National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermal unit ice

  1. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  2. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  3. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  4. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01

    energy cost. A tool for optimal ice storage design is developed, considering the charging and discharge times and optimal sizing of ice thermal storage system. Detailed simulation studies using real office building located near Orlando, FL including...

  5. Ice Bear® Storage Module | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ice Bear Storage Module Ice Bear Storage Module Thermal Energy Storage for Light Commercial Refrigerant-Based Air Conditioning Units The Ice Bear storage technology was...

  6. Tunable Electrical and Thermal Transport in Ice-Templated MultiLayer Graphene Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    to electrical energy storage,1­3 thermal energy storage,4­13 and composite materials.14­21 Ice applications in thermal and electrical energy storage. Phase change thermal storage seeks to reduce building offsets in energy supply and demand.6 Thermal energy storage is also an appealing way to cool power

  7. PSERC 97-12 "Thermal Unit Commitment Including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSERC 97-12 "Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints" Carlos Murillo-562-3966. #12;Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo S anchez Robert a new algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation

  8. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, R; Domingo, M; Satorre, M A

    2008-01-01

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  9. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

    2008-01-21

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  10. Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

  11. Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal storage is becoming a standard consideration in HVAC and process cooling systems. As the technology is refined, more attention is being given to minimize the energy consumption and power demand requirements. This paper addresses a method...

  12. Nanocluster building blocks of artificial square spin ice: Stray-field studies of thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohlit, Merlin Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael; Müller, Jens

    2015-05-07

    We present measurements of the thermal dynamics of a Co-based single building block of an artificial square spin ice fabricated by focused electron-beam-induced deposition. We employ micro-Hall magnetometry, an ultra-sensitive tool to study the stray field emanating from magnetic nanostructures, as a new technique to access the dynamical properties during the magnetization reversal of the spin-ice nanocluster. The obtained hysteresis loop exhibits distinct steps, displaying a reduction of their “coercive field” with increasing temperature. Therefore, thermally unstable states could be repetitively prepared by relatively simple temperature and field protocols allowing one to investigate the statistics of their switching behavior within experimentally accessible timescales. For a selected switching event, we find a strong reduction of the so-prepared states' “survival time” with increasing temperature and magnetic field. Besides the possibility to control the lifetime of selected switching events at will, we find evidence for a more complex behavior caused by the special spin ice arrangement of the macrospins, i.e., that the magnetic reversal statistically follows distinct “paths” most likely driven by thermal perturbation.

  13. Hydro unit commitment in hydro-thermal optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Hsu, E.; Svoboda, A.J.; Tseng, C.; Johnson, R.B. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the authors develop a model and technique for solving the combined hydro and thermal unit commitment problem, taking into full account the hydro unit dynamic constraints in achieving overall economy of power system operation. The combined hydrothermal unit commitment problem is solved by a decomposition and coordination approach. Thermal unit commitment is solved using a conventional Lagrangian relaxation technique. The hydro system is divided into watersheds, which are further broken down into reservoirs. The watersheds are optimized by Network Flow Programming (NFP). Priority-list-based Dynamic Programming is used to solve the Hydro Unit Commitment (HUC) problem at the reservoir level. A successive approximation method is used for updating the marginal water values (Lagrange multipliers) to improve the hydro unit commitment convergence, due to the large size and multiple couplings of water conservation constraints. The integration of the hydro unit commitment into the existing Hydro-Thermal Optimization (HTO) package greatly improves the quality of its solution in the PG and E power system.

  14. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  15. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  16. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed hydro units. The variable ut i 2 f0;1g; i = 1;:::;I;t = 1;:::;T indicates whether the thermal unit i

  17. Thermal H/D exchange in polar ice - deuteron scrambling in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberts, Thanja; Cuppen, Herma; Fedoseev, Gleb; Linnartz, Harold

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the thermally induced proton/deuteron exchange in mixed amorphous H$_2$O:D$_2$O ices by monitoring the change in intensity of characteristic vibrational bending modes of H$_2$O, HDO, and D$_2$O with time and as function of temperature. The experiments have been performed using an ultra-high vacuum setup equipped with an infrared spectrometer that is used to investigate the spectral evolution of homogeneously mixed ice upon co-deposition in thin films, for temperatures in the 90 to 140 K domain. With this non-energetic detection method we find a significantly lower activation energy for H/D exchange -- $3840 \\pm 125$ K -- than previously reported. Very likely this is due to the amorphous nature of the interstellar ice analogues involved. This provides reactive timescales ($\\tau70$ K) fast enough for the process to be important in interstellar environments. Consequently, an astronomical detection of D$_2$O will be even more challenging because of its potential to react with H$_2$O to form H...

  18. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  19. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature gradients and at greater depths in the ice. Preliminary modelling of the impact of brine migration of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted on heat transport through first­year sea ice is presented. Diffusion­driven brine pocket migration

  20. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation.

  1. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    S. A. (2004). "Solar thermal collectors and applications".for High Temperature Solar Thermal Collector Units A thesisfor Solar Thermal Collectors……………………………..7 Solar Thermal

  2. Effect of Thermal Radiation on Melting Times of DT Ice Layers in Polymer-Capsule Targets for IFE Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnell, Timothy R.; Hoffer, James K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the time-to-melt for cryogenic DT inertial fusion targets in the presence of thermal radiation are presented. This time is defined as that required for thermal radiation in a hypothetical reactor to raise the temperature of small polymer capsules containing solid DT by 1 K and to fully liquefy the contents. The time estimates are in turn based on estimates of the infrared absorption spectra of both solid DT and the polymer capsule material. Assuming typical target dimensions and rapid equilibration of the target temperature, the estimates show that the absorption of thermal radiation and subsequent heating of likely capsule materials will dominate the corresponding quantities of DT ice and thus that the former effect largely determines the time-to-melt of the target. Specific estimates are made for capsules fabricated from Kapton{sup TM} polyimide. Comparisons are also made for capsules coated with reflective metal coatings, and the potential benefit of these coatings is discussed.

  3. Effects of spatially variable snow cover on thermal regime and hydrology of an Arctic ice wedge polygon landscape identified using ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Effects of spatially variable snow cover on thermal regime and hydrology of an Arctic ice wedge. Understanding the linkages between microtopography, snow cover, thermal properties, and thaw depth is critical the spatial variability of snow distribution. We compare it's distribution to microtopography, estimated using

  4. Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klam, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-06-02

    A percentage of insulating glass (IG) units break each year due to thermally induced perimeter stresses. The glass industry has known about this problem for many years and an ASTM standard has recently been developed for ...

  5. Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  6. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  7. A genetic algorithm for solving the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolf, A.; Bayrleithner, R.

    1999-11-01

    The paper presents a two layer approach to solve the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system. The first layer uses a genetic algorithm (GA) to decide the on/off status of the units. The second layer uses a non-linear programming formulation solved by a Lagrangian relaxation to perform the economic dispatch while meeting all plant and system constraints. In order to deal effectively with the constraints of the problem and prune the search space of the GA in advance, the difficult minimum up/down-time constraints of thermal generation units and the turbine/pump operating constraint of storage power stations are embedded in the binary strings that are coded to represent the on/off-states of the generating units. The other constraints are handled by integrating penalty costs into the fitness function. In order to save execution time, the economic dispatch is only performed if the given unit commitment schedule is able to meet the load balance, energy, and begin/end level constraints. The proposed solution approach was tested on a real scaled hydro-thermal power system over a period of a day in half-hour time-steps for different GA-parameters. The simulation results reveal that the features of easy implementation, convergence within an acceptable execution time, and highly optimal solution in solving the unit commitment problem can be achieved.

  8. Soil thermal dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States from 1948 to 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    ). Thus, the heat stored in soil and temperature variations cannot be ignored when studying airSoil thermal dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States from 1948 to 2008 to changes in vegetation, snow, soil moisture, and other climate variables (i.e., precipitation, solar

  9. Thermal characteristics and durability of sealed insulated glass units incorporating muntin bars under ultraviolet exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmahdy, A.H. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction

    1998-10-01

    Recent developments in glazing manufacturing have resulted in the introduction of a variety of glazing systems to meet the consumers demand and, in many cases, with better thermal performance than conventional glazing. Insulating glass (IG) units are now available where air is replaced with argon and other heavy gases (or mixtures of gases), low emissivity coatings on glass or plastic films, and muntin bars in the cavity between the sheets of glass. Muntin bars are made of various materials such as aluminum (anodized or painted), vinyl, or silicone foam. Although muntin bars are used for aesthetic reasons, they may cause adverse effects on the IG units performance, which may be attributed to the improper preparation of the muntin bars or the use of interior paints. Ultraviolet (fogging) tests were performed on a number of argon-filled IG units with and without muntin bars. The test results indicate that most of the IG units with muntin bars fail the UV test when viewed at off-angle. Meanwhile, when viewed at right angle, most of the IG units with muntin bars passed the UV test. Test results also showed that the R-value and condensation resistance of IG units with muntin bars are 4% to 7% lower than those units without muntin bars. The thermal bridging effect of the muntin bars contribute to the lower glass surface temperature in the area adjacent to the muntin bars.

  10. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P.; Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A.

    2008-07-15

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  11. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    et al. (2003). Low-Cost Distributed Solar- Thermal-Electriccooling with solar energy, leading to a more cost effectiveSolar Thermal Collector Units Introduction Increased production costs

  12. An Economic Analysis of the Self Commitment of Thermal Units Simon Ede, Ray Zimmerman, Timothy Mount, Robert Thomas, William Schulze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Economic Analysis of the Self Commitment of Thermal Units Simon Ede, Ray Zimmerman, Timothy a series of economic experiments conducted at Cornell University's Laboratory for Experimental Economics Commitment In the most conventional form of economic dispatch, the problem facing the system operator

  13. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative

  14. EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the...

  15. Iced Coffee Iced Chai Tea Latte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Chai Tea Latte Iced Americano Iced Cappuccino Iced Latte Iced Mocha Iced White the Cooler Canned Soda Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0.50 Listed prices do not include applicable sales tax. #12;Brewed Coffee Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Chai Tea Latte

  16. Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

  17. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnley, Stephen; Phillips, Rhiannon; Coleman, Terry; Rampling, Terence

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  18. Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

    1999-05-01

    This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA.

  19. Thermal Use of Biomass in The United States | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe2009) | Open Energy2008)|Al.,ProductThermal

  20. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Patrick 1987-

    2012-11-15

    analysis report HM heavy metal HS Hashin-Shtrikman HEM homogeneous equilibrium model IMF inert matrix fuel INL Idaho National Laboratory LHGR linear heat generation rate LOFA loss-of-flow accident LWR light water reactor MA minor actinides ME... component of the fluid/wall interface ? gravity vector l distance between centroids of adjacent cells ? unit outward normal vector hydrostatic pressure component of the stress tensor ? heat flux vector ? rate of internal heat generation...

  1. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJth of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  2. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-06-10

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJthmore »of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.« less

  3. Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

    2000-04-01

    Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

  4. Fouling and thermal-performance characteristics of the Humboldt Bay Unit 2 power-plant condenser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabas, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Elliott, E.S. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (US)

    1993-07-01

    An experimental program was conducted at the Humboldt Bay condenser using eight clusters of four neighboring tubes with different conditions. In each cluster, there were (1) a new tube, the tubeside fluid being distilled water; (2) a new tube, the tubeside fluid being plant circulating water (seawater) and no cleaning; (3) an old tube, plant circulating water with no cleaning; and (4) an old tube, plant circulating water with normal periodic manual cleaning (blowing plugs or sponge balls). These tube clusters were located at four different locations within both the first and second passes of this two-pass condenser. Because of the different conditions, the fouling and cleaning characteristics can be obtained with measurements of the flow rate and inlet, outlet, and saturation temperatures. In addition to the fouling data, the thermal performance can be compared to that obtained with the standard rating method. There was a reduction in the thermal performance of the new, distilled-water tubes for about the first 80 days, and then the performance remained essentially constant. This performance change was most likely the result of the change from dropwise to filmwise condensation on the 7/8-in OD, 18 BWG Admiralty tubes. There was a continued increase of the tubeside fouling resistance with time (no asymptotic behavior) for the tubes that were not cleaned in each cluster using the plant circulating water. The fouling rates were somewhat larger for the first or lower temperature pass initially for the new tubes and after about 100 days for the old tubes. However, the fouling resistance values were substantially larger for the old tubes.

  5. Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

  6. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    control of building thermal storage, ASHARE Transactionscan be achieved by utilizing thermal energy storage suchas ice storage or building thermal mass. Demand shedding is

  7. Negative Thermal Expansion in ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Mechanisms, Rigid Unit Modes, and Neutron Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Keen, David A. [Physics Department, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Wells, Stephen A. [Biological Physics, Bateman Physical Sciences Building, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Evans, John S.O. [Department of Chemistry, University Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-16

    The local structure of the low-temperature ordered phase of the negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been investigated by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of neutron total scattering data. We obtain, for the first time, quantitative measurements of the extent to which the WO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 6} polyhedra move as rigid units, and we show that these values are consistent with the predictions of rigid unit mode theory. We suggest that rigid unit modes are associated with the NTE. Our results do not support a recent interpretation of x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy data in terms of a larger rigid structural component involving the Zr-O-W linkage.

  8. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  9. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  10. Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development...

  11. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  12. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    with meteorological observations and a heat flux model. South of the island, we compare the ULS and thermalObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite, this paper examines the behavior of the Bering Sea St. Lawrence Island polynya using a combination

  14. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    and future of solar thermal energy as a primary source ofon harnessing solar thermal energy for water desalinationas an alternative. Solar thermal energy has the potential to

  15. Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I{sub h}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigley, D.; Alfè, D.; Slater, B.

    2014-10-28

    Using ab initio methods, we examine the stability of ice 0, a recently proposed tetragonal form of ice implicated in the homogeneous freezing of water [J. Russo, F. Romano, and H. Tanaka, Nat. Mater. 13, 670 (2014)]. Vibrational frequencies are computed across the complete Brillouin Zone using Density Functional Theory (DFT), to confirm mechanical stability and quantify the free energy of ice 0 relative to ice I{sub h}. The robustness of this result is tested via dispersion corrected semi-local and hybrid DFT, and Quantum Monte-Carlo calculation of lattice energies. Results indicate that popular molecular models only slightly overestimate the stability of ice zero. In addition, we study all possible realisations of proton disorder within the ice zero unit cell, and identify the ground state as ferroelectric. Comparisons are made to other low density metastable forms of ice, suggesting that the ice i structure [C. J. Fennel and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 1, 662 (2005)] may be equally relevant to ice formation.

  16. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  17. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  18. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A.

    1980-06-01

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  19. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Cost Distributed Solar- Thermal-Electric Power Generation.S. A. (2004). "Solar thermal collectors and applications".The present and future of solar thermal energy as a primary

  20. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  1. Thermal Conductivity Of Rubble Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure $P\\approx \\epsy\\mu$, where $\\epsy$ is the monolithic material's yield strain and $\\mu$ its rigidity. At low $P$, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, $\\kcon\\approx k(P/(\\epsy\\mu))^{1/2}$, can be orders of magnitude smaller than, $k$, the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, $\\krad=16\\ell\\sigma T^3/3$, to the total effective conductivity, $\\keff=\\kcon +\\krad$. Here $\\ell$, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of order the size of the elements and voids. An important distinction between $\\kcon$ and $\\krad$ is that the former i...

  2. Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

    1999-10-05

    The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

  3. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  4. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    a motorized sun-tracker to the collectors, designing a non-the sun onto each of the three solar thermal collectors. ix

  5. Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Sediment Melt-Migration Dynamics in Perennial Antarctic Lake Ice Steven M. Jepsen* Edward E. Adams examined sediment melt-migration dynamics in the ice cover of Lake Fryxell, Taylor Valley, McMurdo Dry. The specific objectives were to determine the thermal conditions required for sediment melt and how sediment

  6. Simulated heat storage in a perennially ice-covered high Arctic lake: Sensitivity to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    . In contrast, the perennially ice-covered lakes found at high latitudes can store heat in excess of the annualSimulated heat storage in a perennially ice-covered high Arctic lake: Sensitivity to climate change conductivity and temperature profiles. They are salinity stratified and have deep thermal maxima that persist

  7. Photodesorption of ices I: CO, N2 and CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2009-01-23

    A longstanding problem in astrochemistry is how molecules can be maintained in the gas phase in dense inter- and circumstellar regions. Photodesorption is a non-thermal desorption mechanism, which may explain the small amounts of observed cold gas in cloud cores and disk mid-planes. This paper aims to determine the UV photodesorption yields and to constrain the photodesorption mechanisms of three astrochemically relevant ices: CO, N2 and CO2. In addition, the possibility of co-desorption in mixed and layered CO:N2 ices is explored. The ice photodesorption is studied experimentally under ultra high vacuum conditions and at 15-60 K using a hydrogen discharge lamp (7-10.5 eV). The ice desorption during irradiation is monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of the ice and simultaneous mass spectrometry of the desorbed molecules. Both the UV photodesorption yields per incident photon and the photodesorption mechanisms are molecule specific. CO photodesorbs without dissociation from the surface layer of the ice. N2, which lacks an electronic transition in this wavelength range, has a photodesorption yield that is more than an order of magnitude lower. This yield increases significantly due to co-desorption when N2 is mixed in with or layered on top of CO ice. CO2 photodesorbs through dissociation and subsequent recombination from the top 10 layers of the ice. At low temperatures (15-18 K) the derived photodesorption yields are 2.7x10^-3 and CO2 photodesorption yield is 1.2x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/2.9)) + 1.1x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/4.6)) molecules photon-1, where X is the ice thickness in monolayers and the two parts of the expression represent a CO2 and CO photodesorption pathway.

  8. Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Studentnumber:Name:Degree: Semester: Semester: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Unit:Unit:Unit:Unit: Year the Undergraduate Degree Course Rules. Have you included units that will lead to at least one degree-specific major that the units you choose in first year will lead to at least one degree-specific major. It is a requirement

  9. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01

    adoption and reduced PV adoption, but ICEs are still veryPV) arrays are favored by CO 2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  10. Realizing three-dimensional artificial spin ice by stacking planar nano-arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chern, Gia-Wei; Reichhardt, Charles; Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-01-06

    Artificial spin ice is a frustrated magnetic two-dimensional nano-material, recently employed to study variety of tailor-designed unusual collective behaviours. Recently proposed extensions to three dimensions are based on self-assembly techniques and allow little control over geometry and disorder. We present a viable design for the realization of a three-dimensional artificial spin ice with the same level of precision and control allowed by lithographic nano-fabrication of the popular two-dimensional case. Our geometry is based on layering already available two-dimensional artificial spin ice and leads to an arrangement of ice-rule-frustrated units, which is topologically equivalent to that of the tetrahedra in a pyrochlore lattice. Consequently, we show, it exhibits a genuine ice phase and its excitations are, as in natural spin ice materials, magnetic monopoles interacting via Coulomb law.

  11. Hidden force floating ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-01-17

    Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

  12. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  14. Water ice in the dark dune spots of Richardson crater on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kereszturi, A; Schmidt, F

    2010-01-01

    In this study we assess the presence, nature and properties of ices - in particular water ice - that occur within these spots using HIRISE and CRISM observations, as well as the LMD Global Climate Model. Our studies focus on Richardson crater (72{\\deg}S, 179{\\deg}E) and cover southern spring and summer (LS 175{\\deg} - 17 341{\\deg}). Three units have been identified of these spots: dark core, gray ring and bright halo. Each unit show characteristic changes as the season progress. In winter, the whole area is covered by CO2 ice with H2O ice contamination. Dark spots form during late winter and early spring. During spring, the dark spots are located in a 10 cm thick depression compared to the surrounding bright ice-rich layer. They are spectrally characterized by weak CO2 ice signatures that probably result from spatial mixing of CO2 ice rich and ice free regions within pixels, and from mixing of surface signatures due to aerosols scattering. The bright halo shaped by winds shows stronger CO2 absorptions than th...

  15. Impacts of ocean albedo alteration on Arctic sea ice restoration and Northern Hemisphere climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cvijanovic, Ivana; Caldeira, Ken; MacMartin, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to transition into a seasonally ice-free state by mid-century, enhancing Arctic warming and leading to substantial ecological and socio-economic challenges across the Arctic region. It has been proposed that artificially increasing high latitude ocean albedo could restore sea ice, but the climate impacts of such a strategy have not been previously explored. Motivated by this, we investigate the impacts of idealized high latitude ocean albedo changes on Arctic sea ice restoration and climate. In our simulated 4xCO? climate, imposing surface albedo alterations over the Arctic Ocean leads to partial sea ice recovery and a modestmore »reduction in Arctic warming. With the most extreme ocean albedo changes, imposed over the area 70°–90°N, September sea ice cover stabilizes at ~40% of its preindustrial value (compared to ~3% without imposed albedo modifications). This is accompanied by an annual mean Arctic surface temperature decrease of ~2 °C but no substantial global mean temperature decrease. Imposed albedo changes and sea ice recovery alter climate outside the Arctic region too, affecting precipitation distribution over parts of the continental United States and Northeastern Pacific. For example, following sea ice recovery, wetter and milder winter conditions are present in the Southwest United States while the East Coast experiences cooling. We conclude that although ocean albedo alteration could lead to some sea ice recovery, it does not appear to be an effective way of offsetting the overall effects of CO? induced global warming.« less

  16. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENAField ParticipantsField Campaign StatisticsPastIce Cores

  17. Reprocessing of Ices in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks: Carbon and Nitrogen Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) are two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The fo...

  18. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON METHANOL PRODUCTION IN INTERSTELLAR AND PREPLANETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Cook, A. M.; Herbst, Eric; Chiar, J. E.; Shenoy, S. S.

    2011-11-20

    Methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) is thought to be an important link in the chain of chemical evolution that leads from simple diatomic interstellar molecules to complex organic species in protoplanetary disks that may be delivered to the surfaces of Earthlike planets. Previous research has shown that CH{sub 3}OH forms in the interstellar medium predominantly on the surfaces of dust grains. To enhance our understanding of the conditions that lead to its efficient production, we assemble a homogenized catalog of published detections and limiting values in interstellar and preplanetary ices for both CH{sub 3}OH and the other commonly observed C- and O-bearing species, H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2}. We use this catalog to investigate the abundance of ice-phase CH{sub 3}OH in environments ranging from dense molecular clouds to circumstellar envelopes around newly born stars of low and high mass. Results show that CH{sub 3}OH production arises during the CO freezeout phase of ice-mantle growth in the clouds, after an ice layer rich in H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} is already in place on the dust, in agreement with current astrochemical models. The abundance of solid-phase CH{sub 3}OH in this environment is sufficient to account for observed gas-phase abundances when the ices are subsequently desorbed in the vicinity of embedded stars. CH{sub 3}OH concentrations in the ices toward embedded stars show order-of-magnitude object-to-object variations, even in a sample restricted to stars of low mass associated with ices lacking evidence of thermal processing. We hypothesize that the efficiency of CH{sub 3}OH production in dense cores and protostellar envelopes is mediated by the degree of prior CO depletion.

  19. Modeling ground thermal conditions and the limit of permafrost within the nearshore zone of the Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    the duration of time ice is bottomfast and the thermal insulation of the overlying snowpack [Stevens et al floating throughout the winter and the thermal con- dition of subsea permafrost is controlled by water

  20. pMSSM Dark Matter Searches on Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Howe, K.T.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We explore the capability of the IceCube/Deepcore array to discover signal neutrinos resulting from the annihilations of Supersymmetric WIMPS that may be captured in the solar core. In this analysis, we use a previously generated set of {approx} 70k model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space of the pMSSM which satisfy existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Our calculations employ a realistic estimate of the IceCube/DeepCore effective area that has been modeled by the IceCube collaboration. We find that a large fraction of the pMSSM models are shown to have significant signal rates in the anticipated IceCube/DeepCore 1825 day dataset, including some prospects for an early discovery. Many models where the LSP only constitutes a small fraction of the total dark matter relic density are found to have observable rates. We investigate in detail the dependence of the signal neutrino fluxes on the LSP mass, weak eigenstate composition, annihilation products and thermal relic density, as well as on the spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering cross sections. Lastly, We compare the model coverage of IceCube/DeepCore to that obtainable in near-future direct detection experiments and to pMSSM searches at the 7 TeV LHC.

  1. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  2. Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Elliott, Scott; Turner, Adrian

    2012-06-18

    Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

  3. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  4. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, and ground meats Refreeze Discard Poultry and ground poultry Refreeze Discard Variety meats may safely re-freeze foods that s:ll contain ice crystals or that have been

  5. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  6. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01

    VITA 36 37 40 40 40 40 44 45 47 48 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Unit cell for derivation of model Page Heat Conduction Solution 22 3 Fission Gas Release Model 26 4A Metal Matrix Thermal Conductivity 4B Ceramic Fuel Thermal Conductivity 5... is based on the simple heat conduction equation. It is assumed that there is a uniform distribution of fuel particles in a regular array. A unit cell consists of a cube of matrix material of side length L, containing a spherical fuel particle of radius, r...

  7. Preliminary development of an integrated approach to the evaluation of pressurized thermal shock as applied to the Oconee Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, T J; Cheverton, R D; Flanagan, G F; White, J D; Ball, D G; Lamonica, L B; Olson, R

    1986-05-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Oconee-1 nuclear plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been Completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This evaluaion was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants: Oconee-1, a Babcock and Wilco reactor plant owned and operated by Duke Power Company; Calvert Cliffs-1, a Combustion Engineering reactor plant owned and operated by Baltimore Gas and Electric company; and H.B. Robinson-2, a Westinghouse reactor plant owned and operated by Carolina Power and Light Company. Studies of Calvert Cliffs-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 are still underway. The specific objectives of the Oconee-1 study were to: (1) provide a best estimate of the probability of a through-the-wall crack (TWC) occurring in the reactor pressure vessel as a result of PTS; (2) determine dominant accident sequences, plant features, operator and control actions and uncertainty in the PTS risk; and (3) evaluate effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  8. ICE CHEMISTRY IN EMBEDDED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Van Loon, J. Th. [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Chen, C.-H. R.; Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D.; Boyer, M. L.; Shiao, B.; Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Madden, S. [Service d'Astrophysique, Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Speck, A. K. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Marengo, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2009-12-20

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These observations were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the SAGE-Spec Legacy program. We analyze the two prominent ice bands in the IRS spectral range: the bending mode of CO{sub 2} ice at 15.2 mum and the ice band between 5 and 7 mum that includes contributions from the bending mode of water ice at 6 mum among other ice species. The 5-7 mum band is difficult to identify in our LMC sample due to the conspicuous presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission superimposed onto the ice spectra. We identify water ice in the spectra of two sources; the spectrum of one of those sources also exhibits the 6.8 mum ice feature attributed in the literature to ammonium and methanol. We model the CO{sub 2} band in detail, using the combination of laboratory ice profiles available in the literature. We find that a significant fraction (approx>50%) of CO{sub 2} ice is locked in a water-rich component, consistent with what is observed for Galactic sources. The majority of the sources in the LMC also require a pure-CO{sub 2} contribution to the ice profile, evidence of thermal processing. There is a suggestion that CO{sub 2} production might be enhanced in the LMC, but the size of the available sample precludes firmer conclusions. We place our results in the context of the star formation environment in the LMC.

  9. Winter Driving Tips Driving in Ice & Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Winter Driving Tips Driving in Ice & Snow: When you must drive, clear the ice and snow from your in ice and snow, other drivers will be traveling cautiously. Don't disrupt the flow of traffic by driving handle better in ice and snow, but they do not have flawless traction, and skids can occur unexpectedly

  10. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  11. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme andmore »the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.« less

  12. Optimizing the performance of Ice-storage Systems in Electricity Load Management through a credit mechanism. An analytical work for Jiangsu, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yafeng; Shen, Bo; Hu, Huajin; Fan, Fei

    2015-01-12

    Ice-storage air-conditioning is a technique that uses ice for thermal energy storage. Replacing existing air conditioning systems with ice storage has the advantage of shifting the load from on-peak times to off-peak times that often have excess generation. However, increasing the use of ice-storage faces significant challenges in China. One major barrier is the inefficiency in the current electricity tariff structure. There is a lack of effective incentive mechanism that induces ice-storage systems from achieving optimal load-shifting results. This study presents an analysis that compares the potential impacts of ice-storage systems on load-shifting under a new credit-based incentive scheme and the existing incentive arrangement in Jiangsu, China. The study indicates that by changing how ice-storage systems are incentivized in Jiangsu, load-shifting results can be improved.

  13. Method of forming calthrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

    1985-09-30

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  14. Method of forming clathrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  15. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mark Samuel

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage season. Compared with our energy­conserving model, a nonconserving model underestimates top to brine pockets, which change size in order to remain in thermal equilibrium with the ice [Schwerdtfeger

  17. Radiation damage and associated phase change effect on photodesorption rates from ices—Ly? studies of the surface behavior of CO{sub 2}(ice)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Photodesorption from a crystalline film of CO{sub 2}(ice) at 75 K has been studied using Ly? (10.2 eV) radiation. We combine quantitative mass spectrometric studies of gases evolved and transmission IR studies of species trapped in the ice. Direct CO desorption is observed from the primary CO{sub 2} photodissociation process, which occurs promptly for CO{sub 2} molecules located on the outermost surface of the ice (Process I). As the fluence of Ly? radiation increases to ?5.5 × 10{sup 17} photons cm{sup –2}, extensive damage to the crystalline ice occurs and photo-produced CO molecules from deeper regions (Process II) are found to desorb at a rapidly increasing rate, which becomes two orders of magnitude greater than Process I. It is postulated that deep radiation damage to produce an extensive amorphous phase of CO{sub 2} occurs in the 50 nm ice film and that CO (and CO{sub 2}) diffusive transport is strongly enhanced in the amorphous phase. Photodesorption in Process II is a combination of electronic and thermally activated processes. Radiation damage in crystalline CO{sub 2} ice has been monitored by its effects on the vibrational line shapes of CO{sub 2}(ice). Here the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition has been correlated with the occurrence of efficient molecular transport over long distances through the amorphous phase of CO{sub 2}(ice). Future studies of the composition of the interstellar region, generated by photodesorption from ice layers on grains, will have to consider the significant effects of radiation damage on photodesorption rates.

  18. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Laminate H. Malekpour,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Laminate H. Malekpour, K.-H. Chang, J.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Lu, D. L, Manchester, United Kingdom *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We have investigated thermal conductivity and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 m. The thermal conductivity

  20. Electrothermal Icing Protection of Aerosurfaces Using Conductive Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschhorn, Samuel T.

    Ice protection systems (IPS) are critical components for many aerospace flight vehicles, including commercial transports and unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and can include anti-icing, de-icing, ice sensing, etc. Here, an ...

  1. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T. L.

    2001-12-27

    averaged over a distance covered by aircraft in 1 s (-130 m).) tt(X, g = -d) = Sice(t: T, x). (6) The value t = - can be interpreted as the time when S ice(t, x) represents the wave energy due to scattering specifically from depth d, as opposed... of the Greenland ice sheet produced by Mark Fahnestock (Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ron Kwok (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasa- dena). The helpful suggestions and comments of two...

  2. NMR relaxation in spin ice due to diffusing emergent monopoles I Christopher L. Henley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Christopher L.

    out, or the reverse, which were shown to behave as (emergent) magnetic monopole [3]. The low, spin dynamics in ideal spin ice is due mainly to dilute, thermally excited magnetic monopole exponent in that exponential and the formulas for the T1 (longitudinal) and T2 (dephasing) relaxations

  3. Thermal engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnes, T.E.; Trupin, R.J.

    1984-01-03

    A thermal engine utilizing a strip of nitinol material or other thermally responsive shape memory effect material to drive a reciprocating output shaft, said strip of material forming a common wall between two different alternating temperature sources which thermally cycle the material.

  4. 16 Louisiana Agriculture, Summer 2005 ice production in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -added applications is so far limited. Trans- forming the straw fiber resources into high quality panel products provides a prospective solution to the straw disposal problem. Straw-based compos- ites offer potential). The samples were cleaned with water at room temperature and subse- quently conditioned for two weeks

  5. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  6. Rubber friction on ice and snow surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skouvaklis, Gerasimos

    2011-06-28

    The friction of rubber on ice and snow surfaces is complex. Deeper scientific understanding is important for optimising performance of tyres in winter. Rubber, ice and snow systems exhibit frictional behaviour which ...

  7. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  8. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01

    in the interstices of an ice matrix. My focus is on one of the processes by which the salt content of sea ice decreases, namely convective desalination, which is also often called gravity drainage by geophysicists. Modelling convective desalination requires...

  9. Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

    2014-10-28

    A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

  10. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice of interior properties, and habitability. The electrical properties of saline H2O are controlled by the binary

  11. Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

  12. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  13. Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores U R S F E D E R E R , * , , P, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, and British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom Received May 6, 2008. Revised manuscript

  14. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Surface configuration, ice thick- ness, volume and bedrockconstruction of the ice thick- ness grids. between flightof the physical ice thick- ness, rather than an “ice-

  15. Thermal cycler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benett, William J.; Andreski, John T.; Dzenitis, John M.; Makarewicz, Anthony J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.

    2014-07-15

    A thermalcycler includes a first thermalcycler body section having a first face and a second thermalcycler body section having a second face. A cavity is formed by the first face and the second face. A thermalcycling unit is positioned in the cavity. A heater trace unit is connected to a support section, to the first thermalcycler body section, to the second thermalcycler body section, and to the thermalcycling unit. The first thermalcycler body section and the second thermalcycler body section are positioned together against the support section to enclose the thermalcycling unit and the heater trace unit.

  16. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  17. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  18. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Solar Thermal Collectors .is solar energy. Solar thermal collector arrays can be usedon integrating solar thermal collectors with desalination

  19. Geol 795 Paleoceanography Ice Sheet Dynamics and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barranco, Joseph

    Geol 795 ­ Paleoceanography Ice Sheet Dynamics and Climate Change Class Meetings: Tuesday 9 of articles related ice sheet dynamics and the role of ice sheets in past, present, and future climate change ice sheet dynamics and the role of ice sheets in climate change. We will discuss effective ways

  20. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"aided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  1. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  2. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be potentially employed to undertake in situ analysis of materials imbedded in diverse media, such as cryogenic ices, biological samples, tissues, minerals, etc., by covered with an IR-absorbing laser ablation medium and study the chemical composition and reaction pathways of the analyte in its natural surroundings.

  3. IceT users' guide and reference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (IceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. In addition to providing accelerated rendering for a standard display, IceT provides the unique ability to generate images for tiled displays. The overall resolution of the display may be several times larger than any viewport that may be rendered by a single machine. This document is an overview of the user interface to IceT.

  4. In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice; accepted 12 April 2012; published 24 May 2012. [1] Radiocarbon measurements at ice margin sites and blue and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area, J. Geophys. Res., 117, F02029, doi:10

  5. Automated rapid thermal imaging systems technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phan, Long N., 1976-

    2012-01-01

    A major source of energy savings occurs on the thermal envelop of buildings, which amounts to approximately 10% of annual energy usage in the United States. To pursue these savings, energy auditors use closed loop energy ...

  6. BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    software framework, and linked them to the existing Community Ice Sheet Model code (CISM). With AMR, researchers can now model dynamic points of interest at extremely high...

  7. The Next ICE Age | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications The Next ICE Age Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

  8. The Stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    , distribution and seasonality · Solid Earth: · Geothermal heatflux Abrupt Climate Change Studies Symposium 21 Rebound (GIA) GPS stations measure vertical deformation of solid Earth as ice

  9. Relationships between Water Wettability and Ice Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meuler, Adam J.

    Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness ...

  10. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  11. Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming forecasts of how global warming will affect polar icepacks. See also: Earth & Climate q Global Warming q the effects of climate warming, and its presence greatly reduces solar heating of the polar oceans." "Sea ice

  12. Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting of nonspherical ice particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting investigates the relationship between ice water content (IWC) and equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) at 94 GHz. Baum, and A. J. Heymsfield (2008), Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar

  13. A New Approach for Exploring Ice Sheets and Sub-Ice Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    A New Approach for Exploring Ice Sheets and Sub-Ice Geology Active seismic measurements were geology driven by ice flow [Smith et al., 2007] and the long record of seismic exploration of subglacial sur- veys because of the considerable logistical effort necessary for seismic data acquisition

  14. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion (freshwater) ice types using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory C-band scatterometer, together with surface data set, composed of over 20 variations of different ice types measured at incident angles from 0

  15. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  16. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  17. ARM - TWP-ICE Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, AlaskaManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities andTWP-ICE Maps

  18. IceCube at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,Principal InvestigatorsIceCube at

  19. Results from IceCube/IceTop Ooty, 17/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    , 17/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 3 #12;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 5 DetecMng neutrinos in H of interac,ons IceTop #12;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 6

  20. High-Resolution Monitoring of Internal Layers Over the Greenland Ice Sheet P. Kanagaratnam, S.P. Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    been attributed to the melting of mountain glaciers among other causes. The mass balance of the glacial attributed half of this rise to thermal expansion of the ocean and melting of mountain glaciers. To assess extent, intensity of summer melt, wind-generated surface roughness, ice temperature, and absolute

  1. Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy and environment 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) #12;Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy. moisture streamers: (1 Sverdrup...106 m3/sec tranport of water carries 2.2 x 1015 watt thermal energy and environment 2009 slides on water in the atmosphere P.B. Rhines #12;Satellite image of water vapor (not cloud

  2. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    on obliquely propagating radio waves, IEEE Trans. Geosci.dielectric attenuation of radio waves through ice is alsoattenuation of radio waves through ice is also temperature

  3. ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICRICE SOPSep 2013Final.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  4. Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the components-based approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid development of an ice...

  5. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  6. Cosmic-ray results from IceCube/ Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    Cosmic-ray results from IceCube/ IceTop Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1 #12;Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 2 events ­ IceTop/deep IceCube Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab

  7. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  8. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : In the shallow waters where whitefish spawn, ice cover protects their eggs from destructive wind and wave action://coastwatch.glerl.noaa.gov/glsea/cur/glsea_cur.png #12;GLERL Research Forecast capability The capability to forecast and predict ice cover is important for recreational safety and rescue efforts as well as for navigation, weather forecasting, adapting to lake level

  9. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  10. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 and pumped-storage hydro units is developed. For its compu- tational solution two di erent decompo- sition-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  11. The Hierarchic Theory of Liquids and Solids. Computerized applications for ice, water, and Biosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Kaivarainen

    2008-06-05

    This is a new book of quantum Hierarchic theory of condensed matter, general for liquids and solids, developed by this author during 20 years and its numerous applications. Computer program, based on new theory, was used for simulations of big number of physical properties of water and ice. Condensed matter is considered as a superposition of 3D standing waves (collective excitations) of different nature: thermal de Broglie waves, IR photons and thermal phonons. New theories of total internal energy, heat capacity, surface tension, vapor pressure, thermal conductivity, viscosity and self-diffusion are described. Hierarchic theory of osmotic pressure, based on new state equation, new theories of light refraction, Brillouin light scattering and Mossbauer effect are presented also and compared with available experimental data for water and ice. The agreement between theoretical and available experimental results for water and ice is very good. New approach to the turbulence, superfluidity and superconductivity is developed. A lot of applications of new theory to biophysics, including model of Quantum of Mind are described. New optoacoustic device: Comprehensive Analyzer of Matter Properties (CAMP) is proposed.

  12. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    is 3.15, equivalent to a radio-wave velocity in ice of 168.9to be vertical) that a radio wave travels through ice during?t is where v ice is the radio-wave velocity in ice, ?z ¼ v

  13. Crystalline water ice on the Kuiper belt object (50000) Quaoar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    .............................................................. Crystalline water ice on the Kuiper the presence of crystalline water ice and ammonia hydrate. Crystallinity indicates that the ice has been heated to at least 110 K. Both ammonia hydrate and crystalline water ice should be destroyed by energetic particle

  14. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  15. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    of solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solaraided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsobesides MVC require thermal energy as their primary energy

  16. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    15] O. A. Hamed, "THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MULTISTAGE FLASHdesa4.aspx. [18] Encon, "Thermal Evaporators," June 2013. [http://www.evaporator.com/thermal-evaporator. [19] Y. Tian

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  18. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    This requires no thermal storage tanks, but can have athe need for large thermal storage equipment, the evaporatorinclude analysis of thermal storage. A way of keeping the

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  20. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. I. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. Cox; Shawn M. Kathmann; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides

    2015-05-29

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physicochemical properties of a material's surface affect its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at a hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation. We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability.

  1. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics Non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface ?ows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is veri?ed by simulating Poiseuille ?ow, plane shear ?ow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian ?uid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian ?uid and non-Newtonian ?uid, such that the e?ect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  3. Do blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range show the West Antarctic ice sheet survived the last interglacial?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range show the West Antarctic ice sheet survived the last in revised form 10 January 2011 Accepted 28 January 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Blue-ice moraine cosmogenic isotope data on blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range, West Antarctica. The age of the moraines

  4. Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    in this region (Stammerjohn et al., 2003; Stammerjohn and Smith, 1996). Changes in mesoscale ice dynamics

  5. Processes driving sea ice variability in the Bering Sea in an eddying ocean/sea ice model: Mean seasonal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    the southern ice edge, especially on the western side. The sea ice force balance analysis shows that sea ice air from northerly winds and ice motion away from the coast. South of St Lawrence Island, winds drive is important both climatically and economically. Understanding the processes that control the temporal

  6. Thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koros, William John; Kratochvil, Adam Michal

    2014-03-04

    The various embodiments of the present disclosure relate generally to thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a composition comprising: a first polymer comprising a first repeat unit, the first repeat unit comprising a carboxyl group, wherein the first polymer crosslinks to a second polymer formed from a second repeat unit, and wherein the first polymer crosslinks to the second polymer without formation of an ester group.

  7. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

    2012-01-01

    I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

  8. Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brarmann, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    conservation measures were incorporated in the design of the new research facility, the ice-bank system has been the most cost-effective of the load management projects at Union Oil....

  9. Widespread Excess Ice in Arcadia Planitia, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramson, Ali M; Putzig, Nathaniel E; Sutton, Sarah; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Brothers, T Charles; Holt, John W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of subsurface water ice on Mars is a key constraint on past climate, while the volumetric concentration of buried ice (pore-filling versus excess) provides information about the process that led to its deposition. We investigate the subsurface of Arcadia Planitia by measuring the depth of terraces in simple impact craters and mapping a widespread subsurface reflection in radar sounding data. Assuming that the contrast in material strengths responsible for the terracing is the same dielectric interface that causes the radar reflection, we can combine these data to estimate the dielectric constant of the overlying material. We compare these results to a three-component dielectric mixing model to constrain composition. Our results indicate a widespread, decameters-thick layer that is excess water ice ~10^4 km^3 in volume. The accumulation and long-term preservation of this ice is a challenge for current Martian climate models.

  10. Spreading of oil spilled under ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Chowdhury, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new set of equations is presented to describe the process of oil spreading under ice in clam waters. These equations consider the gravity (buoyancy)-inertia phase, the gravity (buoyancy)-viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy-surface-tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to the termination of spreading is presented. Laboratory experiments were conducted using both real ice covers in a cold room and artificial ice covers. The experiments included different ice-cover roughnesses from smooth to rough, oils of different viscosities, and a variety of discharge conditions. The experimental data show close agreement with the theory. These equations can be used during cleanup or environmental impact assessment to estimate the area of an oil slick with respect to time.

  11. Glaciers and Ice Sheets Mapping Orbiter concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jezek, Kenneth; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Freeman, Anthony; Curlander, John; Paden, John D.; Allen, Christopher Thomas

    2006-05-13

    We describe a concept for a spaceborne radar system designed to measure the surface and basal topography of terrestrial ice sheets and to determine the physical properties of the glacier bed. Our primary objective is to ...

  12. Recent vs from IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer R.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    in the Sun and the Earth, look for low-energy (10 MeV)Sun. IceTop has made a preliminary measurement of the cosmic-ray energy

  13. Water, O2 and Ice in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Hollenbach; Michael J. Kaufman; Edwin A. Bergin; Gary J. Melnick

    2009-03-02

    We model the temperature and chemical structure of molecular clouds as a function of depth into the cloud, assuming a cloud of constant density n illuminated by an external FUV (6 eV < E < 13.6 eV) flux G_0 (scaling factor in multiples of the local interstellar field). Extending previous photodissociation region models, we include the freezing of species, simple grain surface chemistry, and desorption (including FUV photodesorption) of ices. We also treat the opaque cloud interior with time-dependent chemistry. Here, under certain conditions, gas phase elemental oxygen freezes out as water ice and the elemental C/O abundance ratio can exceed unity, leading to complex carbon chemistry. Gas phase H2O and O2 peak in abundance at intermediate depth into the cloud, roughly A_V~3-8 from the surface, the depth proportional to ln(G_0/n). Closer to the surface, molecules are photodissociated. Deeper into the cloud, molecules freeze to grain surfaces. At intermediate depths photodissociation rates are attenuated by dust extinction, but photodesorption prevents total freezeout. For G_0 < 500, abundances of H2O and O2 peak at values ~10^(-7), producing columns ~10^(15) per cm^2, independent of G_0 and n. The peak abundances depend primarily on the product of the photodesorption yield of water ice and the grain surface area per H nucleus. At higher values of G_0, thermal desorption of O atoms from grains enhances the gas phase H2O peak abundance and column slightly, whereas the gas phase O2 peak abundance rises to ~10^(-5) and the column to ~2x10^(16) per cm^2. We present simple analytic equations for the abundances as a function of depth which clarify the dependence on parameters. The models are applied to observations of H2O, O2, and water ice in a number of sources, including B68, NGC 2024, and Rho Oph.

  14. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  15. On the correlation between ice water content and ice crystal size and its application to radiative transfer and general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    On the correlation between ice water content and ice crystal size and its application to radiative analysis involving ice water content (IWC) and mean effective ice crystal size (De) intended, K. N., Y. Gu, Q. Yue, and G. McFarguhar (2008), On the correlation between ice water content and ice

  16. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermal Conductivity Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal ConductivityThermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal

  17. Unit and student details Unit code Unit title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    Unit and student details Unit code Unit title If this is a group assignment, each student must submitted Has any part of this assessment been previously submitted as part of another unit/course? Yes not be copied. No part of this assignment has been previously submitted as part of another unit/course. I

  18. IceCube: Performance, Status, and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carsten Rott; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2006-11-28

    High-energy neutrinos are uniquely suited to study a large variety of physics as they traverse the universe almost untouched, in contrast to conventional astronomical messengers like photons or cosmic rays which are limited by interactions with radiation and matter at high energies or deflected by ambient magnetic fields. Located at the South Pole, IceCube combined with its predecessor AMANDA comprise the world's largest neutrino telescope. IceCube currently consists of nine strings, each containing 60 digital optical modules, deployed at depths of 1.5 to 2.5km in the ice and an array of 16 surface air-shower stations. IceCube is expected to be completed in early 2011 at which time it will instrument a volume of one km^3 below the IceTop air-shower array covering an area of one km^2. The current IceCube detector performance is described and an outlook given into the large variety of physics that it can address, with an emphasis on the search for ultra-high-energy neutrinos which may shed light on the origins of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  19. IceCube: Performance, Status, and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rott, C

    2006-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos are uniquely suited to study a large variety of physics as they traverse the universe almost untouched, in contrast to conventional astronomical messengers like photons or cosmic rays which are limited by interactions with radiation and matter at high energies or deflected by ambient magnetic fields. Located at the South Pole, IceCube combined with its predecessor AMANDA comprise the world's largest neutrino telescope. IceCube currently consists of nine strings, each containing 60 digital optical modules, deployed at depths of 1.5 to 2.5km in the ice and an array of 16 surface air-shower stations. IceCube is expected to be completed in early 2011 at which time it will instrument a volume of one km^3 below the IceTop air-shower array covering an area of one km^2. The current IceCube detector performance is described and an outlook given into the large variety of physics that it can address, with an emphasis on the search for ultra-high-energy neutrinos which may shed light on the origins ...

  20. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  1. Technology demonstration of Ka-band digitally-beamformed radar for ice topography mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowy, G; Heavey, B; Moller, D; Rignot, E; Zawadzki, M; Rengarajan, S

    2007-01-01

    Beamformed Radar for Ice Topography Mapping Gregory Sadowy,Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer) is aGLISTIN will collect ice topography measurements over a wide

  2. Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program Desc OLD ACCOUNT FORMAT NEW ACCOUNT FORMAT 001113 AP Old O/S A/P NonResCk 0000 General 000000 General #12;Unit Unit Desc Unit Unit Desc Program Program

  3. Assimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of the actual fields. The simulated ice thickness can then be used to determine the major modes of variability of the ice thickness and the physical processes that are important in their formation. The simulations from concentration measured by satellites is subject to errors (Kwok 2002), particularly during the summer when

  4. ICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    , marketing, and psychology. Quantitative models from these disciplines can be integrated into a design for teaching product design and for designing products taking into account market and policy environments alongICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD

  5. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  6. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Klaus Viljanen

    2015-06-30

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  7. Active People Recognition using Thermal and Grey Images on a Mobile Security Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    Active People Recognition using Thermal and Grey Images on a Mobile Security Robot Andr´e Treptow is an ActivMedia PeopleBot mobile robot that is equipped with several sensors including a thermal camera and a pan-tilt camera unit (see figure 1). Fig. 1. ActivMedia Peoplebot, thermal camera (NEC Thermal Tracer

  8. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger G.

    2007-12-19

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  9. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger G.

    2009-09-01

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  10. UNITED STEELWORKERS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE:Administrationfollowing tableUNITED FERC

  11. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States

  12. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States7

  13. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United States78

  14. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 United

  15. United States

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing YouNeedof EnergyMeeting - MarchUSPS:1 UnitedDuke-4-E

  16. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-09

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  17. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Organoclay Nanolaminates Synthesized via Simple Self-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Information ABSTRACT: Because interfaces impede phonon transport of thermal energy, nanostructuring canUltralow Thermal Conductivity in Organoclay Nanolaminates Synthesized via Simple Self-Assembly Mark of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana Illinois 61801, United States § Materials and Manufacturing

  18. WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H < 3 (and a limited number to H = 4.5) have surface coverings of water ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

  19. Fast Numerical Method for Growth and Retreat of Subsurface Ice on Mars Norbert Schorghofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    ice, retreat of pore ice, retreat of an ice sheet, and retreat of pore ice due to geothermal heating is the vertical spatial resolution and D the diffusion coefficient. The vertical grid spacing needs to be finer

  20. Turbulent heat exchange between water and ice at an evolving ice-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments on the time evolution of an ice layer cooled from below and subjected to a turbulent shear flow of warm water from above. Our study is motivated by observations of warm water intrusion into the ocean cavity under Antarctic ice shelves, accelerating the melting of their basal surfaces. The strength of the applied turbulent shear flow in our experiments is represented in terms of its Reynolds number $\\textit{Re}$, which is varied over the range $2.0\\times10^3 \\le \\textit{Re} \\le 1.0\\times10^4$. Depending on the water temperature, partial transient melting of the ice occurs at the lower end of this range of $\\textit{Re}$ and complete transient melting of the ice occurs at the higher end. Following these episodes of transient melting, the ice reforms at a rate that is independent of $\\textit{Re}$. We fit our experimental measurements of ice thickness and temperature to a one-dimensional model for the evolution of the ice thickness in which the turbulent heat transfer is parameter...

  1. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael; Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-09-14

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " 1Total U.S. includes all primary occupied housing units in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military...

  3. United States Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Consumer Product Safety Commission United States Department of Housing and Urban Development

  4. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  5. A reconciled estimate of ice-sheet mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Estimate of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance Andrew Shepherd, 1 * Erikand models of surface mass balance and glacial isostaticThis Ice Sheet Mass Balance Exercise (IMBIE) was facilitated

  6. Searching for Cosmic Accelerators via IceCube

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Searching for Cosmic Accelerators via IceCube Searching for Cosmic Accelerators via IceCube Berkeley Lab Researchers Part of an International Hunt November 21, 2013 Lynn Yarris,...

  7. Cirrus cloud formation and the role of heterogeneous ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyd, Karl D.

    2013-01-01

    Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic ...

  8. Energy conservation in ice skating rinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, B.K.; McAvoy, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    An economic and energy analysis of ice rinks was made to examine the areas in which energy could be profitably conserved. The areas where new equipment could make a major reduction in energy use are: the use of waste heat for space heating, the installation of a low emissivity false ceiling to reduce radiant heat, the use of a load cycling controller to reduce refrigeration costs, and the installation of more efficient lighting systems. Changes in rink operating procedure that could cut energy use are: higher refrigerant temperatures, thinner ice, the use of colder resurfacing water, turning the compressors and pumps off at night, and reducing ventilation.

  9. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled ice machines.

  10. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hiramatsu; Yuhei Miyamoto; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2014-12-25

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  11. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    storage in solar thermal applications," Applied Energy, pp.of Non-Tracking Solar Thermal Technology," 2011. [26] R.C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energy

  12. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evaporator Powered By Solar Thermal Energy 10:00 AM 10:00 AMaided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  13. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"Solar infrastructure should include analysis of thermal storage.storage equipment, the evaporator can be integrated into the current solar

  14. Operation and Control of Full Ice-storage System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In a dividing time ice-storage system, the refrigerator does not operate during power's on-peak period, and all the cooling is supplied by the ice stored in off-peak period, so that the use of electricity can be maintained. When the ice is thawing...

  15. Ice Simulation Using GPGPU Shadi Alawneh and Dennis Peters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    is to increase the understanding of interactions between ice and steel structures such as ships and oil rigsIce Simulation Using GPGPU Shadi Alawneh and Dennis Peters Electrical and Computer Engineering.alawneh, dpeters}@mun.ca Abstract-- Simulation of the behaviour of a ship operating in pack ice

  16. Hyper-Real-Time Ice Simulation and Modeling Using GPGPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Hyper-Real-Time Ice Simulation and Modeling Using GPGPU By c Shadi Alawneh, B. Eng., M. Eng's, Newfoundland Title: Hyper-Real-Time Ice Simulation and Modeling Using GPGPU Author: Shadi Alawneh, B. Eng operating in pack ice is a computationally in- tensive process to which General Purpose Computing

  17. Introduction Microorganisms in sea ice function ecologically in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    where pelagic and sea ice habitats are intrinsically coupled (Laws 1985, Garrison 1991, Eicken 1992, Knox 1994, Garrison & Mathot 1996, Arrigo et al. 1997, Brierley & Thomas 2002). For instance, sea ice algae - primarily diatoms and phototrophic flagellates (e.g. Garrison 1991) - are inocula for ice

  18. Thermal Phases of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: the Effects of Eccentricity, Obliquity, and Diurnal Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Nicolas B; Abbot, Dorian S

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth-analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like modern Earth), and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. The eccentricity responses of the two climates indicate that the temperate planet has 3x the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The temperate obliquity seasons are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-...

  19. 29April2011JohnLearnedatIceCubeDedication1 IceCube Dedication Symposium, Madison, Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    29April2011JohnLearnedatIceCubeDedication1 IceCube Dedication Symposium, Madison, Wisconsin 29 of Neutrino Studies #12;"Talking to the neighbors" 29April2011JohnLearnedatIceCubeDedication2 "A modest://www.economist.com/PrinterFriendly.cfm?story_id=18526871 Not what this talk is about.... SETI with Neutrinos #12;29April2011JohnLearnedatIceCubeDedication3

  20. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  1. DNA Engine Thermal Cycler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ® Peltier Thermal Cycler PTC-0200 DNA Engine Cycler Operations Manual Version 4.0 #12;ii Tech Support: 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi The DNA Engine® Peltier Thermal Cycler Introduction

  2. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  4. Minnesota Power- Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings;...

  5. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External...

  6. Decadal scale variations in ice flow along Whillans Ice Stream and its tributaries, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Jezek, Kenneth C.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2005-01-05

    We investigate velocity changes occurring along Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) by comparing velocities derived from repeat aerial photographs acquired in 1985–89 (average date of 1987) to interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) ...

  7. Decadal-scale variations in ice flow along Whillans Ice Stream and its tributaries, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Jezek, K.A.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate velocity changes occurring along Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) by comparing velocities derived from repeat aerial photographs acquired in 1985–89 (average date of 1987) to interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) ...

  8. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  9. Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, R. A.

    Chapter 8 Small Units inside Large Units 8.1 Experimental units bigger than observational units 8, but it is individual people that are measured. In general, suppose that there are m experimental units, each of which consists of k observational units, and that there are t treatments, each of which is applied

  10. Prediction of lake ice in the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    by HARMONIE ·Flake driven by ECMWF ensembles ·Conclusions and Outlook #12;Lake workshop sept 2012 Motivation Operational Observations ECMWF model #12;Lake workshop sept 2012 h D Air Water Ice ·Surface energy ·Radiative fluxes (Qs, Ql, absorbed solar radiation) ·Turbulent fluxes (sensible and latent heat fluxes

  11. Ice-volcano interactions Eyjafjallajkull volcano, Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Ice-volcano interactions in Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland Eyjólfur Magnússon1, Magnús Tumi Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland 2. Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland 3. Icelandic Coast Guard SPIRIT workshop 29&30 April 2010, Toulouse Picture by Eyjólfur

  12. Europa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    ; Pappalardo and Head, 2001], and 3) a seafloor plume model in which tidal energy focused in the silicate ice in the shallow crust of Europa. We show that tidal energy can be preferentially focused in risingEuropa: Tidal heating of upwelling thermal plumes and the origin of lenticulae and chaos melting

  13. FORMATION OF DEPTH HOAR RESULTING FROM THERMAL OPTIMIZATION OF SNOW MICROSTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    necessary to induce the corresponding flow is a measure of the system efficiency. Kinetic metamorphism to increase the heat transport efficiency. The optimal geometric configuration is a system of well thermal energy through the ice, the system became more efficient. This progression resulted from

  14. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  15. Unit Commitment 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    , since high wind penetration increases demand forecast uncertainty (the demand that the thermal units of the solution method, however, the solutions may not save much money if the forecast of the demand that needs to be met contains significant error. Having a "perfect" solution for a particular demand forecast

  16. Modeling the Fracture of Ice Sheets on Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waisman, Haim; Tuminaro, Ray

    2013-10-10

    The objective of this project was to investigate the complex fracture of ice and understand its role within larger ice sheet simulations and global climate change. This objective was achieved by developing novel physics based models for ice, novel numerical tools to enable the modeling of the physics and by collaboration with the ice community experts. At the present time, ice fracture is not explicitly considered within ice sheet models due in part to large computational costs associated with the accurate modeling of this complex phenomena. However, fracture not only plays an extremely important role in regional behavior but also influences ice dynamics over much larger zones in ways that are currently not well understood. To this end, our research findings through this project offers significant advancement to the field and closes a large gap of knowledge in understanding and modeling the fracture of ice sheets in the polar regions. Thus, we believe that our objective has been achieved and our research accomplishments are significant. This is corroborated through a set of published papers, posters and presentations at technical conferences in the field. In particular significant progress has been made in the mechanics of ice, fracture of ice sheets and ice shelves in polar regions and sophisticated numerical methods that enable the solution of the physics in an efficient way.

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction Y. Liao · L. D. Marks Received: 25 decades of research has shown that for bulk crys- talline materials the fundamental unit of plasticity of misfit dislocations to include the effect of thermally activated transitions across barriers. We obtain

  18. Thermal initiation caused by fragment impact on cased explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnurr, N.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been used to predict the velocity threshold for thermal initiation of a cased explosive caused by fragment impact. A structural analysis code was used to determine temperature profiles and a thermal analysis code was used to calculate reaction rates. Results generated for the United States Air Force MK 82 bomb indicate that the velocity threshold for thermal initiation is slightly higher than that for the shock-to-detonation process. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Thermal Regimes of Northeast Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Loading (USGS) Stormwater and Streams ­ Optimizing Stormwater Management to Protect the Thermal

  20. United Nations Programme on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    United Nations Programme on Space Applications UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR OUTER SPACE, Sputnik 1. Soon after that event, the Member States of the United Nations declared that space should and natural resources management. At the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses

  1. Hydrogen isotope exchanges between water and methanol in interstellar ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faure, A; Theulé, P; Quirico, E; Schmitt, B

    2015-01-01

    The deuterium fractionation of gas-phase molecules in hot cores is believed to reflect the composition of interstellar ices. The deuteration of methanol is a major puzzle, however, because the isotopologue ratio [CH2DOH]/[CH3OD], which is predicted to be equal to 3 by standard grain chemistry models, is much larger (~20) in low-mass hot corinos and significantly lower (~1) in high-mass hot cores. This dichotomy in methanol deuteration between low-mass and massive protostars is currently not understood. In this study, we report a simplified rate equation model of the deuterium chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. We apply this model to the chemistry of hot corinos and hot cores, with IRAS 16293-2422 and the Orion~KL Compact Ridge as prototypes, respectively. The chemistry is based on a statistical initial deuteration at low temperature followed by a warm-up phase during which thermal hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanges occur between water and methanol. The exchange kinetics is incorpor...

  2. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  3. Should we geoengineer larger ice caps?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The climate of Earth is susceptible to catastrophes that could threaten the longevity of human civilization. Geoengineering to reduce incoming solar radiation has been suggested as a way to mediate the warming effects of contemporary climate change, but a geoengineering program for thousands of years could also be used to enlarge the size of the polar ice caps and create a permanently cooler climate. Such a large ice cap state would make Earth less susceptible to climate threats and could allow human civilization to survive further into the future than otherwise possible. Intentionally extending Earth's glacial coverage will require uninterrupted commitment to this program for millenia but would ultimately reach a cooler equilibrium state where geoengineering is no longer needed. Whether or not this program is ever attempted, this concept illustrates the need to identify preference among potential climate states to ensure the long-term success of civilization.

  4. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  5. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  6. Drilling deep in South Pole Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo

    2014-01-01

    To detect the tiny flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei or from interactions of highest energy cosmic rays with the microwave background photons needs target masses of the order of several hundred cubic kilometers. Clear Antarctic ice has been discussed as a favorable material for hybrid detection of optical, radio and acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions. To apply these technologies at the adequate scale hundreds of holes have to be drilled in the ice down to depths of about 2500 m to deploy the corresponding sensors. To do this on a reasonable time scale is impossible with presently available tools. Remote drilling and deployment schemes have to be developed to make such a detector design reality. After a short discussion of the status of modern hot water drilling we present here a design of an autonomous melting probe, tested 50 years ago to reach a depth of about 1000 m in Greenland ice. A scenario how to build such a probe today with modern technologies...

  7. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, L.; Li, F.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H{sub 2}O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Förster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range symposium dealing with this subject in the western United States, the papers presented address current ........................................................................................................................................ 1 Annosus Root Disease in Europe and the Southeastern United States: Occurrence, Research

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Forest Experiment Station research unit in New Hampshirein 1957, where he studied problemsof regenerationandthinning research unit at Warren, Pennsylvania, where he headed a program of research on problems related

  11. Unit 35 - Raster Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 35, CC in GIS; Peuquet, Donna

    1990-01-01

    in GIS - 1990 Page 8 Unit 35 - Raster Storage GIS to whichNCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990 Page 9 Unit 35 - RasterStorage UNIT 35 IMAGES NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIS - 1990

  12. Thermal energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, P.E.

    1980-04-22

    A thermal energy storage apparatus and method employs a container formed of soda lime glass and having a smooth, defectfree inner wall. The container is filled substantially with a material that can be supercooled to a temperature greater than 5* F., such as ethylene carbonate, benzophenone, phenyl sulfoxide, di-2-pyridyl ketone, phenyl ether, diphenylmethane, ethylene trithiocarbonate, diphenyl carbonate, diphenylamine, 2benzoylpyridine, 3-benzoylpyridine, 4-benzoylpyridine, 4methylbenzophenone, 4-bromobenzophenone, phenyl salicylate, diphenylcyclopropenone, benzyl sulfoxide, 4-methoxy-4prmethylbenzophenone, n-benzoylpiperidine, 3,3pr,4,4pr,5 pentamethoxybenzophenone, 4,4'-bis-(Dimethylamino)-benzophenone, diphenylboron bromide, benzalphthalide, benzophenone oxime, azobenzene. A nucleating means such as a seed crystal, a cold finger or pointed member is movable into the supercoolable material. A heating element heats the supercoolable material above the melting temperature to store heat. The material is then allowed to cool to a supercooled temperature below the melting temperature, but above the natural, spontaneous nucleating temperature. The liquid in each container is selectively initiated into nucleation to release the heat of fusion. The heat may be transferred directly or through a heat exchange unit within the material.

  13. A radio air shower surface detector as an extension for IceCube and IceTop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Auffenberg; T. Gaisser; K. Helbing; T. Huege; T. Karg; A. Karle

    2007-08-24

    The IceCube neutrino detector is built into the Antarctic ice sheet at the South Pole to measure high energy neutrinos. For this, 4800 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are being deployed at depths between 1450 and 2450 meters into the ice to measure neutrino induced charged particles like muons. IceTop is a surface air shower detector consisting of 160 Cherenkov ice tanks located on top of IceCube. To extend IceTop, a radio air shower detector could be built to significantly increase the sensitivity at higher shower energies and for inclined showers. As air showers induced by cosmic rays are a major part of the muonic background in IceCube, IceTop is not only an air shower detector, but also a veto to reduce the background in IceCube. Air showers are detectable by radio signals with a radio surface detector. The major emission process is the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by e+ e- shower particles in the Earths magnetic field (geosynchrotron effect). Simulations of the expected radio signals of air showers are shown. The sensitivity and the energy threshold of different antenna field configurations are estimated.

  14. IceVeto: Extended PeV neutrino astronomy in the Southern Hemisphere with IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auffenberg, Jan; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    IceCube, the world's largest high-energy neutrino observatory, built at the South Pole, recently reported evidence of an astrophysical neutrino flux extending to PeV energies in the Southern Hemisphere. This observation raises the question of how the sensitivity in this energy range could be further increased. In the down-going sector, in IceCube's case the Southern Hemisphere, backgrounds from atmospheric muons and neutrinos pose a challenge to the identification of an astrophysical neutrino flux. The IceCube analysis, that led to the evidence for astrophysical neutrinos, is based on an in-ice veto strategy for background rejection. One possibility available to IceCube is the concept of an extended surface detector, IceVeto, which could allow the rejection of a large fraction of atmospheric backgrounds, primarily for muons from cosmic ray (CR) air showers as well as from neutrinos in the same air showers. Building on the experience of IceTop/IceCube, possibly the most cost-effective and sensitive way to build IceVeto is as an extension of the IceTop detector, with simple photomultiplier based detector modules for CR air shower detection. Initial simulations and estimates indicate that such a veto detector will significantly increase the sensitivity to an astrophysical flux of ?{sub ?} induced muon tracks in the Southern Hemisphere compared to current analyses. Here we present the motivation and capabilities based on initial simulations. Conceptual ideas for a simplified surface array will be discussed briefly.

  15. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  16. Final scientific report for DOE award title: Improving the Representation of Ice Sedimentation Rates in Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2013-09-05

    It is well known that cirrus clouds play a major role in regulating the earth’s climate, but the details of how this works are just beginning to be understood. This project targeted the main property of cirrus clouds that influence climate processes; the ice fall speed. That is, this project improves the representation of the mass-weighted ice particle fall velocity, Vm, in climate models, used to predict future climate on global and regional scales. Prior to 2007, the dominant sizes of ice particles in cirrus clouds were poorly understood, making it virtually impossible to predict how cirrus clouds interact with sunlight and thermal radiation. Due to several studies investigating the performance of optical probes used to measure the ice particle size distribution (PSD), as well as the remote sensing results from our last ARM project, it is now well established that the anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals often reported prior to 2007 were measurement artifacts. Advances in the design and data processing of optical probes have greatly reduced these ice artifacts that resulted from the shattering of ice particles on the probe tips and/or inlet tube, and PSD measurements from one of these improved probes (the 2-dimensional Stereo or 2D-S probe) are utilized in this project to parameterize Vm for climate models. Our original plan in the proposal was to parameterize the ice PSD (in terms of temperature and ice water content) and ice particle mass and projected area (in terms of mass- and area-dimensional power laws or m-D/A-D expressions) since these are the microphysical properties that determine Vm, and then proceed to calculate Vm from these parameterized properties. But the 2D-S probe directly measures ice particle projected area and indirectly estimates ice particle mass for each size bin. It soon became apparent that the original plan would introduce more uncertainty in the Vm calculations than simply using the 2D-S measurements to directly calculate Vm. By calculating Vm directly from the measured PSD, ice particle projected area and estimated mass, more accurate estimates of Vm are obtained. These Vm values were then parameterized for climate models by relating them to (1) sampling temperature and ice water content (IWC) and (2) the effective diameter (De) of the ice PSD. Parameterization (1) is appropriate for climate models having single-moment microphysical schemes whereas (2) is appropriate for double-moment microphysical schemes and yields more accurate Vm estimates. These parameterizations were developed for tropical cirrus clouds, Arctic cirrus, mid-latitude synoptic cirrus and mid-latitude anvil cirrus clouds based on field campaigns in these regions. An important but unexpected result of this research was the discovery of microphysical evidence indicating the mechanisms by which ice crystals are produced in cirrus clouds. This evidence, derived from PSD measurements, indicates that homogeneous freezing ice nucleation dominates in mid-latitude synoptic cirrus clouds, whereas heterogeneous ice nucleation processes dominate in mid-latitude anvil cirrus. Based on these findings, De was parameterized in terms of temperature (T) for conditions dominated by (1) homo- and (2) heterogeneous ice nucleation. From this, an experiment was designed for global climate models (GCMs). The net radiative forcing from cirrus clouds may be affected by the means ice is produced (homo- or heterogeneously), and this net forcing contributes to climate sensitivity (i.e. the change in mean global surface temperature resulting from a doubling of CO2). The objective of this GCM experiment was to determine how a change in ice nucleation mode affects the predicted global radiation balance. In the first simulation (Run 1), the

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  18. Glacial conditions that contribute to the regeneration of Fountain Glacier proglacial icing, Bylot Island, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Glacial conditions that contribute to the regeneration of Fountain Glacier proglacial icing, Bylot icings are one of the most common forms of extrusive ice found in the Canadian Arctic. However, the icing. Its regeneration depends on the availability of subglacial water and on the balance between ice

  19. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General assigned to the Station's research unit studying the regeneration of California forests

  20. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture MIX: A Computer Program to Evaluate Forest Service, a research entomologist, is in charge of the unit developing improved technology for integrated management

  1. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Programs: A Review of Cognitive and Behavioral Studies Introduction Recent wildfires in the Western United

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Chaparral Prescribed Fire Research Unit, headquartered at Riverside, California. Publisher: Pacific

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a Research Ecologist at the Station's Timber Management/Wildlife Habitat Interactions Unit, Redwood Sciences

  4. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General scientist with the Station's Wildland Recreation and Urban Cultures Research Unit, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    A United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station General, land management, carbon sequestration, carbon markets, United States. #12;ii Executive Summary

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General acrossthe United States provide estimates of the amount of erosion reductionon forest roadsfrom

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94701 United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range of California, Berkeley, and a cooperator with the Research Unit. #12;Acknowledgments We especially acknowledge

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range to the Station's chaparral and related ecosystems research unit, with headquarters at Riverside, California. He

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of California Oaks: A Bibliography Agriculture Forest Service Pacific forester in the Station's Forest Regeneration Research Unit, at Redding, California. He holds bachelor

  10. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    United States Department of Agriculture Rural Business- Cooperative Service Research Report 157, concentration, globalization, agency theory Cooperatives in a Changing Global Food System United States

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General is a supervisory research entomologist in the Station's Regeneration Insect Research Unit in Berkeley. W. WAYNE

  12. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  13. POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN RELAXATION NICOLE GR power in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty in load, inflow to reservoirs and prices for fuel to successive decom- position into single thermal and hydro unit subproblems that are solved by dynamic

  14. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  16. Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Side effects of increasing meltwater less severe than feared Meltwater effects on flow of Greenland's ice sheet less severe for sea level rise than earlier feared, scientists...

  17. Sandia Energy - NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) Home Climate Office of Science News News & Events Research & Capabilities Monitoring Analysis...

  18. optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth system models Perego, Mauro Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories; Price, Stephen F. Dr...

  19. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of ?m-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ?210 K), ?m-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of ?m-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  20. Basal melt rates beneath Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beem, Lucas H.; Jezek, Ken C.; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2010-08-05

    and J.E. Mitchell. 1994. The role of the margins in the dynamics of an active ice stream. J. Glaciol., 40(136), 527–538. Engelhardt, H. 2004a. Ice temperature and high geothermal flux at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, from borehole measurements. J. Glaciol... ratio which varies laterally across the shear margin. Basal drag, ?b, basal velocity, U(b), basal temperature gradient, @T/@z(b), esti- mates of geothermal flux, G, plus knowledge of basal ice properties, density, ?, latent heat of fusion of ice, Li...

  1. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halzen, F.

    2010-01-01

    detectors: searching for radio waves or for acoustic pulsespredictions 93 . In cold ice, radio-wave attenuation lengthperfect reflector for radio waves. With this reflection,

  2. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  3. Acceleration of Greenland ice mass loss in spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I; Velicogna, I; Wahr, J

    2006-01-01

    10.1029/ 2005GL025550 (2006). Peltier, W. R. Global glacial2004). Tushingham, A. M. & Peltier, W. R. ICE-3G: A new

  4. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, S.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector The IceCube CollaborationA Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector Spencer R. Klein, forlarge detector is to search for optical Cherenkov radiation

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - SGP Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and their impact on clouds and climate therefore remain relatively unconstrained. Soils of all types and plant surfaces are sources for ice nucleating particles that are...

  6. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  7. optimal initial conditions for coupling ice sheet models to earth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for coupling ice sheet models to earth system models Authors: Perego, Mauro 1 ; Price, Stephen F. Dr 2 ; Stadler, Georg 3 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National...

  8. A METHOD FOR AIRCRAFT ICING DIAGNOSIS IN PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabry, Frederic

    A METHOD FOR AIRCRAFT ICING DIAGNOSIS IN PRECIPITATION François A. Turcotte Department precipitation event and its microphysics was simulated using a high resolution three-dimensional kinematic cloud

  9. Radiokrypton Dating Identifies Ancient Antarctic Ice | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Radiokrypton Dating Identifies Ancient Antarctic Ice Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science...

  10. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

  11. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-09-25

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in large eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that, for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  12. The role of ice nuclei recycling in the maintenance of cloud ice in Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Solomon, A.; Feingold, G.; Shupe, M. D.

    2015-04-21

    This study investigates the maintenance of cloud ice production in Arctic mixed phase stratocumulus in large-eddy simulations that include a prognostic ice nuclei (IN) formulation and a diurnal cycle. Balances derived from a mixed-layer model and phase analyses are used to provide insight into buffering mechanisms that maintain ice in these cloud systems. We find that for the case under investigation, IN recycling through subcloud sublimation considerably prolongs ice production over a multi-day integration. This effective source of IN to the cloud dominates over mixing sources from above or below the cloud-driven mixed layer. Competing feedbacks between dynamical mixing andmore »recycling are found to slow the rate of ice lost from the mixed layer when a diurnal cycle is simulated. The results of this study have important implications for maintaining phase partitioning of cloud ice and liquid that determine the radiative forcing of Arctic mixed-phase clouds.« less

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal or powerthermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solar

  14. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  15. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  16. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  17. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1992-11-01

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  18. Effective stress profiles and seepage flows beneath glaciers and ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rempel, Alan W.

    stress for ice infiltration Qb Heat flux into glacier base Qf Heat produced by dissipation Qg Geothermal Vertical coordinate Exponent in permeability relation #12; Exponent in ice-saturation relation il Ice

  19. Analytical determination of performance degradation on a helicopter main rotor due to ice accretion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camba, Javier

    1986-01-01

    artificial icing tests Canada's National Research Council (NRC) Icing Tunnel and simulated ice tests the OSU Transonic Airfoil Facility using a irfo'1 1 s inbicitave of current rotorcraft technol ogy. The final correlations are: Lift Increment Prediction...

  20. Incorporation of particulates into accreted ice above subglacial Vostok lake, Antarctica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, M. J.; Royston-Bishop, G.; Priscu, J. C.; Tranter, M.; Christner, B.; Lee, V.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of microscopic particulates in meteoric and accreted ice from the Vostok (Antarctica) ice core is assessed in conjunction with existing ice-core data to investigate the mechanism by which particulates are ...

  1. Modeling the evolution of polar ice sheets: Ice sheet system model workshop; Bergen, Norway, 2-4 June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larour, E; Schlegel, N; Morlighem, M

    2014-01-01

    Model Workshop; Bergen, Norway, 2?4 June 2014 The Ice SheetUniversity of Bergen in Norway, in June 2014. This is the

  2. Heat extraction for the CSPonD thermal storage unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Folkers Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Three coiled tube heat exchanger prototypes were designed to extract heat from containers holding 0.5 kg, 2.3 kg, and 10.5 kg of Sodium Nitrate-Potassium Nitrate salt. All of the prototypes were left with an open surface ...

  3. H2 ICE Combustion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided 8/12/15GuyH2 ICE Combustion

  4. Ice in Arctic Mixed-phase Stratocumulus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88 Sign In AboutWorkshop:Ice Nuclei

  5. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3performedValleySouthern Great Plains Ice Nuclei

  6. Identification of sublimation-type thermal contraction crack polygons at the proposed NASA Phoenix landing site: Implications for substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Identification of sublimation-type thermal contraction crack polygons at the proposed NASA Phoenix within the NASA Phoenix landing site Area D characterized by boulder-topped, polygonally-patterned mounds of buried ice. On the basis of morphological similarities, we classify the Phoenix Box 1 polygons

  7. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc, orbital cycles, glacial isostatic adjustment and tectonics. Each of these elements contribute different it to be directly observed. This project examined the contribution to sea-level change due to melting of ice from

  8. IceCube Project Monthly Report November 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    the current budgets or the budgets modified by the cost performance index. Change Log - IceCube Total Project IceCube array with a detector uptime of 97%, above the internal monthly goal of 95%. #12;Cost design, development, procured materials, and the construction of the infrastructure that supports

  9. Integrated navigation for AUV operations under ice shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    2000 Heat Wipes Out Giant Antarctic Ice Shelf The Independent, 31 January 2000 Catastrophic Melting VI Pine Island Bay #12;The (virtual) mission ... #12;The first mission- March 2003: Pine Island Bay NASA 30 km Sea Ice Pine Island Glacier Open Water 9 February 2003 #12;The Pine Island Bay Glacier

  10. ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Claude

    1 ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

  11. ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Claude

    ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    (Oyserman et al., 2012; Twiss et al., 2012). Conducted during times of expansive ice cover, these surveys (Saxton et al., 2012; Twiss et al., 2012). The physical processes involved in the develop- ment of diatom demonstrated the presence of viable diatoms in meltwater from lake ice (Twiss et al., 2012), consistent

  13. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  14. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  15. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  16. Third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorski, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    The third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications which was informal and interactive in nature, was open to persons interested in all ice-growing technologies and in ice storage, both seasonal and diurnal. Presentations were made on some 20 topics, ranging from freezers in Alaska to ice cooling of commercial jet aircraft. Workshop tours included visits to ice-storage systems at Commonwealth Edison's facilities in Bolingbrook and Des Plaines Valley, the A.C. Neilsen builing in Northbrook, and the new State of Illinois Center in Chicago. The first workshop in the present series considered the future of ice storage and predicted applications in the agricultural sector, desalinization, and commercial ice production. Progress has been rapid in the intervening two years, and an important topic at the third workshop was the possible use of ''warm ices'' (clathrate hydrates) for energy storage. This report consists primarily of abstracts of presentations made at the workshop. Persons wishing to obtain further information about particular papers should contact the speakers directly; speakers' addresses and telephone numbers are listed in this report.

  17. Has the ice man arrived? Tact on the Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearst, Marti

    Has the ice man arrived? Tact on the Internet Jonathan Grudin, UC Irvine and Microsoft Research resides in this extremely efficient spread of information. It is efficient, but it is not dis- crete. Eugene O'Neill's play The Ice Man Cometh outlines a series of calamities that occur when his characters

  18. CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauck, Trish; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Oberg, Karin I; Cuppen, Herma M

    2015-01-01

    The mobility of atoms, molecules and radicals in icy grain mantles regulate ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute time scales, and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick's diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an i...

  19. UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices: Production of Alcohols, Quinones. Clemett,3 Richard N. Zare3 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultra, and ethers, and reduced, producing partially hydrogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, molecules that account

  20. Methods and apparatus for rotor blade ice detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMieux, David Lawrence

    2006-08-08

    A method for detecting ice on a wind turbine having a rotor and one or more rotor blades each having blade roots includes monitoring meteorological conditions relating to icing conditions and monitoring one or more physical characteristics of the wind turbine in operation that vary in accordance with at least one of the mass of the one or more rotor blades or a mass imbalance between the rotor blades. The method also includes using the one or more monitored physical characteristics to determine whether a blade mass anomaly exists, determining whether the monitored meteorological conditions are consistent with blade icing; and signaling an icing-related blade mass anomaly when a blade mass anomaly is determined to exist and the monitored meteorological conditions are determined to be consistent with icing.

  1. THE PHASES OF WATER ICE IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2014-03-20

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as the internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures <70 K being possible under protoplanetary disk conditions. We further argue that photodesorption and freeze-out of water molecules near the surface layers of the solar nebula would have provided the conditions needed for amorphous ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  2. The future of water, ice, snow underThe future of water, ice, snow under global warmingglobal warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Katrina, the Kerry--Gingrich debate over globalGingrich debate over global warming, the local and regional warming.effects of global warming. Climate extends beyond temperature and rainfall, toClimate extendsThe future of water, ice, snow underThe future of water, ice, snow under global warmingglobal

  3. Results from IceCube Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    Results from IceCube Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1 #12;2 39 Ins>tu>ons ~220 collaborators Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser-10 20 79 2010-11 7 86 Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser

  4. CO2 diffusion in polar ice: observations from naturally formed CO2 spikes in the Siple Dome (Antarctica) ice core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raggio Parkway, Reno, Nevada 89512-1095, USA ABSTRACT. One common assumption in interpreting ice-core CO2 records is that diffusion in the ice does not affect the concentration profile. However, this assumption/Ar and Kr/Ar), electrical conductivity and Ca2+ ion concentrations to show that substantial CO2 diffusion

  5. Sea ice in the paleoclimate system: the challenge of reconstructing sea ice from proxies e an introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Denmark e Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK f British Antarctic Survey. In the climate system, sea ice cover generally acts as an amplifier: it in- fluences the energy budget). Under perennial sea ice there is generally little primary production apart from under special conditions

  6. Data report TRUPACT-I, Unit 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalovich, G.S.; Hudson, M.; Joseph, B.J.; Romesberg, L.E.

    1985-09-01

    TRUPACT-I was tested to evaluate the design under the regulatory testing requirements defined in DOE Order No. 5480.1, Chapter 3. Tests were conducted both at the Drop Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The program consisted of 12-inch and 30-foot drop tests onto an essentially unyielding surface, 40-inch drop tests onto a puncture bar, and a thermal test. Instrumentation for the tests included accelerometers, strain gages, and thermocouples. Data from each test was stored on magnetic tape for later analysis. The test unit met all of the structural regulatory requirements during the impact events, with the possible exception of damage to the seal retainer bond line discovered during disassembly. The adhesive bonds on the seal retainer did not hold after the thermal test. The foam behind the puncture panel on the outer door burned during the thermal test, overheating and deteriorating the seals; the seals failed. This report presents the raw data from the testing program of TRUPACT-I, Unit 0. An analysis report interpreting the data will be published as ''TRUPACT-I, Unit 0 Test Data Analysis,'' SAND85-0943 (TTC-0555), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  7. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  8. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture DESIGN: A Program to Create Data Forest Service Entry Research Work Unit at the Station's Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507

  9. United Sates Environmental Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    United Sates Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water (4305) EPA/823/B/95/003 August 1995 QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide #12;QUAL2E Windows Interface User's Guide United States

  10. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General Observatory in Stinson Beach, Calif. Thomas E. Martin is Assistant Unit Leader--Wildlife at the U.S. Fish

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range, objectives, and targets and specific work plans for the field units--the National Forests and their Ranger

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables by country

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Peelflc Southwest Forest and Range that are expressed in tems familim to the user. Theboard footand cubic footare mdiriond units of measure, altlnough

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper-Central United States (Monserud and Ek 1977; Monserud 1987). This model was used within the framework of FOREST

  15. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station for the Station's Wildland Recreation and the Urban Culture Research Work Unit, located at the Forest Fire

  16. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Usual Planting and Harvesting Dates for U.S. Field Crops million acres of barley were harvested in the United States (U.S.) during 1996. After reaching a peak

  17. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station Research, import, and export from 1997 to 2010, for main world regions and the United States. Detailed tables

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  19. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    sunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving large mirror surfaces...

  20. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    pp. 67-73, 2003. [17] "Energy Requirements of Desalinationof solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solarapplications," Applied Energy, pp. 538-553, 2013. [20] P. G.

  1. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energya Passive Flat-Plate Solar Collector," International Journalof Flat Plate Solar Collector Equipped with Rectangular Cell

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimated UseofWaterintheUnitedStatesin2005 Trends in estimated water use in the United States.L., Hutson, S.S., Linsey, K.S., Lovelace, J.K., and Maupin, M.A., 2009, Estimated use of water in the United

  3. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range unit investigating measurement and analysis techniques for management planning, with headquarters in Berkeley, Calif. ELLIOT L. AMIDON is now assigned to the Station's unit at Arcata, Calif., that is studying

  4. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Management Research Work Unit at Boise, ID. He re- ceived with the Intermountain Research Station's Riparian-Stream Ecology and Man- agement Research Work Unit at the Forestry

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Estimates for Forest Types of the United States James E. Smith Linda S. Heath Kenneth E. Skog Richard A forest types within 10 regions of the United States. Separate tables were developed for afforestation

  6. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service General Technical #12;- TH ,a geneticist, is assigned to the Station's research unit dyin etics of western forest trees, with headquarters in Berkeley, Berkeley. PAUL D. cal technician with the genetics research unit, isa forestry gra California, Berkeley

  7. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Craig

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Ogden, UT. He was project leader of the fire fundamentals research work unit from 1966 until 1979 and is currently project leader of the fire behavior research work unit at the fire sciences laboratory. RALPH A

  8. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper of the Eastern United States have been devastated by invasive pests. We used existing data to predict-quarter in total host density. Gypsy moth occupies only 23 percent of its potential range in the Eastern United

  9. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Thomas J. Mills Frederick W. Bratten #12;The Authors: are with the Station's research unit studying fire J. MILLS, a forest economist, is in charge of the unit. He earned degrees at Michigan State

  10. United States of Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station General,000 xylem resin samples of pine (Pinus) species and hybrids--largely from the western United States locations in the eastern and southern United States. Cover Image: Chapter 6, Figure 6-2. #12;Xylem

  11. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Forest and Range ecosystemsresearch unit located in Riverside. California. PAUL H. DUNN was project leader at that time and is now project leader of the atmospheric deposition research unit in Riverside. Calif. SUSAN C. BARRO

  12. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Proceedings of the Agriculture Pacific Southwest Symposium on Social of Agriculture; 96 p. The growing demand for recreation at the wildland-urban interface throughout the United and the Urban Culture Research Unit headquartered at the Forest Fire Laboratory, 4955 Canyon Crest Dr

  13. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station http. Arbaugh is a statistician with the Station's Atmospheric Deposition Effects Research Unit at Riverside and associate professor with the National Park Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit, College of Forest

  14. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General Technical Report NE-318 Atlas of Climate Change Effects in 150 Bird Species of the Eastern United States Service 359 Main Road Delaware, OH 43015 USA #12;United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

  15. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station Research Paper NE-722 James E. Smith Linda S. Heath A Model of Forest Floor Carbon Mass for United States Forest contiguous United States. Manuscript received for publication 22 April 2002 #12;A Model of Forest Floor

  16. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southern Research Station General Technical United States. In: Rauscher, H. Michael, and Kurt Johnsen, eds. Southern forest science: past, present Trends in the Southern United States Robert A. Mickler, James E. Smith, and Linda S. Heath1 Abstract

  17. UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNITED STATES PARTMENT OF lMMERCE J8l1CATION SEATTLE, WA IOVEMBER 1973 FISHERY FACTS-6 U. S of foreign fishing off United States coastal waters, and the aevelopment and enforce- ment of international;ABSTRACT Dungeness crabs, Cancer magister, occur in the inshore waters of t he west coast of the United

  18. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Northeastern Research Station General reported in USDA Forest Service surveys for forests of the conterminous United States. Developed for use estimates are provided for regional tree-mass totals using summary forest statistics for the United States

  19. United States Nuclear Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Department of Energy United States.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 E-mail: DISTRIBUTION@nrc.gov Facsimile: 301; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10

  20. Unit Testing Discussion C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

  1. The Macroscopic Cortical Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penny, Will

    The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell Populations Differential Will Penny 21st April 2011 #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell as formulated in David et al. (2006). #12;The Macroscopic Brain Will Penny Cortical Unit Neural Mass Model Cell

  2. Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weng, Kuo-Lianq (Taichung, TW); Weng, Kuo-Liang (Taichung, TW)

    1998-01-01

    The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

  3. Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Sheldon X.-D.

    Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management Pu Liu, Zhenyu Qi, Hang temperature by dynamic thermal managements becomes necessary. This paper proposes a novel approach to the thermal analysis at chip architecture level for efficient dynamic thermal management. Our new approach

  4. Self-Assembly of Faceted Particles Triggered by a Moving Ice Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Bouville; Eric Maire; Sylvain Deville

    2015-06-30

    The possibility to align and organize faceted particles in the bulk offers intriguing possibilities for the design and discovery of materials and architectures exhibiting novel functional properties. The growth of ice crystals can be used to trigger the self-assembly of large, anisotropic particles and consequently to obtain three-dimensional porous materials of large dimensions in a limited amount of time. These mechanisms have not been explored so far due to the difficulty to experimentally investigate these systems. Here we elucidate the self-assembly mechanisms of faceted particles driven by ice growth by a combination of X-ray holotomography and discrete element modeling, providing insights into both the dynamics of self-assembly and their final packing. The encapsulation of particles is the result of a delicate balance between the force exerted by the percolating network of concentrated particles and the force exerted by the moving interface. We illustrate the benefits of such self-assembly for thermal management composite materials.

  5. Gas ageice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, M. L. Bender,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Gas age­ice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, 0­100 ka M. L. Bender,1 G. [1] Gas is trapped in polar ice at depths of $50­120 m and is therefore significantly younger than cores (Vostok, Dome Fuji, and Dome C). We recorrelate the gas records of Vostok and Greenland Ice Sheet

  6. Fast numerical method for growth and retreat of subsurface ice on Mars Norbert Schorghofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    ice, retreat of pore ice, retreat of an ice sheet, and retreat of pore ice due to geothermal heating) Dtexpl: vertical spatial resolution and D the diffusion coef- ficient. The vertical grid spacing needs to be finer than the diurnal skin depth of the temperature cycle. The diurnal

  7. Modelling the reorientation of sea-ice faults as the wind changes direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Modelling the reorientation of sea-ice faults as the wind changes direction Alexander V. WILCHINSKY-1290, USA ABSTRACT. A discrete-element model of sea ice is used to study how a 908 change in wind direction alters the pattern of faults generated through mechanical failure of the ice. The sea-ice domain is 400

  8. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  9. A Model of Viscoelastic Ice-Shelf Flexure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Sergienko, Olga V.; Banwell, Alison F.

    2015-07-15

    -shelf and ice-stream motion and stress fields. Examples of these phenomena27 include tide-driven grounding-line flexure and migration [e.g., Sayag and Worster, 2013, Tsai and28 Gudmundsson, 2015], tidally pulsed grounding line ice velocity variations [e... -shelf flexure that is applicable to circumstances where the114 ratio of vertical to horizontal length scales, H and L, respectively, is small (H/L ? 1), and where115 the vertical displacement (assumed constant through the depth of the ice shelf) due to flexure...

  10. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    This program set out to explore a scattering-based approach to concentrate sunlight with the aim of improving collector field reliability and of eliminating wind loading and gross mechanical movement through the use of a stationary collection optic. The approach is based on scattering sunlight from the focal point of a fixed collection optic into the confined modes of a sliding planar waveguide, where it is transported to stationary tubular heat transfer elements located at the edges. Optical design for the first stage of solar concentration, which entails focusing sunlight within a plane over a wide range of incidence angles (>120 degree full field of view) at fixed tilt, led to the development of a new, folded-path collection optic that dramatically out-performs the current state-of-the-art in scattering concentration. Rigorous optical simulation and experimental testing of this collection optic have validated its performance. In the course of this work, we also identified an opportunity for concentrating photovoltaics involving the use of high efficiency microcells made in collaboration with partners at the University of Illinois. This opportunity exploited the same collection optic design as used for the scattering solar thermal concentrator and was therefore pursued in parallel. This system was experimentally demonstrated to achieve >200x optical concentration with >70% optical efficiency over a full day by tracking with <1 cm of lateral movement at fixed latitude tilt. The entire scattering concentrator waveguide optical system has been simulated, tested, and assembled at small scale to verify ray tracing models. These models were subsequently used to predict the full system optical performance at larger, deployment scale ranging up to >1 meter aperture width. Simulations at an aperture widths less than approximately 0.5 m with geometric gains ~100x predict an overall optical efficiency in the range 60-70% for angles up to 50 degrees from normal. However, the concentrator optical efficiency was found to decrease significantly with increasing aperture width beyond 0.5 m due to parasitic waveguide out-coupling loss and low-level absorption that become dominant at larger scale. A heat transfer model was subsequently implemented to predict collector fluid heat gain and outlet temperature as a function of flow rate using the optical model as a flux input. It was found that the aperture width size limitation imposed by the optical efficiency characteristics of the waveguide limits the absolute optical power delivered to the heat transfer element per unit length. As compared to state-of-the-art parabolic trough CPV system aperture widths approaching 5 m, this limitation leads to an approximate factor of order of magnitude increase in heat transfer tube length to achieve the same heat transfer fluid outlet temperature. The conclusion of this work is that scattering solar thermal concentration cannot be implemented at the scale and efficiency required to compete with the performance of current parabolic trough CSP systems. Applied within the alternate context of CPV, however, the results of this work have likely opened up a transformative new path that enables quasi-static, high efficiency CPV to be implemented on rooftops in the form factor of traditional fixed-panel photovoltaics.

  11. Thermal radiation Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .00032, similarly for 2·T = 0.7·2500 = 1750 µmK4 this gives f0-2 = 0.03392. Thus for 0.4 - 0.7 µm, f1-2 = 0Thermal radiation revisited Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Process Engineering

  12. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LASP's mechanical analysts also lead mechanical verification testing including: random vibration, forceMechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has

  13. Spin ice: magnetic excitations without monopole signatures using muon spin rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunsiger, Sarah [Technical University, Munich, Germany; Aczel, Adam A. [McMaster University; Arguello, Carlos [Columbia University; Dabkowska, H. A. [McMaster University; Dabkowski, A [McMaster University; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL; Goko, Tatsuo [Columbia University; Javanparast, B [University of Waterloo, Canada; Lin, T [University of Waterloo, Canada; Ning, F. L. [McMaster University; Noad, H. M. [McMaster University; Singh, David J [ORNL; Williams, T.J. [McMaster University; Uemura, Yasutomo J. [Columbia University; Gingras, M.P.J. [University of Waterloo, Canada; Luke, Graeme M. [McMaster University

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts the low temperature magnetic excitations in spin ices consist of deconfined magnetic charges, or monopoles. A recent transverse-field (TF) muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment [S.T. Bramwell et al., Nature (London) 461 956 (2009)] reports results claiming to be consistent with the temperature and magnetic field dependence anticipated for monopole nucleation - the so-called second Wien effect. We demonstrate via a new series of {mu}SR experiments in Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} that such an effect is not observable in a TF {mu}SR experiment. Rather, as found in many highly frustrated magnetic materials, we observe spin fluctuations which become temperature independent at low temperatures, behavior which dominates over any possible signature of thermally nucleated monopole excitations.

  14. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  15. Tunable thermal link

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  16. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  17. Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unit 51, CC in GIS; Cowen, David; Ferguson, Warren

    1990-01-01

    51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS1990 Page 1 Unit 51 - GIS Application Areas Computers inyour students. UNIT 51 - GIS APPLICATION AREAS Compiled with

  18. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  19. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  20. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

  1. THE STRUCTURE OF SURFACE H{sub 2}O LAYERS OF ICE-COVERED PLANETS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE ICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueta, S.; Sasaki, T. E-mail: takanori@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    Many extrasolar (bound) terrestrial planets and free-floating (unbound) planets have been discovered. While the existence of bound and unbound terrestrial planets with liquid water is an important question, of particular importance is the question of these planets' habitability. Even for a globally ice-covered planet, geothermal heat from the planetary interior may melt the interior ice, creating an internal ocean covered by an ice shell. In this paper, we discuss the conditions that terrestrial planets must satisfy for such an internal ocean to exist on the timescale of planetary evolution. The question is addressed in terms of planetary mass, distance from a central star, water abundance, and abundance of radiogenic heat sources. In addition, we investigate the structure of the surface H{sub 2}O layers of ice-covered planets by considering the effects of ice under high pressure (high-pressure ice). As a fiducial case, a 1 M{sub ?} planet at 1 AU from its central star and with 0.6-25 times the H{sub 2}O mass of the Earth could have an internal ocean. We find that high-pressure ice layers may appear between the internal ocean and the rock portion on a planet with an H{sub 2}O mass over 25 times that of the Earth. The planetary mass and abundance of surface water strongly restrict the conditions under which an extrasolar terrestrial planet may have an internal ocean with no high-pressure ice under the ocean. Such high-pressure ice layers underlying the internal ocean are likely to affect the habitability of the planet.

  2. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  3. Use of airs and modis thermal infrared channels to retrieve ice cloud properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Christopher Rogers

    2007-04-25

    this project. This study was supported by the National Science Foundation Physical Meteorological Program managed by Dr. Andrew Detwiler (ATM-0239605), and by a NASA research grant (NNG04GL24G) from the Radiation Sciences Program managed by Dr. Hal Maring......................................................................................................... 8 b. Radiative transfer and DISORT.............................................................. 10 c. Correlated k-distribution......................................................................... 15 d. MODIS...

  4. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  5. 1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note (No. 11) De-icing salt damage to trees De-icing Salt Damage to Trees Joan F Webber, David R Rose, Martin C Dobson #12;2 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 S a l t D a m a g e De-icing Salt Damage Introduction Rock salt

  6. Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    events implemented (up from 1); ordered sequences of events to trigger next mission element added. J and shelf ice. 4 - 12 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler to obtain the stratigraphy within sediments Water

  7. Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

  8. Intelligent Matchmaking for Polar Ice Sheet Data Collection and Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    for the dynamic configuration of sensors and the motion of the rovers that carry them. The PRISM intelligent intelligent sensor and roveIntelligent Matchmaking for Polar Ice Sheet Data Collection and Delivery Costas Tsatsoulis, Sudha

  9. Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiryluk, Joanna; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Science, O?ce of Nu- clear Physics, of the U.S. Departmentjkiryluk?lake?louise?lbl NEUTRINO PHYSICS WITH THE ICECUBESNRs). Other IceCube physics topics include searches for

  10. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  11. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  12. Interface limited growth of heterogeneously nucleated ice in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan A. Nistor; Thomas E. Markland; B. J. Berne

    2013-12-30

    Heterogeneous ice growth exhibits a maximum in freezing rate arising from the competition between kinetics and the thermodynamic driving force between the solid and liquid states. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the atomistic details of this competition, focusing on water properties in the interfacial region along the secondary prismatic direction. The crystal growth velocity is maximized when the efficiency of converting interfacial water molecules to ice, collectively known as the attachment kinetics, is greatest. We find water molecules that contact the intermediate ice layer in concave regions along the atomistically roughened surface are more likely to freeze directly. The increased roughening of the solid surface at large undercoolings consequently plays an important limiting role on the rate of ice growth, as water molecules are unable to integrate into increasingly deeper surface pockets. These results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms for self-assembly of solid phases that are important in many biological and atmospheric processes.

  13. Psychology General Of1ice P217 Biological Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Psychology General Of1ice P217 Biological Sciences Building Edmonton, Alberta. Robert Cook ----------------------------------------------- Professor of Psychology Dean in 1986, when he joined the Department of Psychology as an assistant

  14. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  15. Magnetization plateaus of dipolar spin ice on kagome lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Y. L.; Wang, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2014-05-07

    Unlike spin ice on pyrochlore lattice, the spin ice structure on kagome lattice retains net magnetic charge, indicating non-negligible dipolar interaction in modulating the spin ice states. While it is predicted that the dipolar spin ice on kagome lattice exhibits a ground state with magnetic charge order and ?3?×??3 spin order, our work focuses on the magnetization plateau of this system. By employing the Wang-Landau algorithm, it is revealed that the lattice exhibits the fantastic three-step magnetization in response to magnetic field h along the [10] and [01] directions, respectively. For the h//[1 0] case, an additional ?3/6M{sub s} step, where M{sub s} is the saturated magnetization, is observed in a specific temperature range, corresponding to a new state with charge order and short-range spin order.

  16. Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke; Kravchenko, I.

    2013-05-16

    consistent with measurements in East Antarctica. Combined with other radio echo sounding data, we conclude that observed birefringent asymmetries at South Pole are generated entirely in the lower half of the ice sheet. By contrast, birefringent asymmetries...

  17. Thermal Giant Gravitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A; Orselli, Marta; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2012-01-01

    We study the giant graviton solution as the AdS_5 X S^5 background is heated up to finite temperature. The analysis employs the thermal brane probe technique based on the blackfold approach. We focus mainly on the thermal giant graviton corresponding to a thermal D3-brane probe wrapped on an S^3 moving on the S^5 of the background at finite temperature. We find several interesting new effects, including that the thermal giant graviton has a minimal possible value for the angular momentum and correspondingly also a minimal possible radius of the S^3. We compute the free energy of the thermal giant graviton in the low temperature regime, which potentially could be compared to that of a thermal state on the gauge theory side. Moreover, we analyze the space of solutions and stability of the thermal giant graviton and find that, in parallel with the extremal case, there are two available solutions for a given temperature and angular momentum, one stable and one unstable. In order to write down the equations of mot...

  18. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  19. IceCube: The state of the art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teresa Montaruli

    2006-08-09

    In this paper we describe the performance of the 9 instrumented IceCube strings and 16 surface IceTop stations taking data at the Geographical South Pole after 2 deployment seasons. We will focus on the description of the array and on the construction and data analysis status. The expected full array performance is discussed and compared to other results for the relevant physics studies using high energy neutrinos for astrophysical neutrino searches.

  20. Structure order, local potentials, and physical anomalies of water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2014-07-11

    Hydrogen-bond forms a pair of asymmetric, coupled, H-bridged oscillators with ultra-short-range interactions and memory. hydrogen bond cooperative relaxation and the associated binding electron entrapment and nonbonding electron polarization discriminate water and ice from other usual materials in the physical anomalies. As a strongly correlated fluctuating system, water prefers the statistically mean of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with a supersolid skin that is elastic, polarized, ice like, hydrophobic, with 3/4 density.

  1. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  2. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..............................................................................2 Solid Waste Management .........................................................................3 ....................................................................................4 Solid Waste ManagementUnited States Department of Returns on InvestmentsAgriculture Forest Service in Management Sciences

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"...

  4. Sputtering of Oxygen Ice by Low Energy Ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntean, E A; Field, T A; Fitzsimmons, A; Hunniford, C A; McCullough, R W

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring ices lie on both interstellar dust grains and on celestial objects, such as those in the outer solar system. These ices are continu- ously subjected to irradiation by ions from the solar wind and/or cosmic rays, which modify their surfaces. As a result, new molecular species may form which can be sputtered off into space or planetary atmospheres. We determined the experimental values of sputtering yields for irradiation of oxygen ice at 10 K by singly (He+, C+, N+, O+ and Ar+) and doubly (C2+, N2+ and O2+) charged ions with 4 keV kinetic energy. In these laboratory experiments, oxygen ice was deposited and irradiated by ions in an ultra high vacuum chamber at low temperature to simulate the environment of space. The number of molecules removed by sputtering was observed by measurement of the ice thickness using laser interferometry. Preliminary mass spectra were taken of sputtered species and of molecules formed in the ice by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). We find that the experi...

  5. CO and N$_2$ desorption energies from water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayolle, Edith C; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn M; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I

    2015-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N$_2$ are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N$_2$ abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N$_2$H$^+$ anti-correlations in disks, protostars and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N$_2$ ice desorption, the difference between CO and N$_2$ desorption energies is small; the N$_2$-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93$\\pm$0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of $^{13}$CO and $^{15}$N$_2$ on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, $^{15}$N$_2$ desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of $^{13}$CO desorption. The $^{15}$N$_2$ and $^{13}$CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different sub-monolayer co...

  6. IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Halzen, F.; Klein, S.

    2010-06-04

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams.

  7. Sandia Energy - Phasor Measurement Units

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Units Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure Phasor Measurement Units...

  8. Case Study Walnut Hill United Methodist Church - Dallas, Texas, Chiller Replacement Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1992 Walnut Hill United Methodist Church in Dallas, Tx. decided that their existing thermal storage and electric reciprocating chiller system were both in need of replacement. After analyzing several options, they chose to install 150...

  9. Climate change impacts on freshwater recreational fishing in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Russell

    We estimated the biological and economic impacts of climate change on freshwater fisheries in the United States (U.S.). Changes in stream temperatures, flows, and the spatial extent of suitable thermal habitats for fish ...

  10. Quantum-coupled single-electron thermal to electric conversion scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, D. M.

    Thermal to electric energy conversion with thermophotovoltaics relies on radiation emitted by a hot body, which limits the power per unit area to that of a blackbody. Microgap thermophotovoltaics take advantage of evanescent ...

  11. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by impeding or stopping navigation, interfering with power plants and cooling water intakes, and damaging was virtually free of any significant ice cover in 1998 and, with the exception of portions of January, the same

  12. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  13. The glacier and land ice surface topography interferometer: An airborne proof-of-concept demonstration of high-precision Ka-band single-pass elevation mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN): AAND LAND ICE SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY INTERFEROMETER application,”AND LAND ICE SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY INTERFEROMETER Fig. 2.

  14. 115 year ice-core data from Akademii Nauk ice cap, Severnaya Zemlya: high-resolution record of Eurasian Arctic climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Hubertus

    ice core has been drilled within the framework of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica of Antarctica. Drilling reached bedrock during the last field season 2005/06 providing ice over a time span. Since Ca2+ is derived from terrestrial dust and marine sources, the non-sea-salt calcium concentrations

  15. Thermally Polymerized Rylene Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Trisha Lionel

    Rylene dyes functionalized with varying numbers of phenyl trifluorovinyl ether (TFVE) moieties were subjected to a thermal emulsion polymerization to yield shape-persistent, water-soluble chromophore nanoparticles. Perylene ...

  16. Thermal Insulation Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

  17. Contact thermal lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

  18. FULLY SAMPLED MAPS OF ICES AND SILICATES IN FRONT OF CEPHEUS A EAST WITH THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerakines, Perry

    are relatively constant over the mapped region exhibiting both ice absorptions. The fraction of CO2 ice are invoked. The routine detection of solid CO2, with a fraction relative to water ice between 9% and 37 report the first fully sampled maps of the distribution of interstellar CO2 ices, H2O ices, and total

  19. Photovoltaic-thermal collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

    1984-04-24

    A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

  20. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-Guo Dong

    2015-07-07

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at different resonance energy given by the WKB method is shown that indicates the thermal resonance fusion mode, especially combined with the tunnel effect, is possible and feasible. But the penetrating probability decreases very sharply when the input resonance energy decreases less than 3 keV, so for thermal resonance fusion, the key point is to increase the resonance peak or make the resonance sharp enough to the acceptable energy level by the suitable compound catalysts, and it is better to reach up more than 3 keV to make the penetrating probability larger than 10^{-10}.

  1. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at dif...

  2. Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress Anthony J. Bellantuono1 thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained

  3. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

    2013-01-29

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

  4. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  5. The Space Shuttle design presented many thermal insulation challenges. The system not only had to perform well, it had to integrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to exceedingly high temperatures and needed reusable, lightweight, low-cost thermal protection. The vehicle also Steinetz Ice Detection Prevents Catastrophic Problems Charles Stevenson Aerogel-based Insulation System broke apart and collided with the surface of the vehicle, they recombined in an exothermic reaction

  6. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

    2007-06-01

    This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

  7. Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Aug.2013 Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Ron Zevenhoven Course 424101 Processteknikens grunder ("PTG") Introduction to Process Engineering v. 2013 0 > V (m3/s; equations, variables and units 1.1 Process engineering, this course 1.2 Process calculations, equations

  8. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sullivan, S. C.; Morales Betancourt, R.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2015-08-11

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the Barahona and Nenes cirrus formation parameterization to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically-derived spectrum,more »a lab-based empirical spectrum, and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon aerosol and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never unraveled as done here.« less

  9. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. B. Price

    2005-06-27

    Two classes of natural solid media (glacial ice and salt domes) are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy >1e18 eV. Though insensitive to 1e11 to 1e16 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because, due to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced very far apart. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size 0.2 cm at -51 degrees C, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 km and 25 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, respectively, and the absorption length is calculated to be 9 km at frequencies above 100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 km and 1.4 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 30,000 km and 3300 km at 10 kHz and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor.

  10. Thermal Degradation Studies of Polyurethane/POSS Nanohybrid Elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J P; Pielichowski, K; TremblotDeLaCroix, P; Janowski, B; Todd, D; Liggat, J J

    2010-03-05

    Reported here is the synthesis of a series of Polyurethane/POSS nanohybrid elastomers, the characterization of their thermal stability and degradation behavior at elevated temperatures using a combination of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Thermal Volatilization Analysis (TVA). A series of PU elastomers systems have been formulated incorporating varying levels of 1,2-propanediol-heptaisobutyl-POSS (PHIPOSS) as a chain extender unit, replacing butane diol. The bulk thermal stability of the nanohybrid systems has been characterized using TGA. Results indicate that covalent incorporation of POSS into the PU elastomer network increase the non-oxidative thermal stability of the systems. TVA analysis of the thermal degradation of the POSS/PU hybrid elastomers have demonstrated that the hybrid systems are indeed more thermally stable when compared to the unmodified PU matrix; evolving significantly reduced levels of volatile degradation products and exhibiting a {approx}30 C increase in onset degradation temperature. Furthermore, characterization of the distribution of degradation products from both unmodified and hybrid systems indicate that the inclusion of POSS in the PU network is directly influencing the degradation pathways of both the soft and hard block components of the elastomers: The POSS/PU hybrid systems show reduced levels of CO, CO2, water and increased levels of THF as products of thermal degradation.

  11. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  12. Thermal Lens Spectroscopy Mladen Franko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Thermal Lens Spectroscopy Mladen Franko Laboratory of Environmental Research, University of Nova-beam Instruments 5 3.3 Differential Thermal Lens Instruments 7 3.4 Multiwavelength and Tunable Thermal Lens Spectrometers 8 3.5 Circular Dichroism TLS Instruments 9 3.6 Miniaturization of Thermal Lens Instruments 9 4

  13. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A., E-mail: aciaravella@astropa.unipa.it [Centro de Astrobiología (INTA-CSIC), Carretera de Ajalvir, km 4, Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  14. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  15. Thermal ground state and nonthermal probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The Euclidean formulation of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics admits periodic, (anti)selfdual solutions to the fundamental, classical equation of motion which possess one unit of topological charge: (anti)calorons. A spatial coarse graining over the central region in a pair of such localised field configurations with trivial holonomy generates an inert adjoint scalar field $\\phi$, effectively describing the pure quantum part of the thermal ground state in the induced quantum field theory. The latter's local vertices are mediated by just-not-resolved (anti)caloron centers of action $\\hbar$. This is the basic reason for a rapid convergence of the loop expansion of thermodynamical quantities, polarization tensors, etc., their effective loop momenta being severely constrained in entirely fixed and physical unitary-Coulomb gauge. Here we show for the limit of zero holonomy how (anti)calorons associate a temperature independent electric permittivity and magnetic permeability to the thermal ground state of SU(2)$_{\\t...

  16. Thermal ground state and nonthermal probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thierry Grandou; Ralf Hofmann

    2015-08-24

    The Euclidean formulation of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics admits periodic, (anti)selfdual solutions to the fundamental, classical equation of motion which possess one unit of topological charge: (anti)calorons. A spatial coarse graining over the central region in a pair of such localised field configurations with trivial holonomy generates an inert adjoint scalar field $\\phi$, effectively describing the pure quantum part of the thermal ground state in the induced quantum field theory. Here we show for the limit of zero holonomy how (anti)calorons associate a temperature independent electric permittivity and magnetic permeability to the thermal ground state of SU(2)$_{\\tiny\\mbox{CMB}}$, the Yang-Mills theory conjectured to underlie photon propagation.

  17. Thermally matched fluid cooled power converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Beihoff, Bruce C.

    2005-06-21

    A thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. Power electronic circuits are thermally matched, such as between component layers and between the circuits and the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  18. Evidence of NAO control on subsurface ice accumulation in a 1200 yr old cave-ice sequence, St. Livres ice cave, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    . Livres ice cave, Switzerland Markus Stoffel a,b,c, , Marc Luetscher d,e , Michelle Bollschweiler b Sciences, University of Geneva, Site de Batelle, chemin de Drize 7, CH-1227 Carouge-Geneva, Switzerland b, Baltzerstrasse 1+3, CH-3012 Berne, Switzerland c Department of Geosciences, Geography, University of Fribourg

  19. The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    1 The Unit Coordinator Handbook About the Unit Coordinator Handbook This Handbook will assist you in fulfilling your responsibilities as a Unit Coordinator and has been developed with input from Unit staff, however, more resources are available at the Unit Coordinator website: http

  20. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  1. United States Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    United States Shorebird Conservation Plan M A N O M E T C E N T E R F O R C O N S E R V A T I O N T I O N #12;United States Shorebird Conservation Plan Council Organizations #12;1 U n i t e d S t a t e s S h o r e b i r d C o n s e r v a t i o n P l a n 2 0 0 1 The United States Shorebird

  2. Microbial Diversity Studies in Sediments of Perennially Ice-covered Lakes, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Chao

    2009-01-01

    perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Takacs,perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Suzuki, M. ,perennial ice cover. Sedimentology 38: 363-379. Tamaki, H. ,

  3. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  4. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  5. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Saha

    2015-02-21

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

  6. Effects of Pre-Existing Ice Crystals on Cirrus Clouds and Comparison between Different Ice Nucleation Parameterizations with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiangjun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the treatment of ice nucleation in a more realistic manner in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5.3 (CAM5.3), the effects of preexisting ice crystals on ice nucleation in cirrus clouds are considered. In addition, by considering the in-cloud variability in ice saturation ratio, homogeneous nucleation takes place spatially only in a portion of cirrus cloud rather than in the whole area of cirrus cloud. With these improvements, the two unphysical limiters used in the representation of ice nucleation are removed. Compared to observations, the ice number concentrations and the probability distributions of ice number concentration are both improved with the updated treatment. The preexisting ice crystals significantly reduce ice number concentrations in cirrus clouds, especially at mid- to high latitudes in the upper troposphere (by a factor of ~10). Furthermore, the contribution of heterogeneous ice nucleation to cirrus ice crystal number increases considerably.Besides the default ice nucleation parameterization of Liu and Penner (2005, hereafter LP) in CAM5.3, two other ice nucleation parameterizations of Barahona and Nenes (2009, hereafter BN) and Kärcher et al. (2006, hereafter KL) are implemented in CAM5.3 for the comparison. In-cloud ice crystal number concentration, percentage contribution from heterogeneous ice nucleation to total ice crystal number, and preexisting ice effects simulated by the three ice nucleation parameterizations have similar patterns in the simulations with present-day aerosol emissions. However, the change (present-day minus pre-industrial times) in global annual mean column ice number concentration from the KL parameterization (3.24×106 m-2) is obviously less than that from the LP (8.46×106 m-2) and BN (5.62×106 m-2) parameterizations. As a result, experiment using the KL parameterization predicts a much smaller anthropogenic aerosol longwave indirect forcing (0.24 W m-2) than that using the LP (0.46 W m-2) and BN (0.39 W m-2) parameterizations.

  7. Thermal noise driven computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo B. Kish

    2006-10-28

    The possibility of a new type of computing, where thermal noise is the information carrier and the clock in a computer, is studied. The information channel capacity and the lower limit of energy requirement/dissipation are studied in a simple digital system with zero threshold voltage, for the case of error probability close to 0.5, when the thermal noise is equal to or greater than the digital signal. In a simple hypothetical realization of a thermal noise driven gate, the lower limit of energy needed to generate the digital signal is 1.1*kT/bit. The arrangement has potentially improved energy efficiency and it is free of leakage current, crosstalk and ground plane electromagnetic interference problems. Disadvantage is the large number of redundancy elements needed for low-error operation.

  8. Thermal trim for luminaire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-11-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  9. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  10. Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, Benny

    Unit Clause: Summary Benny Applebaum Tel-Aviv University Spring Semester, 2012 #12;Unit Clause: Reminder Unit Clause Input: chosen uniformly from F3(n, rn). 1 If there exists unit clause (Forced step) pick at random unit clause { i} and satisfy it 2 Otherwise, (Free step) pick a random literal i

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

  16. Voltage verification unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Edward J. (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-01-15

    A voltage verification unit and method for determining the absence of potentially dangerous potentials within a power supply enclosure without Mode 2 work is disclosed. With this device and method, a qualified worker, following a relatively simple protocol that involves a function test (hot, cold, hot) of the voltage verification unit before Lock Out/Tag Out and, and once the Lock Out/Tag Out is completed, testing or "trying" by simply reading a display on the voltage verification unit can be accomplished without exposure of the operator to the interior of the voltage supply enclosure. According to a preferred embodiment, the voltage verification unit includes test leads to allow diagnostics with other meters, without the necessity of accessing potentially dangerous bus bars or the like.

  17. Associative list processing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D

    2014-04-01

    An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full.

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use of...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 3Housing units are classified as urban or rural using definitions created by...

  20. Automatically clustering similar units for unit selection in speech synthesis. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W; Taylor, Paul A

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for synthesizing speech by concatenating sub-word units from a database of labelled speech. A large unit inventory is created by automatically clustering units of the same phone class ...

  1. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  2. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  3. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

  4. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClements, K G; Dendy, R O; Carbajal, L; Chapman, S C; Cook, J W S; Harvey, R W; Heidbrink, W W; Pinches, S D

    2014-01-01

    Fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) have provided a valuable diagnostic of confined and escaping fast ions in many tokamaks. This is a passive, non-invasive diagnostic that would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in ITER, and could provide important information on fusion {\\alpha}-particles and beam ions in that device. In JET, ICE from confined fusion products scaled linearly with fusion reaction rate over six orders of magnitude and provided evidence that {\\alpha}-particle confinement was close to classical. In TFTR, ICE was observed from super-Alfv\\'enic {\\alpha}-particles in the plasma edge. The intensity of beam-driven ICE in DIII-D is more strongly correlated with drops in neutron rate during fishbone excitation than signals from more direct beam ion loss diagnostics. In ASDEX Upgrade ICE is produced by both super-Alfv\\'enic DD fusion products and sub-Alfv\\'enic deuterium beam ions.

  5. The sticking of atomic hydrogen on amorphous water ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeraghattam, Vijay K.; Manrodt, Katie; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: lewis@physast.uga.edu

    2014-07-20

    Using classical molecular dynamics, we have simulated the sticking and scattering process of a hydrogen atom on an amorphous ice film to predict the sticking probability of hydrogen on ice surfaces. A wide range of initial kinetic energies of the incident hydrogen atom (10 K-600 K) and two different ice temperatures (10 K and 70 K) were used to investigate this fundamental process in interstellar chemistry. We report here the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen as a function of incident kinetic energy, gas temperature, and substrate temperature, which can be used in astrophysical models. The current results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies that have reported a wide range in the sticking coefficient.

  6. A study of carbon-14 of paleoatmospheric methane for the last glacial termination from ancient glacial ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrenko, Vasilii Victorovich

    2008-01-01

    for the last glacial termination." xii VITA Education Ph.D.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.the Last Glacial Termination: a horizontal ice core.

  7. Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rachel E.

    2009-05-15

    Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation...

  8. The Development of Measurement Techniques to Identify and Characterize Dusts and Ice Nuclei in the Atmosphere 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen, Andrew

    2014-01-15

    Mineral dusts and ice crystals directly influence the Earth's radiative budget through radiative scattering and absorption. The interaction of spherical particles on the radiative budget are well known, however mineral dusts and ice crystals...

  9. Heterogeneous ice nucleation controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms controlling heterogeneous ice nucleation are complex and remain poorly understood. Although good ice nucleators are generally believed to match ice lattice and to bind water, counter examples are often identified. Here we show, by advanced molecular simulations, that the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on graphitic surface is controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity. Molecular level analysis reveals that the crystalline graphitic lattice with an appropriate hydrophilicity may indeed template ice basal plane by forming a strained ice layer, thus significantly enhancing its ice nucleation efficiency. Remarkably, the templating effect is found to transit from within the first contact layer of water to the second as the hydrophilicity increases, yielding an oscillating distinction between the crystalline and amorphous graphitic surfaces in their ice nucleation efficiencies. Our study sheds new light on the long-standing question of what constitutes ...

  10. VoICE: A semi-automated pipeline for standardizing vocal analysis across models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkett, ZD; Day, NF; Peñagarikano, O; Geschwind, DH; White, SA

    2015-01-01

    al. VoICE: A semi-automated pipeline for standardizing vocalVoICE: A semi-automated pipeline for standardizing vocalwe designed an analysis pipeline into which any type of

  11. Thesis proposal CSF Brazil 2014 Innovant de-icing system for more electric aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    . Mechanical de-icing systems are low energy solution that are focused on breaking down and shedding the ice-mechanical systems give a durable, light-weight, power-saver solution which justifies the recent efforts

  12. Ice nucleation and droplet formation by bare and coated soot particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Beth

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of ...

  13. Glacial geology and glaciology of the Younger Dryas ice cap in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golledge, Nicholas Robert

    2009-01-01

    This thesis uses geological field data and numerical ice sheet modelling to study the Younger Dryas ice cap in Scotland. The Younger Dryas stadial is important because it represents the most recent period of high-magnitude ...

  14. The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

  15. Fast proton hopping detection in ice I{sub h} by quasi-elastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fast proton hopping detection in ice Isub h by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fast proton hopping detection in ice...

  16. Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential Impacts Assessment of Future ICE and Fuel-Cell Powered Vehicles and Their Potential Impacts 2004 Diesel Engine...

  17. Mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet from 1958 to 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rignot, E; Rignot, E; Box, JE; Burgess, E; Hanna, E

    2008-01-01

    ice sheet surface mass balance varia- bility (1988 – 2004)5 L20502 RIGNOT ET AL. : MASS BALANCE GREENLAND 1958 – 20072005), Runoff and mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet:

  18. Analysis of Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness: A Newly Created Database for 2000-2009 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Benjamin Patrick

    2012-10-19

    Observations of Antarctic sea ice thickness are sporadic in space and time, hindering knowledge of its variability. A proxy based on stage of development data from the National Ice Center (NIC) weekly operational charts is used to create a high...

  19. Modeling the impact of atmospheric moisture transport on global ice volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nisancioglu, Kerim Hestnes, 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Following Milankovitch's original hypothesis most model studies of changes in global ice volume on orbital time scales have focused on the impact of ablation on ice sheet mass balance. In most cases, poleward moisture flux ...

  20. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  1. NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-24 A COMPUTERIZED ICE CONCENTRATION DATA BASE FOR THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NOAA Data Report ERL GLERL-24 A COMPUTERIZED ICE CONCENTRATION DATA BASE FOR THE GREAT LAKES ......................................................................................................... 5 2. Computerized ice concentration data base .............................................................................................................................................. 5 2. BASIC DATAAND DATA REDUCTION

  2. Using Temporal Information in an Automated Classification of Summer, Marginal Ice Zone Imagery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    * Donna Haverkamp and Costas Tsatsoulis Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science- analyzed temperature records and regional statistics in order to achieve an automated ice's ice/water concentrations and melt state with temperature and wind data, a current interpretation

  3. A Computational Study of Icing Effects on the Performance of an S-Duct Inlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Wonjin

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a diffusing S-duct inlet (M2129) is computationally studied for the effects of inlet icing. Different ice accretion shapes, predicted by numerical analysis in the literature reviewed, are simulated on the inlet lip. Two commercial...

  4. Incorporation of particulates into accreted ice above subglacial Vostok lake, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    polycarbonate membranes, and secondary electron images were collected at Â500 magnification using a scanning conductivity suggest that the ice comprises lake water which has refrozen to the underside of the ice sheet

  5. Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry Glynne

    2009-05-15

    Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding...

  6. 2,000-year record of atmospheric methyl bromide from a South Pole ice core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Eric S; Aydin, Murat; Tatum, Cheryl; Williams, Margaret B

    2008-01-01

    air from firn at the South Pole, Nature, 383, 231 – 235. 5METHYL BROMIDE FROM SOUTH POLE ICE CORE Butler, J. H. , M.of methyl chloride from a South Pole ice core: Evidence for

  7. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

  8. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

  9. UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duh, Kevin

    UNIT SELECTION ALGORITHM FOR JAPANESE SPEECH SYNTHESIS BASED ON BOTH PHONEME UNIT AND DIPHONE UNIT ABSTRACT This paper proposes a novel unit selection algorithm for Japanese Text-To-Speech (TTS) systems, CV units are basic to con- catenative TTS systems for Japanese. However, speech syn- thesized with CV

  10. Conventional regression models Unlabelled units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Sampling bias in logistic models Peter effects #12;Conventional regression models Unlabelled units Consequences Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of conventional models 2 Unlabelled units Point

  11. Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9, CCTP; Dodson, Rustin

    1998-01-01

    UNIT 9: SPATIAL DATA CONVERSION Written by Rustin Dodson,Programs Page 1 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion freezingPrograms Page 2 Unit 9: Spatial Data Conversion Export USGS

  12. Best Buys and Unit Pricing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-02-02

    This guide explains how to determine a unit price--the cost of an item based on a specific unit such as pound or ounce. Unit pricing can be used to identify foods that are the most economical....

  13. Stable levitation and dynamics of ice particles at low pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Kowalski; Bernard Xie; Colin V. Parker; Cheng Chin

    2015-04-13

    We demonstrate stable levitation and trapping of ice particles of 30~200 micon at low background gas pressures in the presence of a temperature gradient. The thermophoretic force levitates the particles, which have long lifetimes of over an hour. The equilibrium position depends on the background pressure and temperature gradient, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. Furthermore, we investigate interesting launching and merging dynamics of the levitated particles, as well as the development of instability at high background pressures. Our system provides a robust platform to investigate the aggregation of floating ice particles in air, and potentially chemical and biological processes in a microgravity environment.

  14. Ice plug employed on subsea pipeline bend during repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-22

    The first controlled-temperature ice plug in the bend of an offshore gas trunkline has been carried out for Phillips Petroleum Co. Norway on its Norpipe A.S. platform in the German sector of the North Sea. The procedure was part of a subsea valve repair operation. The ice plug was successfully formed offshore and tested to a differential pressure of 1,450 psi. Repair of two valves required only 5 days during which time gas production was operating at close to 50--60% via the platform bypass, says the service company. The paper discusses the procedure.

  15. Stochastic Unit Commitment in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    the interestofpowerutilitiesindevelopingmodelsandoptimizationtechniquesforthegeneration and trading of electric power under uncertainty. Utilities participating in deregulated markets be supplied by the power system or by trading activities. The competitive environment forces the utilities-Thermal Power Production Planning Nicole Gröwe-Kuska and Werner Römisch 30.1 Introduction Economic needs

  16. Fluid Flow and Thermodynamic Analysis of a Wing Anti-Icing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is controlled through regulating the hot flow passing a wing anti-icing valve by an automatic control system

  17. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  18. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  19. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  20. Thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.