Sample records for thermal unit ice

  1. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  2. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  3. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONING (ISAC) UNITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cooling with the compressor). Yes No #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONING (ISAC) UNITS CEC/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air Conditioning (ISAC) Units being full of ice. Verify that the system is operates properly in the Idle mode (i.e., the compressor

  5. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

  6. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

  7. MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

  8. Z .Cold Regions Science and Technology 28 1998 189202 Antifreeze thermal ice core drilling: an effective approach to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Z .Cold Regions Science and Technology 28 1998 189­202 Antifreeze thermal ice core drilling Antifreeze thermal electric drills have a long history of ice drilling in temperate, subpolar and polar the past 25 years. A modified version of the antifreeze thermal electric ice coring drill has recently been

  9. Tunable Electrical and Thermal Transport in Ice-Templated MultiLayer Graphene Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    to electrical energy storage,1­3 thermal energy storage,4­13 and composite materials.14­21 Ice applications in thermal and electrical energy storage. Phase change thermal storage seeks to reduce building offsets in energy supply and demand.6 Thermal energy storage is also an appealing way to cool power

  10. Use of airs and modis thermal infrared channels to retrieve ice cloud properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Christopher Rogers

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we use thermal infrared channels to retrieve the optical thickness and effective particle radius of ice clouds. A physical model is used in conjunction with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature and water vapor profiles...

  11. Use of airs and modis thermal infrared channels to retrieve ice cloud properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Christopher Rogers

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we use thermal infrared channels to retrieve the optical thickness and effective particle radius of ice clouds. A physical model is used in conjunction with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature and water vapor profiles...

  12. Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown....

  13. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  14. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, R; Domingo, M; Satorre, M A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  15. Investigation of HNCO isomers formation in ice mantles by UV and thermal processing: an experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiménez-Escobar, A; Caro, G M Muñoz; Cernicharo, J; Marcelino, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current gas phase models do not account for the abundances of HNCO isomers detected in various environments, suggesting a formation in icy grain mantles. We attempted to study a formation channel of HNCO and its possible isomers by vacuum-UV photoprocessing of interstellar ice analogues containing H$_2$O, NH$_3$, CO, HCN, CH$_3$OH, CH$_4$, and N$_2$ followed by warm-up, under astrophysically relevant conditions. Only the H$_2$O:NH$_3$:CO and H$_2$O:HCN ice mixtures led to the production of HNCO species. The possible isomerization of HNCO to its higher energy tautomers following irradiation or due to ice warm-up has been scrutinized. The photochemistry and thermal chemistry of H$_2$O:NH$_3$:CO and H$_2$O:HCN ices was simulated using the Interstellar Astrochemistry Chamber (ISAC), a state-of-the-art ultra-high-vacuum setup. The ice was monitored in situ by Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy in transmittance. A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) detected the desorption of the molecules in the gas phase....

  16. To cite this document: Bennani , Lokman and Villedieu, Philippe and Salan, Michel Two Dimensional Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System. (2013) In: 5th AIAA Atmospheric and Space of an Electro-Thermal Ice Protection System L. Bennani Airbus Operations SAS, Toulouse, 31000, France P shall focus on the main governing equations and building blocks of the M.A.D (Anti-icing Deicing

  17. The Envelope Thermal Test Unit (ETTU): Full Measurement of Wall Perform ance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonderegger, R.C.; Sherman, M.H.; Adams, J.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 30-April THE ENVELOPE THERMAL TEST UNIT (ETTU): FIELDFigure 1. Schematic of Envelope Thermal Test Unit (cross-the dvnami c thermal propert i es of envelope c~ponents. The

  18. The Envelope Thermal Test Unit (ETTU): Full Measurement of Wall Perform ance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 30-April THE ENVELOPE THERMAL TEST UNIT (ETTU): FIELDFigure 1. Schematic of Envelope Thermal Test Unit (cross-the dvnami c thermal propert i es of envelope c~ponents. The

  19. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  20. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  1. Thermal H/D exchange in polar ice - deuteron scrambling in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberts, Thanja; Cuppen, Herma; Fedoseev, Gleb; Linnartz, Harold

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the thermally induced proton/deuteron exchange in mixed amorphous H$_2$O:D$_2$O ices by monitoring the change in intensity of characteristic vibrational bending modes of H$_2$O, HDO, and D$_2$O with time and as function of temperature. The experiments have been performed using an ultra-high vacuum setup equipped with an infrared spectrometer that is used to investigate the spectral evolution of homogeneously mixed ice upon co-deposition in thin films, for temperatures in the 90 to 140 K domain. With this non-energetic detection method we find a significantly lower activation energy for H/D exchange -- $3840 \\pm 125$ K -- than previously reported. Very likely this is due to the amorphous nature of the interstellar ice analogues involved. This provides reactive timescales ($\\tau70$ K) fast enough for the process to be important in interstellar environments. Consequently, an astronomical detection of D$_2$O will be even more challenging because of its potential to react with H$_2$O to form H...

  2. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed aims at the cost optimal scheduling of on/o decisions and output levels for generating units. The power

  3. Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, E.K.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

  4. THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF ICES IN THE ENVIRONMENTS OF NEWLY FORMED STARS: THE CO{sub 2} DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, A. M.; Whittet, D. C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Shenoy, S. S. [Spitzer Science Center, Mail Code 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gerakines, P. A.; White, D. W. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 310 Campbell Hall, 1300 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Archival data from the Infrared Spectrometer of the Spitzer Space Telescope are used to study the 15 {mu}m absorption feature of solid CO{sub 2} toward 28 young stellar objects (YSOs) of approximately solar mass. Fits to the absorption profile using laboratory spectra enable categorization according to the degree of thermal processing of the ice matrix that contains the CO{sub 2}. The majority of YSOs in our sample (20 out of 28) are found to be consistent with a combination of polar (H{sub 2}O-rich) and nonpolar (CO-rich) ices at low temperature; the remainder exhibit profile structure consistent with partial crystallization as the result of significant heating. Ice-phase column densities of CO{sub 2} are determined and compared with those of other species. Lines of sight with crystallization signatures in their spectra are found to be systematically deficient in solid-phase CO, as expected if CO is being sublimated in regions where the ices are heated to crystallization temperatures. Significant variation is found in the CO{sub 2} abundance with respect to both H{sub 2}O (the dominant ice constituent) and total dust column (quantified by the extinction, A{sub V}). YSOs in our sample display typically higher CO{sub 2} concentrations (independent of evidence for thermal processing) in comparison to quiescent regions of the prototypical cold molecular cloud. This suggests that enhanced CO{sub 2} production is driven by photochemical reactions in proximity to some YSOs, and that photoprocessing and thermal processing may occur independently.

  5. Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klam, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A percentage of insulating glass (IG) units break each year due to thermally induced perimeter stresses. The glass industry has known about this problem for many years and an ASTM standard has recently been developed for the design of monolithic...

  6. Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  7. Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klam, Jeremy Wayne

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    glass plates for thermal stresses induced by solar irradiance. It is believed that a similar standard can be developed for IG units if a proper understanding of IG thermal stresses can be developed. The objective of this research is to improve...

  8. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and high temperature cooling_REHVA Guidebook, Federation ofEvaluation of cooling performance of thermally activatedsystem with evaporative cooling source for typical United

  9. INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air Conditioning (ISAC) Units (Page 1 of 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cooling with the compressor). Yes No #12;INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-08 Ice Storage Air being full of ice. Verify that the system is operates properly in the Idle mode (i.e., the compressor in the Ice Melt mode (i.e., it starts discharging and that the compressor is off). Yes No 8 Force

  10. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  11. Thermal Imaging of Canals for Remote Detection of Leaks: Evaluation in the United Irrigation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanbo; Fipps, Guy

    . Procedures A main canal in United Irrigation District was one of several canals which was flown over with an air-borne thermal imager in Fall of 2001. The section of canal analyzed in this report consists of a 6.6 mile unlined (earth) segment and an 11... airborne multispectral remote sensing to determine leakage from rural aqueducts. Daedalus AADS 1268 Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) multispectral scanner remotely sensed data were obtained over the Vyrnwy Aqueduct, North West England. True color aerial...

  12. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, L [ed.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  13. Ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentley, Charles G.; Thomas, Robert H.; Velicogna, Isabella

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is eroding West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Geophysical Researchand Yungel, J. (2000). Greenland Ice Sheet: High-Elevation2004). The west Antarctic ice sheet and long term climate

  14. Observations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite imagery, upward looking sonar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    . The combination of the SAR imagery and ULS observations also allow measurement of the pack ice advection velocityObservations of ice thickness and frazil ice in the St. Lawrence Island polynya from satellite define a thermal ice thickness from the AVHRR retrieval of ice surface temperature combined

  15. An ice shelf breakup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahnestock, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Glaciers and ice sheets are controlled by the climate and must change if the conditions that led to their current configurations are changing. These ice masses exist at the interface between the atmosphere, which provides sustaining snowfall and thermal regulation, and the land, which provides a stable base and in many cases the elevation required to reach suitably cold conditions. Ice sheets and glaciers are distributed around the globe and can serve as potential indicators of past climate variability and current climatic trends. 9 refs.

  16. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older...

  17. 1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP OXYGEN DEFECT FORMATION AND HYDROGEN EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was partially supported by a DOE grant through United Solar Ovonics, Inc., under the Solar America Initiative1.Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 2. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 3. United Solar Ovonic, LLC Troy, MI, United States BACKGROUND THERMAL ACTIVATION OF DEEP

  18. EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the...

  19. Instruments and Methods Intermediate-depth ice coring of high-altitude and polar glaciers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    an electromechanical drill (EMD) and an ethanol thermal electric drill (ETED). The EMD permitted an average ice in cold and temperate ice and in clean and particle-laden ice. The influence of the ethanol drilling fluid- arctica, 2000) and an ethanol thermal electric drill (ETED; Zagorodnov and others, 1998)). Ice thicknesses

  20. Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

  1. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  2. Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

  3. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by utilizing thermal energy storage such as ice storage orThermal Storage Utilization. ” Journal of Solar Energy

  4. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Patrick 1987-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and blanket unit (SBU) configuration, where the seed region contains standard UO2 fuel, and the blanket region contains an inert matrix (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 fuel. The research efforts of this thesis are first to consider the higher burnup effects on DUPLEX...

  5. Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

  6. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. Archimedean Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kari Eloranta

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

  8. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJthmore »of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.« less

  9. Quantity, quality, and availability of waste heat from United States thermal power generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gingerich, Daniel B [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mauter, Meagan S [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJth of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  10. Fouling and thermal-performance characteristics of the Humboldt Bay Unit 2 power-plant condenser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabas, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Elliott, E.S. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Ramon, CA (US)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted at the Humboldt Bay condenser using eight clusters of four neighboring tubes with different conditions. In each cluster, there were (1) a new tube, the tubeside fluid being distilled water; (2) a new tube, the tubeside fluid being plant circulating water (seawater) and no cleaning; (3) an old tube, plant circulating water with no cleaning; and (4) an old tube, plant circulating water with normal periodic manual cleaning (blowing plugs or sponge balls). These tube clusters were located at four different locations within both the first and second passes of this two-pass condenser. Because of the different conditions, the fouling and cleaning characteristics can be obtained with measurements of the flow rate and inlet, outlet, and saturation temperatures. In addition to the fouling data, the thermal performance can be compared to that obtained with the standard rating method. There was a reduction in the thermal performance of the new, distilled-water tubes for about the first 80 days, and then the performance remained essentially constant. This performance change was most likely the result of the change from dropwise to filmwise condensation on the 7/8-in OD, 18 BWG Admiralty tubes. There was a continued increase of the tubeside fouling resistance with time (no asymptotic behavior) for the tubes that were not cleaned in each cluster using the plant circulating water. The fouling rates were somewhat larger for the first or lower temperature pass initially for the new tubes and after about 100 days for the old tubes. However, the fouling resistance values were substantially larger for the old tubes.

  11. IAHR International Symposium on Ice Singapore, August 11 to 15, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    22nd IAHR International Symposium on Ice Singapore, August 11 to 15, 2014 MODELING THERMAL STRUCTURE, CIRCULATION AND ICE IN LAKE ERIE Dmitry Beletsky1 , Haoguo Hu1 , Jia Wang2 , Nathan Hawley2 1 and thermal structure in Lake Erie is studied with a three-dimensional coupled Great Lakes Ice

  12. Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

  13. Simulation of the Fennoscandian ice sheet during the last glaciation using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sliding is triggered when basal temperatures reach melting point of ice sliding is proportional to power- mechanical ice sheet model coupled to an isostatic adjustment model. The model predicts thermal conditions

  14. Domestic olivine vs magnesite as a thermal-energy-storage material: performance comparisons for electrically heated room-size units in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 94. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W.R.; Schoenhals, R.J.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H. III

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically heated thermal-energy-storage (TES) heaters employing high-heat-capacity ceramic refractories for sensible heat storage have been in use in Europe for several years. With these heaters, low cost off-peak electrical energy is stored by heating a storage core composed of ceramic material to approximately 800/sup 0/C. During the peak period, no electrical energy is used as the building heating needs are supplied by extracting the stored heat from the core by forced air circulation. Recently significant interest in the use of off-peak TES units in the US has occured, leading to the search for a domestic supply of high heat capacity ceramic refractory material. North Carolina's extensive but under-utilized supply of refractory grade olivine has been proposed as a source of storage material for these units. In this paper, the suitability of North Carolina olivine for heat-storage applications is assessed by comparing its thermal performance with that of European materials. Using the method of ASHRAE Standard 94.2, the thermal performance of two small room-sized commercially available TES units was determined experimentally with two different storage materials, North Carolina olivine and German magnesite. Comparisons between the two materials are made and conclusions are drawn.

  15. Negative Thermal Expansion in ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Mechanisms, Rigid Unit Modes, and Neutron Total Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, Matthew G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Keen, David A. [Physics Department, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Wells, Stephen A. [Biological Physics, Bateman Physical Sciences Building, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Evans, John S.O. [Department of Chemistry, University Science Laboratories, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The local structure of the low-temperature ordered phase of the negative thermal expansion (NTE) material ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been investigated by reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of neutron total scattering data. We obtain, for the first time, quantitative measurements of the extent to which the WO{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 6} polyhedra move as rigid units, and we show that these values are consistent with the predictions of rigid unit mode theory. We suggest that rigid unit modes are associated with the NTE. Our results do not support a recent interpretation of x-ray-absorption fine structure spectroscopy data in terms of a larger rigid structural component involving the Zr-O-W linkage.

  16. IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF WALL THERMAL PERFORMANCE: DATA INTERPRETATION AND APPARATUS DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modera, M.P.; Sherman, M.H.; de Vinuesa, S.G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Description: The Envelope Thermal Test Unit (submitted forCross-sectional view of Envelope Thermal Test Unit blanketmeasurement prototype, the Envelope Thermal Test Unit,12 and

  17. A NEW MEASUREMENT STRATEGY FOR in situ TESTING OF WALL THERMAL PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Condon, P.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conservation, Dynamic thermal envelope thermal performanceTHERHAL TEST UNIT The envelope thermal test unit (ETTU) is athe thermal resistance of building envelope systems through

  18. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  19. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  20. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  1. How atmospheric ice forms | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric ice forms How atmospheric ice forms Released: September 08, 2014 New insights into atmospheric ice formation could improve climate models This study advances our...

  2. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  3. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

  4. Increase in NOx Emissions from Indian Thermal Power Plants during 1996-2010: Unit-Based Inventories and Multisatellite Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    and Multisatellite Observations Zifeng Lu* and David G. Streets Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Driven by rapid economic development and growing electricity demand, NOx emissions (E) from the power sector in India have

  5. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  6. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  7. Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using ice cores from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, scientists have been able to study ice's ice sheets. Ice sheets are huge areas of permanent ice. There are only three ice sheets on Earth: the Greenland Ice Sheet, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, and the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Greenland Ice Sheet

  8. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  9. Transporting Dry Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

  10. Ice Drilling Gallonmilkjugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Ice Drilling Materials · Gallonmilkjugs · Syringes,largeand small · Pitchers · Spraybottles · 13x9? ·Isitbettertosquirtthewaterslowlyorasquicklyaspossible? ·Doestherateatwhichyousquirtthewaterchangethediameteroftheholes? ·Doesthetypeof`drill

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: ICED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper Presented at American Society of Mechanical Engineers' (ASME) 2012 Internal Combustion Engine Division (ICED) Conference On August 28, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Energy...

  12. Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

  13. Measuring Thermal Transport in Extreme Environments: Thermal Conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Chen California Institute of Technology Jackie Li University of Michigan supported by CarnegieMeasuring Thermal Transport in Extreme Environments: Thermal Conductivity of Water Ice VII to 20 GPa David G. Cahill, Wen-Pin Hsieh, Dallas Trinkle, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Bin

  14. Three Mile Island Unit 1 Main Steam Line Break Three-Dimensional Neutronics/Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis: Application of Different Coupled Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Auria, Francesco [Universita di Pisa (Italy); Moreno, Jose Luis Gago [Universidad Politecnica de Barcelona (Spain); Galassi, Giorgio Maria [Universita di Pisa (Italy); Grgic, Davor [University of Zagreb (Croatia); Spadoni, Antonino [Universita di Pisa (Italy)

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive analysis of the double ended main steam line break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Babcock and Wilcox Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) has been carried out at the Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione of the University of Pisa, Italy, in cooperation with the University of Zagreb, Croatia. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations-Nuclear Science Committee pressurized water reactor MSLB benchmark.Thermal-hydraulic system codes (various versions of Relap5), three-dimensional (3-D) neutronics codes (Parcs, Quabbox, and Nestle), and one subchannel code (Cobra) have been adopted for the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are assumed as reference:1. Relap5/mod3.2.2, beta version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Parcs code parallel virtual machine (PVM) coupling2. Relap5/mod3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Quabbox code (direct coupling)3. Relap5/3D code coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Nestle code.The influence of PVM and of direct coupling is also discussed.Boundary and initial conditions of the system, including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by Pennsylvania State University in cooperation with GPU Nuclear Corporation (the utility, owner of TMI) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The comparison among the results obtained by adopting the same thermal-hydraulic nodalization and the coupled code version is discussed in this paper.The capability of the control rods to recover the accident has been demonstrated in all the cases as well as the capability of all the codes to predict the time evolution of the assigned transient. However, one stuck control rod caused some 'recriticality' or 'return to power' whose magnitude is largely affected by boundary and initial conditions.

  15. Ice particle size matters | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice particle size matters Ice particle size matters Released: May 04, 2014 Fine-tuning cloud models for improved climate predictions The Science Arctic clouds are widespread and...

  16. Elastic Coulomb-levitation: why is ice so slippery?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic, less dense, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid skin lubricates ice. Molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond and lengthens the O:H nonbond through O-O repulsion, which is associated with low-frequency and high-magnitude of O:H vibration and a dual O-O polarization. The softer O:H springs attached with stronger molecular dipoles provide forces levitating objects sliding on ice, like Maglev or Hovercraft.

  17. Design and Execution of Model Experiments to Validate Numerical Modelling of 2D Ship Operations in Pack Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Steve

    in Pack Ice Roelof C. Dragt Offshore Engineering Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Material Engineering of experiments to validate a Graphics Processing Unit based numerical modelling of ship operations in 2D pack ice interaction, 2D Model Experiments, Image Processing. I. INTRODUCTION A ship travelling through pack ice

  18. Reionization on ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

  19. Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

  20. Field demonstration of the ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moistur2048s generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

  1. Life Cycle of Sea-Ice Frazil, or grease ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Sea Ice away from surface, long crystals as congelation ice (frozen on from below) Brine Channels within the ice (~width of human hair) Brine rejected from ice (4-10psu), but concentrates in brine from AWI #12;Brine Volume and Salinity From Thomas and Dieckmann 2002, Science .... adapted from papers

  2. Very ice rich permafrost Moderately ice rich permafrost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruess, Roger W.

    TK lake Very ice rich permafrost Permafrost forest Moderately ice rich permafrost Open Bog Open Fen characteristics (mainly ice content) and burn severity determine trajectories of ecosystem succession post in the presence of moderately ice rich permafrost but have high resilience only under low burn severity in very

  3. Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

  4. Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice CeSOS Highlights and AMOS Visions Conference DP Ice loads Ice #12;Effective stationkeeping in ice 1. Effective ship design. 2. An effective Ice Management system. 3. Effective strategies for the DP control system to compensate ice forces. #12;Ice

  5. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  6. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  7. Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Released: October 04, 2011 In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice...

  8. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

    2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders for ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet. We developed one of these using connectorized components and the other using radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs). Both...

  9. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-36 SIMULATION OF ICE-COVER GROWTH AND DECAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Michigan June 1981 UNITED STATES NATIONAL OCEANIC AND DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Conduction in the Ice and Snow Cover 2.2 Energy Balance at the Ice/Water Boundary 2.3 Energy Balance Energy Balance Model 3.2 Analytical Models of Growth and Decay 3.3 Comparison of Models APPLICATION

  10. A Computational Study of Icing Effects on the Performance of an S-Duct Inlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Wonjin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - CFL Courant-Friedrichs-Levy or Courant number - CPU Central processing unit - DC(?) Total pressure distortion coefficient... accretion on airfoils aimed at quantifying the lift, drag, and aerodynamic stability of iced aircraft wings. However, Venkataramani, et al.[16] were primarily concerned with the mass rate of ice accretion on aircraft engine stator and rotor blade...

  11. Experimental Investigation of Direct Expansion Dynamic Ice-on-coil Storage System Used in Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, M.; Kong, F.; Han, Z.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    better heat exchanger ability caused by the larger surface of sheet ice, steady and low chilled water temperature was directly extracted from an ice storage tank. The longitudinal and axial fin-added coils improved the COP of the refrigerating unit...

  12. Photodesorption of ices I: CO, N2 and CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A longstanding problem in astrochemistry is how molecules can be maintained in the gas phase in dense inter- and circumstellar regions. Photodesorption is a non-thermal desorption mechanism, which may explain the small amounts of observed cold gas in cloud cores and disk mid-planes. This paper aims to determine the UV photodesorption yields and to constrain the photodesorption mechanisms of three astrochemically relevant ices: CO, N2 and CO2. In addition, the possibility of co-desorption in mixed and layered CO:N2 ices is explored. The ice photodesorption is studied experimentally under ultra high vacuum conditions and at 15-60 K using a hydrogen discharge lamp (7-10.5 eV). The ice desorption during irradiation is monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy of the ice and simultaneous mass spectrometry of the desorbed molecules. Both the UV photodesorption yields per incident photon and the photodesorption mechanisms are molecule specific. CO photodesorbs without dissociation from the surface layer of the ice. N2, which lacks an electronic transition in this wavelength range, has a photodesorption yield that is more than an order of magnitude lower. This yield increases significantly due to co-desorption when N2 is mixed in with or layered on top of CO ice. CO2 photodesorbs through dissociation and subsequent recombination from the top 10 layers of the ice. At low temperatures (15-18 K) the derived photodesorption yields are 2.7x10^-3 and CO2 photodesorption yield is 1.2x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/2.9)) + 1.1x10^-3x(1-e^(-X/4.6)) molecules photon-1, where X is the ice thickness in monolayers and the two parts of the expression represent a CO2 and CO photodesorption pathway.

  13. Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funai, Sho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

  14. A Supersolid Skin Covering both Water and Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chang Q

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mysterious nature and functionality of water and ice skins remain baffling to the community since 1859 when Farady firstly proposed liquid skin lubricating ice. Here we show the presence of supersolid phase that covers both water and ice using Raman spectroscopy measurements and quantum calculations. In the skin of two molecular layers thick, molecular undercoordination shortens the H-O bond by ~16% and lengthens the OH nonbond by ~25% through repulsion between electron pairs on adjacent O atoms, which depresses the density from 0.92 for bulk ice to 0.75 gcm-3. The O:H-O cooperative relaxation stiffens the H-O stretching phonon from 3200/3150 cm-1 to the same value of 3450 cm-1 and raises the melting temperature of both skins by up to ~310 K. Numerical derivatives on the viscosity and charge accumulation suggests that the elastic, polarized, and thermally stable supersolid phase makes the ice frictionless and water skin hydrophobic and ice like at room temperature.

  15. Journal of Climate, 2005, Vol 18, p 2903-2921 Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    radiation is the largest component of the ocean energy budget, and the large seasonal range of insolation is known to expand in early winter roughly to the mean position of the ocean thermal front in the Greenland pole depends primarily on coastlines, ice motion, and the melt rate at the ice-ocean interface. At any

  16. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  17. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  18. Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tino, Peter

    Engineering Notes Ice Shape Characterization Using Self-Organizing Maps Stephen T. McClain Baylor. Introduction DURING the validation and verification of ice accretion codes, predicted ice shapes must be compared with experimental measurements of wind-tunnel or atmospheric ice shapes. Current methods for ice

  19. Hidden force floating ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

  20. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Greenland Ice Sheet Retreat Since the Little Ice Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beitch, Marci Jillian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and I. Willis (2012), Greenland's shrinking ice cover: "fastfluctuations in southeast Greenland, Nat. Geosci. , 5(6),T. Decker (2011), Analysis of Greenland marine- terminating

  2. Integrated Ice Storage/Sprinkler HVAC System Sharply Cuts Energy Costs and Air-Distribution First Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated ice thermal storage/sprinkler HVAC systems developed and applied by the author in several commercial applications shift a major portion of electric utility demand to cheaper off-peak hours, while also reducing significantly the first cost...

  3. Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Cathleen

    Ice Mass Balance Buoy: An Instrument to Measure and Attribute Changes in Ice Thickness Jacqueline A the Ice Mass Balance buoy (IMB) in response to the need for monitoring changes in the thickness of the Arctic sea ice cover. The IMB is an autonomous, ice-based system. IMB buoys provide a time series of ice

  4. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by anthropogenic emissions of carbon

  5. ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huth, Michael

    ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements 6 March 2012 Revision 0 for an Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) pulse oximetry monitoring app that provides.2 References [Purpose: List all ICE standards, and other standards and references

  6. ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reas, Elizabeth I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is just a cheap way of boosting ICE ‘criminal alien’ arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

  7. The ice sheet model The polythermal ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calov, Reinhard

    with a temperature at the pressure melting point, the latter being considered as a bi- nary mixture of ice and small a year. Sediment Sliding The sliding velocity over sediment reads which applies if the basal ice Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait has become temperate (see Figure 4d,e), fast basal sliding appears leading

  8. pMSSM Dark Matter Searches on Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotta, R.C.; /SLAC; Howe, K.T.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the capability of the IceCube/Deepcore array to discover signal neutrinos resulting from the annihilations of Supersymmetric WIMPS that may be captured in the solar core. In this analysis, we use a previously generated set of {approx} 70k model points in the 19-dimensional parameter space of the pMSSM which satisfy existing experimental and theoretical constraints. Our calculations employ a realistic estimate of the IceCube/DeepCore effective area that has been modeled by the IceCube collaboration. We find that a large fraction of the pMSSM models are shown to have significant signal rates in the anticipated IceCube/DeepCore 1825 day dataset, including some prospects for an early discovery. Many models where the LSP only constitutes a small fraction of the total dark matter relic density are found to have observable rates. We investigate in detail the dependence of the signal neutrino fluxes on the LSP mass, weak eigenstate composition, annihilation products and thermal relic density, as well as on the spin-independent and spin-dependent scattering cross sections. Lastly, We compare the model coverage of IceCube/DeepCore to that obtainable in near-future direct detection experiments and to pMSSM searches at the 7 TeV LHC.

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: critical marginal ice zone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marginal ice zone NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) On February 24, 2015, in Analysis, Climate, Modeling & Analysis, Monitoring, News,...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment mission Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers &...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Arctic sea ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arctic sea ice Sierra Unmanned Aerial Vehicle to Begin Flights Over Arctic Sea Ice On July 25, 2013, in Climate, Customers & Partners, Global, Monitoring, News, News & Events,...

  13. Termination unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  14. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneralPastIce Cores Outreach Home Room

  15. ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distributiontypes ARMnuclei

  16. A meteorological experiment in the melting zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oerlemans, J. (Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)); Vugts, H.F. (Free Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results are described from a glaciometeorological experiment carried out in the margin (melting zone) of the Greenland ice sheet in the summers of 1990 and 1991. This work was initiated within the framework of a Dutch research program on land ice and sea level change. Seven meteostations were operated along a transect running from the tundra well onto the ice sheet. At the ice edge, humidity, temperature, and wind profiles were obtained with a tethered balloon. On the ice sheet, 90 km from the edge, a boundary-layer research unit, including a sound detecting and ranging system (SODAR) and a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), was established. Although focusing on the relation between surface energy balance, glacier mass balance, and ice flow, the experiment has also delivered a unique dataset on the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer around the warm tundra-cold ice sheet transition. Unexpected behavior was found for the surface albedo during the melt season. Lowest values are not found close to the ice edge, which is usual for glaciers, but higher on the ice sheet. Meltwater accumulation due to inefficient surface drainage was found to be the cause for this. The wind regime is dominated by katabatic flow from the ice sheet. The katabatic layer is typically 100-200 m thick. Close to the ice edge, the flow exhibits a very regular daily rhythm, with maximum wind speed in the afternoon. Farther on the ice sheet, the regime changes, and wind speed reaches maximum values in late night/early morning.

  17. Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassis, Jeremy N.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

  18. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  19. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, and ground meats Refreeze Discard Poultry and ground poultry Refreeze Discard Variety meats may safely re-freeze foods that s:ll contain ice crystals or that have been

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the single new solar thermal electric plant, 5 none of theequipment) Solar Thermal Electric (new plant) Wind (Small)operating solar thermal power tower plant in the United

  1. ICE CHEMISTRY IN EMBEDDED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Van Loon, J. Th. [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Chen, C.-H. R.; Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D.; Boyer, M. L.; Shiao, B.; Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Madden, S. [Service d'Astrophysique, Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Speck, A. K. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Marengo, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These observations were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the SAGE-Spec Legacy program. We analyze the two prominent ice bands in the IRS spectral range: the bending mode of CO{sub 2} ice at 15.2 mum and the ice band between 5 and 7 mum that includes contributions from the bending mode of water ice at 6 mum among other ice species. The 5-7 mum band is difficult to identify in our LMC sample due to the conspicuous presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission superimposed onto the ice spectra. We identify water ice in the spectra of two sources; the spectrum of one of those sources also exhibits the 6.8 mum ice feature attributed in the literature to ammonium and methanol. We model the CO{sub 2} band in detail, using the combination of laboratory ice profiles available in the literature. We find that a significant fraction (approx>50%) of CO{sub 2} ice is locked in a water-rich component, consistent with what is observed for Galactic sources. The majority of the sources in the LMC also require a pure-CO{sub 2} contribution to the ice profile, evidence of thermal processing. There is a suggestion that CO{sub 2} production might be enhanced in the LMC, but the size of the available sample precludes firmer conclusions. We place our results in the context of the star formation environment in the LMC.

  2. Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettelman, Andrew

    and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentiallyGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme

  3. Assimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    are now available to determine the ice drift velocity. In addition, the drift of the pack ice can CoAssimilation of Ice Concentration in an Ice­Ocean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG Polar Science October 2004, in final form 27 June 2005) ABSTRACT Ice concentration is a critical parameter of the polar

  4. Sea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -year pack ice, although other char- acteristics (Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson coefficientSea-ice thickness measurement based on the dispersion of ice swell David Marsana) ISTerre, CNRS propagating in the Arctic sea ice cover is exploited in order to locally measure the ice thickness

  5. Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    Impact of underwater-ice evolution on Arctic summer sea ice Dirk Notz,1,4 Miles G. McPhee,2 M. Grae the simultaneous growth and ablation of a layer of ice between an under-ice melt pond and the underlying ocean. Such ``false bottoms'' are the only significant source of ice formation in the Arctic during summer. Analytical

  6. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice-silicate cutoff. In ice-silicate mixtures, brine channels are evident above the eutectic temperature only when

  7. 2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoto, Stephen H.

    - ponents in its inaugural season. Former bench boss Dave Snyder, in whose honor the Wesleyan ice rink2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

  8. Mathematics of Sea Ice K. M. Golden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    , the sharp decline of the summer Arc- tic sea ice pack is probably the most dramatic. For example, the area and 1990's. While global climate models generally predict de- clines in the polar sea ice packs over the 21, such as the growth and decay of seasonal ice, the evolu- tion of ice pack reflectance, and biomass build

  9. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  10. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  11. Anharmonic nuclear motion and the relative stability of hexagonal and cubic ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Edgar A.; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Anharmonic nuclear motion and the relative stability of hexagonal and cubic ice Edgar A. Engel, Bartomeu Monserrat, and Richard J. Needs TCM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, United... Supplementary Information: Anharmonic nuclear motion and the relative stability of hexagonal and cubic ice Edgar A. Engel, Bartomeu Monserrat, and Richard J. Needs TCM Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thomson Avenue...

  12. Water Ice in 2060 Chiron and its Implications for Centaurs and Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. X. Luu; D. C. Jewitt; C. Trujillo

    2000-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of water ice in the Centaur 2060 Chiron, based on near-infrared spectra (1.0 - 2.5 micron) taken with the 3.8-meter United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) and the 10-meter Keck Telescope. The appearance of this ice is correlated with the recent decline in Chiron's cometary activity: the decrease in the coma cross-section allows previously hidden solid-state surface features to be seen. We predict that water ice is ubiquitous among Centaurs and Kuiper Belt objects, but its surface coverage varies from object to object, and thus determines its detectability and the occurrence of cometary activity.

  13. Neglecting ice-atmosphere interactions underestimates ice sheet melt in millennial-scale deglaciation simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, M. S.; Bush, A. B.; Marshall, S. J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laurentide and Innutian ice sheets during the Last Glacialclimate of the laurentide ice sheet at the LGM, J. Clim. ,1958), The flow law of ice: A discussion of the assumptions

  14. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mark Samuel

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

  15. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 56, No. 199, 2010 805 Enhancement factors for grounded ice and ice shelves inferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardini, Olivier

    shelves inferred from an anisotropic ice-flow model Ying MA,1 Olivier GAGLIARDINI,1 Catherine RITZ,1 on the actual state of stress and strain rate. Within an ice sheet, grounded-ice parts and ice shelves have of ice anisotropy on the flow of grounded ice and ice shelves. For this purpose, a full

  16. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 00, No. 000, 0000 1 Enhancement factors for grounded ice and ice shelves1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand, Gaël

    shelves1 inferred from an anisotropic ice flow model2 Ying MA,1 Olivier GAGLIARDINI,1 Catherine RITZ,1 of stress and strain-rate. Within an ice sheet, grounded ice parts and ice shelves have com-11 pletely of ice anisotropy on the flow of grounded ice and ice shelves. To this pur-14 pose, a full

  17. Method of forming clathrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  18. Method of forming calthrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

    1985-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  19. amorphous water ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  20. amery ice shelf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  1. amorphous ice transition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  2. antarctica larsen ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  3. alpine deep ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  4. airborne ice sounding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial and natural icing conditions MIT - DSpace Summary: Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an...

  5. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United...

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  7. Indirect ultraviolet photodesorption from CO:N2 binary ices - an efficient grain-gas process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Poderoso, Hugo A M; Michaut, Xavier; Philippe, Laurent; Jeseck, Pascal; Öberg, Karin I; Linnartz, Harold; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UV ice photodesorption is an important non-thermal desorption pathway in many interstellar environments that has been invoked to explain observations of cold molecules in disks, clouds and cloud cores. Systematic laboratory studies of the photodesorption rates, between 7 and 14 eV, from CO:N2 binary ices, have been performed at the DESIRS vacuum UV beamline of the synchrotron facility SOLEIL. The photodesorption spectral analysis demonstrates that the photodesorption process is indirect, i.e. the desorption is induced by a photon absorption in sub-surface molecular layers, while only surface molecules are actually desorbing. The photodesorption spectra of CO and N2 in binary ices therefore depend on the absorption spectra of the dominant species in the subsurface ice layer, which implies that the photodesorption efficiency and energy dependence are dramatically different for mixed and layered ices compared to pure ices. In particular, a thin (1-2 ML) N2 ice layer on top of CO will effectively quench CO photod...

  8. IceCube-Gen2: A Vision for the Future of Neutrino Astronomy in Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube-Gen2 Collaboration; :; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; G. Anton; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; S. Axani; X. Bai; I. Bartos; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; G. H. Collin; J. M. Conrad; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Dí andaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; T. Ehrhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; J. J. Evans; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; J. Haugen; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; J. Hignight; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; B. J. P. Jones; M. Jurkovic; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; T. Katori; U. F. Katz; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; C. B. Krauss; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. LoSecco; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; K. B. M. Mahn; S. Marka; Z. Marka; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. W. Moore; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. L. Pinfold; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; P. Sandstrom; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; S. Söldner-Rembold; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stöß andl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Taketa; A. Tamburro; H. K. M. Tanaka; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teš; andi?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; S. Vanheule; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; S. Wren; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; Y. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent observation by the IceCube neutrino observatory of an astrophysical flux of neutrinos represents the "first light" in the nascent field of neutrino astronomy. The observed diffuse neutrino flux seems to suggest a much larger level of hadronic activity in the non-thermal universe than previously thought and suggests a rich discovery potential for a larger neutrino observatory. This document presents a vision for an substantial expansion of the current IceCube detector, IceCube-Gen2, including the aim of instrumenting a $10\\,\\mathrm{km}^3$ volume of clear glacial ice at the South Pole to deliver substantial increases in the astrophysical neutrino sample for all flavors. A detector of this size would have a rich physics program with the goal to resolve the sources of these astrophysical neutrinos, discover GZK neutrinos, and be a leading observatory in future multi-messenger astronomy programs.

  9. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria, E-mail: Valeria.Molinero@utah.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  11. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  12. NMR relaxation in spin ice due to diffusing emergent monopoles I Christopher L. Henley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Christopher L.

    out, or the reverse, which were shown to behave as (emergent) magnetic monopole [3]. The low, spin dynamics in ideal spin ice is due mainly to dilute, thermally excited magnetic monopole exponent in that exponential and the formulas for the T1 (longitudinal) and T2 (dephasing) relaxations

  13. On the scattering-greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    On the scattering-greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds R. T. Pierrehumbert C. Erlick Department in J. Atmos. Sci. #12;Scattering Greenhouse Effect on Early Mars Page 2 Abstract We offer some remarks on the greenhouse effect due to high clouds which reflect thermal infrared radiation, but do not absorb or emit it

  14. Mathematical model for ice formation in the Arctic during Alain Pham Ngoc Dinh and Phan Thanh Nam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s in the ice and the ocean during a time dt is = -I T x F b,h0 + O T x Oc,h0 sdt, where I, O are thermal conductivities of the ice and the ocean. Finally, the law of conservation of energy, i.e. U = , leads pond and the underlying ocean, called false-bottoms. The simultaneous growth and ablation of false

  15. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  16. Quantum Ice : a quantum Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nic Shannon; Olga Sikora; Frank Pollmann; Karlo Penc; Peter Fulde

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice states, in which frustrated interactions lead to a macroscopic ground-state degeneracy, occur in water ice, in problems of frustrated charge order on the pyrochlore lattice, and in the family of rare-earth magnets collectively known as spin ice. Of particular interest at the moment are "quantum spin ice" materials, where large quantum fluctuations may permit tunnelling between a macroscopic number of different classical ground states. Here we use zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations to show how such tunnelling can lift the degeneracy of a spin or charge ice, stabilising a unique "quantum ice" ground state --- a quantum liquid with excitations described by the Maxwell action of 3+1-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. We further identify a competing ordered "squiggle" state, and show how both squiggle and quantum ice states might be distinguished in neutron scattering experiments on a spin ice material.

  17. Rubber friction on ice and snow surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skouvaklis, Gerasimos

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The friction of rubber on ice and snow surfaces is complex. Deeper scientific understanding is important for optimising performance of tyres in winter. Rubber, ice and snow systems exhibit frictional behaviour which ...

  18. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  19. Ice Stream C slowdown is not stabilizing West Antarctic Ice Sheet S Anandakrishnan RB Alleyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobel, Robert W.

    Ice Stream C slowdown is not stabilizing West Antarctic Ice Sheet S Anandakrishnan RB Alleyy RW Jacobelz H Conwayx March 24, 1999 Abstract Changes in the flow of ice stream C likely indicate a continuing part of ice stream C, West Antarctica largely stagnated over the last few centuries, while upglacier

  20. Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Quenched by ice: Transient grating measurements of vibronic dynamics in bromine-doped ice I. U April 2006; published online 25 May 2006 In both water and in ice, the absorption spectra of bromine of the trapped molecule in its electronic B 3 0u state in ice. Independent of the initial excitation energy

  1. New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of several ice shelves in Antarctica led to acceleration of the glaciers that feed into them. CombiningNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane further demonstrates how important ice shelves are to Antarctic glaciers.' Shuman is lead author

  2. 115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    115GLACIERS AND ICE CAPSCHAPTER 6B 6B Glaciers and Ice Caps Michael Zemp (lead author, Department of Sciences, China) #12;116 GLOBAL OUTLOOK FOR ICE AND SNOW Summary Glaciers and ice caps are among the most hazards. Because they are close to the melting point and react strongly to climate change, glaciers

  3. 16 Louisiana Agriculture, Summer 2005 ice production in the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the field to decompose after rice harvesting. Thus, the use of the straw fiber resources for value harvesting) was hand-harvested from an experimental rice field at the Rice Research Station at Crowley). The samples were cleaned with water at room temperature and subse- quently conditioned for two weeks

  4. Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice-sealed'' east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice bed year-round. New ice-core analysis and tempera- ture data show that beneath 19 m of ice is a water°C. The ice cover thickens at both its base and surface, sealing concentrated brine beneath. The ice

  5. Ice Cream in a Bag Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Ice Cream in a Bag Ingredients: 1 tablespoon sugar 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons soft fruit 1/2 cup skim milk For the freezer bag; not to be eaten: 1/3 cup rock salt Ice cubes Directions 1. Open a gallon size plastic bag. Add rock salt and fill half way up with ice. Shake to mix the salt

  6. 3, 9991020, 2007 Summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page Abstract on the early Holocene climate constrains the summer sea ice projections for the 21st century H. Goosse, E #12;CPD 3, 999­1020, 2007 Summer sea ice during the early Holocene H. Goosse et al. Title Page

  7. 2, 879921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 2, 879­921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution during the last climatic cycle S. Charbit et al. Title reconstructions of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets through the last glacial-interglacial cycle S. Charbit1 , C­921, 2006 Ice-sheet evolution during the last climatic cycle S. Charbit et al. Title Page Abstract

  8. Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Surface Impedance Tomography for Antarctic Sea Ice C. Sampsona , K. M. Goldena , A. Gullya , A. P, Australia Abstract During the 2007 SIPEX expedition in pack ice off the coast of East Antarctica, we measured the electrical conductivity of sea ice via surface impedance tomography. Resistance data from

  9. 8, 87438771, 2008 Inhibition of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 8743­8771, 2008 Inhibition of ice crystallisation B. J. Murray Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions Inhibition of ice crystallisation in highly viscous aqueous organic acid­8771, 2008 Inhibition of ice crystallisation B. J. Murray Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  10. 5, 37233745, 2005 characteristics of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 5, 3723­3745, 2005 Chemical characteristics of ice nuclei in anvil cirrus clouds C. H. Twohy and Physics Discussions Chemical characteristics of ice residual nuclei in anvil cirrus clouds: evidence for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation C. H. Twohy 1 and M. R. Poellot 2 1 College of Oceanic

  11. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. · Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice activities that is coordinated with the Raytheon on-ice schedules. Construction Cost accurate application of escalation rates and revisions to actual cost data. Raytheon earned value data

  12. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Ordered Molecular Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W Evans; J Fish; P Keblinski

    2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We use molecular dynamics simulation to investigate thermal transport characteristics of water with various degree of orientational and translational order induced by the application of an electric field. We observe that orientational ordering of the water dipole moments has a minor effect on the thermal conductivity. However, electric-field induced crystallization and associated translational order results in approximately a 3-fold increase of thermal conductivity with respect to the base water, i.e., to values comparable with those characterizing ice crystal structures.

  14. Name of Lecture Intensive Thermal Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name of Lecture Intensive Thermal Engineering Term 2nd semester (October) Units 2-0-0 Lecturers' understanding of the essential part of thermal engineering, comprehensively. The classes are given by three in Thermal Engineering field require the students to have fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and heat

  15. Microwave emissivity of fresh water ice--Lake ice and Antarctic ice pack--Radiative transfer simulations versus satellite radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave emissivity models of sea ice are poorly validated empirically. Typical validation studies involve using averaged or stereotyped profiles of ice parameters against averaged radiance measurements. Measurement sites are rarely matched and even less often point-by-point. Because of saline content, complex permittivity of sea ice is highly variable and difficult to predict. Therefore, to check the validity of a typical, plane-parallel, radiative-transfer-based ice emissivity model, we apply it to fresh water ice instead of salt-water ice. Radiance simulations for lake ice are compared with measurements over Lake Superior from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on EOS (AMSR-E). AMSR-E measurements are also collected over Antarctic icepack. For each pixel, a thermodynamic model is driven by four years of European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis data and the resulting temperature profiles used to drive the emissivity model. The results suggest that the relatively simple ...

  16. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  17. Laboratory H2O:CO2 ice desorption data: entrapment dependencies and its parameterization with an extended three-phase model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayolle, Edith C; Cuppen, Herma M; Visser, Ruud; Linnartz, Harold; 10.1051/0004-6361/201016121

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice desorption affects the evolution of the gas-phase chemistry during the protostellar stage, and also determines the chemical composition of comets forming in circumstellar disks. From observations, most volatile species are found in H2O-dominated ices. The aim of this study is first to experimentally determine how entrapment of volatiles in H2O ice depends on ice thickness, mixture ratio and heating rate, and second, to introduce an extended three-phase model (gas, ice surface and ice mantle) to describe ice mixture desorption with a minimum number of free parameters. Thermal H2O:CO2 ice desorption is investigated in temperature programmed desorption experiments of thin (10 - 40 ML) ice mixtures under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Desorption is simultaneously monitored by mass spectrometry and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The H2O:CO2 experiments are complemented with selected H2O:CO, and H2O:CO2:CO experiments. The results are modeled with rate equations that connect the gas, ice surface an...

  18. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  19. Lattice-structures and constructs with designed thermal expansion coefficients

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spadaccini, Christopher; Hopkins, Jonathan

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal expansion-managed lattice structure having a plurality of unit cells each having flexure bearing-mounted tabs supported on a base and actuated by thermal expansion of an actuator having a thermal expansion coefficient greater than the base and arranged so that the tab is inwardly displaced into a base cavity. The flexure bearing-mounted tabs are connected to other flexure-bearing-mounted tabs of adjacent unit cells so that the adjacent unit cells are spaced from each other to accommodate thermal expansion of individual unit cells while maintaining a desired bulk thermal expansion coefficient of the lattice structure as a whole.

  20. Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    Continuous Flow Analysis of Total Organic Carbon in Polar Ice Cores U R S F E D E R E R , * , , P, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland, and British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, United Kingdom Received May 6, 2008. Revised manuscript

  1. Modeling Interfacial Liquid Layers in Environmental Ices SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Symbol Quantity ice wf Fugacity of pure ice brine wf^ Fugacity of water in brine layer vap wf Fugacity of water in vapor space above ice wf Fugacity of pure liquid water wx Mole fraction of water in brine layer ice wH Enthalpy of ice at T, P 0,ice wH Enthalpy of ice at reference state brine wH Partial molar

  2. A common supersolid low-density skin sliperizing ice and toughening water surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Weitao Zheng; Ji Zhou; Chang Q. Sun

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Skins of water and ice share the same attribute of supersolidity characterized by the identical H-O vibration frequency of 3450 cm-1. Molecular undercoordination and inter-electron-pair repulsion shortens the H-O bond and lengthen the O:H nonbond, leading to a dual process of nonbonding electron polarization. This relaxation-polarization process enhances the dipole moment, elasticity,viscosity, thermal stability of these skins with 25% density loss, which is responsible for the hydrophobicity and toughness of water skin and for the slippery of ice.

  3. Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

  4. New ice rules for nanoconfined monolayer ice from first principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsetti, Fabiano; Artacho, Emilio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structural tendencies of nanoconfined water is of great interest for nanoscience and biology, where nano/micro-sized objects may be separated by very few layers of water. Here we investigate the properties of ice confined to a quasi-2D monolayer by a featureless, chemically neutral potential, using density-functional theory simulations with a non-local van der Waals density functional. An ab initio random structure search reveals all the energetically competitive monolayer configurations to belong to only two of the previously-identified families, characterized by a square or honeycomb hydrogen-bonding network, respectively. From an in-depth analysis we show that the well-known ice rules for bulk ice need to be revised for the monolayer, with distinct new rules appearing for the two networks. All identified stable phases for both are found to be non-polar (but with a topologically non-trivial texture for the square) and, hence, non-ferroelectric, in contrast to the predictions of empirical f...

  5. STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE AIP IEEE CDR APS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    .wt. ­ at.wt. bar bar bar bar bar British Thermal Unit Btu Btu Btu calorie (cgs) cal cal cal centimeter cm

  6. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  7. UNIT NUMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 UNIT NAME C-611 Underaround Diesel Tank REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Immediately southeast of C-611 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 1000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL...

  8. Sea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of Arctic multi-year ice is30 decreasing with more of the ice pack represented by seasonal sea iceSea Ice Enhancements to Polar WRF* Keith M. Hines1** , David H. Bromwich,1,2 , Lesheng Bai1 to6 WRF Version 3.4 include modified Noah land surface model sea ice treatment, allowing7 specified

  9. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice Lake (Section 6.2) incillding ice thickness, the different types of iceformed, and ice classification

  10. An Ice Lithography Instrument Anpan Han 1, John Chervinsky2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 An Ice Lithography Instrument Anpan Han 1, John Chervinsky2 , Daniel Branton3 , and J. A a new nano-patterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice

  11. Investigations in cool thermal storage: storage process optimization and glycol sensible storage enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Michaela Marie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process. This method minimizes the amount of required compressor work, per unit mass of ice produced, by adjusting evaporating temperatures and/or heat exchanger size. The heat transfer irreversibility is also used to exemplify the usefulness...

  12. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  13. Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; A. Groß; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Leute; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Rädel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; L. Schönherr; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km^3 in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in-situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown.

  14. Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    the thinning of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and the collapse of parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf temperature variation is called the ``ice pump'' [Lewis and Perkin, 1983; Jenkins and Bombosch, 1995]. [5

  15. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. Cox; Shawn M. Kathmann; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides

    2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on Earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physiochemical properties of a material's surface affects its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at an hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation. We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability.

  16. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    102 INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Background Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred between the lake and the atmosphere. During winter, ice and snow can decrease the amount of light available below the ice surface for photosynthesis. In the absence of an ice

  17. 4, 107128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel et al. Title Page Abstract aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture A. Chmel 1 , V. N. Smirnov 2 , and L. V. Panov 2 1 to: A. Chmel (chmel@mail.ioffe.ru) 107 #12;OSD 4, 107­128, 2007 Sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack

  18. Summer ICE@Tech Computing Camps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzdial, Mark

    Summer ICE@Tech Computing Camps Session I: June 5th - June 9th Session II: July 10th ­ July 14th (404) 385-2273 Fax (404) 385-0965 http://www.cc.gatech.edu/campice 1 #12;2 Summer ICE@Tech Program Handbook #12;3 Summer ICE@Tech is a computing and technology program for students entering 10th , 11th

  19. H2 ICE Combustion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H2 ICE Combustion Share Description Hydrogen combustion inside a direct injection H2 engine Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Credit S. Ciatti This...

  20. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun, E-mail: wangj220@iccas.ac.cn; Song, Yanlin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  1. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melissa Spannuth; S. G. J. Mochrie; S. S. L. Peppin; J. S. Wettlaufer

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We use X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high-particle-density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. We find that the particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function, and that the particles' characteristic velocity increased with temperature. We explain this behavior in terms of ice grain boundary migration.

  2. BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Retreating Antarctic Ice March 30, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper, Math & Computer Science Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Berkeley Lab Contributes...

  3. Past Accumulation Rates of the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet Near an Ice Divide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Child, Sarah

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of accumulation rates of ice is a direct link to the evolution of ice sheet. It is believed by scientists that ice sheet evolution will aid in the mystery of climate change and may lead to predictions about climates in the future...

  4. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping° to 60° for all polarizations, was processed to radar cross-section to establish a library of signatures (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion

  5. white paper, 9 March 2009 An ice core to reconstruct Greenland ice sheet mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    white paper, 9 March 2009 1 An ice core to reconstruct Greenland a handful of years suggest a profound Greenland ice sheet mass balance sensitivity (2000) found that the Greenland ice sheet lost as much as 2/3 its current

  6. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  7. Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Jacqueline Linh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–21. Ice Drop.How to make clear ice. 28 February 2011. Victoria, BC,2011/02/how-to- make-clear-ice-that-actually-works/ Graham,

  8. Dust takes detour on ice-cloud journey | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dust takes detour on ice-cloud journey Dust takes detour on ice-cloud journey Pollution-coated particles bypass ice formation, but influence clouds Cirrus clouds are composed of...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Ice-Sheet Simulation Code Matures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research & Capabilities Ice-flow velocity magnitude myr on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as computed by the AlbanyFELIX finite element code. Ice-flow velocity...

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  11. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storge

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Simulation of Heat Pipe-Assisted Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Unit for Dish-Stirling Systems" to ASME 2013 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition. *...

  12. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  13. Thermal cycler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Andreski, John T.; Dzenitis, John M.; Makarewicz, Anthony J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermalcycler includes a first thermalcycler body section having a first face and a second thermalcycler body section having a second face. A cavity is formed by the first face and the second face. A thermalcycling unit is positioned in the cavity. A heater trace unit is connected to a support section, to the first thermalcycler body section, to the second thermalcycler body section, and to the thermalcycling unit. The first thermalcycler body section and the second thermalcycler body section are positioned together against the support section to enclose the thermalcycling unit and the heater trace unit.

  14. The Patty Ice Arena User Responsibilities and Conduct is designed to create better communication between the patrons of the Patty Ice Arena and the Facilities Services' Patty Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    PURPOSE: The Patty Ice Arena User Responsibilities and Conduct is designed to create better communication between the patrons of the Patty Ice Arena and the Facilities Services' Patty Ice Arena management or other misuse of any part of the Patty Ice Arena may result in an individual, team, or organization being

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City. Heterogeneous Nucleation of Ice on Anthropogenic Organic Particles Collected in Mexico City....

  16. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below...

  17. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

  18. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

  19. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  20. UNIT NUMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 C-750B Diesel UST UNIT NAME REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southeast corner of C-750 APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 10,000 gallon FUNCTION: Diesel storage OPERATIONAL STATUS: Removed...

  1. Unlocking a Sea Ice Secret

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Rachel Obbard

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Rachel Obbard and her research group from Dartmouth College traveled to the Antarctic to collect samples of sea ice. Next stop: the GeoSoilEnviroCARS x-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. This U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science synchrotron x-ray research facility gave the Obbard team the frontier scientific tools they needed to study the path bromide takes as it travels from the ocean to the atmosphere.

  2. ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data

  3. ARM - Measurement - Ice water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distributiontypes

  4. ARM - Measurement - Ice water path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,ice particleSize Distributiontypespath ARM

  5. ARM - TWP-ICE Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisalaAlaskaInstruments NSASteeringContactsTWP-ICE Maps

  6. Ice Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITC Transmission Jump to: navigation,IbervilleIce

  7. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  8. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    ;3 The latest revised estimates were modified to reflect the anticipated changes resulting from the Raytheon in Raytheon Polar Services completing the IceCube Laboratory. $1 million is from the lagging receipts. The on-ice Integrated Master Schedule is underway and being worked on this week with Raytheon Polar

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  10. Automated rapid thermal imaging systems technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phan, Long N., 1976-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major source of energy savings occurs on the thermal envelop of buildings, which amounts to approximately 10% of annual energy usage in the United States. To pursue these savings, energy auditors use closed loop energy ...

  11. Theory of ice-skating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berre, Martine Le

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost frictionless skating on ice relies on a thin layer of melted water insulating mechanically the blade of the skate from ice. Using the basic equations of fluid mechanics and Stefan law, we derive a set of two coupled equations for the thickness of the film and the length of contact, a length scale which cannot be taken as its value at rest. The analytical study of these equations allows to define a small a-dimensional parameter depending on the longitudinal coordinate which can be neglected everywhere except close to the contact points at the front and the end of the blade, where a boundary layer solution is given. This solution provides without any calculation the order of magnitude of the film thickness, and its dependence with respect to external parameters like the velocity and mass of the skater and the radius of profile and bite angle of the blade, in good agreement with the numerical study. Moreover this solution also shows that a lubricating water layer of macroscopic thickness always exists for...

  12. Magnetic Monopoles in Spin Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Castelnovo; Roderich Moessner; Shivaji L. Sondhi

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically charged particles, such as the electron, are ubiquitous. By contrast, no elementary particles with a net magnetic charge have ever been observed, despite intensive and prolonged searches. We pursue an alternative strategy, namely that of realising them not as elementary but rather as emergent particles, i.e., as manifestations of the correlations present in a strongly interacting many-body system. The most prominent examples of emergent quasiparticles are the ones with fractional electric charge e/3 in quantum Hall physics. Here we show that magnetic monopoles do emerge in a class of exotic magnets known collectively as spin ice: the dipole moment of the underlying electronic degrees of freedom fractionalises into monopoles. This enables us to account for a mysterious phase transition observed experimentally in spin ice in a magnetic field, which is a liquid-gas transition of the magnetic monopoles. These monopoles can also be detected by other means, e.g., in an experiment modelled after the celebrated Stanford magnetic monopole search.

  13. Thermal Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

  14. First data from DM-Ice17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DM-Ice Collaboration; :; J. Cherwinka; D. Grant; F. Halzen; K. M. Heeger; L. Hsu; A. J. F. Hubbard; A. Karle; M. Kauer; V. A. Kudryavtsev; C. Macdonald; R. H. Maruyama; S. Paling; W. Pettus; Z. P. Pierpoint; B. N. Reilly; M. Robinson; P. Sandstrom; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; L. Yang

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first analysis of background data from DM-Ice17, a direct-detection dark matter experiment consisting of 17 kg of NaI(Tl) target material. It was codeployed with IceCube 2457 m deep in the South Pole glacial ice in December 2010 and is the first such detector operating in the Southern Hemisphere. The background rate in the 6.5 - 8.0 keVee region is measured to be 7.9 +/- 0.4 counts/day/keV/kg. This is consistent with the expected background from the detector assemblies with negligible contributions from the surrounding ice. The successful deployment and operation of DM-Ice17 establishes the South Pole ice as a viable location for future underground, low-background experiments in the Southern Hemisphere. The detector assembly and deployment are described here, as well as the analysis of the DM-Ice17 backgrounds based on data from the first two years of operation after commissioning, July 2011 - June 2013.

  15. First Data from DM-Ice17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Grant, D; Halzen, F; Heeger, K M; Hsu, L; Hubbard, A J F; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kudryavtsev, V A; Maruyama, R H; MacDonald, C; Paling, S; Pettus, W C; Pierpoint, Z P; Reilly, B N; Robinson, M; Sandstrom, P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Yang, L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first analysis of background data from DM-Ice17 a direct-detection dark matter experiment consisting of 17 kg of NaI(Tl) target material. It was successfully deployed 2457 m deep in South Pole glacial ice at the bottom of two IceCube strings in December 2010 and is the first such detector to be operating in the Southern Hemisphere. Data from the first two years of operation after commissioning, July 2011 - June 2013, are presented here. The background rate in the 6.5 - 8.0 kevee region is measured to be 7.9 +/- 0.4 counts/day/keV/kg. This is in agreement with the expected background from the crystal assemblies and is consistent with simulation. Background contributions from the surrounding ice were demonstrated to be negligible. The successful deployment and operation of DM-Ice17 establishes the South Pole ice as a location for future underground, low-background experiments in the Southern Hemisphere. The detector assembly, deployment, and analysis of the DM-Ice17 backgrounds are described.

  16. Modelling Sea Ice Growth Mark J. McGuinness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    salinity. The saltier the brine, the lower the freezing point. When salinity is above the critical value is rejected by growing ice as a dense brine, but the brine cannot escape as rapidly as heat at the ice, trapping brine in the ice-brine mixture. This constitutional supercooling causes the ice-ocean interface

  17. Introduction Microorganisms in sea ice function ecologically in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    of the pack via brine drainage, ice melting, or ice break-up (Garrison & Buck 1989 and references thereinIntroduction Microorganisms in sea ice function ecologically in the Antarctic marine ecosystem where pelagic and sea ice habitats are intrinsically coupled (Laws 1985, Garrison 1991, Eicken 1992

  18. FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    FIRST PRINCIPLES MODELING FOR LIDAR SENSING OF COMPLEX ICE SURFACES J. Kerekes, A. Goodenough, S of monitoring the dynamics and mass balance of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. However, it is also known that ice surfaces can have complex 3-dimensional structure, which can challenge their accurate retrieval

  19. Microstructure through an ice sheet Tobias Binder1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    Microstructure through an ice sheet Tobias Binder1, a , Ilka Weikusat2, b , Johannes Freitag2, c.Garbe@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de, e Dietmar.Wagenbach@iup.uni-heidelberg.de, f Sepp.Kipfstuhl@awi.de Keywords: Ice, microstructure characterization, grain boundary curvature, image processing Abstract. Ice cores through an ice sheet can

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Diatom assemblages promote ice formation in large lakes NA D'souza1,3 , Y evidence for the directed formation of ice by planktonic communities dominated by filamentous diatoms sampled from the ice-covered Laurentian Great Lakes. We hypothesize that ice formation promotes attachment

  1. Age characteristics in a multidecadal Arctic sea ice simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bitz, Cecllia M [UNIV. OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from adding a tracer for age of sea ice to a sophisticated sea ice model that is widely used for climate studies are presented. The consistent simulation of ice age, dynamics, and thermodynamics in the model shows explicitly that the loss of Arctic perennial ice has accelerated in the past three decades, as has been seen in satellite-derived observations. Our model shows that the September ice age average across the Northern Hemisphere varies from about 5 to 8 years, and the ice is much younger (about 2--3 years) in late winter because of the expansion of first-year ice. We find seasonal ice on average comprises about 5% of the total ice area in September, but as much as 1.34 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} survives in some years. Our simulated ice age in the late 1980s and early 1990s declined markedly in agreement with other studies. After this period of decline, the ice age began to recover, but in the final years of the simulation very little young ice remains after the melt season, a strong indication that the age of the pack will again decline in the future as older ice classes fail to be replenished. The Arctic ice pack has fluctuated between older and younger ice types over the past 30 years, while ice area, thickness, and volume all declined over the same period, with an apparent acceleration in the last decade.

  2. Dynamics of Ice Nucleation on Water Repellent Surfaces Azar Alizadeh,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    for nonicing applications. 1. INTRODUCTION Ice accretion on surfaces of aircraft, wind turbine blades, oil

  3. Study on Performance Verification and Evaluation of District Heating and Cooling System Using Thermal Energy of River Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi,N.; Niwa, H.; Kawano,M.; Koike,K.; Koga,O.; Ichitani, K.; Mishima,N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    source and cooling water overall (in comparison with normal system 15% of energy saving) -Adopt large-scale ice heat storage system and realize equalization of electricity load -Adopt turbo chiller and heat recovery facilities as high efficiency heat... screw heat pump - 838MJ/? 1 IHP/Water source screw heat pump (Ice storage and heat recovery) Cool water? 3,080MJ/h Ice Storage? 1,936MJ/h Cool water heat recovery? 3,606MJ/h Ice storage heat recovery? 2,448MJ/h 8Unit ?16? TR1 Water cooling turbo...

  4. Self-excited oscillations in sea ice and evaluation of the ice forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, V.N. [Arctic and Antarctic Research Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The processes of the dynamical interactions of the ice are described. Special attention is given to the self-excited oscillating processes when the ice goes through periodical deformations similar to these which appear in the structures in the sea ice. The range of the self-excited oscillations periods is from 0.1 s to 20 s. The jump-like processes transform themselves into the quasi-harmonical ones up to sound frequency range. For comparison purposes the spectra of the frictional self-excited oscillations in the glaciers are presented. An iceberg interacting with the drifting ice also forms self-excited oscillating system with period of up to 10 s. An example of numerical evaluation of the forces of interaction between a drifting ice island and the sea ice is given.

  5. RGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements and in a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of the Arctic geophysical environment. The deformation rate of pack ice, determined from the spatial gradientsRGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements The deformation of sea ice is an important element of the Arctic climate system because of its influence

  6. Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I h D. Quigley, D. Alf, and B. Slater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I h D. Quigley, D. Alfè, and B. Slater (2014) Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and Ih D. Quigley,1,a) D. Alfè,2 and B. Slater3

  7. ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flint-Garcia, Sherry

    ice-surface lowering or some regional climate change induced by ice-surface lowering. If attributed solely to a change in ice-surface elevation, the 3° to 4°C warming at Siple Dome (16) would indicate 500 to 650 m of ice-surface lowering, assuming a free atmospheric lapse rate of 6°C per 1000 m

  8. Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    in this region (Stammerjohn et al., 2003; Stammerjohn and Smith, 1996). Changes in mesoscale ice dynamics

  9. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  10. The Phases of Water Ice in the Solar Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesla, Fred J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics, and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  11. Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the evaporative cooler would often be more than 6.5'F lower than that of a conventional evaporative cooling system due to thermal conduction between water and entering air. - Figure 1 Pad type evaporative cooler. DIRECT EVAPORATIVE COOLER... There are several types of direct evaporative cooler configurations available. Two popular system types are pad type unit and rotary type unit. A number of window mounted units are pad type evaporative coolers (Figure 1). In a pad type cooler, water...

  12. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, P.W.

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  13. Neutrino Oscillation Measurements with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carsten Rott; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results for a neutrino oscillation analysis in progress on data collected with the IceCube 22-string detector during 2007 and 2008. The goal of this analysis is to measure muon neutrino disappearance as a function of energy for a constant baseline length of the diameter of the Earth by studying vertically up-going muon neutrinos. At this baseline disappearance effects are expected to become sizable at neutrino energies below 100 GeV. This energy range has not been previously explored with IceCube, however due to IceCube's vertical geometry there is some sensitivity for this specific class of events. Based on preliminary selection criteria, we show that IceCube has the potential to detect these events and we estimate the sensitivity to determining oscillation parameters.

  14. Scattering Properties of Oriented Hexagonal Ice Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Feng

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To interpret the data from spaceborn lidar measurements, one must have a basic understanding of the backscattering of oriented ice particles. The conventional raytracing method is not applicable to the scattering of light by oriented particles...

  15. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANITA collaboration; P. W. Gorham; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; S. Matsuno; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; J. Nam; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  16. Observations of the Askaryan Effect in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barwick, S W; Besson, D Z; Binns, W R; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; Dowkontt, P F; Duvernois, M A; Field, R C; Goldstein, D; Goodhue, A; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Hoover, S; Israel, M H; Kowalski, J; Learned, J G; Liewer, K M; Link, J T; Lusczek, E; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B; Miki, C; Miocinovic, P; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Ng, J; Nichol, R; Palladino, K J; Reil, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Rosen, M; Saltzberg, D; Secke, D; Varner, G S; Walz, D; Wu, F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first observations of the Askaryan effect in ice: coherent impulsive radio Cherenkov radiation from the charge asymmetry in an electromagnetic (EM) shower. Such radiation has been observed in silica sand and rock salt, but this is the first direct observation from an EM shower in ice. These measurements are important since the majority of experiments to date that rely on the effect for ultra-high energy neutrino detection are being performed using ice as the target medium. As part of the complete validation process for the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment, we performed an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in June 2006 using a 7.5 metric ton ice target, yielding results fully consistent with theoretical expectations.

  17. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

  18. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subglacial topography inferred from ice surface ter- rainSubglacial topography inferred from ice surface ter- rainsurface eleva- tion, ice thickness and subglacial topography

  19. Spread of ice mass loss into northwest Greenland observed by GRACE and GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Wahr, John; Bevis, Michael; Velicogna, Isabella; Kendrick, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oscillations and seasonal ice mass fluctuations, Eos Trans.2007), Rapid changes in ice discharge from Greenland outletW. et al. (2004), Greenland Ice Sheet: Increased coastal

  20. Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

  1. Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chang Q

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

  2. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  3. Liquid photovoltaic/thermal collectors for residential applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrie, S. D.; Raghuraman, P.; Cox, C. H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A second-generation, liquid photovoltaic/thermal collector has been designed and is currently under fabrication. Results of computer simulations indicate that the collector unit, which incorporates novel cell and framing concepts, yields significnatly improved performance results over earlier units tested. Predicted performance values of 55% thermal efficiency and 11% electrical efficiency make the performance and this collector competitive with its single-function solar thermal and photovoltaic counterparts.

  4. First Results from IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    IceCube is a 1 km$^3$ neutrino observatory being built to study neutrino production in active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants, and a host of other astrophysical sources. High-energy neutrinos may signal the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. IceCube will also study many particle-physics topics: searches for WIMP annihilation in the Earth or the Sun, and for signatures of supersymmetry in neutrino interactions, studies of neutrino properties, including searches for extra dimensions, and searches for exotica such as magnetic monopoles or Q-balls. IceCube will also study the cosmic-ray composition. In January, 2005, 60 digital optical modules (DOMs) were deployed in the South Polar ice at depths ranging from 1450 to 2450 meters, and 8 ice-tanks, each containing 2 DOMs were deployed as part of a surface air-shower array. All 76 DOMs are collecting high-quality data. After discussing the IceCube physics program and hardware, I will present some initial results with the first DOMs.

  5. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  6. Thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koros, William John; Kratochvil, Adam Michal

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The various embodiments of the present disclosure relate generally to thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions and methods of making thermally crosslinked polymeric compositions. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a composition comprising: a first polymer comprising a first repeat unit, the first repeat unit comprising a carboxyl group, wherein the first polymer crosslinks to a second polymer formed from a second repeat unit, and wherein the first polymer crosslinks to the second polymer without formation of an ester group.

  7. Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Thermal emission microscopy measures the spa-tial distribution of temperature in a sample. Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    per unit area emitted by an object is proportional to its absolute temperature to the fourth powerThermal emission microscopy measures the spa- tial distribution of temperature in a sample. Thermal- cause the optical power emitted by the sample is a function of its local temperature. The optical power

  9. Quantification of summertime water ice deposition on the Martian north polar ice cap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for two Martian years, to monitor the complete summer cycle of albedo and water ice grain size in order to place quantitative limits of the amount of water ice deposited in late summer. We establish here for the first time the complete spring to summer cycle of water ice grain sizes on the north polar cap. The apparent grain sizes grow until Ls=132, when they appear to shrink again, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. Under the assumption that the shrinking of grain sizes is due to the deposition of find grained ice, we quantify the amount of water ice deposited per Martian boreal summer, and estimate the amount of water ice that must be transported equatorward. Interestingly, we find that the relative amount of water ice deposited in the north cap during boreal summer (0.7-7 microns) is roughly equivalent to the average amount of water ice depos...

  10. Home Atmosphere Sea Ice Ocean Land Greenland Biology Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box, Jason E.

    , thinning and breakup of Jakobshavn Glacier's (SW Greenland) floating ice tongue and acceleration-to-year variability in GrIS mass turnover, e.g. sudden glacier accelerations (Rignot and Kanagartnam 2006). Since or 2005. Physical response mechanisms, such as hydraulic acceleration of the ice sheet from continued

  11. Ice nucleation and overseeding of ice in volcanic clouds A. J. Durant,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, William I.

    that such ``overseeded'' volcanic clouds will exhibit enhanced ice crystal concentrations and smaller average ice crystal nucleation in volcanic plumes and clouds affects dynamics [Glaze et al., 1997; Herzog et al., 1998; Mastin- porting water to the stratosphere [Glaze et al., 1997] and these fluxes depend in part on the microphysics

  12. ICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    derived from the diversity of disciplines that contribute to design, including engineering, economics with the usual engineering requirements. This article describes the basic ideas in constructing the designICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD

  13. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Klaus Viljanen

    2015-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  14. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  15. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger (NSIDC) [NSIDC

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  16. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  17. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  18. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  19. Thermoacoustic refrigerators and engines comprising cascading stirling thermodynamic units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhaus, Scott; Swift, Greg

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a thermoacoustic assembly and method for improved efficiency. The assembly has a first stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator and at least one additional heat exchanger. The first stage Stirling thermal unit is serially coupled to a first end of a quarter wavelength long coupling tube. A second stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator, and at least one additional heat exchanger, is serially coupled to a second end of the quarter wavelength long coupling tube.

  20. THERMAL HYDRAULICS KEYWORDS: thermal hydraulics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    -fluid modeling of nuclear reactor systems. Thermal-hydraulic analysis codes such as RELAP5-3D ~Ref. 1! and FLICA regions of the system. In fact, the CFD code FLUENT has previously been coupled to RELAP5-3D ~Refs. 3

  1. WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H < 3 (and a limited number to H = 4.5) have surface coverings of water ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

  2. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has · STOP (Structural, Thermal, and Optical Performance) analyses of optical systems Thermal engineers lead evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

  3. 43rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 10-13 Jan 2005, Reno, Nevada Improved De-icing of an Inclined Windshield Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    transfer coefficient, W/m2 K k Thermal conductivity, W/m-K Nu Nusselt number P Static pressure, Pa SL-icing of an Inclined Windshield Surface Haribalan Kumar* and Subrata Roy Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory. Nomenclature Cp Specific heat at constant pressure, kJ/kg-K E Specific enthalpy, kJ/kg H Convection heat

  4. Equations of state of ice VI and ice VII at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezacier, Lucile; Hanfland, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38000 Grenoble (France); Journaux, Baptiste; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Cardon, Hervé; Daniel, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, UMR 5276 CNRS, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 rue Raphael Dubois, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure H{sub 2}O polymorphs among which ice VI and ice VII are abundant in the interiors of large icy satellites and exo-planets. Knowledge of the elastic properties of these pure H{sub 2}O ices at high-temperature and high-pressure is thus crucial to decipher the internal structure of icy bodies. In this study we assess for the first time the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) relations of both polycrystalline pure ice VI and ice VII at high pressures and temperatures from 1 to 9 GPa and 300 to 450 K, respectively, by using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The PVT data are adjusted to a second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and give V{sub 0} = 14.17(2) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 14.05(23) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 14.6(14) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VI and V{sub 0} = 12.49(1) cm{sup 3}?mol{sup ?1}, K{sub 0} = 20.15(16) GPa, and ?{sub 0} = 11.6(5) × 10{sup ?5} K{sup ?1} for ice VII.

  5. Maneuverability of ships in ice: numerical simulation and comparison with field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Maneuverability of ships in ice: numerical simulation and comparison with field measurements Biao Su Department of Marine Technology, NTNU May 28, 2013 #12;Motivation Local ice load Global ice load Ship's performance · Ice-hull interaction · Local ice load · Global ice load · Ship's performance #12

  6. Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice-Ocean Model Ice modeling Lake ice cover Ice thickness Ice speed Lake surface temperature Great Lakes Lake Erie

  7. Numerical simulation of ice-induced loads on ships and comparison with field measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    Numerical simulation of ice-induced loads on ships and comparison with field measurements Biao Su Department of Marine Technology, NTNU May 28, 2013 #12;Motivation Local ice load Global ice load Ship's performance · Ice-hull interaction · Local ice load · Global ice load · Ship's performance #12;Outline

  8. Postdoctoral position Antarctic ice sheet modelling Free University of Brussels (VUB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybrechts, Philippe

    systems and ice caps, and in ice sheets in both polar regions (Greenland and Antarctica). The project as improved treatments for basal processes (basal sliding below ice sheet, basal melting below ice shelvesPostdoctoral position ­ Antarctic ice sheet modelling Free University of Brussels (VUB) The Ice

  9. Basal melt rates beneath Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beem, Lucas H.; Jezek, Ken C.; Van Der Veen, C. J.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Basal water lubricates and enables the fast flow of the West Antarctic ice streams which exist under low gravitational driving stress. Identification of sources and rates of basal meltwater production can provide insight into the dynamics of ice...

  10. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  11. arctic ocean ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 320 The Thinning of Arctic Sea Ice, 19882003: Have...

  12. Study of ice cloud properties using infrared spectral data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrett, Kevin James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research presented in this thesis involves the study of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties using both hyperspectral and narrowband infrared spectral data. First, ice cloud models are developed for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding...

  13. aircraft icing training: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  14. andrill mcmurdo ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  15. aterrizamiento del ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  16. aircraft icing hazards: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  17. aircraft icing nowcasting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  18. adsorption ice maker: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  19. ancient 19-m ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completed all Enhanced Hot Water Drill staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice...

  20. IceCube Project Monthly Report -November 2009 Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    -speaking researchers. · IceCube participated with Raytheon Polar Services Company in an extremely successful emergency principally due to lower labor and on-ice support costs for Raytheon Polar Services Corporation and the Air

  1. Cirrus cloud formation and the role of heterogeneous ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyd, Karl D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composition, size, and phase are key properties that define the ability of an aerosol particle to initiate ice in cirrus clouds. Properties of cirrus ice nuclei (IN) have not been well constrained due to a lack of systematic ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total...

  6. A Tight MIP Formulation of the Unit Commitment Problem with Start ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 8, 2014 ... bInstitute for Research in Technology (IIT) of the School of Engineering (ICAI), Universidad. Pontificia Comillas ... thermal units operation [8, 7].

  7. Learn to Skate at UAF Patty Ice Arena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    Learn to Skate at UAF Patty Ice Arena Tots(age 3-6)& Beginners/Pre-Alpha(age 6-up) 4 Sessions for non-members; $20/day Alpha-Freestyle 3:30-5:00pm One year membership to Ice Skating Institute - $15BreakSkatingCamp Skating for Hockey 3:30-5:00pm March 12-15 3:30-3:45 - O -ice:Warm up 4:00-4:45 - On Ice Skills 15 min

  8. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled ice machines.

  9. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  10. Electron decay at IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Morgan H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we apply the formalism of Accelerated Quantum Dynamics (AQD) to the radiative stopping of highly relativistic electrons in ice. We compute the lifetime of electrons to decay into muons as well as the spectrum of the emitted muons. The energy of the emitted muon depends on the deceleration of the electron and this correlation can be used to tag the event and confirm the prediction. The results predict the acceleration-induced decay of electrons at IceCube energies. This experimental setting has the potential to establish the existence of the Unruh effect as well investigate the role of high acceleration in particle physics.

  11. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  12. The effect of ice crystal surface roughness on the retrieval of ice cloud microphysical and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yu

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the surface roughness of ice crystals is not routinely accounted for in current cloud retrieval algorithms that are based on pre-computed lookup libraries. In this study, we investigate the effect of ice crystal surface roughness...

  13. Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jellinek, Mark

    ................................................ 352 4.4.4 Pack Ice Motion................................................... 355 4.5 Changes4 Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground Coordinating Lead Authors: Peter Lemke. Kaser, P. Mote, R.H. Thomas and T. Zhang, 2007: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground. In

  14. Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contemporary Lake Superior Ice Cover Climatology Raymond A. Assel NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Introduction A brief discussion of Lake Superior ice cover climatology (Phillips, 1978) was included) almost three decades ago. Much additional information (and analysis) of Great Lakes ice cover has been

  15. The Integrated Computer Engineering Design (ICED) Curriculum Augustus K. Uht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uht, Augustus K.

    The Integrated Computer Engineering Design (ICED) Curriculum Augustus K. Uht Department computer engineering curriculum, ICED, is being introduced at the University of Rhode Island. The main. This paper gives the rationale of ICED in depth, and describes the core courses, their activities and use

  16. Ice-Floe Simulation Viewer Tool Justin Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Ice-Floe Simulation Viewer Tool Justin Adams Computer Engineering Memorial University St. John's, Newfoundland dpeters@mun.ca Abstract--We are developing software to simulate the be- haviour of sea ice the ability to set up the initial conditions, run the simulation, and display the simulated ice- floe data

  17. Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Bacteria beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Brian Lanoil,1 * Mark Skidmore,1 John C. Priscu,2, particularly those that lie beneath polar ice sheets, are beginning to be recog- nized as an important part Vostok, Antarctica, no sub-ice sheet environments have been shown to support microbial ecosystems. Here

  18. Ice Simulation Using GPGPU Shadi Alawneh and Dennis Peters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Ice Simulation Using GPGPU Shadi Alawneh and Dennis Peters Electrical and Computer Engineering.alawneh, dpeters}@mun.ca Abstract-- Simulation of the behaviour of a ship operating in pack ice on several different ice fields for several iterations to compare the performance. Our results show speed up

  19. A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology R.A. ASSELL U.S. Department of Commerce tutorial was developed to provide an overview of the annual ~ r e a fLakes ice cycle. The tutorial includes an animation to aid in visualizing the normal seasonal progression and the spatial patterns of ice cover

  20. Implementing an ICE: A methodology for the design, development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deussen, Oliver

    Implementing an ICE: A methodology for the design, development and installation of Interactive for the design, development and implementation of ICEs (Interactive Collaborative Environments) in real world with the Edinburgh Napier ICE, a multi-user, multi-surface, multi-touch blended interaction digitally augmented space

  1. Modeling Lake Erie ice dynamics: Process studies , Haoguo Hu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Lake Erie ice dynamics: Process studies Jia Wang1 , Haoguo Hu2 , and Xuezhi Bai2 1 NOAA of Michigan 4840 S. State Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 Abstract. A Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM derived from meteorological measurements. After the seasonal cycles of ice concentration, thickness

  2. ICE Algorithm for the Shocktube Problem Oren E. Livne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    1 ICE Algorithm for the Shocktube Problem Oren E. Livne UUSCI-2006-007 Scientific Computing the main ICE advection algorithm for scalar advection problems (advection and Burg- ers step in this original Kashiwa ICE algorithm [Kas00], and its relation of both the Davis scheme [Dav87

  3. A lattice model to simulate ice-structure interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A lattice model to simulate ice-structure interaction O. Dorival, A. V. Metrikine, A. Simone of Technology P. O. Box 5048, 2600 GA Delft, Netherlands Abstract The interaction between ice sheets, due to the complexity of ice material the use of small-scale experiments is problematic if one aims

  4. Operation and Control of Full Ice-storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dividing time ice-storage system, the refrigerator does not operate during power's on-peak period, and all the cooling is supplied by the ice stored in off-peak period, so that the use of electricity can be maintained. When the ice is thawing...

  5. Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

  6. Is the Missing Ultra-Red Material Colorless Ice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Grundy

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The extremely red colors of some transneptunian objects and Centaurs are not seen among the Jupiter family comets which supposedly derive from them. Could this mismatch result from sublimation loss of colorless ice? Radiative transfer models show that mixtures of volatile ice and nonvolatile organics could be extremely red, but become progressively darker and less red as the ice sublimates away.

  7. THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF GREENLAND ICE SHEET MELTING TO GLOBAL SEA-LEVEL CHANGE Conor Mc three major sources, the Greenland ice sheet, Antarctica, and other eustatic components. Each has its own predictable spatial signal, and particular attention was paid to the Greenland ice sheet, given

  8. The Ice Rink Problem 1 Bernard M.E. Moret,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Bernard

    The Ice Rink Problem 1 Bernard M.E. Moret, Michael Collins, Jared Saia, and Ling Yu Department the sensor footprint. A similar task with a simpler geometry consists of cleaning an ice rink. We prove that the method used in ice rinks (the ``Zamboni algorithm'') is optimal and use it to develop heuristics

  9. Integrated navigation for AUV operations under ice shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    Integrated navigation for AUV operations under ice shelves Gwyn Griffiths and Steve Mc One-slide summary of the Autosub AUV J Why explore beneath ice shelves? J Technology challenges: the Halliburton `Geosub' #12;Why explore beneath ice shelves? Gl oba l Wa r mi ng Li nke d t o Me l t i ng I c e c

  10. ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Anders

    ICE SHEET SOURCES OF SEA LEVEL RISE AND FRESHWATER DISCHARGE DURING THE LAST DEGLACIATION Anders E the sources of sea level rise and freshwater dis- charge to the global oceans associated with retreat of ice­10 m sea level rise at 19.0­19.5 ka, sourced largely from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet retreat

  11. Historical and future black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements and model simulations from 1850 to 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical and future black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements black carbon deposition on the three ice caps: Ice core measurements and model simulations from 1850 tends to enhance snow and ice melting due to the absorption caused by the increased BC deposition

  12. Optimal Airflow Control for Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Y.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimal airflow control method and procedure have been developed for laboratory air handing unit (LAHU) systems using linear optimization theories. The optimal airflow control minimizes the thermal energy consumption and the cost, and improves...

  13. Dynamics and energetics of the cloudy boundary layer in simulations of off-ice flow in the marginal ice zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    kinetic energy even in the present case where very strong surface heat fluxes occur. Ice-phase. Inclusion of the ice phase significantly affected the radiative budget as compared to purely liquid clouds, illustrating the importance of ice-phase­radiative couplings for accurate simulations of arctic clouds

  14. Where might we find evidence of a Last Interglacial West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse in Antarctic ice core records?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddall, Mark

    increased melting from valley glaciers and small ice caps (estimated ~0.6±0.1 m, Radi and Hock, 2010), oceanWhere might we find evidence of a Last Interglacial West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse in Antarctic ice core records? S.L. Bradley a, , M. Siddall a , G.A. Milne b , V. Masson-Delmotte c , E. Wolff d

  15. Decadal-scale variations in ice flow along Whillans Ice Stream and its tributaries, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Jezek, K.A.; Van der Veen, C.J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate velocity changes occurring along Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) by comparing velocities derived from repeat aerial photographs acquired in 1985–89 (average date of 1987) to interferometric satellite radar (InSAR) velocities collected...

  16. Focused synthetic aperture radar processing of ice-sounder data collected over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legarsky, J.; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Akins, T. L.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing algorithm for airborne/spaceborne ice-sounding radar systems and applied it to data collected in Greenland. By using focused SAR (phase-corrected coherent averaging), we improved along...

  17. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  18. Ice surfaces: macroscopic effects of microscopic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    in the large tropical and subtropical belt, and between -20 and -40 C in the small polar caps. Water becomes ice at just around the middle of that temperature range. Only a small shift in temperature determines microphysics and chemistry have large-scale consequences. The difficulties associated with observing processes

  19. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­2, June 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  20. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS3 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide oasis3 prism 2­3, August 2004 Sophie Valcke 1 to realize a coupled simulation with OASIS3. The aim of OASIS3 is to provide a flexible and user friendly. OASIS3 synchronizes the exchanges of coupling fields between the models being coupled, and performs 2D

  1. Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS 2.0 Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Soil User's Guide and Reference Manual November 1995 Laurent for the straightforward use of OASIS 2.0. As far as we know, it is the best way to use it! The aim of OASIS is to provide been particularly emphasized in the OASIS design. The use of OASIS does not change the way the models

  2. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    .2% complete, as measured using earned value techniques. The contingency % of the remaining work is 28.3%. #12 with critical dates and activities managed by both Raytheon Polar Services Company and the UW is set Division Management, and FY08 Actual costs for On-Ice Support that were less than planned. 5/31/08 Change

  3. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    versus the planned performance of 55.8% complete as measured using earned value techniques. The earned safety training for drilling and installation managers, safety leads and a few other on- ice personnel Project Cost $274.3 Value of Foreign Contributions $32.2 NSF Funding $242.1 Contingency as % of Remaining

  4. Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brarmann, G. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of both the 30-year old, 265,000 square foot facility and the new 156,000 square foot Fred L. Hartley Research Center. The energy and demand savings resulting from the installation of the ice-bank system are significant. Large commercial and industrial...

  5. Toward Extraplanetary Under-Ice Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    .jhu@gmail.com Ryan Eustice Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering University of Michigan Ann Arbor· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Toward Extraplanetary Under-Ice@whoi.edu, rsohn@whoi.edu, ssingh@whoi.edu Taichi Sato Ocean Research Institute University of Tokyo Nakano, Tokyo

  6. Modeling the Fracture of Ice Sheets on Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waisman, Haim [Columbia University] [Columbia University; Tuminaro, Ray [Sandia National Labs] [Sandia National Labs

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to investigate the complex fracture of ice and understand its role within larger ice sheet simulations and global climate change. This objective was achieved by developing novel physics based models for ice, novel numerical tools to enable the modeling of the physics and by collaboration with the ice community experts. At the present time, ice fracture is not explicitly considered within ice sheet models due in part to large computational costs associated with the accurate modeling of this complex phenomena. However, fracture not only plays an extremely important role in regional behavior but also influences ice dynamics over much larger zones in ways that are currently not well understood. To this end, our research findings through this project offers significant advancement to the field and closes a large gap of knowledge in understanding and modeling the fracture of ice sheets in the polar regions. Thus, we believe that our objective has been achieved and our research accomplishments are significant. This is corroborated through a set of published papers, posters and presentations at technical conferences in the field. In particular significant progress has been made in the mechanics of ice, fracture of ice sheets and ice shelves in polar regions and sophisticated numerical methods that enable the solution of the physics in an efficient way.

  7. West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alley, R.B. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); MacAyeal, D.R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

  8. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  9. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jakobshavn I. Rinks Observed Historic Flux (km 3 ice/year)I. Rinks * Outlets fed by the Northeast Greenland Ice StreamRinks, measured in 2000). Figure 3.1: Steady-state (A) topography (m) and (C) ice

  10. Isotopic tracing (Sr, Nd, U and Hf) of continental and marine aerosols in an 18th century section of the Dye-3 ice core (Greenland)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    sea salts strontium neodymium hafnium uranium Determining the sources and pathways of atmospheric and 234 U/238 U activity ratios close to seawater. Nd variations are significant (N6 units) and are decoupled from dust composition, indicating that the Nd composition of seawater is preserved in the ice

  11. Ice cloud single-scattering property models with the full phase matrix at wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 mm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    W. Dayton Street, Madison, WI 53706, United States b Texas A&M University, College Station, TX February 2014 Available online 11 March 2014 Keywords: Ice clouds Light scattering Remote sensing Radiative agreement between solar and infrared optical thicknesses. Finally, spectral results are presented

  12. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Székely, V; Kollar, E

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  13. Improvements of the Variable Thermal Resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Szekely; S. Torok; E. Kollar

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat mounting unit with electronically variable thermal resistance [1] has been presented in the last year [2]. The design was based on a Peltier cell and the appropriate control electronics and software. The device is devoted especially to the thermal characterization of packages, e.g. in dual cold plate arrangements. Although this design meets the requirements of the static measurement we are intended to improve its parameters as the settling time and dynamic thermal impedance and the range of realized thermal resistance. The new design applies the heat flux sensor developed by our team as well [3], making easier the control of the device. This development allows even the realization of negative thermal resistances.

  14. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  15. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Morrison, H.; Park, Sungsu; Conley, Andrew; Klein, Stephen A.; Boyle, James; Mitchell, David; Li, J-L F.

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process-based treatment of ice supersaturation and ice-nucleation is implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The new scheme is designed to allow (1) supersaturation with respect to ice, (2) ice nucleation by aerosol particles and (3) ice cloud cover consistent with ice microphysics. The scheme is implemented with a 4-class 2 moment microphysics code and is used to evaluate ice cloud nucleation mechanisms and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloud occurrence better than previous versions of the model. Simulations indicate heterogeneous freezing and contact nucleation on dust are both potentially important over remote areas of the Arctic. Cloud forcing and hence climate is sensitive to different formulations of the ice microphysics. Arctic radiative fluxes are sensitive to the parameterization of ice clouds. These results indicate that ice clouds are potentially an important part of understanding cloud forcing and potential cloud feedbacks, particularly in the Arctic.

  16. Minnesota Power- Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings;...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With"...

  1. Paleo-Climate and Glaciological Reconstruction in Central Asia through the Collection and Analysis of Ice Cores and Instrumental Data from the Tien Shan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Aizen; Donald Bren; Karl Kreutz; Cameron Wake

    2001-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    While the majority of ice core investigations have been undertaken in the polar regions, a few ice cores recovered from carefully selected high altitude/mid-to-low latitude glaciers have also provided valuable records of climate variability in these regions. A regional array of high resolution, multi-parameter ice core records developed from temperate and tropical regions of the globe can be used to document regional climate and environmental change in the latitudes which are home to the vase majority of the Earth's human population. In addition, these records can be directly compared with ice core records available from the polar regions and can therefore expand our understanding of inter-hemispheric dynamics of past climate changes. The main objectives of our paleoclimate research in the Tien Shan mountains of middle Asia combine the development of detailed paleoenvironmental records via the physical and chemical analysis of ice cores with the analysis of modern meteorological and hydrological data. The first step in this research was the collection of ice cores from the accumulation zone of the Inylchek Glacier and the collection of meteorological data from a variety of stations throughout the Tien Shan. The research effort described in this report was part of a collaborative effort with the United State Geological Survey's (USGS) Global Environmental Research Program which began studying radionuclide deposition in mid-latitude glaciers in 1995.

  2. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2 Formation in Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasa, Carina; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 ice is one of the most abundant components in ice-coated interstellar ices besides H2O and CO, but the most favorable path to CO2 ice is still unclear. Molecular dynamics calculations on the ultraviolet photodissociation of different kinds of CO-H2O ice systems have been performed at 10 K in order to demonstrate that the reaction between CO and an OH molecule resulting from H2O photodissociation through the first excited state is a possible route to form CO2 ice. However, our calculations, which take into account different ice surface models, suggest that there is another product with a higher formation probability ((3.00+-0.07)x10-2), which is the HOCO complex, whereas the formation of CO2 has a probability of only (3.6+-0.7)x10-4. The initial location of the CO is key to obtain reaction and form CO2: the CO needs to be located deep into the ice. The HOCO complex becomes trapped in the cold ice surface in the trans-HOCO minimum because it quickly loses its internal energy to the surrounding ice, preventi...

  4. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  5. Searching for sterile neutrinos in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebur Razzaque; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillation interpretation of the results from the LSND, MiniBooNE and some other experiments requires existence of sterile neutrino with mass $\\sim 1$ eV and mixing with the active neutrinos $|U_{\\mu 0}|^2 \\sim (0.02 - 0.04)$. It has been realized some time ago that existence of such a neutrino affects significantly the fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos in the TeV range which can be tested by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. In view of the first IceCube data release we have revisited the oscillations of high energy atmospheric neutrinos in the presence of one sterile neutrino. Properties of the oscillation probabilities are studied in details for various mixing schemes both analytically and numerically. The energy spectra and angular distributions of the $\

  6. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  7. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  8. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 Forschungsgemeinschaft. leads to a tremendous increase in the complex- ity of the traditional power optimization mod- els-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  9. Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units, Fox, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    C41A-0429 Integrated Geophysical Examination of the CRREL Permafrost Tunnel's Fairbanks Silt Units report on a recent geophysical survey of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Region Research geophysical signatures of permanently frozen loess and massive wedge ice. We exploited the increasing path

  10. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Ocean waves and ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craster, Richard

    ; Wadhams & Holt, 1991) to pack ice (Robin, 1963) and even glacial ice tongues (Holdsworth, 1969; Squire etUnder consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Ocean waves and ice sheets By N. J waves incident on ice­covered ocean. The ice cover is idealized as a plate of elastic material for which

  11. Evidence for atmospheric control of sea-ice motion through Nares Strait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Arctic pack ice, a critical element of the global climate system. The general flow of seawater through be sufficient to halt ice drift, despite strong forcing. Pack ice often consolidates in winter behind an ice mobility of pack ice in Fram Strait and the more persistently static conditions in the western CAA. We

  12. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  13. Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 19732002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 1973­2002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL National (Manuscript received 12 July 2004, in final form 13 June 2005) ABSTRACT Annual seasonal average ice cover from 1973 to 2002 and associated dates of first ice, last ice, and ice duration are presented and discussed

  14. MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys ABSTRACT: Ice thickness was measured from the bottom of the ice cover to the piezometric water level and to the top of the ice cover-2360 achiuchiolo@montana.edu VARIABLES: Location Name, Location Code, Limno Run, Collection Date, z-water, z-ice, z

  15. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-48 LAKE ERIE REGIONAL ICE COVER ANALYSIS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS R.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Observation density Average regional ice cover Percentage exceedance from average regional ice cover for discrete ice cover values Contour analysis of percentage ice cover exceedance

  16. Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Polar Sea Ice Mapping Using SeaWinds Data Hyrum S. Anderson and David G. Long Brigham Young for mapping polar sea ice extent. In this study, a new al- gorithm for polar sea ice mapping is developed of Bayes detection to produce sea ice extent maps. Statistical models for sea ice and ocean are represented

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Sedimentary pellets as an ice-cover proxy in a High Arctic ice-covered lake Jessica-cover extent and dynamics on this perennially ice-covered, High Arctic lake. These pellets are interpreted growth. The pellets remain frozen in the ice until a summer or series of summers with reduced ice cover

  18. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu National Center of the net sea ice production and the sea ice exchanges between the Arctic and its adjacent seas are studied) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning ice cover

  19. Holocene-Late Pleistocene Climatic Ice Core Records from Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    for affecting large-scale climate. In 1987, three ice cores were recovered to bedrock from the Dunde ice cap. XIE Three ice cores to bedrock from the Dunde ice cap on the north-central Qinghai- Tibetan Plateau of ago. T HE DUNDE ICE CAP (38°06'N, 96°24'E) is located in a desert envi- ronment between the highest

  20. XXII ICTAM, 2529 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE SHEETSHELF GROUNDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    melting of the polar ice caps due to global warming, a dynamical collapse of the ice sheets has the dynamical stability of shelving ice sheets. INTRODUCTION The Antarctic ice cap contains several tensXXII ICTAM, 25­29 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL MODELLING OF ICE

  1. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 1992­2000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  2. Contractor SOW Template - ICE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergyConsortiumContacts Contacts2012ICE

  3. A radio air shower surface detector as an extension for IceCube and IceTop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Auffenberg; T. Gaisser; K. Helbing; T. Huege; T. Karg; A. Karle

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The IceCube neutrino detector is built into the Antarctic ice sheet at the South Pole to measure high energy neutrinos. For this, 4800 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are being deployed at depths between 1450 and 2450 meters into the ice to measure neutrino induced charged particles like muons. IceTop is a surface air shower detector consisting of 160 Cherenkov ice tanks located on top of IceCube. To extend IceTop, a radio air shower detector could be built to significantly increase the sensitivity at higher shower energies and for inclined showers. As air showers induced by cosmic rays are a major part of the muonic background in IceCube, IceTop is not only an air shower detector, but also a veto to reduce the background in IceCube. Air showers are detectable by radio signals with a radio surface detector. The major emission process is the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by e+ e- shower particles in the Earths magnetic field (geosynchrotron effect). Simulations of the expected radio signals of air showers are shown. The sensitivity and the energy threshold of different antenna field configurations are estimated.

  4. On water ice formation in interstellar clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaud Papoular

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

  5. Analytical determination of propeller performance degradation due to ice accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas Lloyd

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    result of exposing an airfoil in forward motion to supercooled water droplets in a sub-freezing environment. The type of ice which will form may be determined by a variety of factors including freestream velocity, liquid water content of the cloud... as rime ice, occurs at relatively low velocities, low liquid water content values (typically 0. 5 to 1. 0 grams per cubic meter), and temperature well below freezing. Due primarily to the very cold temperatures associated with rime ice formation...

  6. Calibration and Characterization of the IceCube Photomultiplier Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calibration and Characterization of the IceCubeUniversity of California. Calibration and Characterizationchar- acterization and calibration of these PMTs before

  7. Covered Product Category: Air-Cooled Ice Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for air-cooled ice machines, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  8. Artificial Spin Ice - A New Playground to Better Understand Magnetism...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Artificial Spin Ice - A New Playground to Better Understand Magnetism Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding...

  9. antarctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 327 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  10. arctic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 388 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  11. altimeter sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 218 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  12. artic sea ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AD of transient model simulations and a new type of sen- sitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth Born, Andreas 214 Sedimentation and particle dynamics in the...

  13. arctic ice dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. F. Vincent (2008), Seasonal dynamics of bacterial Vincent, Warwick F. 168 Dynamics of artificial spin ice: a continuous honeycomb network MIT - DSpace Summary: We model the...

  14. arctic ice islands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogous to the effects of the Arctic region; KEYWORDS: Arctic Ocean, ice rafting, climate change Citation: Darby, D. A., and J. F. Bischof (2004), A Holocene record of...

  15. Reducing uncertainty in high-resolution sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system, reflecting a significant amount of solar radiation, insulating the ocean from the atmosphere and influencing ocean circulation by modifying the salinity of the upper ocean. The thickness and extent of Arctic sea ice have shown a significant decline in recent decades with implications for global climate as well as regional geopolitics. Increasing interest in exploration as well as climate feedback effects make predictive mathematical modeling of sea ice a task of tremendous practical import. Satellite data obtained over the last few decades have provided a wealth of information on sea ice motion and deformation. The data clearly show that ice deformation is focused along narrow linear features and this type of deformation is not well-represented in existing models. To improve sea ice dynamics we have incorporated an anisotropic rheology into the Los Alamos National Laboratory global sea ice model, CICE. Sensitivity analyses were performed using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA) to determine the impact of material parameters on sea ice response functions. Two material strength parameters that exhibited the most significant impact on responses were further analyzed to evaluate their influence on quantitative comparisons between model output and data. The sensitivity analysis along with ten year model runs indicate that while the anisotropic rheology provides some benefit in velocity predictions, additional improvements are required to make this material model a viable alternative for global sea ice simulations.

  16. About International Cruise & Excursions International Cruise & Excursions, Inc. (ICE) is a worldwide travel and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    About International Cruise & Excursions International Cruise & Excursions, Inc. (ICE corporations, resorts, cruise lines and leisure travel providers. ICE provides cruise and travel programs-commerce platform, state of the art call centers and customer service and fulfillment operations. Situation ICE

  17. Web-Ice: Integrated Data Collection and Analysis for Macromolecular Crystallography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Ana

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results. A summary list is also available in Blu-Ice.Figure 7: SSRL Web-Ice interface displaying the summarizedTable 1: Programs used by Web-Ice for data analysis. Program

  18. The influence of subglacial hydrology on the flow of West Antarctic ice streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Narelle Paula Marie

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Subglacial hydrology is known to influence the flow of ice. However, difficulty in accessing the base of large ice sheets has made determining the interaction between ice streams, basal sediment and water difficult to discern. The aim of this thesis...

  19. Incorporation of particulates into accreted ice above subglacial Vostok lake, Antarctica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegert, M. J.; Royston-Bishop, G.; Priscu, J. C.; Tranter, M.; Christner, B.; Lee, V.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of microscopic particulates in meteoric and accreted ice from the Vostok (Antarctica) ice core is assessed in conjunction with existing ice-core data to investigate the mechanism by which particulates are ...

  20. APPROVED ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONERS Revised as of 06-18-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPROVED ICE STORAGE AIR CONDITIONERS Revised as of 06-18-2008 The following vendors and their ice storage air conditioners models can be used in the ice storage air conditioner compliance option. Input

  1. Ice stream basal conditions from block-wise surface data inversion and simple regression models of ice stream flow: Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    Ice stream basal conditions from block-wise surface data inversion and simple regression models of ice stream flow: Application to Bindschadler Ice Stream O. V. Sergienko,1 R. A. Bindschadler,2 P. L; published 4 December 2008. [1] Widespread basal conditions controlling ice stream flows are still beyond

  2. Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New Zealand, 2nd6th December 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    Ice in the Environment: Proceedings of the 16th IAHR International Symposium on Ice Dunedin, New OF DETERMINING A GEOPHYSICAL-SCALE SEA ICE RHEOLOGY FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS Daniel Feltham1 and Peter Sammonds2 and Daniel Hatton2 ABSTRACT We present a methodology that allows a sea ice rheology, suitable

  3. ICE IGERT Mission The mission of the ICE IGERT program is to exploit the synergistic interface between engineering and the life sciences to enable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    1 ICE IGERT Mission The mission of the ICE IGERT program is to exploit the synergistic interface foundation for future interdisciplinary research success. ICE IGERT Curriculum Structure (minimum of 19 credits) ICE IGERT promotes broad-based graduate training in cellular engineering through the following

  4. Modeling the evolution of polar ice sheets: Ice sheet system model workshop; Bergen, Norway, 2-4 June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larour, E; Schlegel, N; Morlighem, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Workshop; Bergen, Norway, 2?4 June 2014 The Ice SheetUniversity of Bergen in Norway, in June 2014. This is the

  5. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Frazil Deposition Under Growing Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Ice M.J. McGuinness,1,4 M.J.M. Williams,2 P.J. Langhorne,3 C. Purdie,3 J. Crook4 Abstract. Platelet ice may be an important component of Antarctic land-fast sea ice. Typically, it is found at depth in first-year landfast sea ice cover, near ice shelves. To explain why platelet ice is not commonly

  6. Estimation of composite thermal conductivity of a heterogeneousmethane hydrate sample using iTOUGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Arvind; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Sloan Jr., E.D.

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We determined the composite thermal conductivity (ktheta) ofa porous methanehydrate sample (composedof hydrate, water, and methan egas) as a function of density using iTOUGH2. X-ray computed tomography(CT) was used to visualize and quantify the density changes that occurredduring hydrate formation from granular ice. The composite thermalconductivity was estimated and validated by minimizing the differencesbetween the observed and the predicted thermal response using historymatching. The estimated density-dependent composite thermal conductivityranged between 0.25 and 0.58 W/m/K.

  7. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  8. IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    is the culmination of a series of ICECUBE - TOTAL US and NON-US 20.8% 19.4% 17.6% 6.6% 20.4% 19.0% 16.9% 6.6% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% 3FY02-2FY03 3FY03-2FY04 A-04 M -04 J-04 J-04 A and Safety ­ This month the IceCube Safety and Quality Assurance Manager participated in site visits

  9. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

  10. ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, AlaskaWhen Floating Ice Melts in the SeaWhen

  11. Developing and Evaluating Ice Cloud Parameterizations by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application toDevelopingand Evaluating Ice Cloud

  12. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  13. Proton ordering in tetragonal and monoclinic H2O ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Fei; Berlie, Adam; Liu, Xiaodi; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H2O ice remains one of the most enigmatic materials as its phase diagram reveals up to sixteen solid phases. While the crystal structure of these phases has been determined, the phase boundaries and mechanisms of formation of the proton-ordered phases remain unclear. From high precision measurements of the complex dielectric constant, we probe directly the degree of ordering of the protons in H2O tetragonal ice III and monoclinic ice V down to 80 K. A broadened first-order phase transition is found to occur near 202 K we attribute to a quenched disorder of the protons which causes a continuous disordering of the protons during cooling and metastable behavior. At 126 K the protons in ice III become fully ordered, and for the case of ice V becoming fully ordered at 113 K forming ice XIII. Two triple points are proposed to exist: one at 0.35 GPa and 126 K where ices III, IX and V coexist; and another at 0.35 GPa and 113 K where ices V, IX and XIII coexist. Our findings unravel the underlying mechanism driving th...

  14. Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kutschan; K. Morawetz; S. Thoms

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The fascinating ability of algae, insects and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water/ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a new dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration, and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

  15. How Do Cultural Differences Affect Utilization of the ICE Approach?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    with permission. Abstract. Integrated Concurrent Engineering (ICE) is a design approach initially developed process: "Integrated Concurrent Engineering (ICE) is a real-time collaborative process in which-understood procedures for real-time collaboration; concurrent quantitative engineering and qualitative conversation. 4

  16. ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Claude

    1 ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

  17. ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Claude

    ENERGY BASED ICE COLLISION FORCES Claude Daley1 1 Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 3X5 ABSTRACT Ice collision forces can be determined by energy considerations. A variety of interaction geometry cases are considered. The indentation energy functions for eight different

  18. UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clemett,3 Richard N. Zare3 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultra meteorites. Hydrogen and deu- terium atoms exchange readily between the PAHs and the ice, which may explain abundant and widespread class of carbon-car- rying gaseous species is believed to be PAHs (3­5). In dense

  19. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  20. IceCube Project Monthly Report November 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    the current budgets or the budgets modified by the cost performance index. Change Log - IceCube Total Project IceCube array with a detector uptime of 97%, above the internal monthly goal of 95%. #12;Cost design, development, procured materials, and the construction of the infrastructure that supports

  1. Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Azimuth Variation in Microwave Backscatter over the Greenland Ice Sheet Ivan S. Ashcraft and David backscatter measurements are becoming an important tool for monitoring the dynamic behavior of the Greenland ice sheet. However, most Greenland studies assume constant backscatter for varying azimuth angles

  2. Arctic catastrophes in an idealized sea ice model Ian Eisenman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    thermodynamics, varying open water fraction, an energy balance atmosphere, and scalable CO2. We find that summer.e., reflectiveness) between sea ice and the open water that is exposed when it melts. Bare or snow-covered sea ice reflects most sunlight back to space, while the dark ocean surface absorbs most incident light. Global

  3. CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauck, Trish; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Oberg, Karin I; Cuppen, Herma M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobility of atoms, molecules and radicals in icy grain mantles regulate ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute time scales, and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick's diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an i...

  4. IceCube Project Monthly Report -June 2010 Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    (April 29-30) and an ice drilling technology meeting (April 27-28). Cost and Schedule Performance Service Corporation and New York Air National Guard FY10 on-ice fuel and labor cost savings. Contingency. $125K WBS 1.2 Implementation Additional UW & PSL Labor to replace and refurbish drill hardware. On

  5. absorption scale ice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption scale ice First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Optical properties of deep ice at...

  6. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  7. Methods and apparatus for rotor blade ice detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeMieux, David Lawrence

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting ice on a wind turbine having a rotor and one or more rotor blades each having blade roots includes monitoring meteorological conditions relating to icing conditions and monitoring one or more physical characteristics of the wind turbine in operation that vary in accordance with at least one of the mass of the one or more rotor blades or a mass imbalance between the rotor blades. The method also includes using the one or more monitored physical characteristics to determine whether a blade mass anomaly exists, determining whether the monitored meteorological conditions are consistent with blade icing; and signaling an icing-related blade mass anomaly when a blade mass anomaly is determined to exist and the monitored meteorological conditions are determined to be consistent with icing.

  8. Fast-flowing outlet glaciers on Svalbard ice caps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowdeswell, J.A. (Univ. of Cambridge (England)); Collin, R.L. (University College of Wales, Aberystwyth (England))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four well-defined outlet glaciers are present on the 2510 km{sup 2} cap of Vestfonna in Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. Airborne radio echo sounding and aerial-photograph and satellite-image analysis methods are used to analyze the morphology and dynamics of the ice cap and its component outlet glaciers. The heavily crevassed outlets form linear depressions in the ice-cap surface and flow an order of magnitude faster than the ridges of uncrevassed ice between them. Ice flow on the ridges is accounted for by internal deformation alone, whereas rates of outlet glacier flow require basal motion. One outlet has recently switched into and out of a faster mode of flow. Rapid terminal advance, a change from longitudinal compression to tension, and thinning in the upper basin indicate surge behavior. Observed outlet glacier discharge is significantly greater than current inputs of mass of the ice cap, indicating that present rates of flow cannot be sustained under the contemporary climate.

  9. Heat extraction for the CSPonD thermal storage unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Folkers Eduardo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three coiled tube heat exchanger prototypes were designed to extract heat from containers holding 0.5 kg, 2.3 kg, and 10.5 kg of Sodium Nitrate-Potassium Nitrate salt. All of the prototypes were left with an open surface ...

  10. Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    conduction · Heat conduction in Bose condensates ­ electronic superconductors ­ superfluid helium ­ Bose condensate of magnons #12;Outline--toward perfect thermal insulators · Einstein and minimum thermal directions #12;Gas kinetic equation is a good place to start · Anharmonicity (high T limit) · Point defect

  11. Ice emission and the redshifts of submillimeter sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at submillimeter wavelengths have revealed a population of sources thought to be at relatively large redshifts. The position of the 850 $\\mu$m passband on the Rayleigh-Jeans portion of the Planck function leads to a maximum redshift estimate of $z\\sim$4.5 since sources will not retain their redshift independent brightness close to the peak of the Planck function and thus drop out of surveys. Here we review evidence that ice absorption is present in the spectra of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies which are often taken as analogs for the 850 $\\mu$m source population. We consider the implication of this absorption for ice induced spectral structure at far infrared wavelengths and present marginal astronomical evidence that amorphous ice may have a feature similar to crystalline ice near 150 $\\mu$m. Recent corroborative laboratory evidence is supportive of this conclusion. It is argued that early metal enrichment by pair instability SN may lead to a high ice content relative to refractory dust at high redshift and a fairly robust detection of ice emission in a $z=6.42$ quasar is presented. It is further shown that ice emission is needed to understand the 450 $\\mu$m sources observed in the GOODS-N field. We are thus encouraged to apply far infrared ice emission models to the available observations of HDF 850.1, the brightest submillimeter source in the {\\it Hubble Deep Field}. We suggest that a redshift as large as 13 may need to be considered for this source, nearly a factor of three above the usual top estimate. Inclusion of the possibility of far infrared ice emission in the spectral energy distributions of model sources generally broadens the range of redshifts to be considered for submillimeter sources compared to models without ice emission.

  12. Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    -thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer;Leuchtstoffröhre Plasma-Bildschirm Energiesparlampe #12;electrical engineering light sources textile industry

  13. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  14. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  15. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  16. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  17. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  18. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  19. Major transitions in evolution linked to thermal gradients above hydrothermal vents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthonie W. J. Muller

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of the main divisions of today's life: (1) unicellular prokaryotes, (2) unicellular eukaryotes, (3) multicellular eukaryotes, and (4) metazoans, are examples of the--still unexplained--major transitions in evolution. Regarding the origin of life, I have proposed that primordial life functioned as heat engine (thermosynthesis) while thermally cycled in convecting volcanic hot springs. Here I argue for a role of thermal gradients above submarine hydrothermal vents (SHV) in several major transitions. The last decade has witnessed the emergence of phononics, a novel discipline in physics based on controlled heat transport in thermal gradients. It builds thermal analogs to electronic devices: the thermal diode, the thermal transistor, the thermal switch, the thermal amplifier, the thermal memory--the thermal computer has been proposed. Encouraged by (1) the many similarities between microtubules (MT) and carbon nanotubes, which have a very high thermal conductivity, and (2) the recent discovery of a silk protein which also has a very high thermal conductivity, I combine and extend the mentioned ideas, and propose the general conjecture that several major transitions of evolution were effected by thermal processes, with four additional partial conjectures: (1) The first organisms used heat engines during thermosynthesis in convection cells; (2) The first eukaryotic cells used MT during thermosynthesis in the thermal gradient above SHV; (3) The first metazoans used transport of water or in water during thermosynthesis above SHV under an ice-covered ocean during the Gaskiers Snowball Earth; and (4) The first mammalian brain used a thermal machinery based on thermal gradients in or across the cortex. When experimentally proven these conjectures, which are testable by the methods of synthetic biology, would significantly enhance our understanding of life.

  20. Yeast Protein Lysates for SDS-PAGE 1. Collect 2 ODs unit of yeast culture. Centrifuge for 10 minutes at 2000 rpm.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    1 Yeast Protein Lysates for SDS-PAGE 1. Collect 2 ODs unit of yeast culture. Centrifuge for 10 minutes at 2000 rpm. · 1 OD unit = volume X OD600 (e.g., 2 ODs = 5 mls of culture at OD600 0.4). · This method may be used for between 0.5 and 5 OD units. 2. Resuspend pellet in 1 ml ice-cold 10% TCA. Transfer

  1. Air conditioning system with supplemental ice storing and cooling capacity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weng, Kuo-Lianq (Taichung, TW); Weng, Kuo-Liang (Taichung, TW)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present air conditioning system with ice storing and cooling capacity can generate and store ice in its pipe assembly or in an ice storage tank particularly equipped for the system, depending on the type of the air conditioning system. The system is characterized in particular in that ice can be produced and stored in the air conditioning system whereby the time of supplying cooled air can be effectively extended with the merit that the operation cycle of the on and off of the compressor can be prolonged, extending the operation lifespan of the compressor in one aspect. In another aspect, ice production and storage in great amount can be performed in an off-peak period of the electrical power consumption and the stored ice can be utilized in the peak period of the power consumption so as to provide supplemental cooling capacity for the compressor of the air conditioning system whereby the shift of peak and off-peak power consumption can be effected with ease. The present air conditioning system can lower the installation expense for an ice-storing air conditioning system and can also be applied to an old conventional air conditioning system.

  2. GRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the Arc- tic sea ice pack in December 2007, continuously moved with the Arctic ocean currents and meltedGRAPH-BASED METHOD FOR MULTITEMPORAL SEGMENTATION OF SEA ICE FLOES FROM SATELLITE DATA Claudio, MODIS, Sea Ice Floes. ABSTRACT: Automated segmentation of the sea ice evolution would allow scientists

  3. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions revisited and found inadequate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulsky, Deborah L.

    the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment (AIDJEX) assumptions about pack ice behavior with an eye to modeling the behavior of pack ice. A model based on these assumptions is needed to represent the deformation and stress in pack ice on scales from 10 to 100 km, and would need to explicitly resolve discontinuities

  4. Effect of air-sea-ice interaction on winter 1996 Southern Ocean subpolar storm distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    is the baroclinic instability caused by the cold air blown from the ice pack to the warm open-ocean waters. Where with the entire pack ice/open-water region. The heat flux changes considerably in the area from continental ice to pack ice, resulting in strong baroclinicity that leads to the enhanced development of vortices. Streten

  5. Gas ageice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, M. L. Bender,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Gas age­ice age differences and the chronology of the Vostok ice core, 0­100 ka M. L. Bender,1 G. [1] Gas is trapped in polar ice at depths of $50­120 m and is therefore significantly younger than cores (Vostok, Dome Fuji, and Dome C). We recorrelate the gas records of Vostok and Greenland Ice Sheet

  6. CMU-ITC-83-029 WHITE PAPER: The ICE Execution Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMU-ITC-83-029 WHITE PAPER: The ICE Execution Environment Document Number 003-001/002.01 DRAFT-Mellon University Schenley Park Pittsburgh, PA 15213 #12;The ICE Execution Environment DRAFT 003- 001/002.01 U ncla ssified ( 2 The ICE Execution Environment #12;The ICE Execution Environment DRAFT 003

  7. IDENTIFYING ICE HYDROMETEOR SIGNATURES ABOVE SUMMIT, GREENLAND USING A MULTI-INSTRUMENT APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    IDENTIFYING ICE HYDROMETEOR SIGNATURES ABOVE SUMMIT, GREENLAND USING A MULTI. These retrievals, however, may be adversely affected by ice hydrometeors commonly observed in mixed phase clouds. Research on the effect of ice hydrometeors on the microwave signal is insufficient. We establish that ice

  8. Adaptive mesh, finite volume modeling of marine ice sheets Stephen L. Cornforda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaptive mesh, finite volume modeling of marine ice sheets Stephen L. Cornforda , Daniel F. Martinb Abstract Continental scale marine ice sheets such as the present day West Antarctic Ice Sheet are strongly phenomenon of this kind is the migration of the grounding line -- the division between ice in contact

  9. Sessions 1526 & 2526 The URI Integrated Computer Engineering Design (ICED) Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uht, Augustus K.

    Sessions 1526 & 2526 The URI Integrated Computer Engineering Design (ICED) Curriculum: Progress the ICED curriculum in the Fall of 1997. The key feature of ICED is a substantial 2-3 year long project of ICED after two years of startup operation. Some custom hardware was required for the curriculum

  10. IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND A. ASSEL US. Department to project daily mean basin ice cover and annual ice cover duration for Lakes Superior and Erie. Models were), and the Oregon State University (OSU)general circulationmodels. Ice cover estimateswere made for the West

  11. OTC Paper Number 24645 GPU-Event-Mechanics Evaluation of Ice Impact Load Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    OTC Paper Number 24645 GPU-Event-Mechanics Evaluation of Ice Impact Load Statistics Claude Daley of a GPU-Event-Mechanics (GEM) simulation to assess local ice loads on a vessel operating in pack ice workstation. The simulation domain contains hundreds of discrete and interacting ice floes. A simple vessel

  12. Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the southeastern Bering Sea Meibing Jin,1 Clara Deal,1 Jia 2007. [1] Ice-associated phytoplankton blooms in the south- eastern Bering Sea can critically impact ice algal components, our 1-D ecosystem model successfully reproduced the observed ice

  13. ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY USING MCMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menczer, Filippo

    ESTIMATING BEDROCK AND SURFACE LAYER BOUNDARIES AND CONFIDENCE INTERVALS IN ICE SHEET RADAR IMAGERY and Computing Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana USA ABSTRACT Climate models that predict polar ice sheet behavior require accurate measurements of the bedrock-ice and ice-air bound- aries in ground

  14. Ice sheets and their dynamics Continuum thermo-mechanical model of a glacier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Ice sheets and their dynamics Continuum thermo-mechanical model of a glacier Shallow Ice Approximation (SIA) SIA-I Iterative Improvement Technique Benchmarks Numerical modeling of ice-sheet dynamics and Cartography, Zdiby 1.6.2010 Ondej Soucek Ph.D. defense #12;Ice sheets and their dynamics Continuum thermo

  15. Ice-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene Jules A Gardener1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ice-assisted electron beam lithography of graphene Jules A Gardener1 and Jene A Golovchenko1 with a thin ice layer. The irradiated ice plays a crucial role in the process by providing activated species that locally remove graphene from a silicon dioxide substrate. After patterning the graphene, the ice resist

  16. Pleistocene ice and paleo-strain rates at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica S.M. Aciego a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    Pleistocene ice and paleo-strain rates at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica S.M. Aciego a , K.M. Cuffey b September 2006 Abstract Ice exposed in ablation zones of ice sheets can be a valuable source of samples for paleoclimate studies and information about long-term ice dynamics. We report a 28-km long stable isotope

  17. Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray SUMMARY: I climb ice in to ask about local climbing. The guys there told me there was ice nearby, in Clear Creek Canyon. I. Four pitches? Five? It was time to find a partner. The only ice climber I knew in Denver was a friend

  18. Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads Minnesota Circuit opportunity to improve the way we manage snow and ice in Minnesota. By using snow and ice control best safer--while saving money and protecting water quality. Current Situation The snow and ice maintenance

  19. SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    SEA ICE MAPPING ALGORITHM FOR QUIKSCAT AND SEAWINDS Quinn P. Remund and David G. Long Brigham Young@ee.byu.edu Abstruct- Polar sea ice extent is an important input to global climate models and is considered are sensitive to the pres- ence of sea ice. An algorithm has been developed for sea ice extent detection using

  20. The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontelos, Marco

    The ice flow behavior in the neighborhood of the grounding line. Non-Newtonian case. Marco A line dynamics. The grounding line is the line where tran- sition between ice attached to the solid ground and ice floating over the sea takes place. We analyze a mathematical model describing the ice flow

  1. Recent ice loss from the Fleming and other glaciers, Wordie Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    that the glaciers accelerated following ice shelf removal, and have been thinning and losing mass to the ocean overRecent ice loss from the Fleming and other glaciers, Wordie Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula E. Rignot ice thickness data from 2002, reveal that the glaciers flowing into former Wordie Ice Shelf, West

  2. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  3. Using Satellite Radar Data to Map and Monitor Variations in Great Lakes Ice Cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for image-to-image classification, a library of backscatter signatures of different ice types is needed) classification technique has shown that different ice types in the ice cover can be identified and mapped for use with calibrated SAR imagery. III. SAR ICE CLASSIFICATION AND MAPPING During the 1997 winter season

  4. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss Shfaqat A. Khan,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss Shfaqat A. Khan,1 John Wahr,2] The rapid unloading of ice from the southeastern sector of the Greenland ice sheet between 2001 and 2006), Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L21701, doi:10

  5. Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink, USA, Fax: 617-432-4122, Abstract Many ice rink arenas have ice resurfacing equipment that uses fossil temperature distributions in ice rinks. The numerical results agree reasonably with the corresponding

  6. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region: a numerical study Aixue The variability of net sea ice production and sea ice exchange between the Arctic and its adjacent seas export) is the major factor controlling the net sea ice production in the Arctic region since a thinning

  7. NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Aixue

    NAO influence on net sea ice production and exchanges in the Arctic region Aixue Hu, Claes Rooth and Rainer Bleck February 18, 2003 Abstract The variability of the net sea ice production and the sea ice circulation model. The wind driven divergence (or ice flux export) is the major factor controlling the net sea

  8. Developing a coupled ice flow, meltwater plume model to study Developing a coupled ice flow, meltwater plume model to study interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica.interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , meltwater plume model to study interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica.interactions beneath ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica. Victoria Lee1 (v.lee@bristol.ac.uk), Tony Payne1 on the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Observational studies have shown that ice shelves off the coast of West Antarctica

  9. Transoceanic infragravity waves impacting Antarctic ice shelves Peter D. Bromirski,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    Transoceanic infragravity waves impacting Antarctic ice shelves Peter D. Bromirski,1 Olga V that IG- wave forcing may produce ice-shelf fractures that enable abrupt disintegration of ice shelves impacting Antarctic ice shelves, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02502, doi:10.1029/2009GL041488. 1. Introduction

  10. THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SHRINKING ARCTIC ICE CAP From the IPCC* Summary For Policymakers... "Sea ice is projected] - a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "Arctic amplification". As Arctic temperatures rise, sea ice melts for the 20th century. The rate at which the modeled 21st century Arctic warming and sea ice melting occurs

  11. Multiple effects of ice load changes and associated stress change on magmatic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Pressure release melting due to ice cap retreat in Iceland may at present times generate a similar amount that part of this magma may be captured in the crust, rather than being erupted. Gradual retreat of ice caps retreat of ice caps and glaciers worldwide; many of which are located in volcanic regions. The reduced ice

  12. Relationships between Arctic Sea Ice and Clouds during Autumn AXEL J. SCHWEIGER AND RON W. LINDSAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jennifer

    , as the direct radiative effects of cloud cover changes are compensated for by changes in the temperature The connection between sea ice variability and cloud cover over the Arctic seas during autumn is investigated that cloud cover variability near the sea ice margins is strongly linked to sea ice variability. Sea ice

  13. Enhanced residual entropy in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabiano Corsetti; Jon Zubeltzu; Emilio Artacho

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel kind of crystal order in high-density nanoconfined bilayer ice is proposed from molecular dynamics and density-functional theory simulations. A first-order transition is observed between a low-temperature proton-ordered solid and a high-temperature proton-disordered solid. The latter is shown to possess crystalline order for the oxygen positions, arranged on a close-packed triangular lattice with AA stacking. Uniquely amongst the ice phases, the triangular bilayer is characterized by two levels of disorder (for the bonding network and for the protons) which results in a residual entropy twice that of bulk ice.

  14. Vacuum-UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs. II. Absorption cross-sections of nonpolar ice molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Diaz, G A; Chen, Y -J; Yih, T -S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust grains in cold circumstellar regions and dark-cloud interiors at 10-20 K are covered by ice mantles. A nonthermal desorption mechanism is invoked to explain the presence of gas-phase molecules in these environments, such as the photodesorption induced by irradiation of ice due to secondary ultraviolet photons. To quantify the effects of ice photoprocessing, an estimate of the photon absorption in ice mantles is required. In a recent work, we reported the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) absorption cross sections of nonpolar molecules in the solid phase. The aim was to estimate the VUV-absorption cross sections of nonpolar molecular ice components, including CH4, CO2, N2, and O2. The column densities of the ice samples deposited at 8 K were measured in situ by infrared spectroscopy in transmittance. VUV spectra of the ice samples were collected in the 120-160 nm (10.33-7.74 eV) range using a commercial microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. We found that, as expected, solid N2 has the lowest VUV-absorption cros...

  15. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis.

  16. 1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note (No. 11) De-icing salt damage to trees De-icing Salt Damage to Trees Joan F Webber, David R Rose, Martin C Dobson #12;2 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 S a l t D a m a g e De-icing Salt Damage Introduction Rock salt

  17. Advanced Rooftop Unit Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced-Rooftop-Unit-Control Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  5. United States Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., Ashland, OR 97520 and Gwyneth Myer, Consultant, 220 W. Rapp Rd. Unit 3, Talent, OR 97540. #12;2 THE FIRE

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  14. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet sensitivity to regional climate change: one-way coupling of a 3-D thermo-mechanical ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model By Nicole-ice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model Copyrightice sheet model with a mesoscale climate model by Nicole-

  15. Proton ordering dynamics of H2O ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From high precision measurements of the complex dielectric constant of H2O ice, we identify the critical temperatures of the phase transition into and out of ice XI from ice Ih to occur at T_Ih-IX=58.9 K and T_IX-Ih=73.4 K. For D2O, T_Ih-IX=63.7 K and T_IX-Ih=78.2 K. A triple point is identified to exist at 0.07 GPa and 73.4 K for H2O and 0.08 GPa and 78.2 K for D2O where ices Ih, II and XI coexist. A first order phase transition with kinetic broadening associated to proton ordering dynamics is identified at 100 K.

  16. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  17. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  18. Shear measurements across the northern margin of Whillans Ice Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Der Veen, C.J.; Jezek, K.; Stearns, Leigh

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field measurements of surface deformation across the northern shear margin of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica, were analyzed to better understand the processes controlling the position and migration of this margin. Four lines of poles extending...

  19. Composition of Ices in Low-Mass Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulysse Marboeuf; Olivier Mousis; David Ehrenreich; Yann Alibert; Arnaud Cassan; Valentine Wakelam; Jean-Philippe Beaulieu

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation conditions of icy planetesimals in protoplanetary disks in order to determine the composition of ices in small and cold extrasolar planets. Assuming that ices are formed from hydrates, clathrates, and pure condensates, we calculate their mass fractions with respect to the total quantity of ices included in planetesimals, for a grid of disk models. We find that the composition of ices weakly depends on the adopted disk thermodynamic conditions, and is rather influenced by the initial composition of the gas phase. The use of a plausible range of molecular abundance ratios and the variation of the relative elemental carbon over oxygen ratio in the gas phase of protoplanetary disks, allow us to apply our model to a wide range of planetary systems. Our results can thus be used to constrain the icy/volatile phase composition of cold planets evidenced by microlensing surveys, hypothetical ocean-planets and carbon planets, which could be detected by Corot or Kepler.

  20. Composition of Ices in Low-Mass Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marboeuf, Ulysse; Ehrenreich, David; Alibert, Yann; Cassan, Arnaud; Wakelam, Valentine; Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation conditions of icy planetesimals in protoplanetary disks in order to determine the composition of ices in small and cold extrasolar planets. Assuming that ices are formed from hydrates, clathrates, and pure condensates, we calculate their mass fractions with respect to the total quantity of ices included in planetesimals, for a grid of disk models. We find that the composition of ices weakly depends on the adopted disk thermodynamic conditions, and is rather influenced by the initial composition of the gas phase. The use of a plausible range of molecular abundance ratios and the variation of the relative elemental carbon over oxygen ratio in the gas phase of protoplanetary disks, allow us to apply our model to a wide range of planetary systems. Our results can thus be used to constrain the icy/volatile phase composition of cold planets evidenced by microlensing surveys, hypothetical ocean-planets and carbon planets, which could be detected by Corot or Kepler.