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1

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

2

A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 87Sr/86Sr values of thermal waters and hydrothermal calcites of the Long Valley caldera geothermal system are more radiogenic than those of young intracaldera volcanic rocks. Five thermal waters display 87Sr/86Sr

3

Geochemistry of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region, California, and implications for hot dry rock geothermal development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connote types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast, ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connote end-members. The latter end-member has enriched [delta]D as well as enriched d[sup l8]O, very different from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data and modeling of ages indicate most Clear Lake region waters are 500 to > 10,000 yr., although mixing of old and young components is implied by the data. The age of end-member connate water is probably > 10,000 yr. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is [le] 150[degrees]C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures [le] 150[degrees]C (except for Sulphur Bank Mine). Hot dry rock technologies are the best way to commercially exploit the known high temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region, particularly within the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Mansfield, J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Stable isotope investigation of fluids and water-rock interaction in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-hydrogen-oxygen isotope compositions have been measured in regional cold waters, geothermal fluids, and hydrothermally altered rocks from the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area. These data have been used, in conjunction with other geological and geochemical data from this geothermal system, to place some limits on the origin of geothermal fluids and reservoir carbon, the fluid recharge area, physical-chemical environment of hydrothermal alteration, and relative permeability of the geothermal system. The similarity of hydrogen isotope compositions of local meteoric water and geothermal reservoir fluid indicate that the geothermal fluids are virtually entirely of surface derivation. An isotopically reasonable source area would be the Mineral Mountains directly to the east of the Roosevelt system. Hydrothermal calcite appears to be in isotopic equilibrium with the deep reservoir fluid. The deltaC/sup 13/ values of deep calcites and T- pH-f0/sub 2/ conditions of the reservoir defined by measured temperature, fluid chemistry, and alteration mineralogy fix the delta/sup 13/C value of the geothermal system to -5 to -6.5% (PDB). These values do not unambiguously define any one source or process, however. There is a relatively small increase in /sup 18/O of geothermal fluids relative to their cold surface water precursors and significant /sup 18/O depletion accompanying hydrothermal alteration of the granitic host rock. These isotopic shifts indicate a high ratio of geothermal fluid to altered rock for the geothermal system, implying relatively rapid (geologically) recirculation rates and significant permeability of the geothermal system.

Bowman, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal conductivity of rocks associated with energy extraction from hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of thermal conductivity measurements are given for 14 drill core rock samples taken from two exploratory HDR geothermal wellbores (maximum depth of 2929 m (9608 ft) drilled into Precambrian granitic rock in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. These samples have been petrographically characterized and in general represent fresh competent Precambrian material of deep origin. Thermal conductivities, modal analyses, and densities are given for all core samples studied under dry and water-saturated conditions. Additional measurements are reported for several sedimentary rocks encountered in the upper 760 m (2500 ft) of that same region. A cut-bar thermal conductivity comparator and a transient needle probe were used for the determinations with fused quartz and Pyroceram 9606 as the standards. The maximum temperature range of the measurements was from the ice point to 250/sup 0/C. The measurements on wet, water-saturated rock were limited to the temperature range below room temperature. Conductivity values of the dense core rock samples were generally within the range from 2 to 2.9 W/mK at 200/sup 0/C. Excellent agreement was achieved between these laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity and those obtained by in situ measurements used in the HDR wellbores. By using samples of sufficient thickness to provide a statistically representative heat flow path, no difference between conductivity values and their temperature coefficients for orthogonal directions (heat flow parallel or perpendicular to core axis) was observed. This isotropic behavior was even found for highly foliated gneissic specimens. Estimates of thermal conductivity based on a composite dispersion analysis utilizing pure minerallic phase conductivities and detailed modal analyses usually agreed to within 9 percent of the experimental values.

Sibbitt, W.L.; Dodson, J.G.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Simulation of water transport in heated rock salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes computer simulation studies on water transport in German rock salt. Based on JOCKWERS experimental investigations on water content and water liberation, the object of these studies was to select a water transport model, that matches the water inflow which was measured in some heater experiments in the Asse Salt Mine. The main result is, that an evaporation front model, with Knudsen-type vapor transport combined with fluid transport by thermal expansion of the adsorbed water layers in the non evaporated zone, showed the best agreement with experimental evidence.

Schlich, M.; Jockwer, N.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ...

8

The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates of subsurface temperatures derived from heat flow measurements.

Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been created by hydraulic fracturing of Precambrian granitic rock between two wells on the west flank of the Valles Caldera in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. Heat is extracted by injecting water into one well,

11

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program Rock Hill Utilities - Water Heater and Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: up to $275 Heat Pump Replacement: $400 Provider Rock Hill Utilities Through the SmartChoice program, Rock Hill Utilities offers rebates for water heater and heat pump replacements. Information on financing for heat pumps can also be found on the web site listed above. If both the water heater and heat pump are purchased then the customer may qualify for the Great Rate program. The Great Rate program will add a 25% discount to a

12

Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms water in overlying aquifers. Some of the areas of hot water, such as Roosevelt, Pavant-Black Rock, and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, probably have a potential to produce electricity; the estimated potential at Roosevelt is 300 megawatts. But the many areas of warm and hot water whose temperatures are too low to produce electricity may still have their waters utilized for space heating, as is planned for Monroe, for greenhouses, and for the processing of farm produce. In this report are tables that give records of about 1500 thermal springs and wells, 66 yield hot water, more than 400 yield warm water, and more than 1000 yield slightly warm water. The records include location, ownership, temperature, yield, depth (of wells), geologic unit, and some chemical analyses.

Goode, Harry D.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A comparison of two heat transfer models for estimating thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of thermal drawdown in Hot Dry Rock geothermal systems have been made with two different models of heat transfer from hydraulically fractured reservoir rock blocks to water circulated through the fracture permeability. One model is based on deconvolution of experimental tracer response curves into a network of flowpaths connected in parallel with heat transfer calculated individually in each flowpath. The second model is based on one-dimensional flow through the rock with a block size distribution described as a group of equivalent-radius spheres for which the heat transfer equations can be solved analytically. The two-models were applied to the planned Phase II long-term thermal drawdown experiment at Fenton Hill, NM. The results show good agreement between the two models, with estimates of temperature cooldown from 240/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C in a few years depending on selected operation parameters, but with somewhat differing cooldown curve characteristic shapes. Data from the long-term experiment will be helpful in improving the two models.

Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Enhanced heat extraction from hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoirs due to interacting secondary thermal cracks. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How the fluid circulating through the main hydraulic fracture and the thermally-induced secondary, growing, interacting cracks affects the time-varying temperature, deformations, stresses, thermal crack geometry, water flow rates through the main and thermal cracks, reservoir coolant outlet temperature, and reservoir thermal power of the cracked geothermal reservoir is investigated. First, a simplified version of the proposed hot-dry-rock reservoir is considered. A closed-form solution of the rock temperature without thermal crack was found and substituted into SAP-IV computer code to calculate the stresses. These stresses being superposed with earth stresses and fluid pressure were used in conjunction with the fracture mechanics criterion to determine the initiation of secondary thermal crack. After the initiation of secondary thermal crack, the rock temperature was then calculated by a two-dimensional heat conduction program AYER. The detailed procedures for carrying out these steps are listed. Solutions developed are applied to studying the time-varying temperature field, thermal stresses and crack geometry produced, and additional heat power generated in the reservoir. Conclusions were discussed and summarized. (MHR)

Hsu, Y.C.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal ground water in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study area occupies about 14,500 square miles in southwestern Idaho and north-central Nevada. Thermal ground water occurs under artesian conditions, in discontinuous or compartmented zones, in igneous or sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age. Ground-water movement is generally northward. Temperatures of the ground water range from about 30/sup 0/ to more than 80/sup 0/C. Chemical analyses of water from 12 wells and 9 springs indicate that nonthermal waters are a calcium bicarbonate type; thermal waters are a sodium bicarbonate type. Chemical geothermometers indicate probable maximum reservoir temperatures are near 100/sup 0/C. Concentration of tritium in the thermal water water is near zero.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

High temperature water adsorption on The Geysers rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to measure water retention by geothermal reservoir rocks at the actual reservoir temperature, the ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quality of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers geothermal reservoir was measured at 150{sup degree}C, 200{sup degree}C, and 250{sup degree}C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {<=}p/p{sub degree} {<=} 0.98, where p{sub degree} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A correlation is sought between water adsorption, the surface properties, and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids.

Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters of Nevada Thermal Waters of Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1979 Report Number Bulletin 91 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Thermal Waters of Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside,John H. Schilling (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1979. Thermal Waters of Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Bulletin 91. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Waters_of_Nevada&oldid=690515" Categories: References Geothermal References

20

Preliminary measurements of the thermal conductivity of rocks from LASL geothermal test holes GT-1 and GT-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conductivities on a number of dry rocks have been measured in an air environment. These experimental values are probably about 10 percent lower than the in situ values. Initial attempts to prepare ''wet'' rock samples (rocks saturated with water) have so far resulted in only ''damp'' rocks. Considerable effort will be required to characterize the crack system in ''solid'' rocks and to predict the probable conductivity values for in situ conditions.

Sibbitt, W.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO); Mazurkiewicz, Marian (Wroclaw, PL); Bushnell, Dwight J. (Corvallis, OR); Blaine, James (Rolla, MO)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks I.N. Bindeman a,n , C.C. Lundstrom b , C. Bopp b , F. Huang b,c a Department of Geological Sciences, 1272 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA b Department of Geology, University of Illinois

Bindeman, Ilya N.

23

Near-Earth Object Interception Using Nuclear Thermal Rock Propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planetary defense has drawn wide study: despite the low probability of a large-scale impact, its consequences would be disastrous. The study presented here evaluates available protection strategies to identify bottlenecks limiting the scale of near-Earth object that could be deflected, using cutting-edge and near-future technologies. It discusses the use of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) as a propulsion device for delivery of thermonuclear payloads to deflect or destroy a long-period comet on a collision course with Earth. A ‘worst plausible scenario’ for the available warning time (10 months) and comet approach trajectory are determined, and empirical data are used to make an estimate of the payload necessary to deflect such a comet. Optimizing the tradeoff between early interception and large deflection payload establishes the ideal trajectory for an interception mission to follow. The study also examines the potential for multiple rocket launch dates. Comparison of propulsion technologies for this mission shows that NTR outperforms other options substantially. The discussion concludes with an estimate of the comet size (5 km) that could be deflected usingNTRpropulsion, given current launch capabilities.

X-L. Zhang; E. Ball; L. Kochmanski; S. D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the pressing need for the United States to reduce our dependence upon fossil fuels, it has become a national priority to develop technologies that allow practical use of renewable energy sources. One such energy source is sunlight. It has the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical success. The primary reason for these disappointments is a misunderstanding of solar energy dynamics by air conditioning designers; combined with a similar misunderstanding by solar engineers of how thermally driven chillers react to the loads and energy sources applied to them. With this in mind, a modeling tool has been developed which provides the flexibility to apply a strategy which can be termed, Optimization by Design.

Leavell, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 2. An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. The aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-meters underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/1) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/1. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/1. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0/sup 0/ to 83.0/sup 0/C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35/sup 0/C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150/sup 0/C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers.

Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, D.B.; Tippens, C.L.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal and mineral springs of Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waters from the thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged Na-HCO/sub 3/-Cl type waters. St. Martin's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline Na-Cl water, is the notable exception. The dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ waters are generally associated with granitic intrusions; the warm to hot CO/sub 2/-charged waters issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen-isotopic compositions that indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The CO/sub 2/-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. The carbon-13 in the CO/sub 2/-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 %) than in the cold CO/sub 2/-charged soda springs (-2 to -8%) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold CO/sub 2/-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO/sub 3/, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaCO/sub 3/. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur, and Ohanapecosh hot springs seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100/sup 0/C. As these springs occur as individual springs or in small clusters, the respective aquifers are probably of restricted size.

Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

28

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites Final February 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock Sites February 2003 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations...........................................................................................................v Executive Summary...................................................................................................................... vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

29

Esimation of field-scale thermal conductivities of unsaturated rocks from in-situ temperature data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vicinity of the heat source, and rock temperature exceededand the dry rock near the heat source. The other differencesources, heat transfer takes place through the wet rock (see

Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.; Birkholzer, Jens T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Re-Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Thermal...

31

Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Rock Details Activities (13) Areas (11) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.

33

Thermal Degradation of Amines in Supercritical Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity and chemical control of water and steam are essential for ensuring fossil plant availability and reliability. An assessment of amines to address specific corrosion control issues (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 1017475) identified eight amines as alternatives to ammonia for pH control. Previous research has limited the thermal degradation of the pH control agents to temperatures less than 300176C. This report presents an understanding of the high-temperature degradation of the...

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

Light-stable-isotope studies of spring and thermal waters from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Thermal areas and of clay minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen have been determined for spring waters and thermal fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal areas, for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration of the acid-sulfate type in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area, and for spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area of central Utah. The water analyses in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area confirm the origin of the thermal fluids from meteoric water in the Mineral Range. The water analyses in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal area restrict recharge areas for this system to the upper elevations of the Pavant and/or Tushar Ranges. The low /sup 18/O shift observed in these thermal fluids (+0.7 permil) implies either high water/rock ratios or incomplete isotope exchange or both, and further suggests minimal interaction between the thermal fluid and marble country rock in the system. Hydrogen and oxygen-isotope data for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration zones in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal system suggest that the fluids responsible for the shallow acid-sulfate alteration were in part derived from condensed steam produced by boiling of the deep reservoir fluid. The isotope evidence supports the chemical model proposed by Parry et al. (1980) for origin of the acid-sulfate alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs. The isotope analyses of spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area indicate only a general correlation of isotope composition, salinity and chemical temperatures.

Bowman, J.R.; Rohrs, D.T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a review of the research that led to an in-depth understanding of flow and transport processes under strong heat stimulation in fractured, porous rock. It first describes the anticipated multiple processes that come into play in a partially saturated, fractured porous volcanic tuff geological formation, when it is subject to a heat source such as that originating from the decay of radionuclides. The rationale is then given for numerical modeling being a key element in the study of multiple processes that are coupled. The paper outlines how the conceptualization and the numerical modeling of the problem evolved, progressing from the simplified to the more realistic. Examples of numerical models are presented so as to illustrate the advancement and maturation of the research over the last two decades. The most recent model applied to in situ field thermal tests is characterized by (1) incorporation of a full set of thermal-hydrological processes into a numerical simulator, (2) realistic representation of the field test geometry, in three dimensions, and (3) use of site-specific characterization data for model inputs. Model predictions were carried out prior to initiation of data collection, and the model results were compared to diverse sets of measurements. The approach of close integration between modeling and field measurements has yielded a better understanding of how coupled thermal hydrological processes produce redistribution of moisture within the rock, which affects local permeability values and subsequently the flow of liquid and gases. The fluid flow in turn will change the temperature field. We end with a note on future research opportunities, specifically those incorporating chemical, mechanical, and microbiological factors into the study of thermal and hydrological processes.

Tsang, Yvonne; Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mechanisms of heat exchange between water and rock in karst conduits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanisms of heat exchange between water and rock in karst conduits M. D. Covington,1 A. J water quality, have explored the mechanisms for heat transport and heat exchange in surface streams flux can be significant. In contrast, convective heat exchange through the conduit air is often

Saar, Martin O.

37

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 3. An evaluation of thermal water in the Weiser area, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Weiser area encompasses about 200 square miles in southwest Idaho and contains two thermal water areas: (1) the Crane Creek subarea, which is 12 miles east of Weiser, Idaho, and (2) the Weiser Hot Springs subarea, which is 5 miles northwest of Weiser. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of Miocene to Pleistocene age have been faulted and folded to form the northwest-trending anticlines present in much of the area. Basalt of the Columbia River Group or underlying rocks are believed to constitute the reservoir for the hot water. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are present in both subareas. A preliminary audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a shallow conductive zone is associated with each thermal site. Above-normal ground temperatures measured at a depth of 1 metre below the land surface in the Weiser Hot Springs subarea correlate with relatively high concentrations of boron in underlying ground waters, which, in turn, are usually associated with thermal waters in the study area. Sampled thermal waters are of a sodium chloride sulfate or sodium sulfate type, having dissolved-solids concentrations that range from 225 to 1,140 milligrams per litre. Temperatures of sampled waters ranged from 13/sup 0/ to 92.0/sup 0/C. Minimum aquifer temperatures calculated from chemical analysis of water, using geochemical thermometers, were 170/sup 0/ and 150/sup 0/C in the Crane Creek and Weiser Hot Springs subareas, respectively. Estimated maximum temperatures ranged from 212/sup 0/ to 270/sup 0/C and 200/sup 0/ to 242/sup 0/C, respectively, in these subareas. The probable heat sources for both subareas are (1) young magmatic intrusive rocks underlying the basalt or (2) above-normal temperatures resulting from thinning of the earth's crust. Maps are included.

Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste-water characterization survey, Little Rock AFB, Arizona. Final report, 11-24 July 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AFOEHL conducted a waste-water characterization survey at Little Rock AFB from 11 to 24 Jul 88. The scope of the survey included characterizing the major sanitary discharges on base and determining whether the waste-water being discharged to the Jacksonville Wastewater Treatment plant violated limits for biochemical oxygen demand and total suspended solids. A total of 26 sampling sites were evaluated. Analytical results showed that discharge standards for biological oxygen demand and total suspended solids were not being exceeded by Little Rock AFB.

Scott, S.P.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact Ground Water Compliance at the Slick Rock, Colorado, UMTRA Project Sites AGENCY: U.S. DEP.4RTMENT OF ENERGY ACTIOK: FL&-DING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMP-ACT (FONSI) SU$IM$RY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) plans to implement ground lvater compliance strategies for two Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTR.4) Project sites near Slick Rock. Colorado. The purpose of the strategies is to comply with U.S. En\.ironmental Protection .Qency (EP.Aj ground n'ater standards defined in Title 40 Codr ~fF~d~w/ iieplutio?r.s (CFR) Part 192. and in so doing. protect human health and the en\.ironment. Ground water at the Slick Rock sites is contaminated with residual radioactive materials from hisTorica acti\,ities, associated with the processin of uranium ore, The planned action (~formeri>,.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

42

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Modeling of thermally driven hydrological processes in partially saturated fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the heat source and encounters cooler rock, it condenses,fractured rock near the radioactive-decay heat source isrock, giving rise to a reflux of liquid back to the heat source.

Tsang, Yvonne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Estimating Liquid Fluxes in Thermally Perturbed Fractured Rock Using Measured Temperature Profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new temperature-profile method was recently developed for analyzing perturbed flow conditions in superheated porous media. The method uses high-resolution temperature data to estimate the magnitude of the heat-driven liquid and gas fluxes that form as a result of boiling, condensation, and recirculation of pore water. In this paper, we evaluate the applicability of this new method to the more complex flow behavior in fractured formations with porous rock matrix. In such formations, with their intrinsic heterogeneity, the porous but low-permeable matrix provides most of the mass and heat storage capacity, and dominates conductive heat transfer, Fractures, on the other hand, offer highly effective conduits for gas and liquid flow, thereby generating significant convective heat transfer. After establishing the accuracy of the temperature-profile method for fractured porous formations, we apply the method in analyzing the perturbed flow conditions in a large-scale underground heater test conducted in unsaturated fractured porous tuff. The flux estimates for this test indicate a significant reflux of water near the heat source, on the order of a few hundred millimeter per year-much larger than the ambient percolation flux of only a few millimeter per year.

J.T. Birkholzer

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dual-energy neutron tomography of water in rock using the Argonne IPNS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In dual-energy hydrogen imaging, the increase in hydrogen neutron cross-section at subthermal neutron energies is used to enhance the imaging of small amounts of hydrogen against a background of other absorbing materials by subtracting a tomographic image obtained for higher energy neutrons from that obtained for subthermal neutrons (picking energies such that the other absorbing materials have nearly the same cross-sections at both energies). This technique was used to provide dual-energy imaging of water in tuffaceous rock, with the goal being to track water flow through porous rock for site risk analysis of permanent disposal of radwaste. A feasibility experiment was conducted at the IPNS facility with coarse spatial resolution, yielding promising results.

Rhodes, E.; Kupperman, D.S.; Hitterman, R.L.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California`s prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Jager, A.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks. First quarterly report, January--March 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table north of the repository site. This study investigates the cause of the steep gradient, based on the possible influence by Paleozoic rocks under the Yucca Mountain area. A quasi-three dimensional, steady-state, finite-difference model of the groundwater flow system of the Yucca Mountain Site and vicinity, was developed using a manual trial-and-error calibration technique to model the ground-water table. The ground-water system in the model was divided into a two layers, which consist of Cenozoic volcanic rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks were defined to be a confined aquifer. The model simulates vertical flow from the volcanic rocks to the underlying carbonate rocks in an area where the Eleana Formation, a Paleozoic clastic aquitard, is absent. The model requires a vertical hydrologic connection in a particular region and a large difference in hydraulic heads between the volcanic rocks and the carbonates to create the steep gradient north of the repository site. The regions of different hydraulic gradient on the water-table surface could be simulated by spatial variations of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity in the volcanic rocks.

Lee, Si-Yong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

50

Catalog of thermal waters in New Mexico. Hydrologic report 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waters at 67 locations in New Mexico discharge at anomalous temperatures. Details on these thermal water resources such as the location, temperature, discharge rate, field pH, and specific conductance are presented in 29 tables and 47 figures. Included also are 244 chemical analyses of water from 38 areas.

Summers, W.K.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

52

Marshall Municipal Utilities- Solar Thermal Water Heater Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Marshall Municipal Utilities (MMU) offers residential customers rebates for installing a ENERGY STAR Solar Thermal Water Heater. Rebates are based on the size of the system; MMU offers $20 per...

53

A model for the development of a lobate alpine rock glacier in southwest Colorado, USA: implications for water on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rock glaciers play a significant role in the alpine debris transport system. For practical and engineering considerations, identifying the internal structure and its relationship to surface characteristics is significant in terms of how a rock glacier settles during periods of melting, and the mode of deformation. A better understanding of these factors is important for engineers, engineering geologists and geomorphologists who must make prudent evaluations of rock glaciers as potential sites for human development and uses. It is equally important for evaluating potential stores for water on other planets such as Mars. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) shows that the internal structure of a lobate rock glacier located in the San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado consists of continuous to semi-continuous horizontal layers of ice-supersaturated sediments and coarse blocky rockslide debris which likely formed through catastrophic episodes of rockfall from the cirque headwall. Folds in the uppermost layers correspond to the surface expression of ridges and furrows, indicating that compressive stresses originating in the steep accumulation zone are transmitted downslope through the rock glacier. The rock glacier is a composite feature that formed by a process involving the development and overlap of discrete flow lobes that have overridden older glacial moraine and protalus rampart materials. The latter materials have been incorporated into the present flow structure of the rock glacier. The discovery of rock glacier-like features on Mars suggests the presence of flowing, or once-flowing ice-rock mixtures. These landforms, which include lobate debris aprons, concentric crater fill and lineated valley fill, hold significant promise as reservoirs of stored water ice that could be used as fuel sources for human exploration of Mars and provide a frozen record of the climatic history of the planet. To this end, the rock glacier in this study was used as a surrogate for similar Martian landforms. Liquid water, found to be abundant in this rock glacier, occurs within a network of interconnected channels that permeate throughout the landform. In terms of water storage within Martian analogs, consideration must include the possibility that some water ice may be stored in relatively pure form within lenses and vein networks that are supplied by seasonal frost accumulation and/or water influx from below.

Degenhardt, John Jerome

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Preliminary screening of thermal storage concepts for water/steam and organic fluid solar thermal receiver systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparison of thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications was done generically for large and small solar systems with sensible and latent heat and two-stage storage concepts. Concepts were ranked based on the cost of delivered energy. A +- 20% uncertainty in subsystem cost was included in the analysis. Water/steam and organic fluid collector/receivers were studied separately. For the water/steam concept, Barstow technology (100 MW/sub e/) was examined. A nitrite/nitrate salt with a low-cost solid medium was best for buffer storage; for diurnal storage, the two-stage draw salt/low-cost media and oil/rock concept was best. Phase change concepts require improvements on the concept analyzed to be attractive. For the organic fluid system, a Shenandoah total energy system was examined. The Syltherm trickle charge taconite concept was the most favorable and may be improved by replacing the taconite with a lower-cost oil-compatible medium. Salt concepts can be competitive with this system only if there is a low-cost solid medium that is compatible with the salt and the end use requires a large amount of storage. The phase change concept examined was found to be quite poor for this total energy application.

Copeland, R.J.; Karpuk, M.E.; Ullman, J.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Organic petrology, thermal maturity, geology, and petroleum source rock potential of Lower Permian coal, Karoo supersystem, Zambia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on data concerning organic petrology and thermal maturity of Lower Karoo coal measures (Lower Permian) which are of considerable importance in determining the hydrocarbon potential of sediments in the rift-valley and half-graben complexes of the Luangwa and Zambezi valleys of eastern and southern Zambia, respectively, and in the extensive sedimentary basin developed on relatively stable Precambrian basement in western Zambia, a total area in excess of 3000 km{sup 2}. Samples from seven outcrop and subsurface localities situated in the northeast (northern Luangwa Valley), east (mid-Luangwa Valley), south (mid-Zambezi Valley), and the Western Province of Zambia were studied. The coal measures are from 9 to 280 m thick, but individual coal seams are generally less than 6 m. The coal macerals contain an average of 60% vitrinite and 9% liptinite, enough to have potential to generate hydrocarbon. A few samples contain twice this amount of liptinite. Reflected-light microscopy and the thermal alteration index of spores were used to determine the thermal maturity. The organic matter in samples studied is within the oil generation zone (thermal alteration index 2{minus} to 2+; %R{sub 0} max = 0.5-0.9). The petrological and palynological data indicate that the organic matter consists of Types II (generally approximately 25% in carbonaceous shale samples), III, and IV, indicating source rock potential. Late Karoo ( ) and post-Karoo fault blocks with differential vertical displacements may have produced structural traps suitable for oil and gas accumulation.

Utting, J. (Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, AB (Canada)); Wielens, H. (Unocal Canada Exploration Ltd., 150 6th Av. SW, Calgary, Alberta (CA))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermal maturation and source rock potential of sedimentary succession in southeast Anatolia, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that there are numerous oil fields in southeast Anatolia, near the northern extension of the Arabian Plate. The formations range for Cambrian to Miocence. Maturation and source rock potential of these formations are determined using reflectance and geochemistry. Tectonic features of these formations and oil reserves in the region are elaborated and oil generation is interpreted using these data. The maturity of rock units generally increases from west to east, while physical and chemical properties of oils also change accordingly. Oil reserves are generally located in east-west trending anticline systems in Cretaceous reservoirs. The API gravities and the alkane content of oils increase toward the east, while asphaltene content decreases in the same direction. All geological and geochemical data leads us to interpret that the oil is most probably generated near the west border of districts IX and X and migrated to the east.

Harput, O.B.; Erturk, O. (Turkish Petroleum Co. Research Center, Mudafaa Caddesi No. 22 Bakanliklar, Ankara (TR)); Goodarzi, F. (Institute of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology, Calgary, AB (Canada))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using the temperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

host rock in the immediate vicinity of the heat source. Insource of heating and condensed in the cooler parts of the rock.sources, heat transfer was still happening on account of the wet rock.

Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sizing a water softener for aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) installations, ground water is circulated between an aquifer and heat exchangers via a well field. It is often necessary to soften the water to prevent carbonate scaling in pipes, heat exchangers, and well screens. Most ATES projects requiring water softening will be best served by using synthetic ion-exchange resins. The size of the resin beds, the resin regeneration cycle, and the amount of NaCl brine used in each regeneration depend on several factors. These are (1) the chemistry of the native ground water, (2) allowable residual hardness after softening, (3) the maximum flow rate of water through the ATES plant, and (4) exchange characteristics of the resin. Example calculations are given for a three-bed water softening system.

Hall, S.H.; Jenne, E.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Water Injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 1: Hydrofracture Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we model water injection through a growing vertical hydrofracture penetrating a low-permeability reservoir. The results are useful in oilfield waterflood applications and in liquid waste disposal through reinjection. Using Duhamel's principle, we extend the Gordeyev and Entov (1997) self-similar 2D solution of pressure diffusion from a growing fracture to the case of variable injection pressure. The flow of water injected into a low-permeability rock is almost perpendicular to the fracture for a time sufficiently long to be of practical interest. We revisit Carter's model of 1D fluid injection (Howard and Fast, 1957) and extend it to the case of variable injection pressure. We express the cumulative injection through the injection pressure and effective fracture area. Maintaining fluid injection above a reasonable minimal value leads inevitably to fracture growth regardless of the injector design and the injection policy. The average rate of fracture growth can be predicted from early injection. A smart injection controller that can prevent rapid fracture growth is needed.

Patzek, Tad W.; Silin, Dmitriy B.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

LARGO hot water system thermal performance test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance tests and results on the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Some objectives of these evaluations are to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of energy delivered to the household as contributed by solar power supplied to operate the system and auxiliary power to maintain tank temperature at proper level, overall system efficiency and to determine temperature distribution within the tank. The tests and evaluation were performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar test facility. The Solar Hot Water system is termed a ''Dump-type'' because of the draining system for freeze protection. The solar collector is a single glazed flat plate. An 82-gallon domestic water heater is provided as the energy storage vessel. Water is circulated through the collector and water heater by a 5.3 GPM capacity pump, and control of the pump motor is achieved by a differential temperature controller.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Engineering methods for predicting productivity and longevity of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoir in the presence of thermal cracks. Technical completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional heat extraction from geothermal energy reservioirs depends on the feasibility to extend the main, hydraulic fracture through secondary thermal cracks of the adjacent hot rock. When the main, hydraulic fracture is cooled sufficiently, these secondary thermal cracks are produced normal to the main fracture surface. As such, both the heat transfer surface area and heat energy available to the fluid circulating through the main, hydraulic fracture system increase. Methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir were developed. A question is whether a significant long-term enhancement of the heat extraction process is achieved due to these secondary thermal cracks. In short, the objectives of this investigation are to study how the main, hydraulic fracture can be extended through these secondary thermal cracks of the rock, and to develop methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir.

Hsu, Y.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

An overview of water disinfection in developing countries and the potential for solar thermal water pasteurization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study originated within the Solar Buildings Program at the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to assess the potential for solar thermal water disinfection in developing countries. In order to assess solar thermal potential, the alternatives must be clearly understood and compared. The objectives of the study are to: (a) characterize the developing world disinfection needs and market; (b) identify competing technologies, both traditional and emerging; (c) analyze and characterize solar thermal pasteurization; (d) compare technologies on cost-effectiveness and appropriateness; and (e) identify research opportunities. Natural consequences of the study beyond these objectives include a broad knowledge of water disinfection problems and technologies, introduction of solar thermal pasteurization technologies to a broad audience, and general identification of disinfection opportunities for renewable technologies.

Burch, J.; Thomas, K.E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of Amorphous Solid Water  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous solid water (ASW) is a metastable form of water created by vapor deposition onto a cold substrate (typically less than 130 K). Since this unusual form of water only exists on earth in laboratories with highly specialized equipment, it is fair to ask why there is any interest in studying this esoteric material. Much of the scientific interest involves using ASW as a model system to explore the physical and reactive properties of liquid water and aqueous solutions. Other researchers are interested in ASW because it is believed to be the predominate form of water in the extreme cold temperatures found in many astrophysical and planetary environments. In addition, ASW is a convenient model system for studying the stability of metastable systems (glasses) and the properties of highly porous materials. A fundamental understanding of such properties has applications in a diverse range of disciplines including cryobiology, food science, pharmaceuticals, astrophysics and nuclear waste storage among others.There exist several excellent reviews on the properties of ASW and supercooled liquid water and a new comprehensive review is beyond the scope of this Account. Instead, we focus on our research over the past 15 years using molecular beams and surface science techniques to probe the thermal and non thermal properties of nanoscale films of ASW. We use molecular beams to precisely control the deposition conditions (flux, incident, energy, incident angle) to create compositionally-tailored, nanoscale films of ASW at low temperatures. To study the transport properties (viscosity, diffusivity), the amorphous films can be heated above their glass transition temperatures, Tg, at which time they transform into deeply supercooled liquids prior to crystallization. The advantage of this approach is that at temperatures near Tg the viscosity is approximately 15 orders of magnitude larger than a normal liquid, and therefore the crystallization kinetics are dramatically slowed, increasing the time available for experiments. For example, near Tg, on a typical laboratory time scale (e.g. {approx}1000 s), a water molecule moves less than a molecular distance. For this reason, nanoscale films help to probe the behavior and reactions of supercooled liquid at these low temperatures. ASW films can be used for investigating the non-thermal reactions relevant to radiolysis. In this account we will present a survey of our research on the thermal and non thermal properties of ASW using this approach.

Smith, R. Scott; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Kay, Bruce D.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal neutron absorption cross sections for igneous rocks: Newberry Caldera, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal neutron absorption cross sections of geologic materials are of first-order importance to the interpretation of pulsed neutron porosity logs and of second-order importance to the interpretation of steady-state porosity logs using dual detectors. Even in the latter case, uncertainties in log response can be excessive whenever formations are encountered that possess absorption properties appreciably greater than the limestones used in most tool calibrations. These effects are of importance to logging operations directed at geothermal applications where formation vary from igneous to sedimentary and which may contain solution-deposited minerals with very large cross-section values. Most measurements of cross-section values for geologic materials have been made for hydrocarbon production applications. Hence, the specimen materials are sedimentary and clean in the sense that they are not altered by geothermal fluids. This investigation was undertaken to measure cross-section values from a sequence of igneous materials obtained from a single hole drilled in an active hydrothermal system. 3 refs., 1 fig.

Lysne, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust  

SciTech Connect

Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and to quantify the importance of feedback in complex fluid-rock systems and its affects on time and space scales and rates of reaction. We have made significant contributions toward understanding feedback and its impacts by numerical experimentation using 3D computational modeling of fluid-rock systems and by chemical and textural analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks.

Dutrow, Barbara

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Thermal signature reduction through liquid nitrogen and water injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The protection of aircraft against shoulder fired heat seeking missiles is of growing concern in the aviation community. This thesis presents a simple method for shielding the infrared signature of a jet engine from heat seeking missiles. The research efforts investigated two approaches to shield the thermal signature of the Noel Penny Type 401 turbojet at the Texas A&M University Propulsion Lab Test Cell. First, liquid nitrogen was injected through a manifold at a flow rate equivalent to the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a small temperature reduction in the exhaust but no infrared shielding. Second, water was injected at a flow rate of 13% of the flow of exhaust gases, producing a greater temperature reduction and some shielding. Water was then injected through a manifold at a ?ow rate of 118% of the flow rate of exhaust gases, producing a substantial reduction in temperature and complete shielding of the infrared signature. Additionally, numerical simulations were performed using FLUENT to support these experiments. Results are presented in the form of thermocouple data and thermal images from the experiments, and in the form of temperature contours and streamtraces from the simulations.

Guarnieri, Jason Antonio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

Allen, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied… (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer of the non-carbonated surfaces of the underlying rock was reason why the hornblende and diorite exhibited a minimum depth of carbonation. Under exposure to the scCO{sub 2}/water at 200 C and 10.34 MPa pressure for up to 42 days, the ranking of the magnitude of erosion caused by wet carbonation was in the following order; granite > albite > hornblende > diorite > quartz. The eroding-caused weight loss of granite (0.88 %) was {approx}2.4, {approx}5.2, {approx}9.8, and {approx}17.6 times greater than that of albite, hornblends, diorite, and quartz, respectively.

Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

Brown, D.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsang, Y.W. : Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in aanalyses of heterogeneity and thermal-loading factors for a2005 Lin, W. , Sun, Y. : Thermal hydrological processes in

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Metal Ferrite Spinels for Solar-thermal Water Splitting REDOX Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Metal Ferrite Spinels for Solar-thermal Water Splitting REDOX Cycles. Author(s), Alan Weimer. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Alan Weimer.

80

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 5. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the northern Cache Valley area, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the north-south trending graben structure known as northern Cache Valley in southeastern Idaho were sampled during the summer and fall of 1973. Geologic and gravity data for the area indicate fault control for nearly all thermal water occurrences. Thermal-water discharges are generally restricted to the course of the Bear River with few known in areas away from the river. Spring deposits in the form of travertine may not be indications of low temperature thermal waters because abundant limestone and dolomite make up the geologic framework. Much gas, believed to consist mostly of carbon dioxide, is being evolved from many of the springs. The hottest water is found near Battle Creek and Squaw hot springs approximately 4 kilometers northwest of the town of Preston. Metoric waters descend along fault planes, fractures, and fissures to depths at which they are heated by increasing rock temperatures (geothermal gradient of 5/sup 0/C per 100 meters). Due to decreased density, the heated waters rise along the same or adjacent fault planes to the surface. The quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer applied to the thermal water discharges indicates temperatures approaching 150/sup 0/C may be encountered by deep drilling. Mixing models, based on quartz solubility, indicate higher aquifer temperatures than the quartz equilibrium thermometer, but chloride concentration vs. temperature plots are not linear. The sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometer indicates higher temperatures than quartz equilibrium and mixing models. The thermal waters are higher in total dissolved solids (12,000 to 13,000 milligrams per liter) than are known elsewhere in Idaho and represent potential pollution hazards should large scale withdrawal be attempted.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: characterization of rock types and alteration in Getty Oil Company well Utah state 52-21  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Getty Oil Company well 52-21 in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area was drilled to 7500 feet in predominantly upper amphibolite facies metamorphic rocks. All lithologies in the drill hole are pervasively but weakly altered: the alteration assemblage is chlorite + sericite + clays with occasional traces of calcite, above 2300 feet, and chlorite + sericite + clays + calcite +- epidote below 2500 feet. A zone of increased alteration intensity from approximately 1800 feet to 2300 feet occurs within and adjacent to a dacite dike which cuts the metamorphic rocks. A second zone of stronger alteration extends from 6000 feet to the bottom of the drill hole. The drill hole which is located approximately 5000 feet south of the center of the silica apron known as the Opal Mound was apparently drilled beyond the influence of acid, high-sulfate brines such as have affected the upper portions of drill holes 72-16, 76-1 and University of Utah 1A and 1B.

Ballantyne, G.H.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Water geochemistry and hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer at Roosevelt Hot Springs, southern Utah: A hot dry rock prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On the western edge of the geothermal field, three deep holes have been drilled that are very hot but mostly dry. Two of them (Phillips 9-1 and Acord 1-26 wells) have been studied by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) resources evaluation program. A review of data and recommendations have been formulated to evaluate the HDR geothermal potential at Roosevelt. The present report is directed toward the study of the shallow aquifer of the Milford Valley to determine if the local groundwater would be suitable for use as make-up water in an HDR system. This investigation is the result of a cooperative agreement between Los Alamos and Phillips Petroleum Co., formerly the main operator of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Unit. The presence of these hot dry wells and the similar setting of the Roosevelt area to the prototype HDR site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, make Roosevelt a very good candidate site for creation of another HDR geothermal system. This investigation has two main objectives: to assess the water geochemistry of the valley aquifer, to determine possible problems in future make-up water use, such as scaling or corrosion in the wells and surface piping, and to assess the hydrogeology of the shallow groundwaters above the HDR zone, to characterize the physical properties of the aquifer. These two objectives are linked by the fact that the valley aquifer is naturally contaminated by geothermal fluids leaking out of the hydrothermal reservoir. In an arid region where good-quality fresh water is needed for public water supply and irrigation, nonpotable waters would be ideal for an industrial use such as injection into an HDR energy extraction system. 50 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

SciTech Connect

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of in-situ oil-shale retorting on water quality near Rock Springs, Wyoming, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Experimental in-situ retorting techniques (methods of extracting shale oil without mining) were used from 1969 to 1979 by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) at a test area near Rock Springs in southwestern Wyoming. The retorting experiments at site 9 have produced elevated concentrations of some contaminants in the ground water. During 1988 and 1989, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, conducted a site characterization study to evaluate the chemical contamination of ground water at the site. Water samples from 34 wells were analyzed; more than 70 identifiable organic compounds were detected using a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analytical methods. This report provides information that can be used to evaluate possible remedial action for the site. Remediation techniques that may be applicable include those techniques based on removing the contaminants from the aquifer and those based on immobilizing the contaminants. Before a technique is selected, the risks associated with the remedial action (including the no-action alternative) need to be assessed, and the criteria to be used for decisions regarding aquifer restoration need to be defined. 31 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Lindner-Lunsford, J.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Plafcan, M.; Lowham, H.W.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drift-scale thermal test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencemechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test–waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The modeling

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Water injection into a Low-Permeability Rock - 2: Control Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1, we have demonstrated the inevitable growth of the fluid injection hydrofractures in low-permeability rocks. Thus, a smart controller that manages fluid injection in the presence of hydrofracture extension is highly desirable. Such a controller will be an essential part of automated waterflood project surveillance and control. Here we design an optimal injection controller using methods of optimal control theory. The controller inputs are the history of the injection pressure and the cumulative injection, along with the fracture size. The output parameter is the injection pressure and the control objective is the injection rate. We demonstrate that the optimal injection pressure depends not only on the instantaneous measurements, but it is determined by the whole history of the injection and of the fracture area growth. We show the controller robustness when the inputs are delayed and noisy and when the fracture undergoes abrupt extensions. Finally, we propose a procedure that allows estimation of the hydrofracture size at no additional cost.

Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Micromodel Investigations of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, carbon dioxide exsolution from carbonated water is directly observed under reservoir conditions (9MPa and 45oC). Fluorescence microscopy and image analysis are used to quantitatively characterize bubble formation, morphology, and mobility. Observations indicate the strong influence of interfacial tension and pore-geometry on bubble growth and evolution. Most of the gas exhibits little mobility during the course of depressurization and clogs water flow paths. However, a snap-off mechanism mobilizes a small portion of the trapped gas along the water flow paths. This feature contributes to the transport of the dispersed exsolved gas phase and the formation of intermittent gas flow. A new definition of critical gas saturation is proposed accordingly as the minimum saturation that snap-off starts to produce mobile bubbles. Low mobility of the water phase and CO2 phase in exsolution is explained by formation of dispersed CO2 bubbles which block water flow and lack the connectivity to create a mobile gas phase.

Zuo, Lin; Zhang, Changyong; Falta, Ronald W.; Benson, Sally M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 7. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the Camas Prairie area, Blaine and Camas Counties, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the east-west trending intermontane basin making up the Camas Prairie area were sampled during the fall of 1973. Average ground water temperature is 15/sup 0/C (10/sup 0/C above mean annual temperature). The thermal waters, chemically similar to thermal waters discharging from granitic rocks elsewhere in Idaho, have high pH, high Na/K and Na/Ca ratios, and high fluoride content. They are low in total dissolved solids (less than 365 mg/l), low in chloride, and exhibit relatively constant chloride/fluoride ratios and silica concentrations. Geochemical thermometers are interpreted to indicate that maximum aquifer temperatures in the Camas Prairie Basin are only about 100/sup 0/C, although higher temperatures were predicted by the quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer and mixing models. The Magic Hot Springs well, located near the north shore of the Magic Reservoir at Hot Springs Landing, is an exception to these general conclusions. These waters may be circulating to depths approaching 1,800 to 2,500 m along faults or fissures; or may be due to leakage from an aquifer or reservoir heated by a shallow heat source, related perhaps to the Holocene basalt flows south of Magic Reservoir. These waters are nearly neutral in pH, are much higher in dissolved solids, exhibit higher chloride/fluoride, chloride/carbonate plus bicarbonate, and chloride/sulfate ratios, and are, in general, chemically dissimilar to thermal waters elsewhere in the area. Temperatures predicted by geochemical thermometers are thought to indicate that Magic Hot Springs well waters are ascending from an aquifer or reservoir with temperatures from 140/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C. Temperatures in this range would be sufficient for application in many industrial processes, including power generation, should sufficient water be available.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

Numerical Simulation of Thermal-Solid Coupling to Coal-Rock during the Process of Heat Injection Mine for CBM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For gaining effective influence radius of heat injection mine for CBM (Coal Bed Methane) and influence rules of permeability under the condition of temperature and effective stress, heat transfer and elastic mechanics theory combined, hooker law of thermal ... Keywords: heat injection, thermal-solid coupling, numerical simulation, effective influence radius, permeability

Xin Le Yang; Yong Li Zhang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature and salinity seawater, thermal desalination and power plants ...

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Separation of heavy water by vapor-phase thermal diffusion coupled with distillation and condensation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on the enrichment of heavy water in a vapor-phase thermal-diffusion column has been conducted. With the combination of the effects of distillation, vapor-phase thermal diffusion, and partial condensation, considerable improvement in the degree of enrichment has been achieved in a vapor-phase column rather than in a liquid-phase column. It was also found that even the part of enrichment contributed only by vapor-phase thermal-diffusion effect is much higher than that obtained by liquid-phase thermal diffusion.

Yeh, H.M. [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China); Chang, S.M. [Cheng Kung Univ., Taiwan (China)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plant’s primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Thermal Economic Analysis of an Underground Water Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the thermal economic analysis of an underground water source heat pump system in a high school building based on usage per exergy cost as an evaluation standard, in which the black box model has been used and the cost of underground water has also been considered. The economics of the heat pump and other cooling and heating sources has been compared and then several simple methods to improve the thermal economics of the underground water heat pump system have been put forward.

Zhang, W.; Lin, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Pilot Program (Florida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program (Florida) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All...

102

On Water Flow in Hot Fractured Rock -- A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phases stored in matrix pores, the energy E M contained in VEnough energy is transmitted from the matrix to effectivelyfor energy transfer from the adjacent hot rock matrix rather

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhang, Yingqi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

On Water Flow in Hot Fractured Rock -- A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for both liquid and heat transfer processes. In order to beprocesses in hot fractured rock with ( 1) flow channeling in fractures, (2) interface reduction in F-M heat transfer,

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhang, Yingqi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

105

Abstract: Air, Thermal and Water Management for PEM Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are excellent candidates for transportation applications due to their high efficiencies. PEM fuel cell Balance of Plant (BOP) components, such as air, thermal, and water management sub-systems, can have a significant effect on the overall system performance, but have traditionally not been addressed in research and development efforts. Recognizing this, the U.S. Department of Energy and Honeywell International Inc. are funding an effort that emphasizes the integration and optimization of air, thermal and water management sub-systems. This effort is one of the major elements to assist the fuel cell system developers and original equipment manufacturers to achieve the goal of an affordable and efficient power system for transportation applications. Past work consisted of: (1) Analysis, design, and fabrication of a motor driven turbocompressor. (2) A systematic trade study to select the most promising water and thermal management systems from five different concepts (absorbent wheel humidifier, gas to gas membrane humidifier, porous metal foam humidifier, cathode recycle compressor, and water injection pump.) This presentation will discuss progress made in the research and development of air, water and thermal management sub-systems for PEM fuel cell systems in transportation applications. More specifically, the presentation will discuss: (1) Progress of the motor driven turbocompressor design and testing; (2) Progress of the humidification component selection and testing; and (3) Progress of the thermal management component preliminary design. The programs consist of: (1) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of a compact motor driven turbocompressor operating on foil air bearings to provide contamination free compressed air to the fuel cell stack while recovering energy from the exhaust streams to improve system efficiency. (2) The analysis, design, fabrication and testing of selected water and thermal management systems and components to improve system efficiency and reduce packaging size.

Mark K. Gee

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THERMAL WATER SPLITTING PROCESSES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on thermal water splitting processes is presented. Results of the analysis show that the overall efficiency of any thermal water splitting process operating between two temperature limits is proportional to the Carnot efficiency. Implications of thermodynamic efficiency limits and the impacts of loss mechanisms and operating conditions are discussed as they pertain specifically to hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis. Overall system performance predictions are also presented for high-temperature electrolysis plants powered by three different advanced nuclear reactor types, over their respective operating temperature ranges.

J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Re-Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Thermal Waters Along The Konocti Bay Fault Zone, Lake County, California- A Re-Evaluation Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Konocti Bay fault zone (KBFZ), initially regarded by some as a promising target for liquid-dominated geothermal systems, has been a disappointment. At least five exploratory wells were drilled in the vicinity of the KBFZ, but none were successful. Although the Na-K-Ca and Na-Li geothermometers indicate that the thermal waters discharging in the vicinity of Howard and Seigler Springs may have equilibrated at temperatures greater than 200°C, the spring temperatures and fluid

108

Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hydrogeochemical data for thermal and nonthermal waters and gases of the Valles Caldera- southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents field, chemical, gas, and isotopic data for thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, north of San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near-surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters at Sulphur Springs (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters in the ring fracture zone (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal waters of the Baca geothermal field and derivative waters in the Soda Dam and Jemez Springs area (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. Data in this report will help in interpreting the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and will provide background for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Shevenell, L.; Goff, F.; Vuataz, F.; Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Janik, C.J.; Evans, W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

LARGO hot water system long range thermal performance test report. Addendum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedure used and the test results obtained during the long range thermal performance tests of the LARGO Solar Hot Water System under natural environmental conditions are presented. Objectives of these tests were to determine the amount of energy collected, the amount of power required for system operation, system efficiency temperature distribution and system performance degradation.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design of solar water-heater installations for seasonal users of thermal energy  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed for a solar water-heating unit intended to be employed by seasonal users of thermal energy. The expected characteristics of such units are calculated for an ''average'' operating season.

Valyuzhinich, A.A.; Myshko, Yu.L.; Smirnov, S.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hot rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four kilometers down below the orange earth of Australia¿s Cooper Basin lies some of the hottest nonvolcanic rock in the world¿rock that the geothermal industry had never seriously considered using to make electricity. But next month Geodynamics, an ...

S. Upson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geothermal data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the Valles Caldera - southern Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field, chemical, and isotopic data for 95 thermal and nonthermal waters of the southern Jemez Mountains, New Mexico are presented. This region includes all thermal and mineral waters associated with Valles Caldera and many of those located near the Nacimiento Uplift, near San Ysidro. Waters of the region can be categorized into five general types: (1) surface and near surface meteoric waters; (2) acid-sulfate waters (Valles Caldera); (3) thermal meteoric waters (Valles Caldera); (4) deep geothermal and derivative waters (Valles Caldera); and (5) mineralized waters near San Ysidro. Some waters display chemical and isotopic characteristics intermediate between the types listed. The object of the data is to help interpret geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains region and to provide background data for investigating problems in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry.

Goff, F.; McCormick, Trujillo, P.E. Jr.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hot dry rock heat mining: An alternative energy progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mining Heat from the hot dry rock (HDR) resource that lies beneath the earth's crust may provide an almost inexhaustible supply of energy for mankind with minimal environmental effects. In the heat mining process, water is pumped down an injection well into a mass of hydraulically fractured hot rock. As the water flows under high pressure through the opened rock joints, it becomes heated by the rock. It is returned to the surface through a production well (or wells) located some distance from the injector where its thermal energy is recovered by a heat exchanger. The same water is then recirculated through the system to extract more thermal energy. In this closed-loop process, nothing but heat is released to the environment during normal operation. The technical feasibility of HDR heat mining already has been proven by field testing. A long-term flow test is scheduled to begin in 1991 at the world's largest HDR heat mine in New Mexico, USA, to demonstrate that energy can be produced from HDR on a continuous basis over an extended time period. Significant HDR programs are also underway in several other countries. The paper describes the HDR resource, the heat mining concept, environmental characteristics, economics, developments at Los Alamos to date, and HDR development outside the US. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Duchane, D.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal-Structural Design of a Water Shield For Surface Reactor Missions  

SciTech Connect

Water shielding is an attractive option for an affordable lunar surface fission reactor program. The attractiveness of the water shielding option arises from the relative ease of proto-typing and ground testing, the relatively low development effort needed, as well as the fabrication and operating experience with stainless steel and water. The most significant limitation in using a water shield is temperature: to prevent the formation of voids and the consequent loss of cooling, the water temperature has to be maintained below the saturation temperature corresponding to the shield pressure. This paper examines natural convection for a prototypic water shield design using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5 as well as analytical modeling. The results show that natural convection is adequate to keep the water well-mixed. The results also show that for the above-ground configuration, shield surface and water temperatures during lunar day conditions are high enough to require shield pressures up to 2.5 atm to prevent void formation. For the buried configuration, a set of ammonia heat pipes attached to the shield outer wall can be used to maintain water temperatures within acceptable limits. Overall the results show that water shielding is feasible for lunar surface applications. The results of the CFD analyses can also be used to guide development of testing plans for shield thermal testing. (authors)

Sadasivan, Pratap; Kapernick, Richard J.; Poston, David I. [D-5 Nuclear Systems Design Group MS K575, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87545 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion: Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

117

Chemical and hydrologic data for selected thermal-water wells and nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents data collected during January to July 1988 from 37 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs in the Boise area, southwestern Idaho. Included are well and spring locations; well-construction, water-level, and water-use information; hydrographs of water levels in 3 wells; chemical and isotopic analyses of water from 18 thermal-water wells and 3 nonthermal springs; and drillers' logs from 23 wells. The purpose of the report is to make these data conveniently available to the public. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.; Mariner, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented.

Diamond, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal energy experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent heat flow data indicates that about 95,000 sq. mi. in 13 western U.S. states is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft) by hot dry rock at temperatures above 290/sup 0/C (440/sup 0/F.). Therefore a geothermal energy development program was undertaken to develop methods from extracting thermal energy from hot rock in the earth crust by man-made underground circulation systems; demonstrate the commercial feasibility of such systems; and encourage use of this technology. Experiments performed on the Jemez Plateau in New Mexico are described with information on the drilling of boreholes, hydraulic fracturing of hot rocks, well logging, and environmental monitoring to establish base line data and define the potential effects of the project. The technical achievements of the project include boreholes were drilled to 3k (10,000 ft) with bottomhole temperatures of approximately 200/sup 0/C (390/sup 0/F); hydraulic fracturing produced fractured regions with 150 m (500 ft) radii; at least 90 percent of the water injected was recovered; and data was obtained on geologic conditions, seismic effects, and thermal, fracturing, and chemical properties of the downhole rocks. A geothermal power-production system model was formulated for evaluating the total cost of developing power production using a hot-dry-rock geothermal energy source. (LCL)

Pettitt, R.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Directly coupled solar thermal water pumping concepts for agriculture. Final report, October 1978-May 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The directly coupled solar thermal water pumping system has been analyzed for both performance and cost. Performance estimates for a real operating system exceed 8% for the typical environmental conditions expected. The cost of such a system, using currently available flat-panel collectors, is highly competitive with alternative, remote location, water pumping systems. Although the system has a fairly low relative cost, there are areas such as valve and actuator cost that have a high potential for reducing system cost, especially for smaller systems. The performance of the system can be improved by high-performance, moderate-temperature collectors such as evacuated glass tubes. The advantages of the directly coupled solar thermal system are simplicity and limited failure modes. Results of the experimental phase indicate that the analytic models provide an accurate estimate of achievable system performance.

Scharlack, R S

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Deep water pipe, pump, and mooring study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean engineering issues affecting the design, construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants are of key importance. This study addressed the problems associated with the conceptual design of the deep-water pipe, cold-water-pumping, and platform mooring arrangements. These subsystems fall into a natural grouping since the parameters affecting their design are closely related to each other and to the ocean environment. Analysis and evaluations are provided with a view toward judging the impact of the various subsystems on the overall plant concept and to provide an estimate of material and construction cost. Parametric data is provided that describes mooring line configurations, mooring line loads, cold water pipe configurations, and cold water pumping schemes. Selected parameters, issues, and evaluation criteria are used to judge the merits of candidate concepts over a range of OTEC plant size from 100 MWe to 1000 MWe net output power.

Little, T.E.; Marks, J.D.; Wellman, K.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Reid, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Los Alamos hot dry rock geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greatest potential for geothermal energy is the almost unlimited energy contained in the vast regions of hot, but essentially impermeable, rock within the first six or seven km of the Earth's crust. For the past five years, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been investigating and developing a practical, economical and environmentally acceptable method of extracting this energy. By early 1978, a 10 MW (thermal) heat extraction experiment will be in operation. In the Los Alamos concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir is formed by drilling into a region of suitably hot rock, and then creating within the rock a very large surface for heat transfer by large-scale hydraulic-fracturing techniques. After a circulation loop is formed by drilling a second hole to intersect the fractured region, the heat contained in this reservoir is brought to the surface by the buoyant closed-loop circulation of water. The water is kept liquid throughout the loop by pressurization, thereby increasing the rate of heat transport up the withdrawal hole compared to that possible with steam.

Brown, D.W.; Pettitt, R.A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of hot dry rock resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is the only U.S. field test of this geothermal resource. In the LASL concept, a man-made geothermal reservoir would be formed by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rock, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by fracturing the rock hydraulically, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the circulation loop. In 1974, the first hole was drilled to a depth of 2929 m (9610 ft) and a hydraulic fracture was produced near the bottom. In 1975, a second hole was directionally drilled to intersect the fracture. Although the desired intersection was not achieved, a connection was made through which water was circulated. After a year's study of the fracture system, drilling began again in April 1977 and an improved connection was achieved. In September of 1977 a 5 MW (thermal) heat extraction and circulation experiment was conducted for 100 h as a preliminary test of the concept. An 1800-h circulation experiment was concluded on April 13, 1978 to determine temperature-drawdown, permeation water loss and flow characteristics of the pressurized reservoir, to examine chemistry changes in the circulating fluid, and to monitor for induced seismic effects.

Pettitt, R.A.; Tester, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test J.mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Int J Rock

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Thermal Discharge Retrievals with Ground Truth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at a mid-latitude cold-water site along the Atlantic coast near Plymouth, MA. In contrast to the relative uniformity of the sea-surface temperature in the open ocean the water temperature near Pilgrim exhibits strong spatial gradients and temporal variability. This made it critical that all images be accurately registered in order to extract temperature values at the six buoy locations. Sixteen images during a one-year period from August 2000 to July 2001 were selected for the study. The RMS error of Pilgrim water temperature is about 3.5 C for the 4 buoys located in open water. The RMS error of the combined temperatures from 3 of the open-water buoys is 2.8 C. The RMS error includes errors in the ground truth. The magnitude of this error is estimated to range between 0.8 and 2.3 C. The two main components of this error are warm-layer effect and spatial variability. The actual error in the MTI retrievals for Pilgrim daytime conditions is estimated to be between 2.7 and 3.4 C for individual buoys and between 1.7 and 2.7 C for the combined open-water buoys.

Kurzeja, R.J.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Lab Analysis Rock Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core and cuttings analysis is done to define lithology. Water rock interaction. Can determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology. Density of different lithologic units. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Historic structure and deformation of land.

133

Concentrated solar thermal (cst) system for fuelwood replacement and for household water sanitation in developing countries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrated Solar Thermal (CST) is a proven renewable energy technology that harnesses solar irradiation in its most primitive form. This technology with roots in ancient history is growing at a fast pace in recent times. Developing countries could use CST to solve fundamental human-needs challenges, such as for the substitution of fuelwood and the treatment of water for household use. This paper proposes a conceptual design for a standardized modular CST for these applications in developing countries. A modular-designed parabolic CST with an aperture area of 7.5 m2 is adequate to provide enough solar thermal energy to replace the fuelwood need (5 tons/yr) or to pasteurize the minimum daily water requirement (2500 liters) for a household. Critical parameters of the CST are discussed and an affordable solid thermal storage is recommended to be used as a backup when sunlight is unavailable. A funding program that includes in-country resources and external funding will be needed to sustain the development and wide spread adaptation of this technology.

Akinjiola, O. P.; Balachandran, U. (Energy Systems); (Rsage Research, LLC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Thermal energy storage tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-powered water desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a unique project in terms of its size, purpose, objectives, and scope. The plant uses a combination of solar thermal energy and fossil-fuel energy to provide the shaft horsepower necessary to operate the indirect heat-transfer freeze desalination process developed and patented by Chicago Bridge and Iron Inc. (CBandI) to produce potable water. The thermal storage acts as a buffer between the energy collection subsystem and the energy delivery subsystem. This report describes the thermal storage subsystem. One of the objectives of the desalination research project is to publish a series of reports on the performance of its various subsystems. The authors of this report do not claim that it is exhaustive and complete in all respects, for more than one reason. Any research activity is like an open-ended problem and during the tenure of its investigation it raises more problems than can be solved. However, the authors believe that the storage system behavior has posed no serious problem and that the report adequately covers all the facets of the investigation. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Study of Water Speed Sensitivity in a Multifunctional Thick-film Sensor by Analytical Thermal Simulations and Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper deals with an application of the analytical thermal simulator DJOSER. It consist of the characterization of a water speed sensor realized in hybrid technology. The capability of the thermal solver to manage the convection heat exchange and the effects of the passivating layers make the simulation work easy and fast.

F. Stefani; P. E. Bagnoli; S. Luschi

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

Zia Mirza, Program Manager

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Prediction of the Environmental Mobility of Arsenic: Evaluation of a Mechanistic Approach to Modeling Water-Rock Partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic chemistry is important to the drinking water, waste management, and energy industries because of its potential health effects from low levels of exposure, breadth of occurrence, and expense of current treatment and disposal technologies. Since predicting arsenic behavior and mobility in the environment is currently not well developed, this project was undertaken to increase knowledge by testing and evaluating a mechanistic model for arsenic water-mineral partitioning.

2000-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

Isotopic Geochemistry and Hydrology of Geothermal Waters in the Ethiopian Rift Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evidence subsurface water-rock source for a reaction in thissuch source water undergoes isotopic exchange with rocks totype source waters are modified by interaction with rocks to

Isotope Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source scheme in economical, technical, and environmental aspects, it is determined that the scheme of the groundwater source heat pump has better energy efficiency than others. The GHPWTS can take full advantage of the heat source from groundwater and benefit of electricity difference pricing during a day. Its character is a combination of a strength and another strength. It is the lowest cycle cost of all chide and heat source schemes. The GHPWTS has the best economic benefit and runs stably and reliably. Its advantage is clearly compared with other schemes. There is a real value for the project that is similar to the characteristic of this project and the condition of the water source.

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Korean Development of Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Codes for Water Reactors and HTGRs: Space and Gamma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 14th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics (NURETH-14) / Thermal Hydraulics

Hee Cheon No; Sang Jun Ha; Kyung Doo Kim; Hong Sik Lim; Eo Hwak Lee; Hyung Gon Jin

143

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

144

Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Density Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Density Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Density of different lithologic units. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 10.001,000 centUSD 0.01 kUSD 1.0e-5 MUSD 1.0e-8 TUSD / sample

145

Hot Dry Rock at Fenton Hill, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program, operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the Precambrian basement rock at Fenton Hill, outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase 1, 1978--1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/degree/C. A second (Phase 2) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/degree/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Hendron, R.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The US Hot Dry Rock project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

Hendron, R.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Proceedings of hot dry rock geothermal workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstracts of 38 papers are included on the following subjects: rock mechanics, part 1: hydraulic fracturing; fracture imaging and borehole surveying; fluid flow-pressure analyses; rock mechanics, part 2: hydraulic fracturing and thermal cracking; geochemistry; heat extraction modeling; and economics and energy conversion. (MHR)

Elsner, D.B. (comp.)

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils  

SciTech Connect

The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53/sup 0/C; for the OH coils 46/sup 0/C and for the EF coils 39/sup 0/C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120/sup 0/C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33/sup 0/C which is below the coolant design limit of 100/sup 0/C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil (36.6 kA/conductor).

Lee, A.Y.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Pressurized thermal shock: TEMPEST computer code simulation of thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a pressurized water reactor. [Creare 61 and 64  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST computer program was used to simulate fluid and thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a pressurized water reactor under emergency core cooling high-pressure injection (HPI), which is of concern to the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) problem. Application of the code was made in performing an analysis simulation of a full-scale Westinghouse three-loop plant design cold leg and downcomer. Verification/assessment of the code was performed and analysis procedures developed using data from Creare 1/5-scale experimental tests. Results of three simulations are presented. The first is a no-loop-flow case with high-velocity, low-negative-buoyancy HPI in a 1/5-scale model of a cold leg and downcomer. The second is a no-loop-flow case with low-velocity, high-negative density (modeled with salt water) injection in a 1/5-scale model. Comparison of TEMPEST code predictions with experimental data for these two cases show good agreement. The third simulation is a three-dimensional model of one loop of a full size Westinghouse three-loop plant design. Included in this latter simulation are loop components extending from the steam generator to the reactor vessel and a one-third sector of the vessel downcomer and lower plenum. No data were available for this case. For the Westinghouse plant simulation, thermally coupled conduction heat transfer in structural materials is included. The cold leg pipe and fluid mixing volumes of the primary pump, the stillwell, and the riser to the steam generator are included in the model. In the reactor vessel, the thermal shield, pressure vessel cladding, and pressure vessel wall are thermally coupled to the fluid and thermal mixing in the downcomer. The inlet plenum mixing volume is included in the model. A 10-min (real time) transient beginning at the initiation of HPI is computed to determine temperatures at the beltline of the pressure vessel wall.

Eyler, L.L.; Trent, D.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hybrid photovoltaic thermal collector (PVT) for the production of hot water and electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main concept of developing the hybrid Photovoltaic/Thermal (PV/T) is to increase the efficiency of the solar and thermal collector. It is known that the efficiency of the Photovoltaic solar collector is decreases when the ambient temperature increased ... Keywords: absorber collectors, hybrid photovoltaic thermal (PVT), thermal and electrical efficiency

Adnan Ibrahim; K. Sopian; M. Y. Othman; M. H. Ruslan; M. A. Alghoul; M. Yahya; Azami Zaharim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Experimental investigation on the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system on water-heating mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study on operation performance of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was conducted in this paper. The experimental system of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure, the condensation pressure and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump air-conditioning system, the water temperature and receiving heat capacity in water heater, the photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and the photovoltaic efficiency were investigated. The experimental results show that the mean photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar heat pump air-conditioning system reaches 10.4%, and can improve 23.8% in comparison with that of the conventional photovoltaic module, the mean COP of heat pump air-conditioning system may attain 2.88 and the water temperature in water heater can increase to 42 C. These results indicate that the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system has better performances and can stably work. (author)

Fang, Guiyin; Hu, Hainan; Liu, Xu [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

CRC handbook of physical properties of rocks. Volume III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book presents topics on: Density of rocks and minerals, includes histograms of density ranges; elastic constants of minerals, elastic moduli, thermal properties; inelastic properties, strength and rheology for rocks and minerals, rock mechanics and friction, and stress-strain relations; radioactivity, decay constants and heat production of isotope systems in geology; seismic attenuation, in rocks, minerals, and the earth, with application to oil exploration and terrestrial studies; and index.

Carmichael, R.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hot dry rock geothermal heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A man-made geothermal reservoir has been created at a depth of 2.7 km in hot, dry granite by hydraulic fracturing. The system was completed by directionally drilling a second well in close proximity with the top of the vertical fracture. In early 1978 heat was extracted from this reservoir for a period of 75 days. During this period thermal power was produced at an average rate of 4 MW(t). Theoretical analysis of th measured drawdown suggests a total fracture heat transfer area of 16,000 m/sup 2/. Viscous impedance to through-flow declined continuously so that at the end of the experiment this impedance was only one-fifth its initial value. Water losses to the surrounding rock formation also decreased continuously, and eventually this loss rate was less than 1% of the circulated flow rate. Geochemical analyses suggest that, with scale up of the heat transfer area and deeper, hotter reservoirs, hot dry rock reservoirs can ultimately produce levels of power on a commercial scale.

Murphy, H.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summer of previous years, Kuwait faced a series of power shortages emphasizing the need for urgent commissioning of power generation projects. It is estimated that the demand for electricity is growing at an average of 6.2% per year, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS) system is one of the available techniques that can be utilized to reduce peak electricity demand of buildings when national electricity consumption is at its highest level. This paper demonstrates that the use of CWTS system reduces the peak power demand and energy consumption of AC systems for design day conditions by 36.7% - 87.5% and 5.4% - 7.2%, respectively. This reduction depends on selected operating strategies as compared with conventional AC system. Furthermore, results show that the annual energy consumption of CWTS systems decreases by between 4.5% and 6.9% compared with conventional systems, where chillers and pumps significantly contribute to this reduction.

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Industrial applications of hot dry rock geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of naturally occurring hot water or steam have been utilized for many years. While these hydrothermal resources are found in many places, the general case is that the rock at depth is hot, but does not contain significant amounts of mobile fluid. An extremely large amount of geothermal energy is found around the world in this hot dry rock (HDR). Technology has been under development for more than twenty years at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the United States and elsewhere to develop the technology to extract the geothermal energy from HDR in a form useful for electricity generation, space heating, or industrial processing. HDR technology is especially attractive for industrial applications because of the ubiquitous distribution of the HDR resource and the unique aspects of the process developed to recover it. In the HDR process, as developed at Los Alamos, water is pumped down a well under high pressure to open up natural joints in hot rock and create an artificial geothermal reservoir. Energy is extracted by circulating water through the reservoir. Pressurized hot water is returned to the surface through the production well, and its thermal energy is extracted for practical use. The same water is then recirculated through the system to mine more geothermal heat. Construction of a pilot HDR facility at Fenton Hill, NM, USA, has recently been completed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists of a large underground reservoir, a surface plant, and the connecting wellbores. This paper describes HDR technology and the current status of the development program. Novel industrial applications of geothermal energy based on the unique characteristics of the HDR energy extraction process are discussed.

Duchane, D.V.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task III. Mechanical properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Final report, 1 March 1980-29 February 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research performed to gain a fundamental understanding of the mechanical and transport properties of rocks under confining pressure and elevated temperature. There have been many contributions to our understanding of the mechanical behavior or rocks at high temperatures and pressures, but perhaps the three most outstanding contributions are the data which: (a) have helped to demonstrate the scientific feasibility of energy extraction from buried magma by assessing the likelihood of the rock mass to support stable boreholes at the pressures, temperatures (to partial melting), and aqueous conditions apt to occur in crystalline rocks above buried magma chambers; (b) have demonstrated that crystalline rocks deform primarily by brittle fracture when deformed at effective confining pressures to 200 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (to >1000/sup 0/C), water-saturated or room-dry, and in constant strain rate tests (e dot = 10/sup -4/-10/sup -7//sec) or in creep tests; and (c) have shown that under these same conditions the time-dependent behavior of the rocks in the quasi-steady state regime is well described by the flow law: e dot = Asigma/sup n/exp(-Q/RT) - a formulation previously thought to be applicable to rocks deforming primarily by crystal plasticity. This result suggests that fracture is also a time-dependent, thermally-activated process.

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme inclined for improved performance  

SciTech Connect

A separation theory for the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme inclined for improved performance has been developed. Equations for the best angle of inclination and maximum separation have been derived. Considerable improvement in separation is obtainable if the columns are inclined at the best angle, so that the convective strength can be properly reduced and controlled, resulting in suppression of the undesirable remixing effect while still preserving the desirable cascading effect.

Ho-Ming Yeh [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Olivella Grooved Rectangle Beads from a Middle Holocene Site in the Fort Rock Valley, Northern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Fort Rock and other local sources. The primary culturalRock Valley currently receives no water from a perennial source.

Jenkins, Dennis L; Erlandson, Jon M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hot dry rock fracture propagation and reservoir characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North America's largest hydraulic fracturing opeations have been conducted at Fenton hill, New mexico to creae hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs. Microearthquakes induced by these fracturing operations were measured with geophones. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the pre-existing joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60)degree) to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. Field testing of HDR reservoirs at the Fenton Hill site shows that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area. These temporal increases indicate that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock system occurred. For future reservoir testing, Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts. Recent studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene, which can be used in reservoirs as hot as 275)degree)C.

Murphy, H.; Fehler, M.; Robinson, B.; Tester, J.; Potter, R.; Birdsell, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies primarily on minerals, gases, and water found in surficial deposits to construct a conceptual model for Mount Rainier that considers the following factors: - Locations of hydrothermal leakage at the surface; - Structures that provide permeable paths of fluid egress to the surface; - Amount of excess heat discharge; - Composition of surficial thermal fluids; - Composition, guided by mineralogy, of subsurface thermal fluids. Analytical data used as a basis for the model are from samples

166

POLICY ANALYSIS OF PRODUCED WATER ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial scale oil shale and oil sands development will require water, the amount of which will depend on the technologies adopted and the scale of development that occurs. Water in oil shale and oil sands country is already in scarce supply, and because of the arid nature of the region and limitations on water consumption imposed by interstate compacts and the Endangered Species Act, the State of Utah normally does not issue new water rights in oil shale or oil sands rich areas. Prospective oil shale and oil sands developers that do not already hold adequate water rights can acquire water rights from willing sellers, but large and secure water supplies may be difficult and expensive to acquire, driving oil shale and oil sands developers to seek alternative sources of supply. Produced water is one such potential source of supply. When oil and gas are developed, operators often encounter ground water that must be removed and disposed of to facilitate hydrocarbon extraction. Water produced through mineral extraction was traditionally poor in quality and treated as a waste product rather than a valuable resource. However, the increase in produced water volume and the often-higher quality water associated with coalbed methane development have drawn attention to potential uses of produced water and its treatment under appropriations law. This growing interest in produced water has led to litigation and statutory changes that must be understood and evaluated if produced water is to be harnessed in the oil shale and oil sands development process. Conversely, if water is generated as a byproduct of oil shale and oil sands production, consideration must be given to how this water will be disposed of or utilized in the shale oil production process. This report explores the role produced water could play in commercial oil shale and oil sands production, explaining the evolving regulatory framework associated with produced water, Utah water law and produced water regulation, and the obstacles that must be overcome in order for produced water to support the nascent oil shale and oil sands industries.

Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

Mark D. Habana

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

170

Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Korea two popular water distribution systems—the branch type and the separate type systems—have serious drawbacks. The branch type suffers from temperature instability while the separate type suffers from excessive piping. Neither of them re-circulates water. The system proposed in this paper utilizes a water-conserving piping system with a thermostat valve. This paper compares the proposed system with that of the separate type. Our findings show that the proposed system wastes less water. After re-circulating for 78-87 seconds, water is available at set point temperature (40°C). Also, when multiple water taps are in use, the average temperature deviation is less than 0.6°C. Moreover, the proposed system has 50% less flow rate than the separate type system.

Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ASSEMBLAGES ON WASTE ROCK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Natural regeneration on waste rock was investigated at the old Wangaloa coal mine, south-east Otago. A 450-m long waste rock stack had been created 40–50 years ago, and has had little anthropogenic intervention since. The stack is made up of a gradient of three main waste rock types, defined as ‘silt-rich’, ‘mixed’, and ‘quartz-rich’, which reflect different proportions of loess siltstone and quartz gravel conglomerate. Plant species assemblages were quantified in four 5-m 2 quadrats in each waste rock type. Invertebrates were heat extracted from substrate cores (7 cm diameter; depth 5 cm) collected from quadrats over an eight-week period in spring 2003. Ordination analysis showed statistically distinct plant and invertebrate assemblages had arisen on each waste rock type. Revegetation patterns were dominated by native, woody individuals on all waste rock types, particularly manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides). Plant cover on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock was four-fold that on ‘quartz-rich ’ waste rock. Total numbers of invertebrates were highest on ‘quartz-rich’ waste rock, but richness greatest on ‘silt-rich ’ waste rock. Collembola dominated the fauna but their numbers were proportionally greatest in poorly vegetated areas. Further work is required to explain the absence of plants and invertebrates from local areas of waste rock. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

C. G. Rufaut; S. Hammit; D. Craw; S. G. Clearwater

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature… (more)

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hot dry rock: A climate change action opportunity for industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal resources in the form of heat found in rock that is hot but is not in contact with sufficient mobile fluid to transport that heat to the surface are a large, as yet virtually unexploited, source of clean energy. The technology to extract useful amounts of energy from this ubiquitous hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development for more than twenty years. During the last two years, flow testing at the Fenton Hill HDR pilot facility in New Mexico has answered many of the questions about the viability of HDR heat mining. While the most important issue of thermal longevity of the artificial geothermal reservoir that is the heart of an HDR energy system was not fully resolved, the test results provided good reasons to be optimistic that such reservoirs can have long lifetimes. No decline was observed in the temperature of the fluid produced during the relatively short test period and tracer testing indicated that the reservoir may be thermally self sustaining. In addition, water consumption during the circulation test was reduced to very low levels, the production of significant excess energy over that required simply to operate the system was verified, and routine energy production with virtually no emissions to the environment, except waste heat, was demonstrated.

Duchane, D.V.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Borehole temperature survey analysis hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively investigating the potential for extracting geothermal energy from hot dry rock. A man-made geothermal reservoir has been formed at the Fenton Hill Test Site in northern New Mexico. The 10-MW (thermal) prototype energy extraction circulation loop has been completed and has been continuously operating since January 28 of this year. The performance of the Phase I 1000-h circulation experiment would establish technological assessment of the particular hot dry rock geothermal reservoir. The major parameters of interest include equipment operations, geochemistry, water loss, and reservoir thermal drawdown. Temperature measurements were used extensively as one method to study the man-made geothermal reservoir. The temperature probe is one of the less complex wellbore survey tools that is readily fielded to allow on-line analysis of changing conditions in the hydraulic-fracture system. Several downhole temperature instruments have been designed and fabricated for use in the GT-2/EE-1 wellbores.

Dennis, B.R.; Murphy, H.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF LASER SPALLATION DRILLING OF ROCKS P532 Zhiyue Xu, Yuichiro Yamashita 1 , and Claude B. Reed Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439, USA 1 Now with Kyushu University, Japan Abstract High power lasers can weaken, spall, melt and vaporize natural earth materials with thermal spallation being the most energy efficient rock removal mechanism. Laser rock spallation is a very complex phenomenon that depends on many factors. Computer numerical modeling would provides great tool to understand the fundamental of this complex phenomenon, which is crucial to the success of its applications. Complexity of modeling laser rock spallation is due to: 1) rock is a porous media, to which traditional theories of heat transfer and rock mechanics can not be directly

176

Potential for hot-dry-rock geothermal energy in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

ABS>The U. S. Geological Survey has identified 1.5 million acres (2800 square miles) of western lands as having a significant potential for geothermal development.'' The LASL for the past 2 years has been actively investigating the potential for and preblems associated with extracting geothermal energy from the much more numerous regions of the western United States containing hot, but essentially dry, rock at moderate depths. A recent survey reveals that about 7% of the 13-state area comprising the Western Heat Flow Province---about 95,000 square miles--is underlain, at a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft), by hot rock at temperature levels above 290 deg C (>550 deg F). In the Los Alamos concept a man- made geothermal reservoir would be formed by first drilling into suitably hot rock, and then creating a very large surface area for heat transfer using conventional hydraulic fracturing techniques developed by the oil industry. After forming a circulation loop by drilling a second hole into the top of the fractured region, the heat contained would be convected to the surface by the buoyant circulation of water, without the need for pumping. The water in the Earth loop would be maintained as a liquid throughout by pressurization at the surface, both increasing the amount of heat transport up the second (withdrawal) hole, and enhancing the rate of heat removal from the fractured reservoir, when compared to steam. Thermal stresses resulting from the cooling of the hot rock in such a man-made reservoir may gradually enlarge the initial fracture system so that its useful lifetime will be greatly extended beyond the planned 10 to 15 years provided by the original reservoir. If these thermal stress cracks grow preferentially downward and outward into regions of hotter rock, as seems probable, the quality of the geothermal source may actually improve as energy is withdrawn from it. (auth)

Brown, D.W.

1973-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hot dry rock energy extraction field test: 75 days of operation of a prototype reservoir at Fenton Hill, Segment 2 of Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the first extensive field test of a man-made hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir in low permeability crystalline rock are presented. A reservoir with a small heat transfer area was utilized to study the characteristics of a prototype HDR system over a shortened lifetime. The resulting accelerated thermal drawdown was modeled to yield an effective area of 8000 m/sup 2/. In addition to the thermal effects, this test provided an opportunity to examine equipment operation, water permeation into the formation, geochemical interaction between the circulating fluid and the rock and flow characteristics including impedance and residence time distributions. Continuous monitoring for induced seismic effects showed that no activity to a Richter threshold of -1.0 was detected during the 75-day experiment.

Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N. (eds.)

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Thermographthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Some approaches to rock mass hydrofracture theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new engineering method has been developed at the Leningrad Mining Institute for defining hot dry rock hydrofracturing parameters. It reflects the structural features of a real jointed rock mass, its gravity-tectonic components of the stress tensor and volume character of deformations, taking into account the inertial effects of hydrodynamics in the non-Darcy zone of radial fluid flow near the injection well, and conversion of the heat energy extracted from hot rock by circulating water partly into filtration-flow additional pressure. Results of calculations are compared to field experiments at Fenton Hill, NM, and are used for the first HDR circulation systems in the USSR.

Dyadkin, Yuri, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal springs in the Salmon River basin, central Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salmon River basin within the study area occupies an area of approximately 13,000 square miles in central Idaho. Geologic units in the basin are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; however, granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith are predominant. Water from thermal springs ranges in temperature from 20.5/sup 0/ to 94.0/sup 0/ Celsius. The waters are slightly alkaline and are generally a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations are variable and range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined from the silicic acid-corrected silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 30/sup 0/ to 184/sup 0/ Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal waters are near zero and indicate the waters are at least 100 years old. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely that a single hot-water reservoir supplies hot springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 15,800 acre-feet of water in 1980. Associated convective heat flux is 2.7 x 10/sup 7/ calories per second.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

Blackett, R.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

184

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock  

SciTech Connect

The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

Rowley, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 12. Stable isotopic evaluation of thermal water occurrences in the Weiser and Little Salmon River drainage basins and adjacent areas, west-central Idaho with attendant gravity and magnetic data on the Weiser area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fifteen thermal springs, two thermal wells, and eight cold springs in the Weiser and Little Salmon river drainages were sampled for deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis during the fall of 1981. The straight-line fit of delta D and delta /sup 18/O versus latitude and longitude observed in the data is what would be expected if the recharge areas for the thermal and non-thermal waters were in close proximity to their respective discharge points. The discrete values of delta D and delta /sup 18/O for each thermal discharge suggest that none of the sampled thermal systems have common sources. The depleted deuterium and oxygen-18 contents of most thermal relative to non-thermal waters sampled suggests that the thermal waters might be Pleistocene age precipitation. The isotopic data suggest little or no evidence for mixing of thermal and non-thermal water for the sampled discharges. Thermal waters from Weiser, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, and White Licks hot springs show enrichment in oxygen-18 suggesting that these waters have been at elevated temperatures relative to other sampled thermal discharges in the area. Gravity and magnetic data gathered by the Idaho State University Geology Department in the Weiser Hot Springs area suggest that southeastward plunging synclinal-anticlinal couples, which underlie the hot springs, are cut south of the springs by a northeast trending boundary fault.

Mitchell, J.C.; Bideganeta, K.; Palmer, M.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springson Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understandprocesses that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water,and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower

188

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Energy Development Program is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of HDR as a significant energy source and to provide a basis for its timely commercial development. Principal operational tasks are those activities required to enable a decision to be made by FY86 on the ultimate commercialization of HDR. These include development and analyis of a 20- to 50-MW Phase II HDR reservoir at Site 1 (Fenton Hill) with the potential construction of a pilot electric generating station, Phase III; selection of a second site with subsequent reservoir development and possible construction of a direct heat utilization pilot plant of at least 30 MW thermal thereon; the determination of the overall domestic HDR energy potential; and the evaluation of 10 or more target prospect areas for future HDR plant development by commercial developers. Phase I of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's Fenton Hill project was completed. Phase I evaluated a small subterranean system comprised of two boreholes connected at a depth of 3 km by hydraulic fracturing. A closed-loop surface system has been constructed and tests involving round-the-clock operation have yielded promising data on heat extraction, geofluid chemistry, flow impedance, and loss of water through the underground reservoir between the two holes, leading to cautions optimism for the future prospects of private-sector HDR power plants. (MHR)

Franke, P.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

H[sub 2]OTREAT: An acid for evaluating water treatment requirements for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A public-domain software package is available to aid engineers in the design of water treatment systems for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Geochemical phenomena that cause problems in ATES systems include formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials. Preventing such problems frequently requires employing water treatment systems. Individual water treatment methods vary in cost. effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulatory bodies. Evaluating these water treatment options is generally required to determine the feasibility of ATFS systems. The H20TREAT software was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use by engineers with limited or no experience in geochemistry. At the feasibility analysis and design stages, the software utilizes a recently revised geochemical model,MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation indices of key calcium, iron. silica, and manganese carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides (calcite, rhodochrosite, siderite, Fe(OH)[sub 3][a], birnessite, chalcedony, and SiO[sub 2]) are calculated. Currently, H20TREAT does not perform cost calculations; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments considered include (1) Na and H ion exchangers and pellet reactors to avoid calcite precipitation, and (2) in situ nitrate addition and cascade precipitation. The H20TREAT software also provides the user with guidance on other geochemical problems that must be considered, such as SiO[sub 2] precipitation, corrosion, and environmental considerations. The sodium adsorption ratio and sodium hazard are calculated to evaluate the likelihood of clay swelling and dispersion caused by high Na concentrations. H20TREAT is available for DOS and UNIX computers.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

H{sub 2}OTREAT: An acid for evaluating water treatment requirements for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A public-domain software package is available to aid engineers in the design of water treatment systems for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Geochemical phenomena that cause problems in ATES systems include formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials. Preventing such problems frequently requires employing water treatment systems. Individual water treatment methods vary in cost. effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulatory bodies. Evaluating these water treatment options is generally required to determine the feasibility of ATFS systems. The H20TREAT software was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use by engineers with limited or no experience in geochemistry. At the feasibility analysis and design stages, the software utilizes a recently revised geochemical model,MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation indices of key calcium, iron. silica, and manganese carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides (calcite, rhodochrosite, siderite, Fe(OH){sub 3}[a], birnessite, chalcedony, and SiO{sub 2}) are calculated. Currently, H20TREAT does not perform cost calculations; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments considered include (1) Na and H ion exchangers and pellet reactors to avoid calcite precipitation, and (2) in situ nitrate addition and cascade precipitation. The H20TREAT software also provides the user with guidance on other geochemical problems that must be considered, such as SiO{sub 2} precipitation, corrosion, and environmental considerations. The sodium adsorption ratio and sodium hazard are calculated to evaluate the likelihood of clay swelling and dispersion caused by high Na concentrations. H20TREAT is available for DOS and UNIX computers.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Eary, L.E.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Drilling Large Diameter Holes in Rocks Using Multiple Laser Beams (504) Richard Parker,. Parker Geoscience Consulting, LLC, Arvada, Colorado, USA; Zhiyue Xu and Claude Reed, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Ramona Graves, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, USA; Brian Gahan and Samih Batarseh, Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, USA ABSTRACT Studies on drilling petroleum reservoir rocks with lasers show that modern infrared lasers have the capability to spall (thermally fragment), melt and vaporize natural earth materials with the thermal spallation being the most efficient rock removal mechanism. Although laser irradiance as low as 1000 W/cm 2 is sufficient to spall rock, firing the

192

A Thermal Device for Aircraft Measurement of the Solid Water Content of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constant temperature probe for the measurement of solid water content of clouds is described. The probe is operated at a temperature of approximately 25°C, and is designed to collect and melt ice particles that impact in an open half-cylinder, ...

W. D. King; D. E. Turvey

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The development of a solar thermal water purification, heating, and power generation system: A case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parabolic solar troughs. A flow control valve adjustable for temperature and pressure, allowed the pressure within the troughs to build, thus increasing the boiling point of the water. At a temperature greater that was positioned at the focal point of sunlight within an 8 foot, 9 inch parabolic dish. The flash evaporation

Wu, Mingshen

195

Rock melting tool with annealer section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock melting penetrator is provided with an afterbody that rapidly cools a molten geological structure formed around the melting tip of the penetrator to the glass transition temperature for the surrounding molten glass-like material. An annealing afterbody then cools the glass slowly from the glass transition temperature through the annealing temperature range to form a solid self-supporting glass casing. This allows thermally induced strains to relax by viscous deformations as the molten glass cools and prevents fracturing of the resulting glass liner. The quality of the glass lining is improved, along with its ability to provide a rigid impermeable casing in unstable rock formations.

Bussod, Gilles Y. (Santa Fe, NM); Dick, Aaron J. (Oakland, CA); Cort, George E. (Montrose, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Session: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Optimum plate-spacing for the best performance of the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal-diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme  

SciTech Connect

The effect of plate spacing on the degree of separation and production rate for the enrichment of heavy water in flat-plate thermal diffusion columns of the Frazier scheme with fixed operating expense has been investigated. The equations for estimating optimum plate-space for maximum separation and for maximum production rate have been developed. Considerable improvement in performance is obtainable when thermal diffusion columns with optimum plate-spacing are employed for operation.

Ho-Ming Yeh [Tamkang Univ., Taiwan (China)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar�driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

Design of cold water pipe for sea thermal power plants. Progress report, 1 May 1975--30 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the preliminary analysis of design conditions for a 40-ft. diameter, 4000 ft. long, cold water supply pipe for a 100 MW sea thermal power plant. The pipe is assumed to be freely suspended from a floating platform. The design is based on a circular row of tubes with spacers between to form the pipe wall. Internal pressure conditions are calculated for maximum assumed flow rates in the pipe. External pressure distribution is calculated for maximum assumed ocean current velocity. Drag and moment distributions are calculated for the pipe loaded with an assumed current velocity profile and buoyancy distribution. Collapse stability calculations are made for the pipe and for the individual tubes. Tube and spacer interaction stresses are calculated for the combined pressure, bending moment, and tensile loads imposed on the pipe. Preliminary analysis is performed on a flexible pipe support system capable of isolating the pipe from the platform during any sea state likely to be encountered by a sea thermal power plant. It is concluded that the basic design is feasible and justifies more precise analysis.

Anderson, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Rock-ravintolatoiminta : elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä; Rock venue activity : live rock music in the restaurant setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Työn tavoitteena oli tutkia rock-ravintolatoimintaa ja elävää rock-musiikkia ravintolaympäristössä ravintolan, artistin ja asiakkaan näkökulmasta. Tutkimuksessa pyrittiin selvittämään rock-ravintolayrittämisen toimintatapoja ja kartoittamaan alan tämän hetkistä tilaa.… (more)

Väyliö, Jari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Status and prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast majority of accessible geothermal energy exists in the form of heat stored in dry rock at depth. For nearly the last two decades, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been engaged in a program to develop the technology to mine the thermal energy in this hot dry rock (HDR). The world's first heat mine was developed and operated at Fenton Hill, N.M. in the 1970's by using drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques to create an artificial reservoir in hot rock and subsequently circulating water through this reservoir to mine the heat from the rock. Over the last ten years, a much larger, deeper, and hotter heat mine has been constructed at Fenton Hill and a permanent energy extraction plant has been built on the surface. A long-term testing program has recently begun to evaluate the potential for sustained energy extraction from the large Fenton Hill heat mine. This paper summarizes the history of HDR research and development at Los Alamos, reports the initial results of the long-term testing program at Fenton Hill, and discusses the possible future course of HDR technology.

Brown, D.; Duchane, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Appendices to final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOAA/DOE has selected three concepts for a baseline design of the cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC plants: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physical Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme; (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: (A) fiberglass reinforced plastic cold water pipe (specification and drawingss); (B) specification for polyethylene CWP; (C) elastomer pipe drawings; (D) drawings for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; (E) structural design of OTEC 10/40 CWP support and CWP transitions; (F) universal transition joint for CWP; (G) dynamic spherical seal of CWP; (H) at-sea deployment loads - surface towing loads; (I) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment up-ending loads; (J) cost estimates for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; and (K) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment scenario and cost estimate. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Cold Water Pipe Preliminary Design Project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOAA/DOE has selected three concepts for a baseline design of the cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC plants: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physical Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme; (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the south-east coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. Detailed designs and analyses for the FRP, polyethylene, and elastomer concepts, respectively, are described. Each section includes a discussion of fabrication plans and processes, schedules for mobilization of facilities and equipment, installation plans, and cost breakdown. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Oldest Rock on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canada." and "Some of the oldest surface rock can be found in the Canadian Shield, Australia, Africa and in other more specific places around the world. The ages of...

209

Hot Dry Rock - Summary  

SciTech Connect

Hot Dry Rock adds a new flexibility to the utilization of geothermal energy. Almost always the approach has been to limit that utilization to places where there is a natural source of water associated with a source of heat. Actually, the result was that steam was mined. Clearly there are much larger heat resources available which lack natural water to transport that energy to the surface. Also, as is found in hydrothermal fields being mined for steam, the water supply finally gets used up. There is a strong motive in the existing capital investment to revitalize those resources. Techniques for introducing, recovering and utilizing the water necessary to recover the heat from below the surface of the earth is the subject of this session. Implicit in that utilization is the ability to forecast with reasonable accuracy the busbar cost of that energy to the utility industry. The added element of supplying the water introduces costs which must be recovered while still supplying energy which is competitive. Hot Dry Rock technology can supply energy. That has been proved long since. The basic barrier to its use by the utility industry has been and remains proof to the financial interests that the long term cost is competitive enough to warrant investment in a technology that is new to utility on-grid operations. As the opening speaker for this session states, the test that is underway will ''simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings''. Further, the Fenton Hill system is a research facility not designed for commercial production purposes, but it can give indications of how the system must be changed to provide economic HDR operations. And so it is that we must look beyond the long term flow test, at the opportunities and challenges. Proving that the huge HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale must involve the construction of additional sites, preferably to the specifications of the now Federal geothermal community. These facilities will have to be engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, we must not rest on our technological laurels, though they be many. Design and operational techniques have been conceived which could lead to improved economics and operations for HDR. These must be pursued and where merit is found, vigorously pursued. Accelerated research and development ought to include revolutionary drilling techniques, reservoir interrogation, and system modeling to assure the competitiveness and geographical diversity of applications of HDR. Much of this work will be applicable to the geothermal industry in general. More advanced research ought to include such innovations as the utilization of other operating fluids. Supercritical carbon dioxide and the ammonia/water (Kalina) cycle have been mentioned. But even as the near and more distant outlook is examined, today's work was reported in the HDR session. The start-up operations for the current test series at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant were described. The surface plant is complete and initial operations have begun. While some minor modifications to the system have been required, nothing of consequence has been found to impede operations. Reliability, together with the flexibility and control required for a research system were shown in the system design, and demonstrated by the preliminary results of the plant operations and equipment performance. Fundamental to the overall success of the HDR energy resource utilization is the ability to optimize the pressure/flow impedance/time relationships as the reservoir is worked. Significant new insights are still being developed out of the data which will substantially affect the operational techniques applied to new systems. However, again, these will have to be proved to be general and not solely specific to the Fenton Hill site. Nevertheless, high efficiency use of the reservoir without unintended reservoir grow

Tennyson, George P. Jr.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy  

SciTech Connect

The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods, further complicating demand response scenarios. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced is described and its participation in a demand response event during 2008 is detailed. Second, a set of demand response strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated demand response during a 2009 event, which is also evaluated. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility’s DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs.

Granderson, J.; Dudley, J. H.; Kiliccote, S.; Piette, M. A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Initial findings: The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect

This report is one in a series of reports describing research activities in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Commercial Building System Integration Research Program. The goal of the program is to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving integrated decision-making during design and construction. Improved decision-making could significantly reduce buildings' energy use by the year 2010. The objectives of the Commercial Building System Integration Research Program are: to identify and quantify the most significant energy-related interactions among building subsystems; to develop the scientific and technical basis for improving energy related interactions in building subsystems; and to provide guidance to designers, owners, and builders for improving the integration of building subsystems for energy efficiency. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research, development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued. In this report, the interactions of a water loop heat pump system and building structural mass and their effect on whole-building energy performance is analyzed. 10 refs., 54 figs., 1 tab.

Marseille, T.J.; Johnson, B.K.; Wallin, R.P.; Chiu, S.A.; Crawley, D.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Task 2. Analysis for concept selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful performance of the CWP is of crucial importance to the overall OTEC system; the pipe itself is considered the most critical part of the entire operation. Because of the importance the CWP, a project for the analysis and design of CWP's was begun in the fall of 1978. The goals of this project were to study a variety of concepts for delivering cold water to an OTEC plant, to analyze and rank these concepts based on their relative cost and risk, and to develop preliminary design for those concepts which seemed most promising. Two representative platforms and sites were chosen: a spar buoy of a Gibbs and Cox design to be moored at a site off Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, and a barge designed by APL/Johns Hopkins University, grazing about a site approximately 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil. The approach was to concentrate on the most promising concepts and on those which were either of general interest or espoused by others (e.g., steel and concrete concepts). Much of the overall attention, therefore, focused on analyzing rigid and compliant wall design, while stockade (except for the special case of the FRP stockade) and bottom-mounted concepts received less attention. A total of 67 CWP concepts were initially generated and subjected to a screening process. Of these, 16 were carried through design analysis, costing, and ranking. Study results are presented in detail. (WHK)

None

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Next stages in HDR technology development. [Hot Dry Rock (HDR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty years of research and development have brought HDR heat mining technology from the purely conceptual stage to the establishment of an engineering-scale heat mine at Fenton Hill, NM. In April 1992, a long-term flow test (LTFT) of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill was begun. The test was carried out under steady-state conditions on a continuous basis for four months, but a major equipment failure in late July forced a temporary suspension of operations. Even this short test provided valuable information and extremely encouraging results as summarized below: There was no indication of thermal drawdown of the reservoir. There was evidence of increasing access to hot rock with time. Water consumption was in the rangki of 10--12%. Measured pumping costs were $0.003 per kilowatt of energy produced. Temperature logs conducted in the reservoir production zone during and after the flow test confirmed the fact that there was no decline in the average temperature of the fluid being produced from the reservoir. In fact, tracer testing showed that the fluid was taking more indirect pathways and thus contacting a greater amount of hot rock as the test progressed. Water usage quickly dropped to a level of 10--15 gallons per minute, an amount equivalent to about 10--12% of the injected fluid volume. At a conversion rate of 10--15%, these would translate to effective fuel costs'' of 2--3[cents] per kilowatt hour of electricity production potential. The completion of the LTFT will set the stage for commercialization of HDR but will not bring HDR technology to maturity. Relatively samples extensions of the current technology may bring significant improvements in efficiency, and these should be rapidly investigated. In the longer run, advanced operational concepts could further improve the efficiency of HDR energy extraction and may even offer the possibility of cogeneration schemes which solve both energy and water problems throughout the world.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Experimentally determined rock-fluid interactions applicable to a natural hot-dry-rock geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The field program cnsists of experiments in which hot rock of low permeability is hydraulically fractured between two wellbores. Water is circulated from one well to the other through the fractured hot rock. Our field experiments are designed to test reservoir engineering parameters such as heat-extraction rates, water-loss rates, flow characteristics including impedance and buoyancy, seismic activity, and fluid chemistry. Laboratory experiments were designed to provide information on the mineral-water reactivity encountered during the field program. Two experimental circulation systems tested the rates of dissolution and alteration during dynamic flow. Solubility of rock in agitated systems was studied. Moreover, pure minerals, samples of the granodiorite from the actual reservoir, and Tijeras Canyon granite have been reacted with distilled water and various solutions of NaCl, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. The results of these experimental systems are compared to the observations made in field experiments done within the hot dry rock reservoir at a depth of approximately 3 km where the initial rock temperature was 150 to 200/sup 0/C.

Charles, R.W.; Grigsby, C.O.; Holley, C.E. Jr.; Tester, J.W.; Blatz, L.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

218

From Tissues to Landscapes: How Thermal Physiology, Water Use, and Climate Influence Patterns of Landscape Use in Elephants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lowest value (resting), but water intake is limited to thatbehavioral option (Table 3). Water intake via food and drinkliterature (Appendix II). Water intake via food was coupled

Dunkin, Robin Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam- and water-cooled gas turbine: steam turbine combined cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

An analytical study was made of the performance of air-, steam-, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam-turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal-barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205/sup 0/C to 1370/sup 0/C, resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4% when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425/sup 0/C to 1675/sup 0/C and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683/sup 0/C and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6% by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425/sup 0/C to 1730/sup 0/C and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air-cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205/sup 0/C. The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

Nainiger, J.J.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing: 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. This report traces reservoir growth as demonstrated during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m/sup 3/. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D.; Cremer, G.M. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrology and geochemistry of thermal springs of the appalachians  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal springs in nine areas in the Appalachians from Georgia to New York were studied in 1975 and 1976 using satellite imagery, local well and spring data, and results of current and early studies by other investigators. All the springs investigated discharge from folded and faulted sandstone or carbonate rocks in valley areas. Where geologic structure is relatively uncomplicated, ground water discharging from thermal springs probably has circulated to great depths roughly parallel to the strike of the bedding and has moved upward rapidly where a fault or faults cross the bedding. Hydrologic and chemical data suggest that most of the water discharging from warm springs in the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone is derived from recharge entering and circulating through that formation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates very little is primarily water from deep circulation. The discharge at springs where temperature fluctuates widely is warm water mixed with variable proportions of shallow-circulating cool water. Observed temperatures of the warm springs range from 18/sup 0/ to 41/sup 0/C; the highest chemical thermometer temperature is 84/sup 0/C. Agreement among observed, chalcedony, and cation temperatures of the warmest springs suggests reservoir temperatures of 30/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Dissolved helium, arsenic, potassium, and delta/sup 18/O are considered as geothermal indicators. Tritium analyses are used to calculate fractions of old and modern components of mixed waters. Computer calculations of carbonate saturation indices show (1) considerable undersaturation in silica-rock warm spring waters and (2) carbonate equilibrium in the limestone and dolomite thermal waters. Better values of saturation indices are obtained when analyzed carbon dioxide rather than field pH is used in the computer input data. A method is described for adjusting delta/sup 13/C to correct for carbon dioxide outgassing from water samples.

Hobba, W.A. Jr.; Fisher, D.W.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Chemerys, J.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rock properties in support of geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal rock mechanics needs have been defined and subsequently a test system was designed and built for providing appropriate material properties. The development areas identified as requiring rock mechanics were stimulation, reservoir engineering, subsidence prediction, surface exploration and subsurface evaluation, and drilling. The resulting test system provides mechanical, electrical, thermal and physical properties on 2 and 4 inch diameter cores at confining pressures and pore fluid pressures to 200 MPa (30,000 psi) and temperatures to 535/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). The test system development was continued and site specific rock mechanics requirements were identified. (MHR)

Butters, S.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Natural radioactivity in geothermal waters, Alhambra Hot Springs and nearby areas, Jefferson County, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive hot springs issue from a fault zone in crystalline rock of the Boulder batholith at Alhambra, Jefferson County, in southwestern Montana. The discharge contains high concentrations of radon, and the gross activity and the concentration of radium-226 exceed maximum levels recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Part of the discharge is diverted for space heating, bathing, and domestic use. The radioactive thermal waters at measured temperatures of about 60/sup 0/C are of the sodium bicarbonate type and saturated with respect to calcium carbonate. Radium-226 in the rock and on fractured surfaces or coprecipitated with calcium carbonate probably is the principal source of radon that is dissolved in the thermal water and discharged with other gases from some wells and springs. Local surface water and shallow ground water are of the calcium bicarbonate type and exhibit low background radioactivity. The temperature, percent sodium, and radioactivity of mixed waters adjacent to the fault zone increase with depth. Samples from most of the major hot springs in southwestern Montana have been analyzed for gross alpha and beta. The high level of radioactivity at Alhambra appears to be related to leaching of radioactive material from fractured siliceous veins by ascending thermal waters, and is not a normal characteristic of hot springs issuing from fractured crystalline rock in Montana.

Leonard, R.B.; Janzer, W.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

Elders, W.A.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

On the relationship between stress and elastic strain for porous and fractured rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks. J Geophysproperties are electrical resistivity/conductivity dataof pressure on the electrical resistivity of water-saturated

Liu, Hui-Hai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

On the Relationship between Stress and Elastic Strain for Porous and Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Orange, A. S. , Electrical resistivity in saturated rockof pressure on electrical resistivity of rocks, J. Geophys.of pressure on the electrical resistivity of water-saturated

Berryman, Hui-Hai Liu, Jonny Rutqvist and James G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hot dry rock reservoir characterization and modeling. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resuls of analytical and experimental studies on hydraulic fracturing and on the characterization and modeling of hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoirs are presented. The first four Chapters are concerned with problems of thermal cracking and heat transfer, with fluid flow through large cracks, and with the stable and unstable growth of water-filled cracks under internal pressure and thermal loading. Experiments are reported, which present visually observable hydraulic fractures in transparent materials to demonstrate the interaction between hydraulic fractures and the development of thermal cracks. Seismic detection of hydraulic fractures is discussed, and a method to invert crack-scattering data is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the six chapters.

Achenbach, J.D.; Bazant, Z.P.; Dundurs, J.; Keer, L.M.; Nemat-Nasser, S.; Mura, T.; Weertman, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Corresponding Socorro caldera Carboniferous rocks were studied in the field in 1988-1992-Renault later completed geochemistry and silica-crystallite geothermometry, Armstrong petrographic analysis and cathodoluminescence, Oscarson SEM studies, and John Repetski (USGS, Reston, Virgina) conodont stratigraphy and color and textural alteration as guides to the carbonate rocks' thermal history. The carbonate-rock classification used in this

232

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from July 1 through September, 2003 for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms,'' DE-FC26-00BC15311. In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, work focused on completing project tasks in the area of multiphase flow and rock properties. The area of interest is the production mechanisms of oil from porous media at high temperature. Temperature has a beneficial effect on oil recovery and reduces residual oil saturation. Work continued to delineate how the wettability of reservoir rock shifts from mixed and intermediate wet conditions to more water-wet conditions as temperature increases. One mechanism for the shift toward water-wet conditions is the release of fines coated with oil-wet material from pore walls. New experiments and theory illustrate the role of temperature on fines release.

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

234

Thermal performance and economics of solar space and hot water heating system on Long Island, New York. [F-chart method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A practical method for designing solar space and water heating systems, called the ''f-chart'' method, is described with the results calculated for Long Island, New York. The solar heating systems to be considered consist of a solar collector which uses either liquid or air, an energy storage which can be either a water tank or a pebble bed, and an auxiliary energy source which supplies heat when solar energy is not available. Solar heated water from storage can be used either for space heating or for preheating the domestic hot water. The results of the ''f-chart'' analysis can simply be expressed as follows. For the thermal performance, Annual Load Fraction Supplied by Solar Energy versus Collector Area, and for the economic performance, Life Cycle Cost Savings versus Collector Area.

Auh, P C

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Remedial Action Plan and Site design for stabilization of the inactive Uranium Mill Tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado: Revision 1. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, geology report, Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report, Attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites are located near the small community of Slick Rock, in San Miguel County, Colorado. There are two designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites at Slick Rock: the Union Carbide site and the North Continent site. Both sites are adjacent to the Dolores River. The sites contain former mill building concrete foundations, tailings piles, demolition debris, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive materials. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 621,000 cubic yards (475,000 cubic meters). In addition to the contamination at the two processing site areas, 13 vicinity properties were contaminated. Contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into ground water. Pursuant to the requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.), the proposed remedial action plan (RAP) will satisfy the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards in 40 CFR Part 192 (60 FR 2854) for cleanup, stabilization, and control of the residual radioactive material (RRM) (tailings and other contaminated materials) at the disposal site at Burro Canyon. The requirements for control of the RRM (Subpart A) will be satisfied by the construction of an engineered disposal cell. The proposed remedial action will consist of relocating the uranium mill tailings, contaminated vicinity property materials, demolition debris, and windblown/weaterborne materials to a permanent repository at the Burro Canyon disposal site. The site is approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the mill sites on land recently transferred to the DOE by the Bureau of Land Management.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Microwave assisted hard rock cutting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

Lindroth, David P. (Apple Valley, MN); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Blair, James R. (Inver Grove Heights, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hot dry rock geothermal energy in the USA: Moving toward practical use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology for extracting geothermal energy from the vast hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource has been under development by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for about 25 years. In 1992--1993, an extensive flow-testing program was conducted at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico HDR Test Facility. During two segments of this test energy was produced at a rate of 4 thermal megawatts on a continuous basis for periods of 112 and 65 days, respectively. Surface and logging measurements showed no decline in the temperature of the water produced from the HDR reservoir during the flow testing. In fact, tracer evidence indicated that the circulating water was continually gaining access to additional hot rock as the testing proceeded. Water consumption was low and all other test data were positive. The encouraging results of the flow testing at Fenton Hill provided the incentive for the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) to solicit the interest of private industry in a jointly funded program to construct and operate a facility that would produce and sell energy derived from HDR resources. A number of organizations responded positively. On the basis of the interest expressed in these responses, the USDOE subsequently authorized the issuance of a formal solicitation to initiate the project.

Duchane, D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

The design and construction of a hot dry rock pilot plant  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward demonstrating the potential of the hot dry rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Since the inception of the program, scientists and engineers have perfected drilling and fracturing techniques to create underground reservoirs for the purpose of tapping the potential heat energy from the hot rock in the earth. One of the achievements to date has been the creation of a reservoir at the Laboratory's test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. This reservoir, located at a depth of 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth, has an estimated fluid capacity of one million gallons within the large volume of fractured rock. To evaluate the thermal power potential of this reservoir, preparations are currently underway to conduct a test which will entail the circulation of fluid through the reservoir by the injection of water at high pressures. A major part of the preparations involves the building of a demonstration pilot plant. The process concept poses a number of unique technical challenges with regard to the design and construction of the equipment and facilities. This paper reviews the system design and operating features of this plant. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Ponden, R.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

242

Definition: Rock Density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in crustal rocks. Rock density is a physical characteristic that is governed by the chemical composition (in situ minerals) and pore spaces of a specific rock or rock type.1...

243

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

The effect of thermal aging and boiling water reactor environment on Type 316L stainless steel welds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels and duplex stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well known "475°C" embrittlement ...

Lucas, Timothy R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

New project for Hot Wet Rock geothermal reservoir design concept  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the outlines of a new Hot Wet Rock (HWR) geothermal project. The goal of the project is to develop a design methodology for combined artificial and natural crack geothermal reservoir systems with the objective of enhancing the thermal output of existing geothermal power plants. The proposed concept of HWR and the research tasks of the project are described.

Takahashi, Hideaki; Hashida, Toshiyuki

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Issues facing the developmt of hot dry rock geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat will be discussed. Topics covered will include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return.

Tester, J.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Session: Hot Dry Rock  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

An energy equivalency analysis of trade-offs between thermal efficiency and standby loss requirements for commercial gas service water heaters  

SciTech Connect

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Standing Standard Project Committee 90.1 has approved an addendum (90.lb) to ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989. The addendum specifies an increase in the minimum thermal efficiency requirement (from 77% to 78%), accompanied by an easing of the standby loss requirements, for commercial gas-fired service water heaters. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed an energy equivalency analysis to assess the impact of trade-offs between the improved thermal efficiency and the less stringent standby loss requirements. The analysis objective was to estimate whether the energy savings during firing would offset the increased energy losses during standby periods. The primary focus of this report is to summarize the major results of the analysis and provide a recommendation for minimum energy-efficiency commercial gas-fired service water heaters. Limitations to the availability of detailed performance and energy-use data for these commercial water heaters are also pointed out.

Somasundaram, S.; Jarnagin, R.E.; Keller, J.M.; Schliesing, J.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

Anthony R. Kovscek

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Sampling Rock Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Rock Sampling Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting. Hydrological: Isotope geochemistry can reveal fluid circulation of a geothermal system.

253

Prospects for the commercial development of hot dry rock geothermal energy in New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vast store of energy is available to the world in the form of hot dry rock (HDR) which exists almost everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed technology to mine the heat from HDR by using techniques developed in the petroleum industry. In practice, an artificial reservoir is created in the hot rock and water is circulated through the reservoir to extract the thermal energy and bring it to the surface. There are virtually no adverse environmental effects from an HDR plant when the system is operated in a closed-loop mode with the process water continually recirculated. An experimental plant at Fenton Hill, NM is now undergoing long-term testing to demonstrate that energy can be obtained from HDR on a sustained basis with operational procedures which are readily adaptable to industry. Significant HDR resources exist in the state of New Mexico. Resources in the Valles Caldera, Zuni Uplift, and Rio Grande Rift have been evaluated in detail. Studies indicate that it should be possible to economically develop high grade HDR resources with technology available today. As advanced concepts for developing and operating HDR systems are investigated, even more widespread utilization of the technology will be commercially feasible.

Duchane, D.V.; Goff, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of Modeling Capabilities for the Analysis of Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop an experimental and theoretical data base for heat transfer in tubes and channels cooled by water and CO2 at supercritical pressures.

Dr. Michael Z. Podowski

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Overview - Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, James C.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Overview: Hard Rock Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

Dunn, J.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Rock Art in the Public Trust: Managing Prehistoric Rock Art on Federal Land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaic North America. ? In Handbook of Rock Art Research,Rock Art Analysis. ? In Handbook of Archaeological Methods,Rock Art Analysis,? in Handbook of Archaeological Methods,

Hale, John Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Energy from hot dry rock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program is described. The system, operation, results, development program, environmental implications, resource, economics, and future plans are discussed. (MHR)

Hendron, R.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal-Hydraulic Modeling of the Primary Coolant System of Light Water Reactors During Severely Degraded Core Accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of fission-product vapors and aerosols that would be released from an LWR primary system in postulated severe accidents depends on the prevalent thermal-hydraulic conditions. The analytic models developed in this study are incorporated in the PSAAC modular computer program, which can help predict more realistic estimates of accident consequences.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

lake water (a mixture of meteoric waters and degassed hydrothermal fluids) and by high thermal gradients caused by cooling of the underlying magma body and earliest post-caldera...

263

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

264

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Ion Dispersion Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

266

Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

Hall, M.M. Jr.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures  

SciTech Connect

Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (“porosity”) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Trinidadthat monitors the cool- ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.for rocks near water laboratory intake Granite Canyon 55.0'W

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a large-volume water intake from which the daily wateroff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water Intake for laboratory Thermograph

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1986  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Granitethat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Station Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past 15 years, nine solar thermal power plants, with a totala) colocating thermal power plants that use seawater forWater used in thermal electric power plants is extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Advanced technology thermal energy storage and heat exchange systems for solar applications: a survey of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey is presented of the advanced research and development projects underway in the U.S. in all of the known media and methods for storing and transferring thermal energy in solar applications. The technologies reviewed include innovative heat exchange and heat transport methods, advanced sensible heat storage in water, rocks, earth and combinations of these for both short term and annual storage, phase change materials, and reversible chemical reactions. This survey is presented in a structure of categories and subcategories of thermal energy storage and heat transfer technology. Within a given subcategory the project descriptions are listed under the name of the organizations conducting the work, arranged in alphabetical order.

Michaels, A. I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Evaluation of the second hot dry rock geothermal energy reservoir: results of Phase I, Run Segment 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a long-term (286 day) flow test of the second hot dry rock reservoir at the Fenton Hill field site are presented. This second reservoir was created by fracturing an interval of granitic rock located at a depth of 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the same wellbore pair used in the creation of the first, smaller reservoir. The new fracture system has a vertical extent of at least 320 m (1050 ft), suggesting that the combined heat-transfer area of the old and new fracture systems is much greater than that of the old system. The virgin rock temperature at the bottom of the deeper interval was 197/sup 0/C (386/sup 0/F). Downhole measurements of the water temperature at the reservoir outlet, as well as temperatures inferred from geothermometry, showed that the thermal drawdown of the reservoir was about 8/sup 0/C, and preliminary estimates indicate that the minimum effective heat-transfer area of the new reservoir is 45,000 m/sup 2/ (480,000 ft/sup 2/), which is six times larger than the first reservoir.

Zyvoloski, G.A.; Aamodt, R.L.; Aguilar, R.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Shotgun cartridge rock breaker  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rock breaker uses shotgun cartridges or other firearm ammunition as the explosive charge at the bottom of a drilled borehole. The breaker includes a heavy steel rod or bar, a gun with a firing chamber for the ammunition which screws onto the rod, a long firing pin running through a central passage in the rod, and a firing trigger mechanism at the external end of the bar which strikes the firing pin to fire the cartridge within the borehole. A tubular sleeve surround the main body of the rod and includes slits the end to allow it to expand. The rod has a conical taper at the internal end against which the end of the sleeve expands when the sleeve is forced along the rod toward the taper by a nut threaded onto the external end of the rod. As the sleeve end expands, it pushes against the borehole and holds the explosive gasses within, and also prevents the breaker from flying out of the borehole. The trigger mechanism includes a hammer with a slot and a hole for accepting a drawbar or drawpin which, when pulled by a long cord, allows the cartridge to be fired from a remote location.

Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, NM); Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock  

SciTech Connect

As repositories for CO? and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Chimney Rock Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 3495 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC THERMAL STORAGE Commercial GENERAL SEASONAL Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION SERVICE Three Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Single Phase Commercial IRRIGATION STANDBY RATE, Three Phase Commercial LARGE POWER SERVICE Commercial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE AND SEASONAL SERVICE Residential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 136, 094304 (2012) Thermal effects on energetics and dynamics in water cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in water cluster anions (H2O)n - Ryan M. Young,1 Margaret A. Yandell,1 Sarah B. King,1 and Daniel M oscillator/Dragon amplifier). Half (1 mJ/pulse) of the 30 fs, 790 nm fundamental is then used to pump. CHE-0649647. M.A.Y. ac- knowledges funding from a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate

Neumark, Daniel M.

282

Post Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Rock Jump to: navigation, search Name Post Rock Facility Post Rock Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group Developer Wind Capital Group Energy Purchaser Westar Energy Location Ellsworth KS Coordinates 38.87269233°, -98.33059788° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.87269233,"lon":-98.33059788,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

H2O[underscore]TREAT users' manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20[underscore]TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO[sub 2] injection. The H2O[underscore]TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO[sub 2] precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

H2O{underscore}TREAT users` manual: An aid for evaluating water treatment requirements for aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual addresses the use of a public-domain software package developed to aid engineers in the desip of water treatment systems for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). The software, H20{underscore}TREAT, which runs in the DOS or UNIX Environment, was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and targeted to engineers possessing limited or no experience in geochemistry. To do this, the software provides guidance on geochemical phenomena that can cause problems in ATES systems (i.e., the formation of scale in heat exchangers, clogging of wells, corrosion in piping and heat exchangers, and degradation of aquifer materials causing a reduction in permeability). Preventing such problems frequently requires the use of water treatment systems. Because individual water treatment methods vary in cost, effectiveness, environmental impact, corrosion potential, and acceptability to regulators, proper evaluation of treatment options is required to determine the feasibility of ATES systems. The software is available for DOS- and UNIX-based computers. It uses a recently revised geochemical model, MINTEQ, to calculate the saturation indices of selected carbonate, oxide, and hydroxide minerals based on water chemistry and temperature data provided by the user. The saturation index of a specific mineral defines the point at which that mineral is oversaturated and hence may precipitate at the specified temperature. Cost calculations are not performed by the software; however, treatment capacity requirements are provided. Treatments include Na and H ion exchanger, fluidized-bed heat exchanger or pellet reactors, and CO{sub 2} injection. The H2O{underscore}TREAT software also provides the user with warning of geochemical problems that must be addressed, such as Fe and Mn oxide precipitation, SiO{sub 2} precipitation at high temperatures, corrosion, and clay swelling and dispersion.

Vail, L.W.; Jenne, E.A.; Zipperer, J.P.; McKinley, M.I.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersA. 1957. Steady State Free Thermal Convection of Liquid in a1958. An Experiment on Free Thermal Convection of Water in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy extraction characteristics of hot dry rock geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LASL Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Project is investigating methods to extract energy at useful temperatures and rates from naturally heated crustal rock in locations where the rock does not spontaneously yield natural steam or hot water at a rate sufficient to support commercial utilization. Several concepts are discussed for application to low and high permeability formations. The method being investigated first is intended for use in formations of low initial permeability. It involves producing a circulation system within the hot rock by hydraulic fracturing to create a large crack connecting two drilled holes, then operating the system as a closed pressurized-water heat-extration loop. With the best input assumptions that present knowledge provides, the fluid-flow and heat-exchange calculations indicate that unpumped (buoyant) circulation through a large hydraulic fracture can maintain a commercially useful rate of heat extraction throughout a usefully long system life. With a power cycle designed for the temperature of the fluid produced, total capital investment and generating costs are estimated to be at least competitive with those of fossil-fuel-fired and nuclear electric plants. This paper discusses the potential of the hot dry rock resource, various heat extraction concepts, prediction of reservoir performance, and economic factors, and summarizes recent progress in the LASL field program.

Tester, J.W.; Smith, M.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mechanical properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the final year of the grant, we have investigated (1) why the strengths of rocks decrease with increasing temperature and in the presence of water through study of the fracture process in Westerly granite and Sioux quartzite specimens deformed in extension (some in true tension), (2) frictional strengths of rocks at high temperatures, (3) the stability of boreholes in fractured rock, and (4) slip in biotite single crystals (in that biotite is probably the weakest and most ductile of the common constituents of crystalline rocks.

Friedman, M.; Bauer, S.J.; Chester, F.M.; Handin, J.; Hopkins, T.W.; Johnson, B.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Mardon, D.; Russell, J.E.

1987-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage  

SciTech Connect

Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oil from rock  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses first the Green River Formation oil shale projects in the western United States from which conservative estimates have suggested an output of 400,000 to 600,000 bbl/day of crude shale oil by 1990. The western reserves recoverable with present technology are said to exceed 600 billion (10/sup 9/) bbl. Three major considerations could limit the large-scale development of shale oil: availability of water, environmental factors, and socio-economic considerations. Water is used to obtain and process the crude shale oil, and additional water is needed to cool the spent shale and to establish new vegetation on top of it. Nitrogenous compounds and arsenic in crude shale oil are among potential pollutants. Spent shale contains salts that are potentially leachable, as well as organic pyrolytic products. Retorting oil shales may release more CO/sub 2/ through decomposition of carbonate minerals that will subsequently be generated by burning the oil produced. Topographic effects of oil shale mining may raise socio-economic problems. Next the article discusses the conversion of coal to liquid by pyrolysis or hydrogenation, including the Gulf solvent refined coal (SRC) and the Exxon (EDS) liquefaction processes. Also described in the South African SASOL process for producing synthetic fuel from coal. A parallel account is included on the estimated complete cycle of United States and of worldwide crude oil production, forecasting depletion within less than a century. 11 refs.

Walters, S.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Rock physics at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock physics refers to the study of static and dynamic chemical and physical properties of rocks and to phenomenological investigations of rocks reacting to man-made forces such as stress waves and fluid injection. A bibliography of rock physics references written by LASL staff members is given. Listing is by surname of first author. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electrochemical Interpretation of a Stress Corrosion Cracking of Thermally Treated Ni base Alloys in a Lead Contaminated Water  

SciTech Connect

Since the PbSCC(Lead stress corrosion cracking) of alloy 600 tubing materials was reported by Copson and Dean in 1965, the effect of lead on a corrosion film and cracking morphology have been continually debated. An electrochemical interaction of lead with the alloying elements of SG tubings was studied and the corrosion products were analyzed. It was found that lead enhanced the anodic dissolution of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in the electrochemical test. The lead preferentially dissolved the Cr from the corrosion film of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in alkaline water. The lead ion seemed to penetrate into the TG crack tip and react with the corrosion film. A selective Cr depletion was observed to weaken the stability of the passive film on the alloys. Whereas passivity of Ni became stable in lead containing solution, Cr and Fe passivity became unstable.

Hwang, Seong Sik; Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Joung Soo; Thomas, Larry E.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Diffusive separation of noble gases and noble gas abundance patterns in sedimentary rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inventory of Xenon on noble gases in shales: the plastic bagnoble gas signature by shale, rock, gas, oil and or water byof noble gases on organic rich shales in the terrestrial

Torgersen, T.; Kennedy, B.M.; van Soest, M.C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

Butscher, Christoph

297

Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose for this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in solar heating systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating system, and stand-alone domestic hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M [eds.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Summary of hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. Reservoir growth is traced. Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266/sup 3/m. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Economics of a conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock geothermal electric power station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Man-made, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs have been investigated for over ten years. As early as 1977 a research-sized reservoir was created at a depth of 2.9 km near the Valles Caldera, a dormant volcanic complex in New Mexico, by connecting two wells with hydraulic fractures. Thermal power was generated at rates of up to 5 MW(t) and the reservoir was operated for nearly a year with a thermal drawdown less than 10/sup 0/C. A small 60kW(e) electrical generation unit using a binary cycle (hot geothermal water and a low boiling point organic fluid, R-114) was operated. Interest is now worldwide with field research being conducted at sites near Le Mayet de Montagne, France; Falkenberg and Urach, Federal Republic of Germany; Yakedake, Japan; and Rosemanowes quarry in Cornwall, United Kingdom. To assess the commercial viability of future HDR electrical generating stations, an economic modeling study was conducted for a conceptual 75 MW(e) generating station operating at conditions similar to those prevailing at the New Mexico HDR site. The reservoir required for 75 MW(e), equivalent to 550 MW of thermal energy, uses at least 9 wells drilled to 4.3 km and the temperature of the water produced should average 230/sup 0/C. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that a binary cycle should result in optimum electricity generation and the best organic fluids are refrigerants R-22, R-32, R-115 or R-600a (Isobutane). The break-even bus bar cost of HDR electricity was computed by the levelized life-cycle method, and found to be competitive with most alternative electric power stations in the US.

Murphy, H.D.; Drake, R.H.; Tester, J.W.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Hisatoshi Ito, Kazuhiro Tanaka (1995) Insights On The Thermal History Of The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Evidence From Zircon

302

A Mechanism of Improved Oil Recovery by Low-Salinity Waterflooding in Sandstone Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Injection of low-salinity water showed high potentials in improving oil recovery when compared to high-salinity water. However, the optimum water salinity and conditions are uncertain, due to the lack of understanding the mechanisms of fluid-rock interactions. The main objective of this study is to examine the potential and efficiency of low-salinity water in secondary and tertiary oil recovery for sandstone reservoirs. Similarly, this study aims to help in understanding the dominant mechanisms that aid in improving oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Furthermore, the impact of cation type in injected brines on oil recovery was investigated. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of water salinity and chemistry on oil recovery in the secondary and tertiary modes. The contact angle technique was used to study the impact of water salinity and composition on rock wettability. Moreover, the zeta potential at oil/brine and brine/rock interfaces was measured to explain the mechanism causing rock wettability alteration and improving oil recovery. Deionized water and different brines (from 500 to 174,000 mg/l), as well as single cation solutions were tested. Two types of crude oil with different properties and composition were used. Berea sandstone cores were utilized in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood tests indicated that injection of deionized water in the secondary mode resulted in significant oil recovery, up to 22% improvement, compared to seawater flooding. However, no more oil was recovered in the tertiary mode. In addition, injection of NaCl solution increased the oil recovery compared to injection of CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Contact angle results demonstrated that low-salinity water has an impact on the rock wettability; the more reduction in water salinity, the more a water-wet rock surface is produced. In addition, NaCl solutions made the rock more water-wet compared to CaCl2 or MgCl2 at the same concentration. Low-salinity water and NaCl solutions showed a highly negative charge at rock/brine and oil/brine interfaces by zeta potential measurements, which results in greater repulsive forces between the oil and rock surface. This leads to double-layer expansion and water-wet systems. These results demonstrate that the double-layer expansion is a primary mechanism of improving oil recovery when water chemical composition is manipulated.

Nasralla, Ramez

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

Baylin, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Rock Weirs as Tools for Stabilization in Restoration Projects: An appraisal and comparison of two stream restoration projects in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock weir boulder volume (cubic yards) Post-project Rosgen classification Cut (cubic yards) Fill (cubic yards) *Below ordinary high water Sources:

Ball, Dave; Maendly, Romain; Poindexter, Cristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS  

SciTech Connect

The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) studies oil recovery mechanisms relevant to thermal and heavy-oil production. The scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. In August of 2000 we received funding from the U. S. DOE under Award No. DE-FC26-00BC15311 that completed December 1, 2003. The project was cost shared with industry. Heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o} API) is an underutilized energy resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods. Heating reduces oil viscosity dramatically. Hence, thermal recovery is especially important because adding heat, usually via steam injection generally improves displacement efficiency. The objectives of this work were to improve our understanding of the production mechanisms of heavy oil under both primary and enhanced modes of operation. The research described spanned a spectrum of topics related to heavy and thermal oil recovery and is categorized into: (1) multiphase flow and rock properties, (2) hot fluid injection, (3) improved primary heavy-oil recovery, (4) in-situ combustion, and (5) reservoir definition. Technology transfer efforts and industrial outreach were also important to project effort. The research tools and techniques used were quite varied. In the area of experiments, we developed a novel apparatus that improved imaging with X-ray computed tomography (CT) and high-pressure micromodels etched with realistic sandstone roughness and pore networks that improved visualization of oil-recovery mechanisms. The CT-compatible apparatus was invaluable for investigating primary heavy-oil production, multiphase flow in fractured and unfractured media, as well as imbibition. Imbibition and the flow of condensed steam are important parts of the thermal recovery process. The high-pressure micromodels were used to develop a conceptual and mechanistic picture of primary heavy-oil production by solution gas drive. They allowed for direct visualization of gas bubble formation, bubble growth, and oil displacement. Companion experiments in representative sands and sandstones were also conducted to understand the mechanisms of cold production. The evolution of in-situ gas and oil saturation was monitored with CT scanning and pressure drop data. These experiments highlighted the importance of depletion rate, overburden pressure, and oil-phase chemistry on the cold production process. From the information provided by the experiments, a conceptual and numerical model was formulated and validated for the heavy-oil solution gas drive recovery process. Also in the area of mechanisms, steamdrive for fractured, low permeability porous media was studied. Field tests have shown that heat injected in the form of steam is effective at unlocking oil from such reservoir media. The research reported here elucidated how the basic mechanisms differ from conventional steamdrive and how these differences are used to an advantage. Using simulations of single and multiple matrix blocks that account for details of heat transfer, capillarity, and fluid exchange between matrix and fracture, the importance of factors such as permeability contrast between matrix and fracture and oil composition were quantified. Experimentally, we examined the speed and extent to which steam injection alters the permeability and wettability of low permeability, siliceous rocks during thermal recovery. Rock dissolution tends to increase permeability moderately aiding in heat delivery, whereas downstream the cooled fluid deposits silica reducing permeability. Permeability reduction is not catastrophic. With respect to wettability, heat shifts rock wettability toward more water wet conditions. This effect is beneficial for the production of heavy and medium gravity oils as it improves displacement efficiency. A combination of analytical and numerical studies was used to examine the efficiency of reservoir heating using nonconventional wells such as horizontal and multi

Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Influence of the temperature dependence of thermal parameters of heat conduction models on the reconstruction of thermal history of igneous-intrusion-bearing basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat conduction models are important tools for reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary basins affected by magmatic intrusions. Accurate thermal properties of the intrusion and its wall rocks are crucial for accurate predictions of thermal history. ... Keywords: Igneous intrusion, Peak temperature, Specific heat, Thermal conductivity, Vitrinite reflectance

Dayong Wang; Xiancai Lu; Yongchen Song; Rong Shao; Tian Qi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Water geochemistry of hydrothermal systems, Wood River District, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems of the Wood River District, central Idaho, have been studied by geologic mapping of thermal spring areas and geochemical investigations of thermal and non-thermal waters. This report summarizes the new geochemical data gathered during the study. Integration of the results of geological and geochemical studies has led to development of a target model for hydrothermal resources on the margin of the Idaho Batholith. Warfield Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 58/sup 0/C, flow from a major shear zone along the margin of an apophysis of the batholith. Hailey Hot Springs, with temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C, occur in an area of multiple thrust faults and newly recognized, closely spaced normal faults in the Paleozoic Milligen and Wood River Formations, 2.5 km from a highly brecciated batholith contact. Other Wood River district hydrothermal systems also occur along the margins of batholith apophyses or in adjacent highly fractured Paleozoic rocks, where there are indications of batholith rocks at shallow depths (100 to 300 m) in water wells.

Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.; Blackett, R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hot Dry Rock Overview at Los Alamos  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. Having extracted energy from the first Fenton Hill HDR reservoir for about 400 days, and from the second reservoir for 30 days in a preliminary test, Los Alamos is focusing on the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies. Current budget limitations have slowed preparations thus delaying the start date of that test. The test is planned to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other salient information will address geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to pumping power requirements. During this year of ''preparation'' we have made progress in modeling studies, in chemically reactive tracer techniques, in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis.

Berger, Michael; Hendron, Robert H.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser Rock Perforation Demo - The NE Multimedia Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rock perforation demo High power laser beam can be used in oil well completion application for perforating oil reservoir rock and increasing rock's permeability for high oil...

313

The nature of fire-cracked rock: new insights from ethnoarchaeological and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire-cracked rock (FCR) is the archaeological by-product of the systemic use of hot rocks for cooking and heating purposes. As a record of various cooking and heating facilities, FCR has substantial potential for addressing research questions on past settlement and subsistence systems. To be able to address these questions requires reliable methods that can identify or infer how a given FCR was used. A series of ethnoarchaeological replication experiments are conducted in order to improve the understanding of the geothennodynamics of FCR production. FCR from two experimental data sets are cut to expose flat surfaces that are inspected for thermal-weathering characteristics under low-power magnification. Analytical results indicate that rock structure and the length of heat application have the most control over thermal weathering. The five most important rock structure characteristics are (1) strength of the bond between grains/crystals, (2) degree of porosity, (3) grain/crystal mineralogy, (4) presence of discontinuities, and (5) grain size; thin section analysis can identify these characteristics for any rock sample. The length of heat application varies dependent on the type of cooking or heating facility, for instance, a typical earth oven remains hot for a longer duration than a typical stone-boil facility; multiple uses of a rock in a facility also increases the sum total of heat application. In broad terms, experimental tests indicate igneous rock types withstand thermal weathering better than metamorphic or sedimentary rock types. Ethnoarchaeological results are applied to six archaeological FCR features, and provide new insights on the use-history of five of the features. Microscopic observations of archaeological FCR also all for the re-evaluation of the current model which explains the occurrence of various FCR shape types within features.

Jackson, Michael A

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK & PARKER-GILA 161-kV TRANSMISSION LINE Cross Arm Repair and Helicopter Staging Areas Figure 1. Project Location Project Location j PARKER-HEADGATE ROCK &...

315

Synthesis report on thermally driven coupled processes  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this report is to document observations and data on thermally coupled processes for conditions that are expected to occur within and around a repository at Yucca Mountain. Some attempt is made to summarize values of properties (e.g., thermal properties, hydrologic properties) that can be measured in the laboratory on intact samples of the rock matrix. Variation of these properties with temperature, or with conditions likely to be encountered at elevated temperature in the host rock, is of particular interest. However, the main emphasis of this report is on direct observation of thermally coupled processes at various scales. Direct phenomenological observations are vitally important in developing and testing conceptual models. If the mathematical implementation of a conceptual model predicts a consequence that is not observed, either (1) the parameters or the boundary conditions used in the calculation are incorrect or (2) the conceptual basis of the model does not fit the experiment; in either case, the model must be revised. For example, the effective continuum model that has been used in thermohydrology studies combines matrix and fracture flow in a way that is equivalent to an assumption that water is imbibed instantaneously from fractures into adjacent, partially saturated matrix. Based on this approximation, the continuum-flow response that is analogous to fracture flow will not occur until the effective continuum is almost completely saturated. This approximation is not entirely consistent with some of the experimental data presented in this report. This report documents laboratory work and field studies undertaken in FY96 and FY97 to investigate thermally coupled processes such as heat pipes and fracture-matrix coupling. In addition, relevant activities from past years, and work undertaken outside the Yucca Mountain project are summarized and discussed. Natural and artificial analogs are also discussed to provide a convenient source of material documenting the conceptual and mathematical basis for modeling coupled phenomena. The actual models and codes, and their specific empirical and theoretical bases, will be documented in a separate report to be delivered in FY99.

Hardin, E.L.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot spring deposits in the Roosevelt thermal area consist of opaline sinter, and siliceous-sinter-cemented alluvium. Alluvium, granite to granodiorite plutonic rocks, and amphibolite facies gneiss have been altered by acid-sulfate water to alunite and opal at the surface, and to kaolinite, alunite, montmorillonite, and muscovite to a depth of 60 m. Marcasite and pyrite occur below the water table at about 30m. Deeper alteration sampled to a depth of 2.26 km consists of muscovite, chlorite, calcite, K-feldspar, albite, and epidote with pyrite and sparse chalcopyrite. Thermal water is dilute (ionic strength 0.1 to 0.2) sodium chloride brine. Surface water contains 10 times as much calcium and 100 times as much magnesium as the deep water. Sulfate varies from 48 to 200 mg/l. Present-day spring temperature is 25/sup 0/C but in 1950 the spring temperature was 85/sup 0/C. Computed Na-K-Ca temperature is 241/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 274/sup 0/C for a well and 283/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. Quartz saturation temperatures are 170/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 283/sup 0/C for the well, and 213/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. A plausible model for development of the near-surface alteration consists of hydrothermal fluid which convectively rises along major fractures. Water cools by conduction and steam separation, and hydrogen ion is produced by oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. The low pH water percolates from the surface downward and reacts with rocks to produce alunite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and muscovite as hydrogen is consumed.

Parry, W.T.; Bryant, N.L.; Dedolph, R.E.; Ballantyne, J.M.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Rohrs, D.T.; Mason, J.L.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Bentonite alteration due to thermal-hydro-chemical processes during the early thermal period in a nuclear waste repository  

SciTech Connect

After closure of an underground nuclear waste repository, the decay of radionuclides will raise temperature in the repository, and the bentonite buffer will resaturate by water inflow from the surrounding host rock. The perturbations from these thermal and hydrological processes are expected to dissipate within hundreds to a few thousand years. Here, we investigate coupled thermal-hydro-chemical processes and their effects on the short-term performance of a potential nuclear waste repository located in a clay formation. Using a simplified geometric configuration and abstracted hydraulic parameters of the clayey formation, we examine geochemical processes, coupled with thermo-hydrologic phenomena, and potential changes in porosity near the waste container during the early thermal period. The developed models were used for evaluating the mineral alterations and potential changes in porosity of the buffer, which can affect the repository performance. The results indicate that mineral alteration and associated changes in porosity induced by early thermal and hydrological processes are relatively small and are expected to not significantly affect flow and transport properties. Chlorite precipitation was obtained in all simulation cases. A maximum of one percent volume fraction of chlorite could be formed, whose process may reduce swelling and sorption capacity of bentonite clay, affecting the performance of the repository. llitisation process was not obtained from the present simulations.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hot dry rock geothermal energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Program was on development of methods to produce the hydraulic fractures required to connect the deep, inclined wells of the Phase II system at Fenton Hill. Environmental surveillance, instrument development, laboratory and modeling studies, and other supporting activities were continued. After two unsuccessful attempts to fracture hydraulically through inflatable packers, formation breakdown was produced in an uncased section near the bottom of well EE-2 by pumping water through a cemented-in steel liner. Breakdon occurred at a wellhead pressure of 33.1 MPa and a total of 8539 m/sup 3/ of water was injected. Mapping of source locations of microseismic events indicated opening of an extensive set of planar features dipping about 40/sup 0/W, striking about N20/sup 0/W, and apparently passing beneath the bottom of well EE-3. An attempt was then made to fracture at a higher level where the relative positions of the two wells increased the probability that an inclined fracture would connect them. Repeated failures of drill pipe, tubing, couplings, and packers terminated most pumping experiments prematurely. Important advances were made in thermal protection of downhole instruments, real-time mapping source locations of microseismic signals, modeling of heat and mass transport, and the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing.

Smith, M.C.; Nunz, G.J.; Ponder, G.M. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Validation studies for assessing unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock  

SciTech Connect

*The objectives of this contract are to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through heterogeneous fractured rock and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models. Important new information is presented such as the application and evaluation of procedures for estimating hydraulic, pneumatic, and solute transport coefficients for a range of thermal regimes. A field heater experiment was designed that focused on identifying the suitability of existing monitoring equipment to obtain required data. A reliable method was developed for conducting and interpreting tests for air permeability using a straddle-packer arrangement. Detailed studies of fracture flow from Queen Creek into the Magina Copper Company ore haulage tunnel have been initiated. These studies will provide data on travel time for transport of water and solute in unsaturated tuff. The collection of rainfall runoff, and infiltration data at two small watersheds at the Apache Leap Tuff Site enabled us to evaluate the quantity and rate of water infiltrating into the subsurface via either fractures or matrix. Characterization methods for hydraulic parameters relevant to Weigh-level waste transport, including fracture apertures, transmissivity, matrix porosity, and fracture wetting front propagation velocities, were developed.

Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Guzman, A.; Davidson, G.R.; Lohrstorfer, C.F. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Definition: Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a...

322

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This oxygen isotope and fluid inclusion study has allowed us to determine the pathways of fluid circulation, set limits on the thermal regime, and link the source of the heat to prolonged volcanic activity. At shallow depths in the caldera References Brian M. Smith, Gene A. Suemnicht (1991) Oxygen Isotope Evidence For Past And Present Hydrothermal Regimes Of Long Valley Caldera, California

325

Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The volcanic rocks investigated in a cross-section between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Nicaragua - with the exception of Recent and some Pleistocene lavas - are incipiently to strongly altered. Alteration patterns on different scales can be discerned in the Tertiary sequences: (i) a regional burial diagenesis or very low-grade burial metamorphism at the low-temperature end of the zeolite facies (mordenite subfacies) with an inferred thermal gradient of < 50°C/km, grading into (ii) a geothermal

326

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

327

A combined heat transfer and quartz dissolution/deposition model for a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A kinetic model of silica transport has been coupled to a heat transfer model for a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir to examine the effect of silica rock-water interactions on fracture aperture and permeability. The model accounts for both the dissolution and deposition of silica. Zones of local dissolution and deposition were predicted, but their effect on aperture and permeability were fairly small for all cases studied. Initial rock temperature, reservoir size, and the ratio of rock surface area to fluid volume have the largest effect on the magnitude of silica mass transferred between the liquid and solid phases. 13 refs., 6 figs.

Robinson, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Alaska Open-File Report 127 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites in Southern Southeastern Alaska - Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information has been gathered on 13 reported thermal-spring sites, 12 in southern Southeastern Alaska and one in western British Columbia. Five of the reported sites could not be substantiated by DGGS. The eight known thermal spring sites are associated with grainitic terrain and, except for Baker Island Hot Springs, occur within or near intensively fractured Cretaceous-age pluons of the Coast Range Batholith. Thermal-spring surface temperatures range from 21 C (Twin Lakes) to 91.5 C (Bailey Bay). The greatest discharge occurs at Chief Shakes hot springs (450 1pm). Bell Island Hot Springs, which has about a 100-1 pm discharge and a 70 C temperature, has had the most development. Two previously unreported thermal-spring sites, Barnes Lake warm springs and Bradfield hot springs, have a low rate of discharge and respective surface temperatures of about 25 and 54 C. The known thermal springs probably originate from circulation of meteoric waters through deep-seated fracture and fault systems. The chemical constituents of the alkali-sulfate to alkali-chloride thermal waters are probably derived from interaction of the deeply circulating meteoric waters with the granitic wall rocks. Chemical geothermometry suggests subsurface temperatures of 55 to 151 C. If waters are being heated solely by conduction from wall rocks, circulation depths must be about 1.5 to 5 km, assuming geothermal gradients of 30 to 50 C/km. Variations in temperature, discharge, and chemistry were noted at several thermal springs for which previous records are available. A major decrease in silica and potassium concentrations at Chief Shakes hot springs is suggested by comparing recent analyses of water chemistry to Waring's (1917) original analysis. The rate of discharge at Bell Island Hot Springs may have increased by a factor of two since Waring's visit to the springs. Subsurface reservoirs associated with thermal springs in southern Southeastern Alaska are of low temperature and are probably limited in extent, compared to geothermal fields now being used elsewhere in the world. Only the Bell Island and Bailey Bay sites now offer any potential for generation of electricity; these sites could also be used for a variety of direct uses such as space heating, wood or lumber processing, and perhaps aquaculture. The other sites have less potential but could be used locally for space heating or agriculture enhancement.

Motyka, Roman J.; Moorman, Mary A.; Reeder, John W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Federal hot dry rock geothermal energy development program: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The formulation and evolution of the Federal Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are traced. Program motivation is derived from the enormous potential of the resource. Accomplishments to date, including the establishment and evaluation of the 5-MW/sub t/ Phase 1 reservoir at Fenton Hill, NM and various instrument and equipment developments, are discussed. Future plans presented include (1) establishment of a 20- to 50-MW/sub t/ Phase 2 reservoir at Fenton Hill that will be used to demonstrate longevity and, eventually, electric power production and (2) the selection of a second site at which a direct thermal application will be demonstrated.

Nunz, G.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Experimental permeability studies at elevated temperature and pressure of granitic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Permeability of quartz monzonite from the Los Alamos hot-dry-rock geothermal well GT-2 was experimentally measured as a function of pressure and temperature. Permeability of the GT-2 rocks from depths of 8580 ft and 9522 ft behaves like Westerly granite for changes in effective confining pressure. However, permeability of these rocks behaves much differently with increasing temperature. As temperature is increased, the permeability of Westerly granite passes through a slight minimum and then increases exponentially above 100/sup 0/C. Upon cooling the permeability shows a permanent increase of up to four times its original value. The permeability of GT-2-9522', on the other hand, drops off exponentially with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum near 140/sup 0/C; above 150/sup 0/C, permeability rises slowly. These changes in permeability with temperature are postulated to be caused by differential thermal expansion (DTE), a phenomena related to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous coefficients of thermal expansion of the mineral grains in the rock. Scanning electron photomicrographs of unheated and heated samples of Westerly and GT-2 rocks support the DTE hypothesis. Differences in the behavior of these rocks with temperature are believed to be due to the respective temperature and pressure environments in which they became equilibrated, since both GT-2 rocks had existed at moderately high temperatures and pressures for some time. Temperature disequilibrium of the GT-2 rocks in their present in situ environments is believed to have caused the differences in the behavior between the two samples and may provide a method for determining the pre-intrusion geothermal gradient of the Jemez area. Flow channels were observed in GT-2 samples using radioactive tracer techniques. Several radioactive isotopes were tried in these experiments, including /sup 22/Na, /sup 63/Ni, and /sup 35/S.

Potter, J.M.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development of hot dry rock geothermal resources; technical and economic issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical and economic issues related to the commercial feasibility of hot dry rock geothermal energy for producing electricity and heat are discussed. Topics covered include resource characteristics, reservoir thermal capacity and lifetime, drilling and surface plant costs, financial risk and anticipated rate of return. The current status of research and deveopment efforts in the US are also summarized.

Tester, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal stress cracking and the enhancement of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Given sufficient time, the extraction of heat from geothermal reservoirs formed by the hydraulic fracturing of competent rock will eventually result in the formation of thermal stress cracks in the reservoir. These cracks penetrate the rock in a manner such that the penetration-to-spacing ratio is approximately one. The penetration depends upon the extent of cooling and the square root of time. Initially then, the cracks are closely spaced and penetrate but little, so that a crazing pattern is apparent; but with increasing time some of these cracks, now more widely spaced, grow deeper. Eventually these larger cracks attain a critical aperture such that significant rates of water flow can be established within them and thus the newly created heat transfer area becomes useful for heat extraction. At the same time that cracks are forming within the main reservoir, thermal cracking also occurs in the wellbores that communicate with the reservoir. These cracks eventually convey water to and from the reservoir, thus leading to a decrease in the flow impedances that are often concentrated in the wellbore regions.

Murphy, H.D.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

DOE hot dry rock program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

Nunz, G.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

336

Cornell University Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water System Hot Water System The production and delivery of hot water in the CUSD home is technologically advanced, economical, and simple. Hot water is produced primarily by the evacuated solar thermal tube collectors on the roof of the house. The solar thermal tube array was sized to take care of the majority of our heating and hot water needs throughout the course of the year in the Washington, DC climate. The solar thermal tube array also provides heating to the radiant floor. The hot water and radiant floor systems are tied independently to the solar thermal tube array, preventing the radiant floor from robbing the water heater of much needed thermal energy. In case the solar thermal tubes are not able to provide hot water to our system, the hot water tank contains an electric heating

337

Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.05}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.

Oinhong Hu

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

Definition: Rock Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to core recovered from boreholes. They typically involve measuring the physical and chemical properties of the rock. Physical properties include density, elastic modulus, seismic...

339

Rock Energy Cooperative (Illinois) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative (Illinois) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Energy Cooperative Place Illinois Utility Id 16196 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

340

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the slick rock Uranium Mill Tailings sites Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (42 USC {section} 7901 et seq.), hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. Contaminated materials cover an estimated 55 acres of the Union Carbide (UC) processing site and 12 ac of the North Continent (NC) processing site. The total estimated volume of contaminated materials is approximately 61 8,300 cubic yards. In addition to the contamination in the two processing site areas, four VPs were found to contain contamination. As a result of the tailings being exposed to the environment, contamination associated with the UC and NC sites has leached into shallow ground water. Surface water has not been affected. The closest residence is approximately 0.3 air mi from either site. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the sites on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. All solid contaminated materials would be buried under 5 feet (ft) of rock and soil materials. The proposed disposal site area is currently used by ranchers for cattle grazing over a 7-month period. The closest residence to the proposed disposal site is 2 air mi. An estimated 44 ac of land would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future use.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Long-duration thermal storage for solar-thermal high-pressure steam IPH  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal central-receiver systems are cost effective for electric-power and industrial process-heat applications. Systems employing molten nitrate salt as both receiver working fluid and storage have previously been evaluated for diurnal thermal storage. This study evaluates the potential of employing a molten salt receiver for a baseload industrial process plant requiring saturated steam at 68 atm (1000 psi). Two types of thermal storage are evaluated: molten salt, and air and rock. When thermal storage of six hours or less is used, molten nitrate salt alone is the optimum storage. For more than six hours, the optimum storage is a combination of molten salt and air and rock. The air and rock system uses a molten-salt-to-air heat exchanger and a thermocline rock bed heated and cooled by the air. The economic potential of the system is determined. The results depend on the relative cost of fossil fuel and the solar thermal energy costs. The optimum quantity of storage is highly variable, and the range is from no storage to a long duration capacity - 48 hours.

Copeland, R.J.; Stern, C.; Leach, J.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An evaluation of near-field host rock temperatures for a spent fuel repository  

SciTech Connect

A repository heat transfer analysis has been performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy's Performance Assessment Scientific Support Program. The objective of this study was to evaluate the near-field thermal environmental conditions for a spent fuel repository system. A spent fuel logistics analysis was performed using a waste management system simulation model, WASTES-II, to evaluate the thermal characteristics of spent fuel received at the repository. A repository-scale thermal analysis was performed using a finite difference heat transfer code, TEMPEST, to evaluate the near-field host rock temperature. The calculated temporal and spatial distributions of near-field host rock temperatures provide input to the repository source term model in evaluations of engineered barrier system performance. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Altenhofen, M.K.; Lowery, P.S.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1 - August 31, 1954. This was the tenth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish caught by species, (2) number of adipose clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) daily average riverflow, (4) daily average powerhouse No. 1 and No. 2 flows and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center, which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the {open_quotes}water budget{close_quotes}, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows to enhance survival of downstream migrating juvenile salmonids. The Rock Island Dam trapping facility collected 37,795 downstream migrating salmonids in 1994. Collected fish included 4 yearling and 4 sub-yearling chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) that had been previously PIT tagged to help determine migration rates. Additionally, 1,132 sub-yearling chinook, 4,185 yearling chinook, 6,627 steelhead, (O. mykiss) and 422 sockeye (O. nerka) with clipped adipose fins were collected. The middle 80% of the 1994 spring migration (excluding sub-yearling chinooks) passed Rock Island Dam during a 34 day period, April 25 - May 28. Passage rates of chinook and steelhead smolts released from hatcheries and the downstream migration timing of all salmonids are presented. The spring migration timing of juvenile salmonids is strongly influenced by hatchery releases above Rock Island Dam.

Truscott, Keith B.; Fielder, Paul C. (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

Bureau of Economic Geology

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Microbiology of thermally polluted environments. Technical progress report, August 1, 1973--July 31, 1974  

SciTech Connect

Thermal pollution is discussed with regard to sources of manmade thermal water; thermal consequences of thermal pollution; and thermal effects on water quality. Natural habitats receiving thermal additions are discussed with regard to geothermal habitats and geothermal modification of normal aquatic ecosystems. Ecological observations on geothermal habitats include upper temperature limits for various taxonomic groups and consequences of species restriction by temperature. General ecological consequences of thermal polution are discussed with regard to differences between thermal effects on cold and warm water habitats; adaptation to the thermal environment; effect of temperature on gruwth rate; temperatare and water quality; and bacterial indicators of thermal pollution. (HLW)

Brock, T.D.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Dani Podladchikov, PGP, University of Oslo, Norway Intro 1 #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming Rocks Motivation 2 The single most useful thing to understand! #12;Schmid et al. Inclusion Behavior in Deforming

Cesare, Bernardo

348

Hot dry rock: What does it take to make it happen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ubiquitous heat in hot dry rock (HDR) is an abundant, widely distributed form of geothermal energy. Until recently, development of this energy source has been largely focused on understanding the scientific and engineering principles involved in forming and operating HDR reservoirs. During the past year, however, a pilot facility at Fenton Hill, NM has been run under steady-state conditions simulating the operation of a commercial HDR energy plant. Issues important to commercialization such as sustainability of thermal production, water loss, operating costs, and others have been addressed to the extent possible. The results, while not always definitive, have been encouraging. The stage is now set for the formation of an initiative led by private industry to take HDR technology from its current state of scientific and engineering demonstration to the production and marketing of energy in commercial quantities. Because of the technology risks involved, this can probably only be accomplished through a cost-shared industry/government effort. The potential rewards are great, since HDR represents the best, and perhaps the only, opportunity for geothermal energy to take its rightful place as a major energy source for the 21st century.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hot dry rock: What does it take to make it happen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ubiquitous heat in hot dry rock (HDR) is an abundant, widely distributed form of geothermal energy. Until recently, development of this energy source has been largely focused on understanding the scientific and engineering principles involved in forming and operating HDR reservoirs. During the past year, however, a pilot facility at Fenton Hill, NM has been run under steady-state conditions simulating the operation of a commercial HDR energy plant. Issues important to commercialization such as sustainability of thermal production, water loss, operating costs, and others have been addressed to the extent possible. The results, while not always definitive, have been encouraging. The stage is now set for the formation of an initiative led by private industry to take HDR technology from its current state of scientific and engineering demonstration to the production and marketing of energy in commercial quantities. Because of the technology risks involved, this can probably only be accomplished through a cost-shared industry/government effort. The potential rewards are great, since HDR represents the best, and perhaps the only, opportunity for geothermal energy to take its rightful place as a major energy source for the 21st century.

Duchane, D.V.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

BUBBLE MOTION AND SIZE VARIATION DURING THERMAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For a water-steam system conditions are determined for a stationary bubble in which the effects of buoyancy and thermal migration are balanced. ...

351

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat. flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the ofpossibility of land subsidence or upliftu thermal pollution,flow, land uplift or subsidence 1 water chemistry and

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A solar concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis discusses aspects of a novel solar concentrating photovoltaic / thermal (PV/T) collector that has been designed to produce both electricity and hot water.… (more)

Coventry, Joseph S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

East, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heatingsolar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The hot dry rock geothermal energy program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper presents a simplified description of the Department of Energy's Hot-Dry-Rock program conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. What a hot-dry-rock resource is and what the magnitude of the resource is are also described.

Smith, M.C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NREL: News Feature - Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock'  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' July 23, 2012 This photo shows an island in the middle of blue sea water, with industrial buildings taking up a good deal of the island. The 1,300 solar panels on the Cellhouse building are a dark blue. Enlarge image Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay is referred to as "The Rock" and was home to a notorious prison for 75 years. NREL recently helped the National Park Service and the DOE Federal Energy Management Program transform the island's electricity source from diesel fuel to photovoltaic panels on the rooftop of the Cellhouse building. Courtesy of the National Park Service "Machine Gun Kelly," Al Capone, the "Birdman" - Alcatraz prison has had some infamous residents on the craggy island known as "The Rock" in the

359

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility General Information Name Eagle Rock Geothermal Facility Facility Eagle Rock Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location The Geysers, California Coordinates 38.826770222484°, -122.80002593994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.826770222484,"lon":-122.80002593994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

Definition: Rock Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Rock Sampling Systematic rock sampling can be used to characterize a geothermal reservoir. The physical and chemical properties of rock samples provide important information for determining whether a power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed. Some general rock properties can be measured by visual inspection, but detailed properties require laboratory techniques. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is called the "core hole". A variety of core samplers exist to sample

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Summary - Hot Dry Rock R&D Strategies and Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In geothermal energy technology, the hydrothermal systems rely on volcanic hot rocks being fortuitously co-located with an adequate supply of natural ground water, usually at some considerable depth within the earth. This represents essentially two accidents in the same place, and the occurrence is relatively rare. Yellowstone Park and the desert valley of southern California are the most noteworthy US. examples. Since the heat is the energy needed, if we could just get the water down to it and back. Well, that's what is being done with the hot dry rock program. A well is drilled down to where there is adequate heat in the rocks. The well is then pressurized until the rock fractures creating what amounts to a reservoir full of hot, shattered rock. Finally, a well is drilled into the reservoir and water is pumped in one well, heated by the rock, and taken out through the other well at useful temperatures and pressures. We are getting ready to run significant long-term flow tests at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site west of Los Alamos, New Mexico. We expect the operational information to provide the data to forecast the energy life of the wells as a production facility. This kind of resource is much more common than regular geothermal resources. Robert H. Hendron described the Long Term Flow Test and reservoir studies for which the project is preparing. A shortfall of available funding has slowed preparations, delaying the start of that test. The test is planning to gather data for more definitive reservoir modeling with energy availability or reservoir lifetime of primary interest. Other interests include geochemistry and tracer studies, microseismic response, water requirements and flow impedance which relates directly to the pumping power required. Progress has been made in modeling studies, chemically reactive tracer techniques, and in improvements in acoustic or microseismic event analysis. Donald W. Brown discussed reservoir modeling as it relates to production management of the HDR well. For wells which are fracture dominated rather than matrix-permeability controlled, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (or pre-existing fractures is critical to long-term power production from the wells) through optimized pressure management. It was mentioned that a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs, or reinjection I procedures of geothermal reservoirs. Dr. Bruce A. Robinson discussed the development of fluid flow and transport models for simulation of HDR geothermal reservoirs. These models are also expected to provide accurate predictions of long-term behavior and help in the development of strategies for reservoir improvement and operation. Two approaches were discussed. The discrete fracture approach is based on a random fracture network subject to prescribed statistical properties of the fracture set. It is used to simulate steady state fluid flow and solute transport. The other approach used the continuum approximation. This type of model is appropriate when the reservoir consists of many interconnected fractures, as is the case at Fenton Hill.

Tennyson, George P..

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Geothermal potential of West-Central New Mexico from geochemical and thermal gradient data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To study the low temperature and Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal potential of west-central New Mexico, 46 water samples were collected and geothermal gradient measurements were made in 29 wells. Water chemistry data indicate that all the samples collected are meteoric waters. High temperatures of samples taken from wells between Gallup and Tohatchi indicate these wells may derive water from a warm aquifer below the depth of the wells. The chemistries of the samples farther south on the Zuni Indian reservation suggest these waters are not circulating below 600 m of the surface. Geothermometry calculations support the conclusion that the waters sampled are meteoric. The geothermometry also indicates that the deep reservoir between Gallup and Tohatchi may be greater than 60/sup 0/C. Thermal gradient data indicate an area of high gradient on the Zuni Indian Reservation with a measured maximum of 67/sup 0/C/km between 181 m and 284 m. This high probably is not hydrologically controlled. The maximum gradients in the study area are 76/sup 0/C/km and 138/sup 0/C/km, measured just east of Springerville, Arizona. These gradients are undoubtedly controlled by circulating water, possibly heated by a magmatic source at depth and circulating back to the surface.

Levitte, D.; Gambill, D.T.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Progress of the US Hot-Dry-Rock Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While other geologic environments and possible heat-extraction methods are recognized, the US Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Program has so far concentrated on the use of hydraulic fracturing to create flow passages and heat-transfer surface between two wells drilled into hot crystalline rock of low initial permeability. A recirculating pressurized-water loop has been used at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, to extract heat at rates up to 5MW(t) from a system of this type in granitic rock at a depth of 2600 m. The two wells for a larger, deeper, hotter system have now been drilled at the same location. They will be connected during 1982 by a set of hydraulic fractures, and the resulting heat-extraction loop is expected to yield the engineering experience and performance data required to demonstrate the commercial usefulness of such systems. Meanwhile, an evaluation of the HDR resource base of the United States is continuing, together with detailed investigation of local areas that appear especially promisng either for future heat-extraction experiments or for eventual commercial development.

Smith, M.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Protected Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bits For Hard Rock Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two bits were designed. One bit was fabricated and tested at Terra-Tek's Drilling Research Laboratory. Fabrication of the second bit was not completed due to complications in fabrication and meeting scheduled test dates at the test facility. A conical bit was tested in a Carthage Marble (compressive strength 14,500 psi) and Sierra White Granite (compressive strength 28,200 psi). During the testing, Hydraulic Horsepower, Bit Weight, Rotation Rate, were varied for the Conical Bit, a Varel Tricone Bit and Varel PDC bit. The Conical Bi did cut rock at a reasonable rate in both rocks. Beneficial effects from the near and through cutter water nozzles were not evident in the marble due to test conditions and were not conclusive in the granite due to test conditions. At atmospheric drilling, the Conical Bit's penetration rate was as good as the standard PDC bit and better than the Tricone Bit. Torque requirements for the Conical Bit were higher than that required for the Standard Bits. Spudding the conical bit into the rock required some care to avoid overloading the nose cutters. The nose design should be evaluated to improve the bit's spudding characteristics.

Robert Lee Cardenas

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

FRACTURE DETECTION IN CRYSTALLINE ROCK USING ULTRASONIC SHEAR WAVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the piezoelectric source plate and the rock surface. With aThe S^j sources were bonded to the rock surface with a fast-^ source plate was epoxied in position on the rock specimen.

Waters, K.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

Zyvoloski, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was developed in the late 1980's under the Hot Dry Rock Project. Those studies described-conceptually and mathematically-the application of reactive tracers to tracking thermal fronts and to reservoir sizing. Later mathematical treatments focused on application of a single reactive tracer test to recover the temperature profile of a single streamtube. Previous tracer work has mainly focused on identifying conservative tracers. In these studies, chemicals that degraded at reservoir temperatures were discarded. Benzoic acids and dicarboxylic acids, which were found by Adams to degrade, may be useful as reactive tracers. Organic esters and amide tracers that undergo hydrolysis have been investigated and their use as reactive tracers appears feasible over a temperature range of 100ºC to 275ºC. However their reaction rates are pH dependent and sorption reactions have not been evaluated. While reactive tracer parameters have been measured in the lab, reactive tracers have not been extensively tested in the field. Thus, while reactive tracers appear to be a promising means of monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir, the concept has yet to be tested at the scale necessary for successful implementation, and tools for analyzing results of such tracer tests under the non-ideal conditions of an actual geothermal system have yet to be developed.

369

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

Hobson, M. J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Definition: Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Water Sampling Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or...

372

Active solar thermal design manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is aimed at systems design engineers, architects, system supplier/installers, and contractor/builders. Practical information for both skilled and inexperienced designers. Solar thermal applications focuses on residential and commercial space heating, potable hot water heating, process water heating, and space cooling.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Strength and ductility of four dry igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy extraction from magma requires stable boreholes at relatively shallow depths (< 10 km) in rocks at temperatures of the order of 1000/sup 0/C. Accordingly, the failure strengths, strains at failure, and associated deformation mechanisms of room-dry andesite, besalt, granodiorite, and obsidian are determined at temperatures to partial melting (> 1050/sup 0/C), at confining pressures of 0 and 50 MPa, and strain rate of 10/sup -4//s. The strength reductions of the crystalline rocks are more or less linear until they steepen suddenly with approach to melting. When that occurs, strengths vanish and deformations become quasiviscous. The obsidian is stronger than the crystalline rocks to 600/sup 0/C where glass softening begins and strength goes to zero at 800/sup 0/C. All rocks are brittle throughout the entire temperature range until melting or softening occurs. Shortenings at failure are 3 percent or less. The crystalline rocks tend to deform primarily by precursive microscopic extension fracturing and its coalescence into macroscopic faults. The abundance of load-induced fractures remains about constant, but thermal cracking increases with increasing temperature. Results from tests at 25/sup 0/C on specimens that previously had been heated to 900-1000/sup 0/C clearly show that the weakening of unconfined specimens is due to the thermal cracking. Weakening of confined specimens, however, probably is due to an inherent temperature effect on the load-induced fracturing process. Comparisons of instantaneous failure-strengths with stresses likely ot occur at the walls of boreholes show that a hole as deep as 10 km in impermeable crystalline rock is not likely to fail under short-time loading even at 1000/sup 0/C, unless the maximum in-situ horizontal stress is greater than or equal to vetical stress and the hole is open (i.e., borehole pressure is zero). 27 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111 Massive Rock Well Fractured Basalt WT Soil of fractured basalt. Fractures and layer-junctions important for seepage. Note seepage face. Soil layers lined, and is typically pebbles. The water collects in the main column and is fed up through the delivery pipe

Sohoni, Milind

377

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

378

Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Ages of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy Purchaser Rock of Ages Location Graniteville VT Coordinates 44.14668574°, -72.48180896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.14668574,"lon":-72.48180896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Rock | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopic Analysis- Rock Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Rock Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://wwwrcamnl.wr.usgs.gov/isoig/isopubs/itchch2.html Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Isotopic_Analysis-_Rock&oldid=687702" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

380

Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in fractured porous rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical methods have been applied for the prediction of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through water-saturated fractured porous rock. The presence of colloids may enhance the transport of radionuclides in groundwater by reducing retardation effects. The colloids existing in the groundwater act as carriers, adsorbing radionuclides on their large surface area and moving faster than the average water velocity. With colloids present, the system consists of three phases, i. e., an aqueous phase, a carrier phase, and a stationary solid phase. In the basic model, one-dimensional advection in a single planar fracture of infinite extent is coupled with diffusion in the rock matrix perpendicular to the fracture. In this study, a full-equilibrium model was developed to describe the transport and fate of the radionuclides in the fracture. Sorption onto rock matrix, fracture surface and sorption into mobile and immobile colloids are included. The effect of colloidal particle size was also considered. Mass partition mechanisms between the colloids and solid matrix and between colloid and contaminant are represented by local equilibrium. In the three-phase i.e., retardation coefficient, hydrodynamic dispersion system, the coefficient, and fracture width are modified to include the equilibrium distribution coefficient of contaminant with a carrier. In the three phase model, much smaller retardation and hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are obtained and the effect of fracture width is larger. With the additional consideration of colloidal particle sizes, these effects become ever larger. Numerical solutions for the model were obtained using a fully implicit finite difference scheme. A significant sensitivity to model parameters was discovered, and in particular, the equilibrium distribution coefficients between a contaminant and the carrier were found to be the most important factors.

Baek, Inseok

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

Blahnik, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

Norton, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Water information bulletin No. 30, part 13: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Preliminary geologic reconnaissance of the geothermal occurrences of the Wood River Drainage Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pre-tertiary sediments of the Milligen and Wood River Formations consisting primarily of argillite, quartzite, shale and dolomite are, for the most part, exposed throughout the area and are cut locally by outliers of the Idaho Batholith. At some locations, Tertiary-age Challis Volcanics overlay these formations. Structurally the area is complex with major folding and faulting visible in many exposures. Many of the stream drainages appear to be fault controlled. Hydrologic studies indicate hot spring occurrences are related to major structural trends, as rock permeabilities are generally low. Geochemical studies using stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the thermal water in the Wood River region to be depleted by about 10 0/00 in D and by 1 to 2 0/00 in /sup 18/0 relative to cold water. This suggests the water could be meteoric water that fell during the late Pleistocene. The geological data, as well as the chemical data, indicate the geothermal waters are heated at depth, and subsequently migrate along permeable structural zones. In almost all cases the chemical data suggest slightly different thermal histories and recharge areas for the water issuing from the hot springs. Sustained use of the thermal water at any of the identified springs is probably limited to flow rates approximating the existing spring discharge. 28 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Anderson, J.E.; Bideganeta, K.; Mitchell, J.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Green Systems Solar Hot Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1,2; basement) Pre-heats water so water heaters don't need to use as much energy Gas-powered, high efficiency

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

388

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Slick Rock uranium mill tailings sites, Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereafter referred to as the UMTRCA, authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to clean up two uranium mill tailings processing sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in San Miguel County. The purpose of the cleanup is to reduce the potential health effects associated with the radioactive materials remaining on the processing sites and on vicinity properties (VPs) associated with the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards for the UMTRCA that contained measures to control the contaminated materials and to protect the ground water from further degradation. The sites contain concrete foundations of mill buildings, tailings piles, and areas contaminated by windblown and waterborne radioactive tailings materials. The proposed action is to remediate the UC and NC sites by removing all contaminated materials within the designated site boundaries or otherwise associated with the sites, and relocating them to, and stabilizing them at, a location approximately 5 road mi (8 km) northeast of the processing sites on land administered by the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Remediation would be performed by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Peak Load Management of Thermal Loads Using Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 50% of electric energy delivered to residences is converted into some sort of thermal energy—hot water, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Storing energy in thermal form is cheaper especially when the medium used to store the energy is an end-use medium for example, hot water. This technical update evaluates two different technologies for storing energy—in cold water and in hot water.GreenPeak technology, a storage condensing unit (SCU) from IE Technologies, uses an ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1991  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off tlw rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen- erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen­ erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Rock-brine chemical interactions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of experimental interaction of powdered volcanic rock with aqueous solutions are presented at temperatures from 200 to 400/sup 0/C, 500 to 1000 bars fluid pressure, with reaction durations of approximately 30 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The aim of this research is to develop data on the kinetics and equilibria of rock solution interactions that will provide insight into the complex geochemical processes attending geothermal reservoir development, stimulation, and reinjection. The research was done in the Stanford Hydrothermal Lab using gold cell equipment of the Dickson design. This equipment inverts the solution rock mixture several times a minute to ensure thorough mixing. Solution samples were periodically withdrawn without interruption of the experimental conditions. The data from these experiments suggests a path dependent series of reactions by which geothermal fluids might evolve from meteoric or magmatic sources.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Exploration for hot dry rock geothermal resources in the Midcontinent USA. Hot dry rock conceptual models for exploration, HDR test site investigations, and the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project. Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three potential sources of HDR, each covering approximately a 2/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ area, were identified and subjected to preliminary evaluation with ad hoc exploration strategies. In the Mississippi Embayment test site, lateral thermal conductivity variations and subcrustal heat sources may be involved in producing abnormally high subsurface temperatures. Studies indicate that enhanced temperatures are associated primarily with basement rift features where vertical displacement of aquifers and faults cause the upward migration of hot waters leading to anomalously high, local, upper crustal temperatures. The Western Nebraska test site is a potential low temperature HDR source also related, at least in part, to groundwater movement. There appear to be much more widespread possibilities for similar HDR sites in the Great Plains area. The Southeast Michigan test site was selected for study because of the possible presence of radiogenic plutons overlain by a thickened sedimentary blanket. There is no direct information on the presence of abnormally high temperatures in this area, but the study does show that a combination of gravity and magnetic anomaly mapping with regional geological information derived from sparse drill holes in the Phanerozoic rocks is useful on a widespread basis for focusing on local areas for detailed evaluation.

Hinze, W.J.; Braile, L.W.; von Frese, R.R.B.; Lidiak, E.G.; Denison, R.E.; Keller, G.R.; Roy, R.F.; Swanberg, C.A.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Morgan, P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal waters rocks" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evidence for the existence of a stable, highly fluidized-pressurized region of deep, jointed crystalline rock from Fenton Hill hot dry rock test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated several times at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Fenton Hill hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal test site, that large volumes of naturally jointed Precambrian crystalline rock can be stably maintained at pressures considerably above the least principal earth stress in the surrounding rock mass. In particular, for the deeper, larger, and tighter of the two HDR reservoirs tested at this site in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, testing was carried out for a cumulative period of 11 months without evidence of fracture extension at the boundaries of the pressure-stimulated region, even though a very high reservoir inlet circulating pressure of 27.3 MPa (3960 psi) above hydrostatic was maintained throughout the testing, considerably in excess of the least principal stress in the surrounding rock mass of about 10 MPa above hydrostatic at a depth of 3500 m. The author reviews and summarizes information concerning the earth stresses at depth and the test data relative to the containment of pressurized fluid, particularly the data showing the declining rate of water loss and the absence of microseismicity--the two principal indicators of a stable, pressurized reservoir region. The author then provides a coherent and concise evaluation of this and other evidence supporting his assertion that one can indeed maintain large volumes of jointed rock at pressures considerably in excess of the least principal earth stress. In addition, a discussion is presented concerning the initial state of stress at depth beneath Fenton Hill and then possible changes to the stress state resulting from the very large volumes of injected high-pressure water and the accompanying shear displacements--and shear dilation--associated with these pressurizations.

Brown, D.W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Category:Little Rock, AR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AR AR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Little Rock, AR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVHospital Little Rock... 69 KB SVLargeHotel Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeHotel Little Ro... 70 KB SVLargeOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVLargeOffice Little R... 71 KB SVMediumOffice Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMediumOffice Little ... 68 KB SVMidriseApartment Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Lit... 70 KB SVOutPatient Little Rock AR Entergy Arkansas Inc.png SVOutPatient Little Ro...

403

INTERLABORATORY, MULTIMETHOD STUDY OF AN IN SITU PRODUCED OIL SHALE PROCESS WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion) and the oil shale reserves near Rock Springs,homogeneous reserve of an in situ oil-shale process water

Farrier, D.S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z