Wind and Photovoltaic Power Plant Capabilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Allen, A.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2014-07-01

    This work compares and contrasts strategies for providing oscillation damping services from wind power plants and photovoltaic power plants.

  17. Power plant rehabilitation in Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaglia, B.N. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Lecesne, E. [ABB Power Generation Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    Beginning in 1989, political revolution in the former Eastern block countries precipitated a period of economic transformation from a centrally planned to a market-oriented economy. Because energy is a vital factor of any economic development, rehabilitation of the region`s aging and polluting energy sector is essential to achieving economic stability and growth. Today Eastern Europe is among the most polluted regions in the world. This is due to the absence of effective environmental responsibility over the last 40 years. The European Community and other Western countries have focused on Eastern Europe as a significant world environmental problem, particularly the Black Triangle area. To meet this challenge the governments of Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany and others have embarked on various programs to rehabilitate the key power stations in the region. This paper will present the various aspects of power plant rehabilitation including the installation of new efficient turbine generators, new digital control systems, renovated power cycle equipment and modern efficient clean coal circulating fluidized bed technology. The paper focuses on this issue by using the Turow 2 x 235 MW rehabilitation project in Bogatynia, Poland as a case study. Included in the paper will be a discussion of a broad range of issues affecting rehabilitation including technical considerations, financial and commercial limitations and political aspects.

  18. Aalborg Universitet FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    of wind power has become significant, grid performance and stability is affected [3]-[5]. ThereforeAalborg Universitet FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants Adamczyk, Andrzej Grzegorz., Teodorescu, R., Rodriguez, P., & Mukerjee, R. N. (2010). FACTS Devices for Large Wind Power Plants

  19. Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

    2002-01-01

    Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

  20. High temperature thermoelectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moczygemba, Joshua E.; Biershcenk, James L.; Sharp, Jeffrey W.

    2014-09-23

    In accordance with one embodiment of the present disclosure, a thermoelectric device includes a plurality of thermoelectric elements that each include a diffusion barrier. The diffusion barrier includes a refractory metal. The thermoelectric device also includes a plurality of conductors coupled to the plurality of thermoelectric elements. The plurality of conductors include aluminum. In addition, the thermoelectric device includes at least one plate coupled to the plurality of thermoelectric elements using a braze. The braze includes aluminum.

  1. The 125 MW Upper Mahiao geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forte, N.

    1996-12-31

    The 125 MW Upper Mahiao power plant, the first geothermal power project to be financed under a Build-Own-Operate-and-Transfer (BOOT) arrangement in the Philippines, expected to complete its start-up testing in August of this year. This plant uses Ormat`s environmentally benign technology and is both the largest geothermal steam/binary combined cycle plant as well as the largest geothermal power plant utilizing air cooled condensers. The Ormat designed and constructed plant was developed under a fast track program, with some two years from the April 1994 contract signing through design, engineering, construction and startup. The plant is owned and operated by a subsidiary of CalEnergy Co., Inc. and supplies power to PNOC-Energy Development Corporation for the National Power Corporation (Napocor) national power grid in the Philippines.

  2. SUPERCRITICAL STEAM CYCLE FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Talbert, Robert J.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Filippov, Gennady A.; Bogojavlensky, Roald G.; Grishanin, Evgeny I.

    2005-07-01

    Revolutionary improvement of the nuclear plant safety and economy with light water reactors can be reached with the application of micro-fuel elements (MFE) directly cooled by a supercritical pressure light-water coolant-moderator. There are considerable advantages of the MFE as compared with the traditional fuel rods, such as: Using supercritical and superheated steam considerably increases the thermal efficiency of the Rankine cycle up to 44-45%. Strong negative coolant and void reactivity coefficients with a very short thermal delay time allow the reactor to shutdown quickly in the event of a reactivity or power excursion. Core melting and the creation of corium during severe accidents are impossible. The heat transfer surface area is larger by several orders of magnitude due to the small spherical dimensions of the MFE. The larger heat exchange surface significantly simplifies residual heat removal by natural convection and radiation from the core to a subsequent passive system of heat removal.

  3. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  4. Autonomous Control of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basher, H.

    2003-10-20

    A nuclear reactor is a complex system that requires highly sophisticated controllers to ensure that desired performance and safety can be achieved and maintained during its operations. Higher-demanding operational requirements such as reliability, lower environmental impacts, and improved performance under adverse conditions in nuclear power plants, coupled with the complexity and uncertainty of the models, necessitate the use of an increased level of autonomy in the control methods. In the opinion of many researchers, the tasks involved during nuclear reactor design and operation (e.g., design optimization, transient diagnosis, and core reload optimization) involve important human cognition and decisions that may be more easily achieved with intelligent methods such as expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Many experts in the field of control systems share the idea that a higher degree of autonomy in control of complex systems such as nuclear plants is more easily achievable through the integration of conventional control systems and the intelligent components. Researchers have investigated the feasibility of the integration of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and expert systems with the conventional control methods to achieve higher degrees of autonomy in different aspects of reactor operations such as reactor startup, shutdown in emergency situations, fault detection and diagnosis, nuclear reactor alarm processing and diagnosis, and reactor load-following operations, to name a few. With the advancement of new technologies and computing power, it is feasible to automate most of the nuclear reactor control and operation, which will result in increased safety and economical benefits. This study surveys current status, practices, and recent advances made towards developing autonomous control systems for nuclear reactors.

  5. Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

  6. The ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study Kessel, C. E Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Tillak, M. S Univ. of California, San...

  7. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    such as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and costsuch as annualized capital costs, variable costs, and costintercept is the annualized capital cost of the power plant,

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    to produce electricity by concentrating solar energy andcol- lected solar energy must be converted into electricitysolar power plant without energy storage for nighttime generation produces electricity

  9. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

  10. New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

  11. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

  12. N.R. 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; HEAT...

  13. Optimizing a Hybrid Energy Storage System for a Virtual Power Plant for Improved Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teodorescu, Remus

    Optimizing a Hybrid Energy Storage System for a Virtual Power Plant for Improved Wind Power approach to find two optimum energy storages (ESs) to build a hybrid system which is part of a virtual power plant. In this paper it means the combination of the hybrid energy storage system and wind power

  14. Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the heat recovery steam generator powers an additional steam turbine, providing extra electricBiennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Gas Turbine Power Plant Planning Assumptions October 17, 2006 Simple- and combined-cycle gas turbine power plants fuelled by natural gas are among the bulk

  15. NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: High-Performance Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: High-Performance Thermoelectric...

  16. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean. Components and operation of a nuclear power plant (2 lectures) 7. Hydroelectric power (1 lecture) 8

  17. Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power...

  18. Salton Sea Power Plant Recognized as Most Innovative Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The first power plant to be built in the Salton Sea area in 20 years was recognized in December by Power Engineering magazine as the most innovative geothermal project of the year....

  19. DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant to Vyborg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshcheev, L. A.; Shul'ginov, N. G.

    2011-05-15

    DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant (LAES) to city of Vyborg is proposed. This will provide a comprehensive solution to several important problems in the development and control of the unified power system (EES) of Russia.

  20. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Laboratory Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units,...

  1. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    unit in an over-the-road truck system. schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  2. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review and Peer Evaluation ace049schock2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  3. Assessment of the Effect of Different Isolation Systems on Seismic Response of a Nuclear Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jenna

    2014-01-01

    Diesel Generators." Nuclear Power International MagazineIsolation Structure for Nuclear Power Plant, Japan ElectricIsolation System for Nuclear Power Plants, JEAG 4614-2000,

  4. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Coreysystems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems.

  5. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant Richard Kemp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant Richard Kemp Gonville and Caius College University, The Hunting Of The Snark #12;Abstract Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react by the surrounding material struc- ture of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling

  6. Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal Maintenance Scheduling of a Gas Engine Power Plant Pedro M. Castro Ignacio E. Grossmann MILP starting from GDP model September 4-5 2EWO Fall Meeting 2013 Problem statement · Gas Engine Power Plant Project in Sasolburg (SGEPP) ­ 18 identical gas engines consuming natural gas & producing

  7. Baca geothermal demonstration project. Power plant detail design document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This Baca Geothermal Demonstration Power Plant document presents the design criteria and detail design for power plant equipment and systems, as well as discussing the rationale used to arrive at the design. Where applicable, results of in-house evaluations of alternatives are presented.

  8. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1991-12-31

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results.

  9. Nuclear power plant status diagnostics using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartlett, E.B. (Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    In this work, the nuclear power plant operating status recognition issue is investigated using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The objective is to train an ANN to classify nuclear power plant accident conditions and to assess the potential of future work in the area of plant diagnostics with ANNS. To this end, an ANN was trained to recognize normal operating conditions as well as potentially unsafe conditions based on nuclear power plant training simulator generated accident scenarios. These scenarios include; hot and cold leg loss of coolant, control rod ejection, loss of offsite power, main steam line break, main feedwater line break and steam generator tube leak accidents. Findings show that ANNs can be used to diagnose and classify nuclear power plant conditions with good results.

  10. Modeling of concentrating solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng

    The conversion of solar power into electricity is dominated by non-concentrating photovoltaics and concentrating solar thermal systems. Recently, it has been shown that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are a viable ...

  11. Heat Transfer in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zhiting

    Solid-state thermoelectric devices are currently used in applications ranging from thermocouple sensors to power generators in space missions, to portable air-conditioners and refrigerators. With the ever-rising demand ...

  12. Analysis of pure electrical and cogeneration steam power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albar, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    General Electric's method of steam turbine performance was used with pure electrical and with cogeneration power plants at various flow rates. Comparisons were made for two cases: (1) the same amount of heat is added to each boiler and the amount of electrical power generated is compared; and (2) when each plant should produce the same amount of electric power and the amount of heat added to each boiler is compared. Cogeneration is energetically more efficient than pure electrical plant. Correlations for the dependence of heat rate, power generated, heat added to throttle flow ratio were obtained from this work.

  13. Simulating solar power plant variability : a review of current methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lave, Matthew; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua S.

    2013-06-01

    It is important to be able to accurately simulate the variability of solar PV power plants for grid integration studies. We aim to inform integration studies of the ease of implementation and application-specific accuracy of current PV power plant output simulation methods. This report reviews methods for producing simulated high-resolution (sub-hour or even sub-minute) PV power plant output profiles for variability studies and describes their implementation. Two steps are involved in the simulations: estimation of average irradiance over the footprint of a PV plant and conversion of average irradiance to plant power output. Six models are described for simulating plant-average irradiance based on inputs of ground-measured irradiance, satellite-derived irradiance, or proxy plant measurements. The steps for converting plant-average irradiance to plant power output are detailed to understand the contributions to plant variability. A forthcoming report will quantify the accuracy of each method using application-specific validation metrics.

  14. Ryazan power plant feasibility study. Volume 1. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This study was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Ryazan Power Plant Joint Stock Company to assess the feasibility of rehabilitating the Ryazan Power Plant in Novomichurinsk, Russia. The scope of this study includes reviewing plant equipment and operations as well as making recommendations for upgrade to present day plant standards. The main emphasis of the report is on boiler analysis, but also includes all equipment from coal entering the plant to electrical power leaving the plant. This is the first of two volumes and is divided into the following sections: (A) Abstract; (B) Evaluation of Alternative Technologies; (C) Technical: Section 1- Coal Handling, Section 2- Feeders and Pulverizers, Section 3- Boiler, Section 4- Ash Handling, Section 5- Electrostatic Precipitator.

  15. Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feser, Joseph Patrick

    2010-01-01

    thermoelectric materials consisting of epitaxially-grownefficient thermoelectric materials," Nature, vol. 451, pp.superlattice thermoelectric materials and devices," Science,

  16. Vehicular Applications of Thermoelectrics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicular Applications of Thermoelectrics Overivew of DOE projects developing thermoelectric generators for engine waste heat utilization and vehiclular thermoelectric...

  17. Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

  18. Methodology and application of surrogate plant PRA analysis to the Rancho Seco Power Plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, B.F.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1987-07-01

    This report presents the development and the first application of generic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) information for identifying systems and components important to public risk at nuclear power plants lacking plant-specific PRAs. A methodology is presented for using the results of PRAs for similar (surrogate) plants, along with plant-specific information about the plant of interest and the surrogate plants, to infer important failure modes for systems of the plant of interest. This methodology, and the rationale on which it is based, is presented in the context of its application to the Rancho Seco plant. The Rancho Seco plant has been analyzed using PRA information from two surrogate plants. This analysis has been used to guide development of considerable plant-specific information about Rancho Seco systems and components important to minimizing public risk, which is also presented herein.

  19. Energy-Harvesting Thermoelectric Sensing for Unobtrusive Water and Appliance Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Energy-Harvesting Thermoelectric Sensing for Unobtrusive Water and Appliance Metering Bradford that meters using the same thermoelectric generator with which it powers itself. In short, the rate at which be harvested with a thermoelectric generator (TEG) to power a sensor node. TEGs utilize the Seebeck effect

  20. Preconstruction of the Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-30

    The work undertaken under this Contract is the prosecution of the preconstruction activities, including preliminary engineering design, well field development, completion of environmental review and prosecution of permits, and the economic and financial analysis of the facility. The proposed power plant is located in northeastern California in Lassen County, approximately 25 miles east of the town of Susanville. The power plant will use a combination of wood residue and geothermal fluids for power generation. The plant, when fully constructed, will generate a combined net output of approximately 33 megawatts which will be sold to Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGandE) under existing long-term power sales contracts. Transfer of electricity to the PGandE grid will require construction of a 22-mile transmission line from the power plant to Susanville. 11 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Rehabilitation and life extension -- Vojany fossil power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudlovsk, J.

    1998-07-01

    The article briefly describes an example of two plants' unit's rehabilitation and reconstruction, which operate in the Slovak Republic power system. The goals to be achieved for these power plants: enable further operation of the power plants (EVO 1, EVO 2) as the significant electricity supply elements in the Eastern part of the Slovak Republic and at the same time as important power plants which are able to meet primary and secondary power output demands and frequency regulation demands; assure the EVO units compliance with the new environmental legislation valid in the Slovak Republic for air quality protection; trends of the expected emission and nominal emission amount is shown; upgrade the unit's obsolete control system for the boilers.

  2. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices at the Army Research Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Army interests in thermoelectrics include integrated TE-hand-held burners for battery-replacement, waste-heat recovery on vehicles, heat-powered mobile units, and for thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for surveillance

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this MIT project, funded by SunShot, for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2012.

  4. Magnetic Detection of Microstructure Change in Power Plant Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yardley, Victoria Anne

    2003-07-12

    energy by a system of turbines and a generator. Figure 2.1 shows the route followed by the steam and water. Water is pumped into the boiler and converted to steam, then superheated. It is injected through nozzles onto the blades of the high pressure (HP... . – 2 – Chapter 2 Microstructural Evolution in Power Plant Steels 2.1 Power plant operation In power plant, heat energy from fuel combustion or nuclear fission is used to produce jets of steam. The kinetic energy of the steam is converted to electrical...

  5. Los Alamos Nuclear Plant Analyzer: an interactive power-plant simulation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinke, R.; Booker, C.; Giguere, P.; Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.; Turner, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a computer-software interface for executing the TRAC or RELAP5 power-plant systems codes. The NPA is designed to use advanced supercomputers, long-distance data communications, and a remote workstation terminal with interactive computer graphics to analyze power-plant thermal-hydraulic behavior. The NPA interface simplifies the running of these codes through automated procedures and dialog interaction. User understanding of simulated-plant behavior is enhanced through graphics displays of calculational results. These results are displayed concurrently with the calculation. The user has the capability to override the plant's modeled control system with hardware-adjustment commands. This gives the NPA the utility of a simulator, and at the same time, the accuracy of an advanced, best-estimate, power-plant systems code for plant operation and safety analysis.

  6. A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 microW of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 microWcc, which is denser than any system...

  7. Thermo-electrically pumped semiconductor light emitting diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santhanam, Parthiban

    2014-01-01

    Thermo-electric heat exchange in semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs) allows these devices to emit optical power in excess of the electrical power used to drive them, with the remaining power drawn from ambient heat. ...

  8. On the form of the power equation for modeling solar chimney power plant systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fathi, Nima; Vorobieff, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recently several mathematical models of a solar chimney power plant were derived, studied for a variety of boundary conditions, and compared against CFD calculations. The importance of these analyses is about the accuracy of the derived pressure drop and output power equation for solar chimney power plant systems (SCPPS). We examine the assumptions underlying the derivation and present reasons to believe that some of the derived equations, specifically the power equation in this model, may require a correction to be applicable in more realistic conditions. The analytical resutls are compared against the available experimental data from the Manzanares power plant.

  9. Use of neurals networks in nuclear power plant diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    A technique using neural networks as a means of diagnosing transients or abnormal conditions in nuclear power plants is investigated and found to be feasible. The technique is based on the fact that each physical state of the plant can be represented by a unique pattern of sensor outputs or instrument readings that can be related to the condition of the plant. Neural networks are used to relate this pattern to the fault, problem, or transient condition of the plant. A demonstration of the ability of this technique to identify causes of perturbations in the steam generator of a nuclear plant is presented. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  11. The Guy at the Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant Efficiency July 2007Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant E ciency James B.on the fuel e ciency of power plants. Although electricity

  12. Biomass power plant feedstock procurement: Modeling transportation cost zones and the potential for competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kizha., Anil R; Han, Han-Sup; Montgomery, Timothy; Hohl, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    network Green Leaf Power plants Total* $10/BDT Total Milesor exclusive for each power plant and TCZ. † Total areaof timberlands for each power plant within the $20/BDT TCZ (

  13. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Different types of solar power plants have been designed andAmong the concentrating solar power plants (CSPP) are Solar

  14. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01

    of power plant emissions of greenhouse gases, and thee) power plant FGD and SCR systems; also, (f) gas turbineno IGCC power plant has yet combined CO 2 capture with a gas

  15. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

  16. Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yungang

    2014-01-01

    Effect of the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urbanof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambientof the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant on ambient

  17. Microbial activities in forest soils exposed to chronic depositions from a lignite power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klose, Susanne; Wernecke, K D; Makeschin, F

    2004-01-01

    around a coal-burning power plant: a case study in the Czechdepositions from a lignite power plant Susanne Klose 1* ,DEPOSITIONS FROM A LIGNITE POWER PLANT Susanne Klose 1* ,

  18. Effect of the shutdown of a large coal fired power plant on ambient mercury species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yungang

    2014-01-01

    the shutdown of a coal-fired power plant on urban ultrafineof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury speciesof a large coal-fired power plant on ambient mercury species

  19. Use of experience curves to estimate the future cost of power plants with CO2 capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Antes, Matt; Berkenpas, Michael; Davison, John

    2007-01-01

    systems at a new coal-fired power plant in the U.S. (500 MW,capture systems at coal-?red power plants (Fig. 2). Fig. 4 –systems installed at coal-?red power plants. Lower component

  20. Power plant cumulative environmental impact report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    This report presents the results of studies conducted by the Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) to determine the cumulative impact of power plants on Maryland's environment. Included in this report are: (1) current and projected power demands and consumption in Maryland; (2) current and planned power generation; (3) air impacts; (4) aquatic effects; (5) radiological effects; (6) social and economic considerations; (7) noise impacts; (8) groundwater effects; (9) solid waste management concerns; (10) transmission line impacts; and (11) descriptions of cooling towers in Maryland. Also contained is the 1982 Ten Year Plan of Maryland Electric Utilities.

  1. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofsolar energy and collecting the resulting thermal energy inBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-

  2. THE ARIES ADVANCED AND CONSERVATIVE TOKAMAK POWER PLANT STUDY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE ARIES ADVANCED AND CONSERVATIVE TOKAMAK POWER PLANT STUDY C. E. KESSEL, a * M. S. TILLACK, b F. NAJMABADI, b F. M. POLI, a K. GHANTOUS, a N. GORELENKOV, a X. R. WANG, b D....

  3. ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, John E.

    ADVANCED POWER PLANT MODELING WITH APPLICATIONS TO THE ADVANCED BOILING WATER REACTOR AND THE HEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor - General Description . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1 Modifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ii #12;4. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4

  4. Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

    2012-12-11

    sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

  5. Intelligent User Interfaces for Expert System Applications in Power Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frogner, B.

    1989-01-01

    the end-user with all the capabilities still available. An expert system for diagnosis of heat rate degradation in power plants is discussed to illustrate the utility of the approach....

  6. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements can support Clean Air Act regulations LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 19, 2014-Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from two coal-fired power plants in the Four...

  7. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  8. North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW; Additional Operations Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site:...

  9. The Industrial Power Plant Management System - An Engineering Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aarnio, S. E.; Tarvainen, H. J.; Tinnis, V.

    1979-01-01

    Based on energy studies in over 70 plants in the forest products industry, experience has shown that, in addition to process improvements, the most important energy conservation measures in mill power departments are: - Load shedding and fuel...

  10. Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Power Variability, Its Cost, and Effect on Power Plant Emissions A Dissertation Submitted The recent growth in wind power is transforming the operation of electricity systems by introducing. As a result, system operators are learning in real-time how to incorporate wind power and its variability

  11. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, D.; Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.

    1995-05-23

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant is described including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production. 1 figure.

  12. Hybrid solar central receiver for combined cycle power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Williams, Thomas A. (Arvada, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid combined cycle power plant including a solar central receiver for receiving solar radiation and converting it to thermal energy. The power plant includes a molten salt heat transfer medium for transferring the thermal energy to an air heater. The air heater uses the thermal energy to preheat the air from the compressor of the gas cycle. The exhaust gases from the gas cycle are directed to a steam turbine for additional energy production.

  13. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak fusion power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This volume contains chapters on each of the following topics: (1) radioactivity, (2) heat transport and energy conversion, (3) tritium systems, (4) electrical storage and power supplies, (5) support structure, (6) cryogenics, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) maintenance and operation, (9) balance of plant design, (10) safety and environmental analysis, (11) economic analysis, and (12) plant construction.

  14. Novel Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  15. Inertial Fusion Power Plant Concept of Operations and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T.; Knutson, B.; Dunne, A. M.; Kasper, J.; Sheehan, T.; Lang, D.; Roberts, V.; Mau, D.

    2015-01-15

    Parsons and LLNL scientists and engineers performed design and engineering work for power plant pre-conceptual designs based on the anticipated laser fusion demonstrations at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Work included identifying concepts of operations and maintenance (O&M) and associated requirements relevant to fusion power plant systems analysis. A laser fusion power plant would incorporate a large process and power conversion facility with a laser system and fusion engine serving as the heat source, based in part on some of the systems and technologies advanced at NIF. Process operations would be similar in scope to those used in chemical, oil refinery, and nuclear waste processing facilities, while power conversion operations would be similar to those used in commercial thermal power plants. While some aspects of the tritium fuel cycle can be based on existing technologies, many aspects of a laser fusion power plant presents several important and unique O&M requirements that demand new solutions. For example, onsite recovery of tritium; unique remote material handling systems for use in areas with high radiation, radioactive materials, or high temperatures; a five-year fusion engine target chamber replacement cycle with other annual and multi-year cycles anticipated for major maintenance of other systems, structures, and components (SSC); and unique SSC for fusion target waste recycling streams. This paper describes fusion power plant O&M concepts and requirements, how O&M requirements could be met in design, and how basic organizational and planning issues can be addressed for a safe, reliable, economic, and feasible fusion power plant.

  16. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  17. Overall Power Core Configuration and System Integration for ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant , M.S. Tillack1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overall Power Core Configuration and System Integration for ARIES-ACT1 Fusion Power Plant X.R. Wang Consulting, Fliederweg 3, D 76351 Linkenheim-Hochstetten, GERMANY, smalang@web.de ARIES-ACT1 power plant has of the fusion power plant, the power core components of a sector, including the inboard and outboard FW

  18. Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Alic

    2011-01-01

    effective media theories for electrical conductivity andDesign theory of thermoelectric modules for electrical powerfact, many of the theories on the electrical conductivity of

  19. NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development for commercialization of automotive thermoelectric generators from high-ZT TE materials with using low-cost, widely available materials, system design and modeling to maximize temperature differential across TE modules and maximize power output

  20. Radioisotope Power System Delivery, Ground Support and Nuclear Safety Implementation: Use of the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Johnson; K.L. Lively; C.C. Dwight

    2014-07-01

    Radioisotope power systems have been used for over 50 years to enable missions in remote or hostile environments. They are a convenient means of supplying a few milliwatts up to a few hundred watts of useable, long-term electrical power. With regard to use of a radioisotope power system, the transportation, ground support and implementation of nuclear safety protocols in the field is a complex process that requires clear identification of needed technical and regulatory requirements. The appropriate care must be taken to provide high quality treatment of the item to be moved so it arrives in a condition to fulfill its missions in space. Similarly it must be transported and managed in a manner compliant with requirements for shipment and handling of special nuclear material. This presentation describes transportation, ground support operations and implementation of nuclear safety and security protocols for a radioisotope power system using recent experience involving the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Mars Science Laboratory, which launched in November of 2011.

  1. Use of expert systems in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The application of technologies, particularly expert systems, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, there are a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) in which expert systems can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of overall plant and corporate operations. This document presents a number of potential applications of expert systems in the nuclear power field. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Winter study of power plant effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrinos, A.A.N.

    1980-10-01

    As a part of DOE's Meteorological Effects of Thermal Energy Releases (METER) program a field study was undertaken at the Bowen Electric Generating Plant (Plant Bowen) in December 1979. The study was a joint endeavor of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the main objective of determining the effects of the plant's smokestack effluents on aerosol characteristics and precipitation chemistry. Other objectives included studies of cooling tower temperature and humidity (T/h) plumes and drift drop concentrations. Conducted over a period of three weeks, the study involved an instrumented aircraft, pilot balloons, a tethered balloon system, a dense network of wetfall chemistry collectors and numerous ground- and tower-based meteorological instruments. Rainfall samples collected during the precipitation event of December 13, 1979, revealed some evidence of plume washout. The tethered balloon flights rarely detected the faint presence of the T/h plumes while the airborne measurements program concentrated on the study of SO/sub 2/ to sulfate conversion. A series of plume observations confirmed the suitability of the plant's windset for plume direction determinations.

  3. EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    . Environmental impact of electric generation (3 lectures) 9. Advanced energy conversion systems (geothermalEEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description: Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean

  4. Visual Sensitivity of River Recreation to Power Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the sensitivity of river-related recreational activities to visual intrusion by large coal-fired power plants is determined for each landscape type. These visual absorption values are then mapped along the case study river The State of Minnesota anticipates the construction of a considerable number of large new coal-fired power

  5. Wind Power Plant Prediction by Using Neural Networks: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z.; Gao, W.; Wan, Y. H.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-08-01

    This paper introduces a method of short-term wind power prediction for a wind power plant by training neural networks based on historical data of wind speed and wind direction. The model proposed is shown to achieve a high accuracy with respect to the measured data.

  6. Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turpin, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

  7. Some aspects of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stritar, A.; Mavko, B.; Susnik, J.; Sarler, B. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1993-02-01

    In the summer of 1991, the Krsko nuclear power plant in Slovenia found itself in an area of military operations. This was probably the first commercial nuclear power plant to have been threatened by an attack by fighter jets. A number of never-before-asked questions had to be answered by the operating staff and supporting organizations. Some aspects of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions are described, such as the selection of the best plant operating state before the attack and the determination of plant system vulnerability and dose releases from the potentially damaged spent fuel in the spent-fuel pit. The best operating mode to which the plant should be brought before the attack is cold shutdown, and radiological consequences to the environment after the spent fuel is damaged and the water in the pit is lost are not very high. The problem of nuclear power plant safety under war conditions should be addressed in more detail in the future.

  8. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  9. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Richard

    has been published in the Journal of Nuclear Materials, or has been submitted for publication in the proceed- ings of the 12th International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials and Energy Materials. Richard Kemp August 8, 2006 Acknowledgements I... control systems and plant engineering (the to-be-built International Thermonuclear 3 2.2 The first-wall environment Experimental Reactor, ITER) to run concurrently with a fusion-spectrum material ir- radiation facility (the International Fusion Materials...

  10. Tracking new coal-fired power plants: coal's resurgence in electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-05-01

    This information package is intended to provide an overview of 'Coal's resurgence in electric power generation' by examining proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under consideration in the USA. The results contained in this package are derived from information that is available from various tracking organizations and news groups. Although comprehensive, this information is not intended to represent every possible plant under consideration but is intended to illustrate the large potential that exists for new coal-fired power plants. It should be noted that many of the proposed plants are likely not to be built. For example, out of a total portfolio (gas, coal, etc.) of 500 GW of newly planned power plant capacity announced in 2001, 91 GW have been already been scrapped or delayed. 25 refs.

  11. Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta Electric Power AssnDelugeDemarest,

  12. The parabolic trough power plants Andasol 1 to 3 The largest solar power plants in the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    only be achieved through the extensive use of renewable energy sources. Each year, the sun sends over for power generation and solar-thermal collectors for producing hot water. The solar- thermal principle i from the sun into electricity. This is done in large-scale power plants with a capacity of up to 250

  13. Chin. Phys. B Vol. 20, No. 10 (2011) 107301 Measuring thermoelectric property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    2011-01-01

    Chin. Phys. B Vol. 20, No. 10 (2011) 107301 Measuring thermoelectric property of nano May 2011) A method of measuring the thermoelectric power of nano-heterostructures based on four of a tungsten­indium tip, the precise control of the tip-sample contact and the identification of thermoelectric

  14. Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties of Solution Grown Bi2Te3-xSex Nanoplatelet Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, Qihua

    Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties of Solution Grown Bi2Te3-xSex Nanoplatelet Composites Ajay Soni on the enhanced thermoelectric properties of selenium (Se) doped bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3-xSex) nanoplatelet (NP transport measure- ments, we show that both the thermoelectric power S (-259 V/K) and the figure of merit ZT

  15. Thermoelectric Rotating Torus for Fusion A. B. Hassam and Yi-Min Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassam, Adil

    Thermoelectric Rotating Torus for Fusion A. B. Hassam and Yi-Min Huang Institute for Plasma power maintains the rotation and also heats the plasma. The thermoelectric effect from the resultingRevLett.91.195002 PACS numbers: 52.58.­c, 52.30.­q, 52.55.­s In magnetized plasma, thermoelectric currents

  16. Large thermoelectric figure of merit in Si1-xGex nanowires Lihong Shi,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baowen

    Large thermoelectric figure of merit in Si1-xGex nanowires Lihong Shi,1 Donglai Yao,1 Gang Zhang,2 transport equation, we investigate composition effects on the thermoelectric properties of silicon thermoelectric figure of merit ZT Refs. 1­4 due to both enhancement in the power factor through increasing

  17. Hierarchically structured TiO2 for Ba-filled skutterudite with enhanced thermoelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Hierarchically structured TiO2 for Ba-filled skutterudite with enhanced thermoelectric performance be considered. Thermoelectric (TE) materials are a very good candidate to achieve a more efficient usage performance of a thermoelectric material is governed by its power factor P ¼ S2 s. The challenge to develop

  18. www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 thermoelectric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 91, No. 334 Modeling thermoelectric. Thermoelectric devices have the advantage of containing no moving parts, making them quiet, durable and reliable that thermoelectric devic- es can compete with traditional refrigeration and power generation technologies.1

  19. Thermoelectric figure of merit calculations for semiconducting nanowires Jane E. Cornett1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Thermoelectric figure of merit calculations for semiconducting nanowires Jane E. Cornett1 and Oded 2011 A model for the thermoelectric properties of nanowires was used to demonstrate the contrasting influences of quantization and degeneracy on the thermoelectric power factor. The prevailing notion

  20. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals.

  1. Clean Power Plan: Reducing Carbon Pollution From Existing Power Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremer,K.

    2014-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-KT-14-11-20.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7502 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-KT-14-11-20.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CLEAN POWER PLAN Reducing... improvements Co-firing or switching to natural gas Coal retirements Retrofit CCS (e.g.,WA Parish in Texas) 2. Use lower-emitting power sources more Dispatch changes to existing natural gas combined cycle (CC) Dispatch changes to existing natural gas CC 3...

  2. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  3. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  4. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  5. EEE 598 27074 Power Plant Control & Monitoring This class deals with the Dynamics, Control, and Operations of Electric Power Systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    drives - constant / adjustable speed Power plant characteristics Steam plants - turbine dynamics - boiler configurations, dynamics, controls Gas turbines - control fundamentals - operational limits, constraints

  6. Capture-Ready Power Plants -Options, Technologies and Economics Mark C. Bohm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Capture-Ready Power Plants - Options, Technologies and Economics by Mark C. Bohm Bachelor and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Capture-ready Power Plants ­ Options, Technologies and Costs by Mark C. Bohm of a plant. Power plant owners and policymakers are interested in capture-ready plants because they may offer

  7. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naser, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  8. Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Presentation given at the 16th...

  9. Yamagawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard PowerWyandanch, New1991)Yalesville,YamagawaYamagawa

  10. Yangbajain Geothrmal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard PowerWyandanch,Yamhill,

  11. Electric power plant emissions and public health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, A.B.; Roy, C.

    2008-02-15

    The generation of electric power is one important source of pollutants such as mercury, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and fine particulate matter that can affect the respiratory, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and cause pregnancy complications. But protecting people from environmental health hazards has become increasingly complex. Air pollutants are often invisible and travel many miles virtually undetected. Nurses can play a critical role in preventive strategies, as well as in the national debate on energy production and dependence on fossil fuels.

  12. Rotokawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan: EnergyRocklinRohmRoshniRotokawa Geothermal Power

  13. Simulation and Optimization on Power Plant Operation Using SEGA's EOP Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of a cogeneration power plant is complicated. The Energy Optimization Program (EOP, software made by SEGA, Inc.) was designed to simulate and optimize the operation of TAMU power plant. All major plant components were represented...

  14. Simulation and Optimization on Power Plant Operation Using Sega's EOP Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of a cogeneration power plant is complicated. The Energy Optimization Program (EOP, software made by SEGA, Inc.) was designed to simulate and optimize the operation of TAMU power plant. All major plant components were represented...

  15. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

  16. Can New Nuclear Power Plants be Project Financed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Simon

    plant & desalination plant 2007 2.8 Calyon, Citigroup, SMBC Abu Dhabi Water & Electricity Authority, International Power, Marubeni Sakhalin II, Russia Liquefied natural gas & oil development 2008 5.3 Japan Bank for International Cooperation... lenders. This third party would therefore need to be highly creditworthy, or receive guarantees from export credit agencies or similar state- backed entities. 3 http://www.horizonnuclearpower.com/ EPRG...

  17. Pailas Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program |View New Pages Recent Changes AllPailas Geothermal Power

  18. Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories81TowardsTracking Living Cells as

  19. Addressing employee concerns about welding in a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Hansen, D.D.; O'Leary, P.D.

    1988-03-01

    A leading utility contracted with EG and G Idaho to perform a comprehensive, independent evaluation of the utility's welding program with respect to the safety-related welds made at one of its nuclear power plants. The purpose of this paper is to review a number of the employee concerns and the technical basis for the disposition of these concerns. In addition, recommendations are presented that may help to prevent the recurrence of employee concerns in future nuclear power plant construction, and thereby costly delays may be avoided and welding productivity and quality improved.

  20. Neural networks and their application to nuclear power plant diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

    1997-10-01

    The authors present a survey of artificial neural network-based computer systems that have been proposed over the last decade for the detection and identification of component faults in thermal-hydraulic systems of nuclear power plants. The capabilities and advantages of applying neural networks as decision support systems for nuclear power plant operators and their inherent characteristics are discussed along with their limitations and drawbacks. The types of neural network structures used and their applications are described and the issues of process diagnosis and neural network-based diagnostic systems are identified. A total of thirty-four publications are reviewed.

  1. Using auxiliary gas power for CCS energy needs in retrofitted coal power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashadi, Sarah O.

    Adding post-combustion capture technology to existing coal-fired power plants is being considered as a near-term option for mitigating CO[subscript 2] emissions. To supply the thermal energy needed for CO[subscript 2] ...

  2. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  3. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  4. Greenhouse Gas emissions from California Geothermal Power Plants

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    2014-03-14

    The information given in this file represents GHG emissions and corresponding emission rates for California flash and dry steam geothermal power plants. This stage of the life cycle is the fuel use component of the fuel cycle and arises during plant operation. Despite that no fossil fuels are being consumed during operation of these plants, GHG emissions nevertheless arise from GHGs present in the geofluids and dry steam that get released to the atmosphere upon passing through the system. Data for the years of 2008 to 2012 are analyzed.

  5. Intelligent Component Monitoring for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefteri Tsoukalas

    2010-07-30

    Reliability and economy are two major concerns for a nuclear power generation system. Next generation nuclear power reactors are being developed to be more reliable and economic. An effective and efficient surveillance system can generously contribute toward this goal. Recent progress in computer systems and computational tools has made it necessary and possible to upgrade current surveillance/monitoring strategy for better performance. For example, intelligent computing techniques can be applied to develop algorithm that help people better understand the information collected from sensors and thus reduce human error to a new low level. Incidents incurred from human error in nuclear industry are not rare and have been proven costly. The goal of this project is to develop and test an intelligent prognostics methodology for predicting aging effects impacting long-term performance of nuclear components and systems. The approach is particularly suitable for predicting the performance of nuclear reactor systems which have low failure probabilities (e.g., less than 10-6 year-). Such components and systems are often perceived as peripheral to the reactor and are left somewhat unattended. That is, even when inspected, if they are not perceived to be causing some immediate problem, they may not be paid due attention. Attention to such systems normally involves long term monitoring and possibly reasoning with multiple features and evidence, requirements that are not best suited for humans.

  6. Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current., ... Kjær, P. C. (2013). HVDC Connected Offshore Wind Power Plants: Review and Outlook of Current Research Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants

  7. Quiz: Know Your Power Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your Power Plants Quiz: Know Your Power

  8. Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

  9. Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof

    2010-04-15

    Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key functionality of a virtual power plant is to increase the value of the produced power by clustering different plants. The first step of the optimisation concerns the local operation of the individual power generator, the second step is to calculate the contribution to the virtual power plant. With small extensions the suggested MILP algorithm can be used for an overall EEX (European Energy Exchange) optimised management of clustered CHP systems in form of the virtual power plant. This algorithm has been used to control cogeneration plants within a distribution grid. (author)

  10. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  11. Safeguard Requirements for Fusion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston and Alexander Glaser

    2012-08-10

    Nuclear proliferation risks from magnetic fusion energy associated with access to fissile materials can be divided into three main categories: 1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, 2) covert production and diversion of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and 3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state openly produces fissile material in violation of international agreements. The degree of risk in each of these categories is assessed, taking into account both state and non-state actors, and it is found that safeguards are required for fusion energy to be highly attractive from a non-proliferation standpoint. Specific safeguard requirements and R&D needs are outlined for each category of risk, and the technical capability of the ITER experiment, under construction, to contribute to this R&D is noted. A preliminary analysis indicates a potential legal pathway for fusion power systems to be brought under the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. "Vertical" proliferation risks associated with tritium and with the knowledge that can be gained from inertial fusion energy R&D are outlined.

  12. Analysis of nuclear power plant component failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Items are shown that have caused 90% of the nuclear unit outages and/or deratings between 1971 and 1980 and the magnitude of the problem indicated by an estimate of power replacement cost when the units are out of service or derated. The funding EPRI has provided on these specific items for R and D and technology transfer in the past and the funding planned in the future (1982 to 1986) are shown. EPRI's R and D may help the utilities on only a small part of their nuclear unit outage problems. For example, refueling is the major cause for nuclear unit outages or deratings and the steam turbine is the second major cause for nuclear unit outages; however, these two items have been ranked fairly low on the EPRI priority list for R and D funding. Other items such as nuclear safety (NRC requirements), reactor general, reactor and safety valves and piping, and reactor fuel appear to be receiving more priority than is necessary as determined by analysis of nuclear unit outage causes.

  13. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  14. Sabah barge-mounted power plant in service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, T.

    1995-03-01

    The world`s largest barge-mounted simple-cycle power plant, constructed by the Sabah Shipyards in Malaysia, is now in service in the Philippines. Construction of similar barges from Westinghouse should begin shortly. This paper discusses in brief the projects in progress at present and prospects in the Asian market from the perspective of the manufacturers.

  15. reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reliable, efficient, ultra-clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department Shore Capacity - Low Profile, Easy Siting Connects to existing electricity and fuel infrastructure Cell Stack and operated with high sulfur naval logistic fuel (JP-5 jet fuel) · Over 1000 Hours of Fuel

  16. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  17. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    2010-12-10

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  18. Understanding Inertial and Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze and quantify the inertia and frequency responses of wind power plants with different wind turbine technologies (particularly those of fixed speed, variable slip with rotor-resistance controls, and variable speed with vector controls).

  19. Ris9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with steam line, turbine and condenser, interconnected with pumps, valves and controllers. The model canRis9-R-609(EN) Simulation ofa PWR Power Plant for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg ^N> for Process Control and Diagnosis Finn Ravnsbjerg Nielsen Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

  20. Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pines, Howard S. (El Cerrito, CA); Doyle, Padraic A. (Oakland, CA); Silvester, Lenard F. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

  1. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  2. A Plantwide Control Procedure with Application to Control Structure Design for a Gas Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    A Plantwide Control Procedure with Application to Control Structure Design for a Gas Power Plant #3 and Skogestad (2001) and apply it to a gas power plant. 1 Introduction A chemical plant may have thousands extend the plantwide control procedure of Larsson and Skogestad (2001) and apply it to a gas power plant

  3. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  4. Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation of combined heat andcombined heat and power ­Clean Power with natural gas f lfuel ­Renewable Gas 30 ­ 42% Turbines * Combined Heat & Power 25 ­35% Micro- (CHP)) fuel cell applications( pp z ETHANOL z WASTE METHANE z BIOGASz BIOGAS z COAL GAS Diversity of Fuels plus High Efficiency ­ High

  5. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callas, James J. (Peoria, IL); Taher, Mahmoud A. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  6. U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20% of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of greenhouse gas regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

  7. Enhancement of NRC station blackout requirements for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) in response to Commission direction to conduct a systematic and methodical review of NRC processes and regulations to determine whether the agency should make additional improvements to its regulatory system and to make recommendations to the Commission for its policy direction, in light of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The NTTF's review resulted in a set of recommendations that took a balanced approach to defense-in-depth as applied to low-likelihood, high-consequence events such as prolonged station blackout (SBO) resulting from severe natural phenomena. Part 50, Section 63, of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), 'Loss of All Alternating Current Power,' currently requires that each nuclear power plant must be able to cool the reactor core and maintain containment integrity for a specified duration of an SBO. The SBO duration and mitigation strategy for each nuclear power plant is site specific and is based on the robustness of the local transmission system and the transmission system operator's capability to restore offsite power to the nuclear power plant. With regard to SBO, the NTTF recommended that the NRC strengthen SBO mitigation capability at all operating and new reactors for design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NTTF also recommended strengthening emergency preparedness for prolonged SBO and multi-unit events. These recommendations, taken together, are intended to clarify and strengthen US nuclear reactor safety regarding protection against and mitigation of the consequences of natural disasters and emergency preparedness during SBO. The focus of this paper is on the existing SBO requirements and NRC initiatives to strengthen SBO capability at all operating and new reactors to address prolonged SBO stemming from design-basis and beyond-design-basis external events. The NRC initiatives are intended to enhance core and spent fuel pool cooling, reactor coolant system integrity, and containment integrity. (authors)

  8. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

  9. Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiencies of different types of solar thermoelectric generators were predicted using theoretical modeling and validated with measurements using constructed prototypes under different solar intensities

  10. Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned, the set-point is followed even in severe operating conditions. Keywords: Hydroelectric power plants

  11. COMPARING MAINTENANCE APPROACHES FOR TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS* Lester M. Waganer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Waganer 1 COMPARING MAINTENANCE APPROACHES FOR TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS* Lester M. Waganer generic approaches for maintaining commercial fusion power plants are compared to determine the most tokamak power plant, the ARIES-AT1 . The scheduled and unscheduled maintenance times for the power core

  12. Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design Daniela Borissova1 and Ivan. Designing of reliable and cost-effective industrial wind power plant is a prerequisite for the effective use of wind power as an alternative resource. The design of a wind power plant includes the determination

  13. Aalborg Universitet An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants). An assessment of converter modelling needs for offshore wind power plants connected via VSC-HVDC networks Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Plants. Energynautics

  14. Fusion Engineering and Design 38 (1997) 2757 Physics basis for a reversed shear tokamak power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    1997-01-01

    fusion power plant. Analysis of plasma equilibrium and ideal MHD stability, bootstrap current and current the recirculating power fraction. The final plasma configuration for the ARIES-RS power plant obtains i of 4 reserved. Keywords: Reversed shear; Tokamak power plant; Plasma configuration 1. Introduction The reversed

  15. New Composite Thermoelectric Materials for Macro-size Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    A review will be given of several important recent advances in both thermoelectrics research and industrial thermoelectric applications, which have attracted much attention, increasing incentives for developing advanced materials appropriate for large-scale applications of thermoelectric devices. One promising strategy is the development of materials with a dense packing of random nanostructures as a route for the sacle-up of thermoelectrics applications. The concepts involved in designing composite materials containing nanostructures for thermoelectric applications will be discussed in general terms. Specific application is made to the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocomposite system for use in power generation. Also emphasized are the scientific advantages of the nanocomposite approach for the simultaneous increase in the power factor and decrease of the thermal conductivity, along with the practical advantages of having bulk samples for property measurements and device applications. A straightforward path is identified for the scale-up of thermoelectric materials synthesis containing nanostructured constituents for use in thermoelectric applications. We end with some vision of where the field of thermoelectrics is now heading.

  16. Impacts of TMDLs on coal-fired power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-30

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) includes as one of its goals restoration and maintenance of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters. The CWA established various programs to accomplish that goal. Among the programs is a requirement for states to establish water quality standards that will allow protection of the designated uses assigned to each water body. Once those standards are set, state agencies must sample the water bodies to determine if water quality requirements are being met. For those water bodies that are not achieving the desired water quality, the state agencies are expected to develop total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) that outline the maximum amount of each pollutant that can be discharged to the water body and still maintain acceptable water quality. The total load is then allocated to the existing point and nonpoint sources, with some allocation held in reserve as a margin of safety. Many states have already developed and implemented TMDLs for individual water bodies or regional areas. New and revised TMDLs are anticipated, however, as federal and state regulators continue their examination of water quality across the United States and the need for new or revised standards. This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements its overall research effort by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. One of the program missions of the DOE's NETL is to develop innovative environmental control technologies that will enable full use of the Nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. Some of the parameters for which TMDLs are being developed are components in discharges from coal-fired power plants. If a state establishes a new or revised TMDL for one of these pollutants in a water body where a power plant is located, the next renewal of the power plant's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is likely to include more restrictive limits. Power generators may need to modify existing operational and wastewater treatment technologies or employ new ones as TMDLs are revised or new ones are established. The extent to which coal-fired power plants may be impacted by revised and new TMDL development has not been well established. NETL asked Argonne to evaluate how current and potential future TMDLs might influence coal-fired power plant operations and discharges. This information can be used to inform future technology research funded by NETL. The scope of investigation was limited to several eastern U.S. river basins rather than providing a detailed national perspective.

  17. Increasing the thermoelectric figure of merit of tetrahedrites by Co-doping with nickel and zinc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, X; Morelli, DT; Morelli, DT; Xia, Y; Ozolins, V

    2015-01-01

    Fermi  energy  level  and  mini-­? mum   lattice   thermal  energy  to  optimize  the  Seebeck  coefficient  and  thermoelectric  power  factor;  and  2)  a  reduction  in  thermal  

  18. Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feser, Joseph Patrick

    2010-01-01

    P. D. Yang, "Enhanced thermoelectric performance of roughHigh efficiency thermoelectric materials consisting ofG. Chen, and Z. F. Ren, "High-thermoelectric performance of

  19. Vehicular Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009 Vehicular Thermoelectric Applications Session DEER 2009 This presentation is an overview of the DOE thermoelectric program....

  20. Characterizing the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Samuel S

    2009-01-01

    An experimental setup was designed and utilized to measure the thermoelectric properties as functions of temperature of a commercially available, bismuth telluride thermoelectric module. Thermoelectric modules are solid ...

  1. Holey Silicon as an Efficient Thermoelectric Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Jinyao

    2011-01-01

    Silicon as Efficient Thermoelectric Material Jinyao Tang 1,This work investigated the thermoelectric properties of thinat room temperature, the thermoelectric performance of HS is

  2. Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Santoso, S.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of this report was to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind turbine and wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Manufacturer-specific models of wind turbines are favored for use in wind power interconnection studies. While they are detailed and accurate, their usages are limited to the terms of the non-disclosure agreement, thus stifling model sharing. The primary objective of the work proposed is to develop universal manufacturer-independent wind power plant models that can be shared, used, and improved without any restrictions by project developers, manufacturers, and engineers. Each of these models includes representations of general turbine aerodynamics, the mechanical drive-train, and the electrical characteristics of the generator and converter, as well as the control systems typically used. To determine how realistic model performance is, the performance of one of the models (doubly-fed induction generator model) has been validated using real-world wind power plant data. This work also documents selected applications of these models.

  3. Understanding the nature of nuclear power plant risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denning, R. S.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the evolution of understanding of severe accident consequences from the non-mechanistic assumptions of WASH-740 to WASH-1400, NUREG-1150, SOARCA and today in the interpretation of the consequences of the accident at Fukushima. As opposed to the general perception, the radiological human health consequences to members of the Japanese public from the Fukushima accident will be small despite meltdowns at three reactors and loss of containment integrity. In contrast, the radiation-related societal impacts present a substantial additional economic burden on top of the monumental task of economic recovery from the nonnuclear aspects of the earthquake and tsunami damage. The Fukushima accident provides additional evidence that we have mis-characterized the risk of nuclear power plant accidents to ourselves and to the public. The human health risks are extremely small even to people living next door to a nuclear power plant. The principal risk associated with a nuclear power plant accident involves societal impacts: relocation of people, loss of land use, loss of contaminated products, decontamination costs and the need for replacement power. Although two of the three probabilistic safety goals of the NRC address societal risk, the associated quantitative health objectives in reality only address individual human health risk. This paper describes the types of analysis that would address compliance with the societal goals. (authors)

  4. Heuristic Optimization for the Discrete Virtual Power Plant Dispatch Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Mette K.; Hansen, Lars H.; Bendtsen, Jan; Edlund, Kristian; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-17

    We consider a virtual power plant, which is given the task of dispatching a fluctuating power supply to a portfolio of flexible consumers. The flexible consumers are modeled as discrete batch processes, and the associated optimization problem is denoted the discrete virtual power plant dispatch problem (DVPPDP). First, the nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-completeness of the discrete virtual power plant dispatch problem is proved formally. We then proceed to develop tailored versions of the meta-heuristic algorithms hill climber and greedy randomized adaptive search procedure (GRASP). The algorithms are tuned and tested on portfolios of varying sizes. We find that all the tailored algorithms perform satisfactorily in the sense that they are able to find sub-optimal, but usable, solutions to very large problems (on the order of 105 units) at computation times on the scale of just 10 s, which is far beyond the capabilities of the optimal algorithms we have tested. In particular, GRASP sorted shows with the most promising performance, as it is able to find solutions that are both agile (sorted) and well balanced, and consistently yields the best numerical performance among the developed algorithms.

  5. Method of operating a thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Michael G; Cowgill, Joshua D

    2013-11-05

    A method for operating a thermoelectric generator supplying a variable-load component includes commanding the variable-load component to operate at a first output and determining a first load current and a first load voltage to the variable-load component while operating at the commanded first output. The method also includes commanding the variable-load component to operate at a second output and determining a second load current and a second load voltage to the variable-load component while operating at the commanded second output. The method includes calculating a maximum power output of the thermoelectric generator from the determined first load current and voltage and the determined second load current and voltage, and commanding the variable-load component to operate at a third output. The commanded third output is configured to draw the calculated maximum power output from the thermoelectric generator.

  6. Determination of Thermoelectric Module Efficiency A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin [ORNL; McCarty, Robin [Marlow Industries, Inc; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Yamamoto, Atsushi [AIST, Japan; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany

    2014-01-01

    The development of thermoelectrics (TE) for energy conversion is in the transition phase from laboratory research to device development. There is an increasing demand to accurately determine the module efficiency, especially for the power generation mode. For many thermoelectrics, the figure of merit, ZT, of the material sometimes cannot be fully realized at the device level. Reliable efficiency testing of thermoelectric modules is important to assess the device ZT and provide the end-users with realistic values on how much power can be generated under specific conditions. We conducted a general survey of efficiency testing devices and their performance. The results indicated the lack of industry standards and test procedures. This study included a commercial test system and several laboratory systems. Most systems are based on the heat flow meter method and some are based on the Harman method. They are usually reproducible in evaluating thermoelectric modules. However, cross-checking among different systems often showed large errors that are likely caused by unaccounted heat loss and thermal resistance. Efficiency testing is an important area for the thermoelectric community to focus on. A follow-up international standardization effort is planned.

  7. High Temperature Integrated Thermoelectric Ststem and Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike S. H. Chu

    2011-06-06

    The final goal of this project is to produce, by the end of Phase II, an all ceramic high temperature thermoelectric module. Such a module design integrates oxide ceramic n-type, oxide ceramic p-type materials as thermoelectric legs and oxide ceramic conductive material as metalizing connection between n-type and p-type legs. The benefits of this all ceramic module are that it can function at higher temperatures (> 700 C), it is mechanically and functionally more reliable and it can be scaled up to production at lower cost. With this all ceramic module, millions of dollars in savings or in new opportunities recovering waste heat from high temperature processes could be made available. A very attractive application will be to convert exhaust heat from a vehicle to reusable electric energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Phase I activities were focused on evaluating potential n-type and p-type oxide compositions as the thermoelectric legs. More than 40 oxide ceramic powder compositions were made and studied in the laboratory. The compositions were divided into 6 groups representing different material systems. Basic ceramic properties and thermoelectric properties of discs sintered from these powders were measured. Powders with different particles sizes were made to evaluate the effects of particle size reduction on thermoelectric properties. Several powders were submitted to a leading thermoelectric company for complete thermoelectric evaluation. Initial evaluation showed that when samples were sintered by conventional method, they had reasonable values of Seebeck coefficient but very low values of electrical conductivity. Therefore, their power factors (PF) and figure of merits (ZT) were too low to be useful for high temperature thermoelectric applications. An unconventional sintering method, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was determined to produce better thermoelectric properties. Particle size reduction of powders also was found to have some positive benefits. Two composition systems, specifically 1.0 SrO - 0.8 x 1.03 TiO2 - 0.2 x 1.03 NbO2.5 and 0.97 TiO2 - 0.03 NbO2.5, have been identified as good base line compositions for n-type thermoelectric compositions in future module design. Tests of these materials at an outside company were promising using that company's processing and material expertise. There was no unique p-type thermoelectric compositions identified in phase I work other than several current cobaltite materials. Ca3Co4O9 will be the primary p-type material for the future module design until alternative materials are developed. BaTiO3 and rare earth titanate based dielectric compositions show both p-type and n-type behavior even though their electrical conductivities were very low. Further research and development of these materials for thermoelectric applications is planned in the future. A preliminary modeling and optimization of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) that uses the n-type 1.0 SrO - 1.03 x 0.8 TiO2 - 1.03 x 0.2 NbO2.5 was performed. Future work will combine development of ceramic powders and manufacturing expertise at TAM, development of SPS at TAM or a partner organization, and thermoelectric material/module testing, modeling, optimization, production at several partner organizations.

  8. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day PiSafetyContact Power ServicesPower plant

  9. Utilization of Estonian oil shale at power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ots, A. [Tallin Technical Univ. (Estonia). Thermal Engineering Department

    1996-12-31

    Estonian oil shale belongs to the carbonate class and is characterized as a solid fuel with very high mineral matter content (60--70% in dry mass), moderate moisture content (9--12%) and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg). Estonian oil shale deposits lie in layers interlacing mineral stratas. The main constituent in mineral stratas is limestone. Organic matter is joined with sandy-clay minerals in shale layers. Estonian oil shale at power plants with total capacity of 3060 MW{sub e} is utilized in pulverized form. Oil shale utilization as fuel, with high calcium oxide and alkali metal content, at power plants is connected with intensive fouling, high temperature corrosion and wear of steam boiler`s heat transfer surfaces. Utilization of Estonian oil shale is also associated with ash residue use in national economy and as absorbent for flue gas desulfurization system.

  10. Improving the safety of LWR power plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Study to identify current, potential research issues and efforts for improving the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plants. This final report describes the work accomplished, the results obtained, the problem areas, and the recommended solutions. Specifically, for each of the issues identified in this report for improving the safety of LWR power plants, a description is provided in detail of the safety significance, the current status (including information sources, status of technical knowledge, problem solution and current activities), and the suggestions for further research and development. Further, the issues are ranked for action into high, medium, and low priority with respect to primarily (a) improved safety (e.g. potential reduction in public risk and occupational exposure), and secondly (b) reduction in safety-related costs (improving or maintaining level of safety with simpler systems or in a more cost-effective manner).

  11. CO? Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toy, Lora; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO?, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO? capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO? from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO? purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO?-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO?, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO? over N? and CO? permeance greater than 300 gas permeation units (GPU) targeted; - Development of next-generation polycarbonate hollow-fiber membranes and membrane modules with higher CO? permeance than current commercial polycarbonate membranes; - Development and fabrication of membrane hollow fibers and modules from candidate polymers; - Development of a CO? capture membrane process design and integration strategy suitable for end-of-pipe, retrofit installation; and - Techno-economic evaluation of the "best" integrated CO? capture membrane process design package In this report, the results of the project research and development efforts are discussed and include the post-combustion capture properties of the two membrane material platforms and the hollow-fiber membrane modules developed from them and the multi-stage process design and analysis developed for 90% CO? capture with 95% captured CO? purity.

  12. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  13. Nuclear power plant fault-diagnosis using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Keehoon; Aljundi, T.L.; Bartlett, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to various fields due to their fault and noise tolerance and generalization characteristics. As an application to nuclear engineering, we apply neural networks to the early recognition of nuclear power plant operational transients. If a transient or accident occurs, the network will advise the plant operators in a timely manner. More importantly, we investigate the ability of the network to provide a measure of the confidence level in its diagnosis. In this research an ANN is trained to diagnose the status of the San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station using data obtained from the plant's training simulator. Stacked generalization is then applied to predict the error in the ANN diagnosis. The data used consisted of 10 scenarios that include typical design basis accidents as well as less severe transients. The results show that the trained network is capable of diagnosing all 10 instabilities as well as providing a measure of the level of confidence in its diagnoses.

  14. Medium Power Lead Alloy Fast Reactor Balance of Plant Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaclav Dosta; Pavel Hejzlar; Neil E. Todreas; Jacopo Buongiorno

    2004-09-01

    Proper selection of the power conversion cycle is a very important step in the design of a nuclear reactor. Due to the higher core outlet temperature (~550°C) compared to that of light water reactors (~300°C), a wide portfolio of power cycles is available for the lead alloy fast reactor (LFR). Comparison of the following cycles for the LFR was performed: superheated steam (direct and indirect), supercritical steam, helium Brayton, and supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) recompression. Heat transfer from primary to secondary coolant was first analyzed and then the steam generators or heat exchangers were designed. The direct generation of steam in the lead alloy coolant was also evaluated. The resulting temperatures of the secondary fluids are in the range of 530-545°C, dictated by the fixed space available for the heat exchangers in the reactor vessel. For the direct steam generation situation, the temperature is 312°C. Optimization of each power cycle was carried out, yielding net plant efficiency of around 40% for the superheated steam cycle while the supercritical steam and S-CO2 cycles achieved net plant efficiency of 41%. The cycles were then compared based on their net plant efficiency and potential for low capital cost. The superheated steam cycle is a very good candidate cycle given its reasonably high net plant efficiency and ease of implementation based on the extensive knowledge and operating experience with this cycle. Although the supercritical steam cycle net plant efficiency is slightly better than that of the superheated steam cycle, its high complexity and high pressure result in higher capital cost, negatively affecting plant economics. The helium Brayton cycle achieves low net plant efficiency due to the low lead alloy core outlet temperature, and therefore, even though it is a simpler cycle than the steam cycles, its performance is mediocre in this application. The prime candidate, however, appears to be the S-CO2 recompression cycle, because it achieves about the same net plant efficiency as the supercritical steam cycle and is significantly simpler than the steam cycles. Moreover, the S-CO2 cycle offers a significantly higher potential for an increase in efficiency than steam cycles, after better materials allow the LFR operating temperatures to be increased. Therefore, the S-CO2 is chosen as the reference cycle for the LFR, with the superheated or supercritical steam cycles as backups if the S-CO2 cycle development efforts do not succeed.

  15. Thermoelectric Properties of Scaled Silicon Nanowires Using the s*-SO Atomistic Tight-Binding Model and Boltzmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Thermoelectric Properties of Scaled Silicon Nanowires Using the sp3 d5 s*-SO Atomistic Tight|kosina}@iue.tuwien.ac.at Abstract As a result of suppressed phonon conduction, large improvements of the thermoelectric figure, the Seebeck coefficient, and the thermoelectric power factor. We examine n-type nanowires of diameters of 3nm

  16. Recent Progress in the Development of High Efficiency Thermoelectrics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Heat Power Generation Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery Scale Up of SiSi0.8GE0.2 and B4CB9C Superlattices for Harvesting of Waste Heat in Diesel Engines...

  17. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T estimated to be 500 oC deer09schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle...

  18. Is Privatization Enough? Finding Performance Breaks for UK Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triebs, Thomas P.; Pollitt, Michael G.

    .4) Various technological changes can be made at the combustion and post- combustion stages. At the combustion stage low NOx or sulphur burners can be retrofitted. Though for NOx (and particular gas-fired stations) these decrease thermal efficiency... as they dial down the combustion temperature to reduce the nitrogen intake from the air (Martin et al., 2007). In the early 1990s National Power and Powergen retrofitted low NOx burners as originally planned by the CEGB. Most new CCGT plants also featured...

  19. Incidents at nuclear power plants caused by the human factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashin, V. A.

    2012-09-15

    Psychological analysis of the causes of incorrect actions by personnel is discussed as presented in the report 'Methodological guidelines for analyzing the causes of incidents in the operation of nuclear power plants.' The types of incorrect actions and classification of the root causes of errors by personnel are analyzed. Recommendations are made for improvements in the psychological analysis of causes of incorrect actions by personnel.

  20. Turbocharged PFBC Power Plant Technical and Economic Assessments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leppke, D.

    1988-01-01

    . The SOX remova 1 process is integral with the combustion process rather than a separate system subject to upsets during combustion transients. 3. NOX production is low because of the lower combustion temperatures. 4. Waste is in a dry form... POWER PLANT TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS DELBERT M. LEPPKE Senior Technical Manager Fluor Daniel Chicago, Illinois Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers are receiving considerable attention by the utility and industrial business...

  1. Controlling Emissions of SOx and NOx from power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Controlling Emissions of SOx and NOx from power plants By: Ben Bernardo #12;Main Control2 2 H2S + SO2 2 H2O + 3 S The elemental sulfur is then sold and the emissions of SO2 and H2S 2 CaSO3 + CO2 + H2O CaCO3 + SO2 CaSO3 + CO2 #12;Main Control Technologies for NOx Combustion

  2. Carter, L.D. 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL GASIFICATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon capture, utilisation, and storage Carter, L.D. 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL GASIFICATION; POWER GENERATION; CARBON DIOXIDE; CAPTURE; STORAGE; USA; ENHANCED...

  3. Method of Equivalencing for a Large Wind Power Plant with Multiple Turbine Representation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Pasupulati, S.; Ellis, A.; Kosterov, D.

    2008-07-01

    This paper focuses on our effort to develop an equivalent representation of a Wind Power Plant collector system for power system planning studies.

  4. Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    Mapping Complexity Sources in Nuclear Power Plant Domains Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical of complexity leveraging network theory. INTRODUCTION The nuclear power industry in United States has declined

  5. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lee, G.T.; Sudhoff, F.A. 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS; GAS TURBINE...

  6. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash...

  7. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash A...

  8. The Effect of Power Plants on Local Housing Values and Rents: Evidence from Restricted Census Microdata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Lucas W.

    2008-01-01

    Current trends in electricity consumption imply that hundreds of new fossil-fuel power plants will be built in the United States over the next several decades. Power plant siting has become increasingly contentious, in ...

  9. Risks and decision making in development of new power plant projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristinsdottir, Asbjorg

    2012-01-01

    Power plant development projects are typically capital intensive and subject to a complex network of interconnected risks that impact development's performance. Failure to develop a power plant to meet performance constraints ...

  10. Assessing the costs of solar power plants for the Island of Roatàn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huwe, Ethan (Ethan L.)

    2011-01-01

    This is an analysis assessing the installation costs of different solar power plant technologies and the current commercial availability for installation on the Island or Roatàn. Commercial large-scale power plants have ...

  11. Modelling of power plant dynamics and uncertainties for robust control synthesis *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    , TRAC type models3 have been applied to perform safety analysis of nuclear power plants. However, complex dynamic processes such as fossil and nuclear power plants can be modelled and simulated

  12. Title: Net Energy Ratio and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of a Biogas Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    of a Biogas Power Plant Author: W. Bauer Author Affiliation: Department and greenhouse gas analysis for a 1.45 MW (0.71 MW electrical) biogas power plant

  13. MWM-Array Sensors for In Situ Monitoring of High-Temperature Components in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheiretov, Yanko

    Utilization of America's substantial coal reserves for energy production has become a national priority. Advanced coal-fired power plants offer an environmentally friendly means to achieve that goal. These power plants, ...

  14. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  15. The Guy at the Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    the performance of generating plants. We focus on the roleThe generating sector encompasses the power plants wherePlant and Unit Characteristics Unit characteristics are taken from the \\Base Generating

  16. Method and apparatus for optimizing operation of a power generating plant using artificial intelligence techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wroblewski, David (Mentor, OH); Katrompas, Alexander M. (Concord, OH); Parikh, Neel J. (Richmond Heights, OH)

    2009-09-01

    A method and apparatus for optimizing the operation of a power generating plant using artificial intelligence techniques. One or more decisions D are determined for at least one consecutive time increment, where at least one of the decisions D is associated with a discrete variable for the operation of a power plant device in the power generating plant. In an illustrated embodiment, the power plant device is a soot cleaning device associated with a boiler.

  17. ROOT LOCUS TECHNIQUE 323 7.6.1 Hydro Power Plant Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    ROOT LOCUS TECHNIQUE 323 7.6.1 Hydro Power Plant Experiment The design of a static controller for a real hydro power plant is considered in Skatariâ?? c and Gajiâ?? c (1992). The hydro power plant is treated variables of this hydro power plant are represented by x T = [1` 1! 1u f 1/ d 1/ q 1/ f 1/D 1/Q ] where 1

  18. Increasing Thermoelectric Generation Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Consumption by Plant Type 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 Coal Gas Comb. Cycle Nuclear Plant Type Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. Water Consumption by Plant Type Water

  19. Pricing Hydroelectric Power Plants with/without Operational Restrictions: a Stochastic Control Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    Pricing Hydroelectric Power Plants with/without Operational Restrictions: a Stochastic Control of Waterloo, Waterloo ON, Canada N2L 3G1 Abstract. In this paper, we value hydroelectric power plant cash operational constraints may considerably overestimate the value of hydroelectric power plant cashflows. 1

  20. The ARIES-CS A Compact Stellarator Power Plant F. Najmabadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    1 FT/P5-26 The ARIES-CS ­ A Compact Stellarator Power Plant F. Najmabadi University of California features as fusion power plants. A detailed and integrated study of compact stellarator configurations as power plants, ARIES-CS, was initiated recently. Configurations with A 6 and excellent quasi

  1. Impact of Advanced Physics and Technology on the Attractiveness of Tokamak Fusion Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Impact of Advanced Physics and Technology on the Attractiveness of Tokamak Fusion Power Plants--During the past ten years, the ARIES Team has studied a variety of tokamak power plants with different degrees to apply lessons learned from each ARIES design to the next. The results of ARIES tokamak power plant

  2. September 4-5, 2008/ARR TRL Assessment of Fusion Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    September 4-5, 2008/ARR 1 TRL Assessment of Fusion Power Plant Subsystems A. René Raffray of tritium throughout the entire plant, including breeding and recovery. 12. Power Extraction: Understand how the readiness level of the blanket subsystem for a fusion power plant (DEMO and beyond) · In order to develop

  3. FORAGE FISH POPULATIONS AND GROWTH OF MUSKELLUNGE IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORAGE FISH POPULATIONS AND GROWTH OF MUSKELLUNGE IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR This thesis is approved as a creditable and independent investigation estimates of the 4 major forage fishes in Big Stone Power Plant cooling reservoir, South Dakota, 1 July Page

  4. CONFIGURATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE ARIES-ST POWER PLANT X.R. Wang,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONFIGURATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE ARIES-ST POWER PLANT X.R. Wang,a M.S. Tillack,a F ARIES-ST is a 1000 MWe fusion power plant based on a low aspect ratio "spherical torus" (ST) plasma availability of the power plant. Mechanical joints are poss- ible in the normal conducting single-turn toroidal

  5. Compact Stellarator Power Plants Prospects, Technical Issue, and R&D Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    1 FT/P3-13 Compact Stellarator Power Plants ­ Prospects, Technical Issue, and R&D Directions F was to investigate whether stellarator power plants can be made to be similar in size to advanced tokamak variants features as a power plant because of the lack of a large driven external current: they are inherently

  6. FEEDING ECOLOGY OF FISHES IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEEDING ECOLOGY OF FISHES IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR BY ROBERT J. KRSKA, JR OF FISHES IN A SOUTH DAKOTA POWER PLANT COOLING RESERVOIR This thesis is approved as a creditable Power Plant cooling reservoir, South Dakota................................................10 2. Mean

  7. Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    Performance and Fiscal Analysis of Distributed Sensor Networks in a Power Plant Mitchell Colby University 204 Rogers Hall Corvallis, OR 97331 kagan.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT As power plants become power plant, showing that system parameters may be accurately measured and tracked more effectively than

  8. CONFIGURATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE ARIES-ST POWER PLANT X.R. Wang,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    CONFIGURATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE ARIES-ST POWER PLANT X.R. Wang,a M.S. Tillack,a F Abstract- ARIES-ST is a 1000 MWe fusion power plant based on a low aspect ratio "spherical torus" (ST availability of the power plant. Mechanical joints are possible in the normal conducting single-turn toroidal

  9. ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS FOR ATTRACTIVE COMMERCIAL AND DEMONSTRATION TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS FOR ATTRACTIVE COMMERCIAL AND DEMONSTRATION TOKAMAK FUSION POWER PLANTS Power Plant based on toka- mak confinement concept. It is obvious that the Fusion Demo should demonstrate that a commercial fusion power plant would be accepted by utility and industry (i

  10. Initial Maintenance Assessment for ARIES-CS Power Plant X. R. Wang, S. Malang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Initial Maintenance Assessment for ARIES-CS Power Plant X. R. Wang, S. Malang a , A. R. Raffray that will result in the detailed design study of a compact stellarator power plant. The first year engineering and maintenance scheme is quite challenging for a compact stellerator power plant because of the helical plasma

  11. Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    807 Proceedings of IEEE Sensors 2003 Paper 22-2 Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor for Power Plant for power plant applications. The sensor utilizes quenching of the bright red fluorescence from inorganic. Motivation Combustion processes in power plants require the correct mix of fuel and oxygen to maximize

  12. Neutronics Characteristics, Shielding System, Activation and Environmental Aspects of ARIES-ACT-2 Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Plant L. El-Guebaly and L. Mynsberge Fusion Technology Institute University of Wisconsin 1500 fusion power plants. An integral approach considered the overall ARIES-ACT-2 configuration, design. Introduction The ARIES team [1] has developed four power plants that are designed with a range of aggressive

  13. Aesthetic Impact of a Proposed Power Plant on an Historic Wilderness Landscape1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aesthetic Impact of a Proposed Power Plant on an Historic Wilderness Landscape1 2 Carl H. Petrich impact of a proposed nuclear power plant, the historic foundation of American concepts of scenic beauty. This research concluded that building the power plant in this location would entail an unacceptable, negative

  14. Design of a creep resistant nickel base superalloy for power plant applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Design of a creep resistant nickel base superalloy for power plant applications Part 2­Phase and used as tools to design a new `made to measure' nickel base superalloy for power plant applications (wt-%) nickel base superalloy has been proposed, for use in future fossil fuel power plant, to operate

  15. Synthesis of Schedulers for Planned Shutdowns of Power Plants Carla P. Gomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas R.

    Synthesis of Schedulers for Planned Shutdowns of Power Plants Carla P. Gomes Rome Laboratory describe the synthesis of efficient schedulers for planned shutdowns of power plants for refueling of power plants. 1 An outage is a planned shutdown for refueling, repair, and mainte­ nance. It is a rather

  16. ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF MHD EQUILIBRIUM OPTIONS FOR ADVANCED STEADY STATE TOKAMAK POWER PLANTS D for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak for future power plants. 1. INTRODUCTION The development path to economical and environ- mentally attractive

  17. Physics basis for a spherical torus power plant S.C. Jardin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Physics basis for a spherical torus power plant S.C. Jardin a, *, C.E. Kessel a , J. Menard a , T for a fusion power plant. A special class of wall-stabilized high-b high-bootstrap fraction low-aspect-ratio tokamak; Fusion power plant; Plasma operating regime 1. Introduction The most significant difference

  18. ARIES-AT: AN ADVANCED TOKAMAK, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FUSION POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARIES-AT: AN ADVANCED TOKAMAK, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FUSION POWER PLANT F. Najmabadi, S. C. Jardin*,6 of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several and advanced technology leads to attractive fusion power plant with excellent safety and environmental

  19. Yale's Environment School Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Introduction Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    Yale's Environment School · Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Introduction Power Plants Big Influence in Regional Mercury Emissions Related Topics: News Releases; Publications winters and a correspondent decrease in the need for regional power plants to burn coal could partially

  20. Aalborg Universitet Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active. (2015). Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis and Active Mitigation Methods from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Harmonic Resonances in Wind Power Plants: Modeling, Analysis