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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

2

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

3

British Thermal Units (Btu) - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

4

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Btu tax is dead, long live the Btu tax  

SciTech Connect

The energy industry is powerful. That is the only explanation for its ability to jettison a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration's proposed deficit reduction package, the Btu tax plan, expected to raise about $71.5 billion over a five-year period. Clinton had proposed a broad-based energy tax of 25.7 cents per million Btus, and a surcharge of 34.2 cents on petroleum products, to be phased in over three years starting July 1, 1994. House Democrats went along, agreeing to impose a tax of 26.8 cents per million Btus, along with the 34.2-cent petroleum surcharge, both effective July 1, 1994. But something happened on the way to the Senate. Their version of the deficit reduction package contains no broad-based energy tax. It does, however, include a 4.3 cents/gallon fuel tax. Clinton had backed down, and House Democrats were left feeling abandoned and angry. What happened has as much to do with politics-particularly the fourth branch of government, lobbyists-as with a President who wants to try to please everyone. It turns out that almost every lawmaker or lobbyist who sought an exemption from the Btu tax, in areas as diverse as farming or ship and jet fuel used in international commercial transportation, managed to get it without giving up much in return. In the end, the Btu tax was so riddled with exemptions that its effectiveness as a revenue-raiser was in doubt. Meanwhile, it turns out that the Btu tax is not dead. According to Budget Director Leon Panetta, the Administration has not given up on the Btu tax and will fight for it when the reconciliation bill goes to a joint House-Senate conference.

Burkhart, L.A.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

8

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

9

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment...

10

Materials Week '97: United Thermal Spray Conference - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. Materials Week '97: United Thermal Spray Conference. September 14 -18, 1997 MATERIALS WEEK '97 Indianapolis, Indiana. MW97 Logo...

11

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

12

Economical operation of thermal generating units integrated with smart houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an economic optimal operation strategy for thermal power generation units integrated with smart houses. With the increased competition in retail and power sector reasoned by the deregulation and liberalization of power market make ... Keywords: particle swarm optimization, renewable energy sources, smart grid, smart house, thermal unit commitment

Shantanu Chakraborty; Takayuki Ito; Tomonobu Senjyu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

14

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

15

The behavior of a thermal unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine in this work, the behavior of an isolated area with a group of thermal generation and a load. Here we consider the simplified model of the steam turbine, the system of elementary excitation and the current model of the alternator load and ... Keywords: thermal parameters, wear of transformer

Marius-Constantin O. S. Popescu; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

17

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

18

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

19

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

20

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 3 Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade

22

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

23

Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 29 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumptiona

24

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

26

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 19492012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 19492012

27

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

28

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

May, E.K.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

32

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

33

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

34

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma, 1960 - 2011 1960 33.9 902.0 1,118.9 0.0 NA 17.8 17.8 2,072.6 1961 26.1 976.9 1,119.9 0.0 NA 20.2 20 ...

37

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 589.7 1,771.0 (s) NA 270.2 270.2 2,630.9 1961 0.0 633.8 1,737.7 0.1 NA 248.2 ...

38

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.0 5.0 5.0 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.1 5.1 5.1

39

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas, 1960 - 2011 1960 26.4 6,610.7 5,379.4 0.0 NA 50.2 50.2 12,066.6 1961 26.5 6,690.2 5,447.3 0.0 NA 52.0 ...

40

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana, 1960 - 2011 1960 346.3 0.3 69.9 0.0 NA 24.6 24.6 441.1 1961 336.7 0.4 66.7 0.0 NA 24.2 24.2 428.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 190.5 190.5 190.5 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 188.9 188.9 188.9

42

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 36.2 36.2 36.7 1961 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 35.1 35.1 35.5

43

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at 1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to use an existing glass melter thermal treatment unit (also known as a Penberthy Pyro-Converter joule-heated glass furnace) for the treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive material at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 1995 EA-0821: Finding of No Significant Impact Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department

46

Thermal performance of concrete masonry unit wall systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials, modern building wall technologies now available in the building marketplace, and unique, more accurate, methods of thermal analysis of wall systems create an opportunity to design and erect buildings where thermal envelopes that use masonry wall systems can be more efficient. Thermal performance of the six masonry wall systems is analyzed. Most existing masonry systems are modifications of technologies presented in this paper. Finite difference two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer modeling and unique methods of the clear wall and overall thermal analysis were used. In the design of thermally efficient masonry wall systems is t to know how effectively the insulation material is used and how the insulation shape and its location affect the wall thermal performance. Due to the incorrect shape of the insulation or structural components, hidden thermal shorts cause additional heat losses. In this study, the thermal analysis of the clear wall was enriched with the examination of the thermal properties of the wall details and the study of a quantity defined herein the Thermal Efficiency of the insulation material.

Kosny, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermal Use of Biomass in The United States | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Biomass in The United States of Biomass in The United States Jump to: navigation, search The biomass heat exchanger furnace can burn husklage, wood residue, or other biomass fuels to produce warm air for space heating or for process use such as grain drying. Courtesy of DOE/NREL. Credit - Energetics The United States much less biomass to produce thermal energy even when compared with developed countries. In 2003, the United States only consumed 727 kilotons of oil equivalent (ktoe) of biomass to produce thermal energy while consuming 6,078 ktoe of biomass to produce electricity. On the other hand, Europe consumed 6,978 ktoe of biomass to produce useful thermal energy while consuming 5,663 ktoe of biomass as electricity. In Europe (especially Sweden and other Nordic Countries) the use of biomass for heat

48

Development of a simplified thermal analysis procedure for insulating glass units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A percentage of insulating glass (IG) units break each year due to thermally induced perimeter stresses. The glass industry has known about this problem for many years and an ASTM standard has recently been developed for the design of monolithic glass plates for thermal stresses induced by solar irradiance. It is believed that a similar standard can be developed for IG units if a proper understanding of IG thermal stresses can be developed. The objective of this research is to improve understandings of IG thermal stresses and compare the IG thermal stresses with those that develop in monolithic glass plates given similar environmental conditions. The major difference between the analysis of a monolithic glass plate and an IG unit is energy exchange due to conduction, natural convection, and long wave radiation through the gas space cavity. In IG units, conduction, natural convection, and long wave radiation combine in a nonlinear fashion that frequently requires iterative numerical analyses for determining thermal stresses in certain situations. To simplify the gas space energy exchange, a numerical propagation procedure was developed. The numerical propagation procedure combines the nonlinear effects of conduction, natural convection, and long wave radiation into a single value. Use of this single value closely approximates the nonlinear nature of the gas space energy exchange and simplifies the numerical analysis. The numerical propagation procedure was then coupled with finite element analysis to estimate thermal stresses for both monolithic glass plates and IG units. It is shown that the maximum thermal stresses that develop in IG units increase linearly with input solar irradiance during the transient phase. It is shown that an initial preload stress develops under equilibrium conditions due to the thermal bridge effects of the spacer. It is shown that IG units develop larger thermal stresses than monolithic glass plates under similar environmental conditions. Finally, it is shown that the use of low-e coatings increase IG thermal stresses and that the location of low-e coating as well as environmental conditions affect which glass plate develops larger thermal stresses.

Klam, Jeremy Wayne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA...

50

United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

Fiskum, R.J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

53

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels

54

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

55

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Production: Trade: Stock Change and Other 8: Consumption: Fossil Fuels 2

56

Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports

57

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

58

LS-145 STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE ____________________________________________________________________________________ AIP IEEE CDR APS ____________________________________________________________________________________ ampere A A A A ampere hour Ah Ah A·h A·h ampere turn At A A At angstrom A · A · Å atmosphere, std atm atm atm atm atomic mass unit amu u amu atomic percent at.% - at.% atomic unit a.u. - a.u. atomic weight at.wt. - at.wt. bar bar bar bar bar British Thermal Unit Btu Btu Btu calorie (cgs) cal cal cal centimeter cm cm cm cm coulomb C C C C cubic centimeter cm 3 cm 3 cm 3 cycles per second Hz, cps, Hz, c/s Hz Hz c/s, c/sec cubic meter m 3 m 3 decibel dB dB dB dB decibel above 1 mW dBm - dBm degree (plane angle) ...°, deg ...° ...°,deg ...°, deg degree Celsius °C °C °C °C degree Fahrenheit °F °F °F °F electromagnetic unit

59

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? In 2010, world total primary energy consumption was 511 quadrillion Btu. The United States' primary energy ...

60

Summary of seasonal thermal energy storage field test projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storage of available heat or chill for distribution at a later time to meet thermal loads. STES can reduce energy consumption, peak energy demand, and emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere over conventional systems. It is estimated that full-scale application of STES would provide 2% to 4% of total energy needs in the United States. One STES technology, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), has been determined to be the most cost-effective option in the United States when site conditions enable its use. ATES has been analyzed in the laboratory and investigated in the field in the United States since the program was established at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in 1979. Two field test facilities (FTFs), one for heating ATES at the University of Minnesota and the other for cooling ATES at the University of Alabama, have been primary testing grounds for US ATES research. Computer models have been developed to analyze the complex thermal and fluid dynamics. Extensive monitoring of FTFs has provided verification of and refinements to the computer models. The areas of geochemistry and microbiology have been explored as they apply to the aquifer environment. In general, the two FTFs have been successful in demonstrating the steps needed to make an ATES system operational.

Johnson, B.K.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Fossil Fuels

63

Thermal Imaging of Canals for Remote Detection of Leaks: Evaluation in the United Irrigation District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes our initial analysis of the potential of thermal imaging for detecting leaking canals and pipelines. Thermal imagery (video format) was obtained during a fly over of a portion of the main canal of United Irrigation District. The video was processed to produce individual images, and 45 potential sites were identified as having possible canal leakage problems (see Appendix I for all 45 thermal images). District Management System Team personnel traveled to 11 of the 45 sites to determine if canal leakage was actually occurring. Of the 11 sites, 10 had leakage problems. Thus, thermal image analysis had a success rate of 91% for leak detection. Two sites had leaks classified as severe by the DMS Team. This report also provides a detailed analysis of 4 sites, 3 with leaks and 1 without. For each site, photographs are included showing the source of the leak and/or condition of the canal segment. A literature review of thermal imagery for leak detection is included in Appendix II. Our findings and recommendations are as following: 1. thermal imaging is a promising technique for evaluation of canal conditions and leak detection; 2. the district provide should provide personnel to help the DMS Team verify the remaining 34 sites; and 3. the district should consider correcting the problems identified at sites 7 and 8.

Huang, Yanbo; Fipps, Guy

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Tests with a microcomputer based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer on a 400MW thermal unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field tests have been conducted on a microcomputer-based adaptive synchronous machine stabilizer. The adaptive control algorithm tracks the system operating conditions using a least squares identification technique with variable forgetting factor and the control is calculated by a self-searching pole-shift method. An outline of the control algorithm and the results of field tests on a 400MW thermal generating unit are described in this paper.

Malik, O.P.; Hope, G.S.; Hancock, G.C. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Mao, C.X. (Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)); Prakash, K.S. (Bharat Heavy Electricals, Banglore (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

67

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the greatest challenges facing the nuclear power industry is the final disposition of nuclear waste. To meet the needs of the nuclear power industry, a new fuel assembly design, called DUPLEX, has been developed which provides higher fuel burnups, burns transuranic waste while reducing minor actinides, reduces the long term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, and was developed for use in current light water reactors. The DUPLEX design considered in this thesis is based on a seed and blanket unit (SBU) configuration, where the seed region contains standard UO2 fuel, and the blanket region contains an inert matrix (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 fuel. The research efforts of this thesis are first to consider the higher burnup effects on DUPLEX assembly thermal-hydraulic performance and thermal safety margin over the assemblys expected operational lifetime. In order to accomplish this, an existing burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic methodology for conventional homogeneous fuel assemblies has been updated to meet the modeling needs specific to SBU-type assemblies. The developed framework dramatically expands the capabilities of the latest thermal-hydraulic evaluation framework such that the most promising and unique DUPLEX fuel design can be evaluated. As part of this updated methodology, the posed DUPLEX design is evaluated with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, peak fuel temperatures for both regions, and the peak cladding temperatures, under ANS Condition I, II, and III transient events with the thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. Due to difficulty in the fabrication and handling of minor actinide dioxides, documented thermal conductivity values for the considered IMF design are unavailable. In order to develop a representative thermal conductivity model for use in VIPRE-01, an extensive literature survey on the thermal conductivity of (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 component materials and a comprehensive review of combinatory models was performed. Using the updated methodology, VIPRE-01 is used to perform steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses for the DUPLEX fuel assembly. During loss-of-flow accident scenarios, the DUPLEX design is shown to meet imposed safety criteria. However, using the most conservative thermal conductivity modeling approach for (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2, the blanket region fuel temperatures remain only slightly below the design limit.

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Comprehensive tables giving physical data and thermal energy estimates for young igneous systems of the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two tables are presented. The first is a comprehensive table of 157 young igneous systems in the western United States, giving locations, physical data, and thermal energy estimates, where appropriate for each system. The second table is a list of basaltic fields probably less than 10,000 years old in the western United States.

Smith, R.L.; Shaw, H.R.; Leudke, R.G.; Russell, S.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Analysis of medium-BTU gasification condensates, June 1985-June 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the final results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from biomass gasification systems which are part of the US Department of Energy Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The work described in detail in this report involves extensive analysis of condensates from four medium-BTU gasifiers. The analyses include elemental analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and Ames Assay. This work was an extension of a broader study earlier completed of the condensates of all the gasifers and pyrolyzers in the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recoverd in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. Future studies of the time/temperature relationship to tar composition and the effect of processing atmosphere should be undertaken. Further processing of the condensates either as wastewater treatment or upgrading of the organics to useful products is also recommended. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils, the inability to utilize caking coals, and the inability to accept coal fines. Mansfield Carbon Products, Inc., a subsidiary of A.T. Massey Coal Company, has developed an atmospheric pressure, two-stage process that eliminates these three problems.

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

73

Simulation System on the Thermal Stress and Fatigue Life Loss of Startup and Shutdown for a Domestic 600MW Steam Turbo Generator Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simulation System on the thermal stresses and fatigue life loss of the rotator during startup and shutdown for a domestic 600MW steam turbo generator unit, By means of the analysis of Simulation System on the thermal stress and life loss of the rotor, ... Keywords: steam turbine unit, thermal stress, Fatigue Life Loss, rotator, startup, shutdown

Yunchun Xia

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

75

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 - 2011 1960 796.6 36.9 31.3 0.0 NA 37.0 37.0 901.9 1961 756.0 37.3 32.7 0.0 NA 36.4 36.4 862.4

76

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Economic Analysis of the Self Commitment of Thermal Units Simon Ede, Ray Zimmerman, Timothy Mount, Robert Thomas, William Schulze  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constraints. Liberalization of energy markets worldwide has led not only to the privatization of generation dispatch in the presence of asymmetric information in deregulated markets. The second sectionAn Economic Analysis of the Self Commitment of Thermal Units Simon Ede, Ray Zimmerman, Timothy

78

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

79

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

80

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

82

Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench-scale. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. The project is on schedule and on budget. Task 4, a bench-scale demonstration of the ultra-fast TSA system is complete. Rapid thermal swing of an adsorbent bed using microchannels has been successfully demonstrated and the separation of a 70% methane and 30% nitrogen was purified to 92% methane. The bench-scale demonstration unit was small relative to the system dead volume for the initial phase of experiments and a purge step was added to sweep the dead volume prior to desorbing the bed and measuring purity. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather than air) is used for gasification, the resulting medium Btu gas could be economically transported by pipeline from the gasification sites to the Gulf coast. Technical, environmental, and economic aspects of implementing this technology are discussed.

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give the reader knowledge into utility marketing strategies, rates, and services. Although water is a utility service, this paper will concern itself with the energy utilities, gas and electric. Commonality and diversity exist in the strategies and rates of the gas and electric utilities. Both provide services at no charge which make energy operation for their customers easier, safer and more economical. It is important to become familiar with utility strategies, rates, and services because energy knowledge helps your business operate at the lowest energy cost ($/BTU).

Phillips, J. N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thermal History of the Felsite Unit, Geysers Geothermal Field, From Thermal Modeling of 40Ar/39Ar Incremental Heating Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Pb study was performed of the Geysers plutonic complex of the Geysers Geothermal Field in California. Sixty-nine ion microprobe spot analyses of zircons from four granite samples from the plutonic complex that underlies the Geysers geothermal field yielded Pb-207/Pb-206 vs. U-238/Pb-206 concordia ages ranging from 1.13 {+-} 0.04 Ma to 1.25 {+-} 0.04 Ma. The U-Pb ages coincide closely with Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateau and ''terminal'' ages from coexisting K-feldspars and with the eruption ages of overlying volcanic rocks. The data indicate that the granite crystallized at 1.18 Ma and had cooled below 350 C by {approximately}0.9-1.0 Ma. Interpretation of the feldspar Ar-40/Ar-39 age data using multi-diffusion domain theory indicates that post-emplacement rapid cooling was succeeded either by slower cooling from 350-300 C between 1.0 and 0.4 Ma or transitory reheating to 300-350 C at about 0.4-0.6 Ma. Heat flow calculations constrained with K-feldspar thermal histories and the pre sent elevated regional heal flow anomaly demonstrate that appreciable heat input from sources external to the known Geysers plutonic complex is required to maintain the geothermal system. This requirement is satisfied by either a large, underlying, convecting magma chamber (now solidified) emplaced at 1.2 Ma or episodic intrusion of smaller bodies from 1.2-0.6 Ma.

T. M. Harrison (U of California); G. B. Dalrymple (Oregon State U); J. B. Hulen (U of Utah); M. A. Lanphere; M. Grove; O. M. Lovera

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the technical feasibility and cost of upgrading low-BTU methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys modular microchannel process technology. The objective of Phase II is to demonstrate the process at the bench scale. The project is on schedule and on budget. A technical and economic feasibility assessment was completed in Task 3. The proposed Velocys technology appears feasible for the methane upgrading market. Evaluated categories include adsorbent selection, rapid-cycle valve selection, microchannel manufacturability assessment, and system design and cost. The selected adsorbent, granular microporous carbon from either Barnaby-Sutcliffe or Calgon, experimentally demonstrated sufficient methane capacity under differential temperature at 100 pounds per square inch gauge. Several valve options were identified, including candidates that can operate millions of cycles between refurbishment. The microchannel adsorber and desorber designs were made using internal Velocys manufacturability standards, and the associated costs are acceptable as included with the complete nitrogen rejection unit (NRU) cost projection. A system design and cost estimate was completed for the NRU section of the methane upgrading system. As integrated into the complete system, the cost is in line with the market requirement. The system has six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration will be initiated in the next fiscal year. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electricity in the United States - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline

95

Thermal Energy Storage for the Small Packaged Terminal Air Conditioning Unit. Quarterly progress report, February 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To finalize the IceBear design for full-scale production, build two preproduction prototypes, and confirm cost projections for production and market analysis. The 5 tasks being carried out are: Task 1--Finalize thermal energy storage tank design; Task 2--Finalize internal heat exchanger; Task 3--Finalize refrigerant management and control components; Task 4--Preproduction prototype laboratory testing; and Task 5--Reporting.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Operable Unit 7-13/14 in situ thermal desorption treatability study work plan  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan provides technical details for conducting a treatability study that will evaluate the application of in situ thermal desorption (ISTD) to landfill waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ISTD is a form of thermally enhanced vapor vacuum extraction that heats contaminated soil and waste underground to raise its temperature and thereby vaporize and destroy most organics. An aboveground vapor vacuum collection and treatment system then destroys or absorbs the remaining organics and vents carbon dioxide and water to the atmosphere. The technology is a byproduct of an advanced oil-well thermal extraction program. The purpose of the ISTD treatability study is to fill performance-based data gaps relative to off-gas system performance, administrative feasibility, effects of the treatment on radioactive contaminants, worker safety during mobilization and demobilization, and effects of landfill type waste on the process (time to remediate, subsidence potential, underground fires, etc.). By performing this treatability study, uncertainties associated with ISTD as a selected remedy will be reduced, providing a better foundation of remedial recommendations and ultimate selection of remedial actions for the SDA.

Shaw, P.; Nickelson, D.; Hyde, R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Central and eastern United States: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM  

SciTech Connect

The GEOTHERM sample file contains 119 records for the central and eastern United States. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioisotopic data are occasionally available. 7 refs. (ACR)

Bliss, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen.

Alvares, N.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

1957-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1 ...

107

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

110

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Survey of solar thermal energy storage subsystems for thermal/electric applications  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the current technology and estimated costs of subsystems for storing the thermal energy produced by solar collectors is presented. The systems considered were capable of producing both electricity and space conditioning for three types of loads: a single-family detached residence, an apartment complex of 100 units, and a city of 30,000 residents, containing both single-family residences and apartments. Collector temperatures will be in four ranges: (1) 100 to 250/sup 0/F (used for space heating and single-cycle air conditioners and organic Rankine low-temperature turbines); (2) 300 to 400/sup 0/F (used for dual-cycle air conditioners and low-temperature turbines); (3) 400 to 600/sup 0/F (using fluids from parabolic trough collectors to run Rankine turbines); (4) 800 to 1000/sup 0/F (using fluids from heliostats to run closed-cycle gas turbines and steam Rankine turbines). The solar thermal energy subsystems will require from 60 to 36 x 10/sup 5/ kWhr (2.05 x 10/sup 5/ to 1.23 x 10/sup 10/ Btu) of thermal storage capacity. In addition to sensible heat and latent heat storage materials, several other media were investigated as potential thermal energy storage materials, including the clathrate and semiclathrate hydrates, various metal hydrides, and heat storage based on inorganic chemical reactions.

Segaser, C. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

What are Ccf, Mcf, Btu, and therms? How do I convert ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why am I being charged more for propane than the price on EIA's website? ... How much shale gas is produced in the United States? What are Ccf, Mcf, ...

115

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Potential benefits of distributed PCM thermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the benefits of passive thermal storage by means of phase change material (PCM) distributed throughout the wall and ceiling surfaces of a building, as would occur if the wallboard were impregnated with PCM. Surface heat transfer is expected to be adequate for thermal storage capacity up to 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ of surface area. Sums of daily energy balances during the heating season indicate that use of PCM-impregnated wallboard with a 40-Btu/ft/sup 2/ capacity would provide adequate storage for direct gain systems with the largest practical window area in Denver, Boston, and Fort Worth. It is shown that distributed PCM thermal storage offers the opportunity to obtain several ton-hours of ventilative cooling per night throughout much of the US during July. 17 refs., 9 figs.

Neeper, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cement industry is the most energy-intensive industry in the United States in terms of energy cost as a percentage of the product according to a 1973 report by the Cost of Living Council. Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver Division, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been completed and illustrates very attractive cost benefits realized from waste heat recovery/thermal storage systems. This paper will identify and quantify the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establish uses of this energy, exhibit various energy storage concepts, and present a methodology for selection of most promising energy storage systems. Two storage systems show the best promise - rock beds and draw salt storage. Thermal performance and detailed economic analyses have been performed on these systems and will be presented. Through use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 1013 BTU per year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10 barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for utilization and further development.

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems. Project 8981, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of storing thermal energy at temperatures of 450/sup 0/ to 535/sup 0/C (850/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/F) in the form of latent heat of fusion has been examined for over 30 inorganic salts and salt mixtures. Alkali carbonate mixtures are attractive as phase-change storage materials in this temperature range because of their relatively high storage capacity and thermal conductivity, moderate cost, low volumetric expansion upon melting, low corrosivity, and good chemical stability. An equimolar mixture of Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, which melts at 505/sup 0/C with a latent heat of 148 Btu/lb, was chosen for experimental study. The cyclic charge/discharge behavior of laboratory- and engineering-scale systems was determined and compared with predictions based on a mathematical heat-transfer model that was developed during this program. The thermal performance of one engineering-scale unit remained very stable during 1400 hours of cyclic operation. Several means of improving heat conduction through the solid salt were explored. Areas requiring further investigation have been identified.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Kardas, A.; Paul, L.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermal performance measurements of sealed insulating glass units with low-E coatings using the MoWiTT (Mobile Window Thermal Test) field-test facility  

SciTech Connect

Using data obtained in a mobile field-test facility, measured performance of clear and low-emissivity double-glazing units is presented for south-facing and north-facing orientations. The changes in U-value and shading coefficient resulting from addition of the low-E coating are found to agree with theoretical expectations for the cold spring test conditions. Accurate nighttime U-values were derived from the data and found to agree with calculations. Expected correlation between U-value and wind speed was not observed in the data; a plausible experimental reason for this is advanced.

Klems, J.; Keller, H.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

122

Assessment of thermal damage to polymeric materials by hydrogen deflagration in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations duplicate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building. These data support estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen concentration predictions based on various hydrogen production mechanisms.

Alvares, N.J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Word Pro - Untitled1 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The thermal conversion factors presented in the following tables can be used to estimate the heat content in British thermal units (Btu) of a given amount of energy ...

125

Word Pro - A - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The thermal conversion factors presented in the following tables can be used to estimate the heat content in British thermal units (Btu) of a given amount of energy ...

126

Simulated biomass and soil carbon of loblolly pine and cottonwood plantations across a thermal gradient in southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization were simulated for a 25-year loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation and for three consecutive 7-year short-rotation cottonwood (Populus deltoides) stands. Simulations were conducted for 17 locations in the southeastern United States with mean annual temperatures ranging from 13.1 to 19.4 C. The LINKAGES stand growth model, modified to include the "RothC" soil C and soil N model, simulated tree growth and soil C status. Nitrogen fertilization significantly increased cumulative cottonwood aboveground biomass in the three rotations from a site average of 106 to 272 Mg/ha in 21 years, whereas the equivalent site averages for loblolly pine were unchanged at 176 and 184 Mg/ha in 25 years. Location results, compared on the annual sum of daily mean air temperatures above 5.5 C (growing-degree-days), showed contrasts. Loblolly pine biomass increased whereas cottonwood decreased with increasing growing-degree-days, particularly in cottonwood stands receiving N fertilization. The increment of biomass due to N addition per unit of control biomass (relative response) declined in both plantations with increase in growing-degree-days. Average soil C in loblolly pine stands increased from 24.3 to 40.4 Mg/ha in 25 years and in cottonwood soil C decreased from 14.7 to 13.7 Mg/ha after three 7-year rotations. Soil C did not decrease with increasing growing-degree-days in either plantation type suggesting that global warming may not initially affect soil C. Nitrogen fertilizer increased soil C slightly in cottonwood plantations and had no significant effect on the soil C of loblolly stands.

Luxmoore, Robert J [ORNL; Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

130

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

131

Market potential for solar thermal energy supply systems in the United States industrial and commercial sectors: 1990--2030. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report revises and extends previous work sponsored by the US DOE on the potential industrial market in the United States for solar thermal energy systems and presents a new analysis of the commercial sector market potential. Current and future industrial process heat demand and commercial water heating, space heating and space cooling end-use demands are estimated. The PC Industrial Model (PCIM) and the commercial modules of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM) used by the DOE`s Energy Information Administration (EIA) to support the recent National Energy Strategy (NES) analysis are used to forecast industrial and commercial end-use energy demand respectively. Energy demand is disaggregated by US Census region to account for geographic variation in solar insolation and regional variation in cost of alternative natural gas-fired energy sources. The industrial sector analysis also disaggregates demand by heat medium and temperature range to facilitate process end-use matching with appropriate solar thermal energy supply technologies. The commercial sector analysis disaggregates energy demand by three end uses: water heating, space heating, and space cooling. Generic conceptual designs are created for both industrial and commercial applications. Levelized energy costs (LEC) are calculated for industrial sector applications employing low temperature flat plate collectors for process water preheat; parabolic troughs for intermediate temperature process steam and direct heat industrial application; and parabolic dish technologies for high temperature, direct heat industrial applications. LEC are calculated for commercial sector applications employing parabolic trough technologies for low temperature water and space heating. Cost comparisons are made with natural gas-fired sources for both the industrial market and the commercial market assuming fuel price escalation consistent with NES reference case scenarios for industrial and commercial sector gas markets.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Extension-Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective technology for upgrading coal mine methane to natural gas pipeline quality. Nitrogen rejection is the most costly step with conventional technology and emerging competitive technology. Significant cost reductions to this step will allow for the cost effective capture and utilization of this otherwise potent greenhouse gas. The proposed approach is based on the microchannel technology platform that Velocys is developing to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this application, ultra fast thermal swing adsorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat transfer enabled by microchannels. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. Initial performance results for the Velocys TSA technology were promising. Velocys has also completed initial discussions with several prospective users of the technology and received positive market feedback. Some of the factors that create an attractive opportunity for the technology include the sustained high prices for natural gas, the emerging system of carbon credits, and continued focus on reducing coal mine emissions. While market interest has been confirmed, improvements and optimization are necessary to move the technology to a point that will enable commercial investment in the technology scale-up. In particular, prospective industry collaborators are interested in seeing validation that the technology can meet real-world conditions, including handling impurities, meeting purity and recovery targets (which requires low dead volume), and meeting cost and manufacturability goals. In this quarter, the system adsorbent has been selected--a granular mesoporous carbon. An overall change to the system to move to a phase change fluid for heating and cooling has been projected to significantly reduce the thermal lag of adsorption and desorption unit. Modeling work using the properties of powder carbon has shown that the overall system performance can be achieved, thus negating the need for structured adsorbents. A revised testing protocol for powder adsorbents has been initiated.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

134

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

136

Stewart Thermal Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stewart Thermal Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Stewart Thermal Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product Provides specialist advice in the field of biomass energy....

137

Energy Management A Program of Energy Conservation for the Community College Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glossary I II Btu (British thermal unit). The amount of energyGlossary M Interested Associations N Bibliography Acknowledgments The TEEM concept, or Total Educational Energy

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

coming from renewable energy by 2023. vii List of Acronyms Btu British thermal unit CSP concentrating solar power DER distributed energy resource DG distributed generation DOE...

139

Net income: A company's total earnings, or profit  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Acronyms . API American Petroleum Institute . boe barrels of oil equivalent . Btu British thermal unit . DD&A depreciation, depletion, and amortization

140

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table US12. Total Consumption by Energy End Uses, 2005 Quadrillion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

142

Drilling often results in both oil and natural gas production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar Energy in Brief ... Btu = British thermal units. ... A future Today in Energy article will focus on how drilling efficiency relates to ...

143

Table AP1. Total Households Using Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Electricity

144

Table US14. Average Consumption by Energy End Uses, 2005 Million ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Million British Thermal Units (Btu) per Household U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

145

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE: American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers Btu: British thermal unit CAV: constant air volume CCZ: California climate zone

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Table AC6. Average Consumption for Air-Conditioning by Equipment ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Central System 5 Table AC6. Average Consumption for Air-Conditioning by Equipment Type, 2005 Million British Thermal Units (Btu) per Household

147

Microsoft Word - DOE-FC26-02NT15444 FINAL REVISED_draft5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

None BIBLIOGRAPHY None LISTS OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS AQMD Air Quality Management District BTU British Thermal Units CAISO California Independent System Operator CEC...

148

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

149

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

150

Extension-Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a cost effective technology for upgrading coal mine methane to natural gas pipeline quality. Nitrogen rejection is the most costly step with conventional technology and emerging competitive technology. Significant cost reductions to this step will allow for the cost effective capture and utilization of this otherwise potent greenhouse gas. The proposed approach is based on the microchannel technology platform that Velocys is developing to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this application, ultra fast thermal swing adsorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat transfer enabled by microchannels. Natural gas upgrading systems have six main unit operations: feed compressor, dehydration unit, nitrogen rejection unit, deoxygenator, carbon dioxide scrubber, and a sales compressor. The NRU is the focus of the development program, and a bench-scale demonstration has been initiated. The Velocys NRU system targets producing methane with greater than 96% purity and at least 90% recovery for final commercial operation. A preliminary cost analysis of the methane upgrading system, including the Velocys NRU, suggests that costs below $2.00 per million (MM) BTU methane may be achieved. The cost for a conventional methane upgrading system is well above $2.30 per MM BTU, as benchmarked in an Environmental Protection Agency study. Initial performance results for the Velocys TSA technology were promising. Velocys has also completed initial discussions with several prospective users of the technology and received positive market feedback. Some of the factors that create an attractive opportunity for the technology include the sustained high prices for natural gas, the emerging system of carbon credits, and continued focus on reducing coal mine emissions. While market interest has been confirmed, improvements and optimization are necessary to move the technology to a point that will enable commercial investment in the technology scale-up. In particular, prospective industry collaborators are interested in seeing validation that the technology can meet real-world conditions, including handling impurities, meeting purity and recovery targets (which requires low dead volume), and meeting cost and manufacturability goals.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Definition: Thermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Thermal energy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal energy The kinetic energy associated with the random motions of the molecules of a material or object; often used interchangeably with the terms heat and heat energy. Measured in joules, calories, or Btu.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Thermal energy is the part of the total potential energy and kinetic energy of an object or sample of matter that results in the system temperature. It is represented by the variable Q, and can be measured in Joules. This quantity may be difficult to determine or even meaningless unless the system has attained its temperature only through warming (heating), and not been subjected to work input or output, or any other

152

Solar Thermal/PV | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal/PV Thermal/PV Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

153

Unit Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unit Conversion. ... Unit Conversion Example. "If you have an amount of unit of A, how much is that in unit B?"; Dimensional Analysis; ...

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

154

united stadium. united station.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??DC United is one of Major League Soccers most decorated franchises, yet it still plays its home games within the crumbling confines of RFK Stadium. (more)

Groff, David R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

INEL Operable Unit 7-13 Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration options: INEL Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Systems Analysis project  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Systems Analysis project is to identify and evaluate cradle-to-grave systems for the remediation of Transuranic (TRU)Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The BWID program will use the results of the BWID Systems Analysis in conjunction with identified Department of Energy (DOE) Complex buried waste needs to develop a long-term strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities throughout the DOE system. This report presents Buried Waste Retrieval/Ex Situ Thermal Treatment configuration option concepts in the form of block diagrams. These configuration options are: Retrieval/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; Retrieval/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Melter Treatment; Retrieval/Interim Storage/Metal Sort/Thermal Treatment; and Retrieval/Interim Storage/No Sort/Incineration/Melter Treatment. Each option is presented as a complete end-to-end system.

Richardson, J.G.; Rudin, M.J.; O' Brien, M.C.; Morrison, J.L.; Raivo, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project, Polk Power Station -- Unit No. 1. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This describes the Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project which will use a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 Btu/scf (LHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

CREST Cost of Renewable Energy Spreadsheet Tool: A Model for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the two DSCR tests have passed or failed. * Cubic foot - a unit of volume used to measure biogas * BTU - British Thermal Unit, a unit measuring the energy content of a fuel * Therm...

160

C. A. La Electricidad de Caracas: Feasibility-study definitional report. Arreciffs Units 1 through 5 repowering project, electric power generation expansion Venezuela thermal power plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

C.A. La Electricidad de Caracas (E.de C.) is a private company which in 1991 served some 830,000 customers in an area of 4,160 square kilometers surrounding Caracas. A program is underway by E.de C. for upgrading equipment and expanding the capacity of several of its existing generating facilities. The Arrecifes repowering project will involve the addition of about 330 MW of new natural gas fired gas turbine generators and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) to five existing thermal power units built 30 to 40 years ago which have steam turbine generator sets of 26 to 41 MW each. The existing steam boilers will be removed. The limited but seemingly sufficient space available is to be a primary focus of the feasibility study.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [2.86 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K] and 0.30 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F [1.70 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K]). Turning such windows into ``superwindows,`` windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (1.14 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degree}F (0.57 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Improving the thermal performance of vinyl-framed windows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last five years, vinyl-framed windows have gained an increased market share in both new and retrofit residential construction. This success has been mainly due to their low manufacturing cost and relatively good thermal performance (i.e., total window U-values with double glazing between 0.50 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [2.86 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K] and 0.30 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F [1.70 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K]). Turning such windows into superwindows,'' windows with a U-value of 0.20 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (1.14 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K) or less that can act as passive solar elements even on north-facing orientations in cold climates, requires further significant decreases in heat transfer through both the glazing system and the frame/edge. Three-layer glazing systems (those with two low-emissivity coatings and a low-conductivity gas fill) offer center-of-glass U-values as low as 0.10 Btu/h[center dot]ft[sup 2][center dot][degree]F (0.57 W/m[sup 2][center dot]K); such glazings are being manufactured today and can be incorporated into existing or new vinyl frame profiles. This paper focuses on the use of a state-of the-art infrared imaging system and a two-dimensional finite-difference model to improve the thermal performance of commercially available vinyl profiles and glazing edge systems. Such evaluation tools are extremely useful in identifying exactly which components and design features limit heat transfer and which act as thermal short circuits. Such an analysis is not possible with conventional whole-window testing in hot boxes where testing uncertainties with superwindows are often greater than proposed improvements.

Beck, F.A.; Arasteh, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Legend Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Syntax: LEGEND UNIT units> where is an integer number or parameter in the range 1 to 100 that specifies the legend identifier; and ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

THERMAL RECOVERY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMAL RECOVERY Thermal recovery comprises the techniques of steamflooding, cyclic steam stimulation, and in situ combustion. In steamflooding, high-temperature steam is injected...

167

A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal conductivity, Aau heat capacity per unit volume, Ca,thermal conductivity Ac and heat capacity per unit volumeCc Cw The heat capacity per unit volume of water is All

Doughty, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In English or engineering units, solar radiation is measured in Btu/ft2 (British thermal units per square foot). The average intensity of solar radiation on the outer edge of the earth's atmosphere is 429 Btu, passive solar energy is probably the most cost-effective use of solar energy for space heating

169

DOE/EIA-0304 Survey of Large Combustors:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

consumption in the United States has been approximated at 25 to 26 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu).- Manufacturin g is by far the largest components totaling 12.9...

170

UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

Anna Lee Tonkovich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Solar Thermal Electric Technology: 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status and progress of the solar thermal and concentrating solar power (CSP) industry in 2009. It addresses relevant policies in the United States and internationally, technology status, trends, companies and organizations involved in the field, and modeling activities supported by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Solar Thermal Electric Project (STEP).

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Unit Conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... volume flow units, which contain "atm", assume that the gas is: ideal; at a pressure of 101325 Pa; at a temperature of 0 C. Be aware that the unit "atm ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal direct use developments in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct heat use of geothermal energy in the United States is recognized as one of the alternative energy resources that has proven itself technically and economically, and is commercially available. Developments include space conditioning of buildings, district heating, groundwater heat pumps, greenhouse heating, industrial processing, aquaculture, and swimming pool heating. Forty-four states have experienced significant geothermal direct use development in the last ten years. The total installed capacity is 5.7 billion Btu/hr (1700 MW/sub t/), with an annual energy use of nearly 17,000 billion Btu/yr (4.5 million barrels of oil energy equivalent). In this report we provide an overview of how and where geothermal energy is used, the extent of that use, the economics and growth trends. The data is based on an extensive site data gathering effort by the Geo-Heat Center in the spring of 1988, under contract to the US Department of Energy. 100 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

178

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

179

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

180

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Metric Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: Metric Units, Elevation Converter, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (m), 0, m, ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gas, still gas, manufactured gas, biomass gas, or air or inert gases added for British thermal unit (Btu) stabilization. Annual data beginning with 1980 are from the U.S. Energy...

183

Energy Department Announces Five Research Projects to Improve...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by which very fine coal can be recovered and "dewatered" so that it can be used as power plant fuel. Removing moisture raises the BTU (British Thermal Unit) content of coal,...

184

New Markets. New Solutions.www.evomarkets.com Overview of REC Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; in the form of liquid or gaseous fuels, it is often referred to as biofuels. British Thermal Unit (Btu): One as much). Independent Power Producer: A wholesale electricity producer (other than a qualifying facility

185

Energy Efficiency Report--Glossary  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thermal Unit (Btu): The quantity of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at or near 39.2 degrees Fahrenheit. Census Region: A geographic...

186

Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2(53:35:12). And for an H2O2 distillation process, the two promising fluids are Trifluoroethanol (TFE) + Triethylene Glycol Dimethyl ether (DMETEG) and Ammonia+ Water. Thermo-physical properties calculated by Aspen+ are reasonably accurate. Documentation of the installation of pilot-plants or full commercial units were not found in the literature for validating thermo-physical properties in an operating unit. Therefore, it is essential to install a pilot-scale unit to verify thermo-physical properties of working fluid pairs and validate the overall efficiency of the thermal heat pump at temperatures typical of distillation processes. For an HO2 process, the ammonia-water heat pump system is more compact and preferable than the TFE-DMETEG heat pump. The ammonia-water heat pump is therefore recommended for the H2O2 process. Based on the complex nature of the heat recovery system, we anticipated that capital costs could make investments financially unattractive where steam costs are low, especially where co-generation is involved. We believe that the enhanced heat transfer equipment has the potential to significantly improve the performance of TEE crystallizers, independent of the absorption heat-pump recovery system. Where steam costs are high, more detailed design/cost engineering will be required to verify the economic viability of the technology. Due to the long payback period estimated for the TEE open system, further studies on the TEE system are not warranted unless there are significant future improvements to heat pump technology. For the H2O2 distillation cycle heat pump waste heat recovery system, there were no significant process constraints and the estimated 5 years payback period is encouraging. We therefore recommend further developments of application of the thermal heat pump in the H2O2 distillation process with the focus on the technical and economic viability of heat exchangers equipped with the state-of-the-art enhancements. This will require additional funding for a prototype unit to validate enhanced thermal performances of heat transfer equipment, evaluat

Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

Green Energy Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program Green Energy Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 04/01/2009 State Ohio Program Type Non-Profit Rebate Program Provider Green Energy Ohio With funding from The Sierra Club, Green Energy Ohio (GEO) is offering rebates on residential properties in Ohio for solar water heating systems purchased after April 1, 2009. The rebates are based on the projected energy output from the solar collectors and are calculated at $30 per kBtu/day (based on SRCC rating for "Clear Day/C Interval"). The maximum amount is $2,400 per applicant. There are two parts to the application. PART I of the application collects

188

Yankee hood performance studies; The effect of air balance on thermal efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With today's ever-increasing production rates on tissue-grade machines, many mills experience a need to increase the contribution of Yankee hoods to drying. Until the cylinder is replaced, its contribution to drying is fixed at its maximum drying rate. Consequently, the hoods should be checked routinely to ensure that they run optimally. Most air systems are not gas-or oil-fired, in contrast to the original steam-heated designs. As a result, Yankee air systems are energy intensive. A proper hood balance ensures minimum thermal consumption, or optimum thermal efficiency. Thermal efficiency is defined as the Btu's consumed by the burner per pound of water evaporated by hood. A simple engineering survey, or system examination, allows the papermaker to verify hood performance and balance the air system. In this paper typical data from a such a survey are shown. These surveys can often lead to considerably savings in burner fuel.

Schukov, V. (Yankee Air Systems (US)); Wozny, J. (Enerquin Air Inc., Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermal and cost goal analysis for passive solar heating designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic methodologies developed over the past several years for the design of residential solar systems have been based on life cycle cost (LCC) minimization. Because of uncertainties involving future economic conditions and the varied decision making processes of home designers, builders, and owners, LCC design approaches are not always appropriate. To deal with some of the constraints that enter the design process, and to narrow the number of variables to those that do not depend on future economic conditions, a simplified thermal and cost goal approach for passive designs is presented. Arithmetic and graphical approaches are presented with examples given for each. Goals discussed include simple payback, solar savings fraction, collection area, maximum allowable construction budget, variable cost goals, and Btu savings.

Noll, S.A.; Kirschner, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

191

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

192

Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing Units Title Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing...

193

Automated rapid thermal imaging systems technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major source of energy savings occurs on the thermal envelop of buildings, which amounts to approximately 10% of annual energy usage in the United States. To pursue these savings, energy auditors use closed loop energy ...

Phan, Long N., 1976-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the Districts Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,522 ac-ft of water per year and 3,520,302,471 BTUs (1,031,742 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $341.51 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001574 per BTU ($0.537 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $359.42 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003468 per BTU ($1.183 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.551.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the Districts Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,409 ac-ft of water per year and 4,506,882,727 BTUs (1,320,892 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $325.20 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001113 per BTU ($0.380 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $354.30 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003376 per BTU ($1.152 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.442.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE THERMAL LANDSLIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The large Thermal Landslide overlies the initial area of geothermal development at The Geysers. The landslide is waterbearing while the underlying Franciscan formation bedrock units are essentially non-waterbearing except where affected by hydrothermal alteration. Perched ground water moving through the landslide is heated prior to discharge as spring flow.

Vantine, J.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

197

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

199

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

200

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

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201

The International System of Units (SI) Conversion Factors for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Manufacturers of packaged goods sold in the commercial marketplace are required under ... ton, refrigeration (12 000 Btu/h) kilowatt (kW) 3.516 853 ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Advanced solar thermal technology  

SciTech Connect

The application of dish solar collectors to industrial process heat (IPH) has been reviewed. IPH represents a market for displacement of fossil fuels (10 quads/y). A 10% market penetration would indicate a substantial market for solar thermal systems. Apparently, parabolic dish systems can produce IPH at a lower cost than that of troughs or compound parabolic concentrators, even though dish fabrication costs per unit area are more expensive. Successful tests of point-focusing collectors indicate that these systems can meet the energy requirements for process heat applications. Continued efforts in concentrator and transport technology development are needed. 7 figures.

Leibowitz, L.P.; Hanseth, E.; Liu, T.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thermal Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermal conductivities of polymers and other materials...40,000 2.8 Aluminum 24,000 1.7 Steel 5000 0.35 Granite 350 0.02 Crown glass (75 wt% silica) 90 0.006 Source: Ref 4...

205

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

206

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

207

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

208

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

209

Analysis of the economic potential of solar thermal energy to provide industrial process heat. Final report, Volume I. [In-depth analysis of 78 industries  

SciTech Connect

The process heat data base assembled as the result of this survey includes specific process applications from 78 four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. These applications account for the consumption of 9.81 quadrillion Btu in 1974, about 59 percent of the 16.6 quadrillion Btu estimated to have been used for all process heat in 1974. About 7/sup 1///sub 2/ percent of industrial process heat is used below 212/sup 0/F (100/sup 0/C), and 28 percent below 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C). In this study, the quantitative assessment of the potential of solar thermal energy systems to provide industrial process heat indicates that solar energy has a maximum potential to provide 0.6 quadrillion Btu per year in 1985, and 7.3 quadrillion Btu per year in 2000, in economic competition with the projected costs of conventional fossil fuels for applications having a maximum required temperature of 550/sup 0/ (288/sup 0/C). A wide variety of collector types were compared for performance and cost characteristics. Performance calculations were carried out for a baseline solar system providing hot water in representative cities in six geographical regions within the U.S. Specific industries that should have significant potential for solar process heat for a variety of reasons include food, textiles, chemicals, and primary metals. Lumber and wood products, and paper and allied products also appear to have significant potential. However, good potential applications for solar process heat can be found across the board throughout industry. Finally, an assessment of nontechnical issues that may influence the use of solar process heat in industry showed that the most important issues are the establishment of solar rights, standardization and certification for solar components and systems, and resolution of certain labor-related issues. (Volume 1 of 3 volumes.)

1977-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

212

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

213

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

214

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

215

United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

216

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Performance of Thermal Insulation Containing Microencapsulated Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is dynamic thermal performance microencapsulated phase change material (PCM) blended with loose-fill cellulose insulation. Dynamic hot-box testing and heat-flux measurements have been made for loose-fill cellulose insulation with and without uniformly distributed microencapsulated PCM. The heat flux measurements were made with a heat-flow-meter (HFM) apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 518. Data were obtained for 1.6 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3} cellulose insulation containing 0 to 40 wt% PCM. Heat-flux data resulting from a rapid increase in the temperature on one side of a test specimen initially at uniform temperature were analyzed to access the effect of PCM on total heat flow. The heat flux was affected by the PCM for about 100 minutes after the temperature increase. The total heat flow during this initial period decreased linearly with PCM content from 6.5 Btu/ft{sup 2} at 0% PCM to 0.89 Btu/ft{sup 2} for 40 wt% PCM. The cellulose insulation with PCM discharged heat faster than the untreated cellulose when the hot-side temperature of the test specimen was reduced. In addition, hot-box apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 1363 was utilized for dynamic hot-box testing of a wood stud wall assembly containing PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. Experimental data obtained for wood-frame wall cavities containing cellulose insulation with PCM was compared with results obtained from cavities containing only cellulose insulation.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David [R & D Services; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermal modeling of tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104 with the TEMPEST code  

SciTech Connect

The TEMPEST code was exercised in a preliminary study of double-shell Tanks 241 -AW-101 and 241-AN-104 thermal behavior. The two-dimensional model used is derived from our earlier studies on heat transfer from Tank 241-SY-101. Several changes were made to the model to simulate the waste and conditions in 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104. The nonconvective waste layer was assumed to be 254 cm (100 in.) thick for Tank 241-AW-101, and 381 cm (150 in.) in Tank 241-AN-104. The remaining waste was assumed, for each tank, to consist of a convective layer with a 7.6-cm (3-inch) crust on top. The waste heat loads for 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104 were taken to be 10 kW (3.4E4 Btu/hr) and 12 kW (4.0E4 Btu/hr), respectively. Present model predictions of maximum and convecting waste temperatures are within 1.7{degrees}C (3{degrees}F) of those measured in Tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-104. The difference between the predicted and measured temperature is comparable to the uncertainty of the measurement equipment. These models, therefore, are suitable for estimating the temperatures within the tanks in the event of changing air flows, waste levels, and/or waste configurations.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Recknagle, K.P.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary Heating, Ventilation and Cooling Terminology System Capacity System capacity is a measurement of the total amount of heat or cooling the furnace, heat pump or air conditioner can produce in one hour. This amount is reported in Btu/hr on the nameplate of the equipment. Btu Btu, short for British Thermal Unit is a unit of heat energy. One Btu is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water 1°F. To get a rough idea of how much heat energy this is, the heat given off by burning one wooden kitchen match is approximately one Btu. AFUE The AFUE, or Annualized Fuel Utilization Efficiency, is the ratio of the total useful heat the gas furnace delivers to the house to the heat value of the fuel it consumes. Heat Pump A heat pump is basically an air conditioner with a reversible valve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermoacoustic refrigerators and engines comprising cascading stirling thermodynamic units  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a thermoacoustic assembly and method for improved efficiency. The assembly has a first stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator and at least one additional heat exchanger. The first stage Stirling thermal unit is serially coupled to a first end of a quarter wavelength long coupling tube. A second stage Stirling thermal unit comprising a main ambient heat exchanger, a regenerator, and at least one additional heat exchanger, is serially coupled to a second end of the quarter wavelength long coupling tube.

Backhaus, Scott; Swift, Greg

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam, steam condensate and boiler feedwater in large facilities are described. Insights gained and lessons learned through the actual in-field installation of thermal monitoring equipment for energy savings verification purposes at over 100 sites at various locations throughout the United States are presented.

McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Repowering reheat units with gas turbines: Final report. [Adding gas turbines and heat recovery to present units  

SciTech Connect

Although conventional repowering on nonreheat units replaces existing boilers with gas turbines and heat recovery steam generators, options investigated by Virginia Power use gas turbine waste heat to supplement, rather than replace, the output of existing steam generators. Virginia Power's experience in considering feedwater heater repowering (FHR) and hot windbox repowering (HWR) as repowering options is described here. Studying five plants identified as potential repowering candidates, investigators first evaluated FHR, which uses a gas turbine generator set equipped with an economizer to heat boiler feedwater. This reduces the steam turbine extraction flow and increases the steam turbine capacity. HWR, the second method investigated, routes the hot, relatively oxygen-rich exhaust flow from a gas turbine into the boiler windbox, eliminating the need for an air preheater. A boiler stack gas cooler then heats feedwater, again increasing turbine capacity by reducing extraction steam flow requirements for feedwater heating. FHR provided the lowest installed cost, especially at Mount Storm unit 3, a coal-fired minemouth plant. Use of a gas turbine to heat feedwater at this plant resulted in a $523/kW (1985) installed cost and 124-MWe unit capacity increase at a design incremental heat rate of 8600 Btu/kWh. FHR at Mount Storm units 1, 2, and 3 cost less overall than installation and operation of a new combined cycle. Although the findings and conclusions in this series of repowering reports are largely unique to the individual plants, units, and applications studied, other utilities performing repowering studies can draw on the types of consideration entertained, alternatives examined, and factors and rationale leading to rejection or acceptance of a given repowering approach. 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Rives, J.D.; Catina, J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TWO-STAGE ROBUST UNIT COMMITMENT PROBLEM 1 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demands for a power plant are highly uncertain. ... For a thermal plant to generate power for its customers, there are two phases: 1) Unit commit- ment, i.e. ...

226

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Molten salt thermal energy storage systems: salt selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program aimed at the development of a molten salt thermal energy storage system commenced in June 1976. This topical report describes Work performed under Task I: Salt Selection is described. A total of 31 inorganic salts and salt mixtures, including 9 alkali and alkaline earth carbonate mixtures, were evaluated for their suitability as heat-of-fusion thermal energy storage materials at temperatures of 850 to 1000/sup 0/F. Thermophysical properties, safety hazards, corrosion, and cost of these salts were compared on a common basis. We concluded that because alkali carbonate mixtures show high thermal conductivity, low volumetric expansion on melting, low corrosivity and good stability, they are attractive as heat-of-fusion storage materials in this temperature range. A 35 wt percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-65 wt percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ (50 mole percent Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-50 mole percent K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mixture was selected as a model system for further experimental work. This is a eutectoid mixture having a heat of fusion of 148 Btu/lb (82 cal/g) that forms an equimolar compound, LiKCO/sub 3/. The Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture is intended to serve as a model system to define heat transfer characteristics, potential problems, and to provide ''first-cut'' engineering data required for the prototype system. The cost of a thermal energy storage system containing this mixture cannot be predicted until system characteristics are better defined. However, our comparison of different salts indicated that alkali and alkaline earth chlorides may be more attractive from a salt cost point of view. The long-term corrosion characteristics and the effects of volume change on melting for the chlorides should be investigated to determine their overall suitability as a heat-of-fusion storage medium.

Maru, H.C.; Dullea, J.F.; Huang, V.S.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ferrocyanide safety program: Heat load and thermal characteristics determination for selected tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis was conducted to determine the heat loads, conductivities, and heat distributions of waste tanks 241-BY-105, -106, -108, -110, -111, and 241-C-109 at the Hanford Site. The heat distribution of tank 241-BY-111 was determined to be homogeneously distributed throughout the sludge contained in the tank. All of the other tanks, with the exception of 241-C-109, showed evidence of a heat-producing layer at the bottom of the tanks. No evidence of a heat-producing layer in a position above the bottom was found. The thermal conductivities were determined to be within the ranges found by previous laboratory and computer analysis. The heat loads of the tanks were found to be below 2.81 kW (9,600 Btu/hr).

McLaren, J.M.; Cash, R.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

A solar heating unit is disclosed for disposition exteriorly of a building window for heating the air within the space interiorly of the window embodying a casing with a transverse divider for creating a rear passage and a front passage which are in communication in their lower portions. The upper end of the rear passage connects with the forward end of a rearwardly extending lower duct having a cool air inlet at the rearward end thereof. The upper end of the front passage connects with the forward end of an upper duct progressing rearwardly above the lower duct and with there being a warm air outlet at the rearward extremity thereof. A heat exchanger is disposed within the front passage for impingement thereon of solar radiation passing through a transparent panel defining the front of said casing. A thermal responsive closure is provided at the upper end of said front passage for closing same when the temperature within the front passage has descended to a predetermined level.

Grisbrook, R.B.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2011 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 4, 2011 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

232

Unit Outline Training Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Outline Builder Training Guide Document Status: Final Revision Number: 6.0 Revision Date: 14 Approved #12;Online Unit Outline Builder Training Guide Curtin University of Technology Page 2 TABLE................................................................................................................. 4 4. Log in and Select a Unit Outline

233

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2013 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: MARCH 5, 2013 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

234

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2012 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 2, 2012 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

235

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: CLASSIFICATION / TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2014 FRANKLIN STAFF SERVICE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: ACTUAL NUMBER MEMBER DEADLINE: MARCH 7, 2014 ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit

Arnold, Jonathan

236

Japans use of thermal generation is up since March 2011 due ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, ... Total post-Fukushima fossil fuel consumption peaked at about 500 trillion British thermal units in January 2012 ...

237

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

238

The West Coast Thermal Trough: Climatology and Synoptic Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the West Coast thermal trough (WCTT) is the most important mesoscale feature over the U.S. west coast during the warm season, its initiation, evolution, and structure are not well understood. Originating in the southwest United States, ...

Matthew C. Brewer; Clifford F. Mass; Brian E. Potter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External...

240

Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the pressing need for the United States to reduce our dependence upon fossil fuels, it has become a national priority to develop technologies that allow practical use of renewable energy sources. One such energy source is sunlight. It has the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical success. The primary reason for these disappointments is a misunderstanding of solar energy dynamics by air conditioning designers; combined with a similar misunderstanding by solar engineers of how thermally driven chillers react to the loads and energy sources applied to them. With this in mind, a modeling tool has been developed which provides the flexibility to apply a strategy which can be termed, Optimization by Design.

Leavell, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Peak Load Management of Thermal Loads Using Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 50% of electric energy delivered to residences is converted into some sort of thermal energyhot water, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Storing energy in thermal form is cheaper especially when the medium used to store the energy is an end-use medium for example, hot water. This technical update evaluates two different technologies for storing energyin cold water and in hot water.GreenPeak technology, a storage condensing unit (SCU) from IE Technologies, uses an ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

Uncertainty analysis routine for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) biofouling measurement device and data reduction procedure. [HTCOEF code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofouling and corrosion of heat exchanger surfaces in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems may be controlling factors in the potential success of the OTEC concept. Very little is known about the nature and behavior of marine fouling films at sites potentially suitable for OTEC power plants. To facilitate the acquisition of needed data, a biofouling measurement device developed by Professor J. G. Fetkovich and his associates at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) has been mass produced for use by several organizations in experiments at a variety of ocean sites. The CMU device is designed to detect small changes in thermal resistance associated with the formation of marine microfouling films. An account of the work performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop a computerized uncertainty analysis for estimating experimental uncertainties of results obtained with the CMU biofouling measurement device and data reduction scheme is presented. The analysis program was written as a subroutine to the CMU data reduction code and provides an alternative to the CMU procedure for estimating experimental errors. The PNL code was used to analyze sample data sets taken at Keahole Point, Hawaii; St. Croix, the Virgin Islands; and at a site in the Gulf of Mexico. The uncertainties of the experimental results were found to vary considerably with the conditions under which the data were taken. For example, uncertainties of fouling factors (where fouling factor is defined as the thermal resistance of the biofouling layer) estimated from data taken on a submerged buoy at Keahole Point, Hawaii were found to be consistently within 0.00006 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu, while corresponding values for data taken on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico ranged up to 0.0010 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

Bird, S.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Application guide for 25-ton solar system (unitized)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arkla has developed a unitary solar system for air conditioning, heating and service hot water loads in commercial buildings of up to 25 tons cooling requirement. A semi-exploded view shows the basic elements of the Arkla system. These elements, listed below, are described in individual sections of the guide in sufficient detail to enable a competent designer to duplicate the Arkla unitary system in a site built system. The elements are: (1) collectors with summary procedure guide; (2) storage/receiver; (3) pumps/piping/valves; (4) controls; (5) chiller; (6) cooling tower; (7) gas boiler back-up; (8) central air handling unit; and (9) service and DHW. Any successful solar HVAC system requires careful analysis of the integration of the elements. This is particularly true due to the large year-round variation in the temperature of the solar HW available. Several items of this nature are discussed in the element sections. Consequently, the designer should review this entire guide before proceeding to individual elements particularly A and B. This guide presumes that the monthly (and design) hot water loads have been determined for the heating, cooling, and service-DHW water Btu requirements. In addition to these normal calculations, an hourly profile for a typical day each month should be made. The hourly profile is necessary to maximize the solar fraction for a given amount of collector surface in conjunction with the size of the storage system; that is, the coincidence, or lack of, sunshine to the instantaneous demands.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Heat extraction for the CSPonD thermal storage unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three coiled tube heat exchanger prototypes were designed to extract heat from containers holding 0.5 kg, 2.3 kg, and 10.5 kg of Sodium Nitrate-Potassium Nitrate salt. All of the prototypes were left with an open surface ...

Rojas, Folkers Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An Economic Analysis of the Self Commitment of Thermal Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the load profile of an electricity market and the capabilities of the set of generators supplying power to that market, it is likely that at any given point in time, available supply will exceed demand. If only a subset of generators is required, ...

Simon Ede; Ray Zimmerman; Timothy Mount; Robert Thomas; William Schulze

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

247

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Word Pro - A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thermal Conversion Factor Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation Approximate Heat Content of Petro- leum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Asphalt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) adopted the thermal conversion factor of 6.636 million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petro- leum Statement, Annual, 1956. Aviation Gasoline. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation publication Competition and Growth in Ameri- can Energy Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of histori- cal and projected statistics. Butane. EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conver- sion factor of 4.326 million Btu per barrel as published in

249

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

250

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2014 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: MARCH 7, 2014 PLEASE

Arnold, Jonathan

252

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2012 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 2, 2012

Arnold, Jonathan

253

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2011 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: FRIDAY MARCH 4, 2011

Arnold, Jonathan

254

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nomination Form DEPARTMENT / UNIT: CAMPUS ADDRESS: JOB TITLE: DEPARTMENT EMAIL ADDRESS: DEPARTMENT TELEPHONE: 2013 FRANKLIN STAFF EXCELLENCE AWARDS START DATE IN DEPARTMENT / UNIT: Nominee Information NAME / RESEARCHPROFESSIONAL Signature of Head / Director of Nominee's Unit: NOMINATION PACKET DEADLINE: MARCH 5, 2013 PLEASE

Arnold, Jonathan

255

SolarOil Project, Phase I preliminary design report. [Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the Solar Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (SolarOil) Plant is described in this document. This plant is designed to demonstrate that using solar thermal energy is technically feasible and economically viable in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The SolarOil Plant uses the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) to heat high thermal capacity oil (MCS-2046) to 322/sup 0/C (611/sup 0/F). The hot fluid is pumped from a hot oil storage tank (20 min capacity) through a once-through steam generator which produces 4.8 MPa (700 psi) steam at 80% quality. The plant net output, averaged over 24 hr/day for 365 days/yr, is equivalent to that of a 2.4 MW (8.33 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr) oil-fired steam generator having an 86% availability. The net plant efficiency is 57.3% at equinox noon, a 30%/yr average. The plant will be demonstrated at an oilfield site near Oildale, California.

Baccaglini, G.; Bass, J.; Neill, J.; Nicolayeff, V.; Openshaw, F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

257

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

258

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings...

259

Plasma-Thermal Synthesis  

INLs Plasma-Thermal Synthesis process improves the conversion process for natural gas into liquid hydrocarbon fuels.

260

Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Ravichandran, Jayakanth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Thermal Analysis and Stress Analysis of the Heat-Exchange Pipe Based on ANSYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ANSYS to be as a finite element analysis software has powerful features in thermal analysis and structural analysis. Based on ANSYS thermal analysis function, this paper selects SOLID90 unit, for thermal analysis on the heat-exchange pipe of heat exchanger ... Keywords: ANSYS, temperature distribution, stress distribution

Fenhua Li; Jian Xing; Yuan Liu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

265

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance of the Acurex solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions are presented for the Acurex solar collector, with FEK 244 reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thermal Analysis of a Uranium Silicide Miniplate Irradiation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the thermal analysis for the irradiation of high density uranium-silicide (U3Si2 dispersed in an aluminum matrix and clad in aluminum) booster fuel for a Boosted Fast Flux Loop designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. The purpose of this experiment (designated as Gas Test Loop-1 [GTL-1]) is two-fold: (1) to assess the adequacy of the U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel and the aluminum alloy 6061 cladding, and (2) to verify stability of the fuel cladding boehmite pre-treatment at nominal power levels in the 430 to 615 W/cm2 (2.63 to 3.76 Btu/sin2) range. The GTL-1 experiment relies on a difficult balance between achieving a high heat flux, yet keeping fuel centerline temperature below a specified maximum value throughout an entire operating cycle of the reactor. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux levels and to reveal which experiment parameters place constraints on reactor operations. Analyses were performed to determine the bounding lobe power level at which the experiment could be safely irradiated, yet still provide meaningful data under nominal operating conditions. Then, simulations were conducted for nominal and bounding lobe power levels under steady-state and transient conditions with the experiment in the reactor. Reactivity changes due to a loss of commercial power with pump coast-down to emergency flow or a standard in-pile tube pump discharge break were evaluated. The time after shutdown for which the experiment can be adequately cooled by natural convection cooling was determined using a system thermal hydraulic model. An analysis was performed to establish the required in-reactor cooling time prior to removal of the experiment from the reactor. The inclusion of machining tolerances in the numerical model has a large effect on heat transfer.

Donna Post Guillen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Proceedings of the solar thermal technology conference  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Thermal Technology Conference was held on August 26-28, 1987, at the Marriott Hotel, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories. Topics covered during the conference included a status summary of the Sandia Solar Thermal Development Project, perspectives on central and distributed receiver technology including energy collection and conversion technologies, systems analyses and applications experiments. The proceedings contain summaries (abstracts and principal visual aids) of the presentations made at the conference.

Tyner, C.E. (ed.)

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

RECEIVED JUL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unit (Btu) value at a low cost: coal costs roughly 2.64 per million Btu, while fuel oil costs 7.61 per million Btu. 3 Further, the cost of coal is relatively stable, while...

271

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Units & Calculators ... 2012. Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, ...

272

Definition: Therm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Therm Therm Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Therm A unit of heat containing 100,000 British thermal units (Btu).[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Natural Gas is usually measured by volume in the United States and is stated in cubic feet. A cubic foot of gas is the amount of gas needed to fill a volume of one cubic foot under set conditions of pressure and temperature. To measure larger amounts of natural gas, a "therm" is used to denote 100 cubic feet, and "mcf" is used to denote 1,000 cubic feet. To provide greater accuracy in comparing fuels, energy content is measured in terms of "British Thermal Units (BTU's). " A BTU is the amount of heat required to raise one pound of water (approximately a pint), one degree

273

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

274

International Energy Annual, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

Not Available

1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

276

MODULAR CORE UNITS FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A modular core unit for use in a nuclear reactor is described. Many identical core modules can be placed next to each other to make up a complete core. Such a module includes a cylinder of moderator material surrounding a fuel- containing re-entrant coolant channel. The re-entrant channel provides for the circulation of coolant such as liquid sodium from one end of the core unit, through the fuel region, and back out through the same end as it entered. Thermal insulation surrounds the moderator exterior wall inducing heat to travel inwardly to the coolant channel. Spaces between units may be used to accommodate control rods and support structure, which may be cooled by a secondary gas coolant, independently of the main coolant. (AEC)

Gage, J.F. Jr.; Sherer, D.B.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

BNL United Way Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about Long Island issues and challenges. Because we care, we come together to raise money towards The United Way of Long Island, which provides "services to children and...

278

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CERN, in collaboration with the United States (U.S.) and other non-member states,...

279

Redefining the SI Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and accuracy, simplify and normalize the unit definitions, and liberate the system from dependence on the prototype kilogram, an artifact adopted in ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Base unit definitions: Kilogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Unit of mass (kilogram), Abbreviations: CGPM, CIPM, BIPM. At the end of the 18th century, a kilogram was the mass of a cubic decimeter of water. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

United States Patent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

( 1 of 1 ) United States Patent 6,994,831 Gentile , et al. February 7, 2006 Oxidative tritium decontamination system Abstract The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS,...

282

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South...

283

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle...

284

Rooftop Unit Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

919-943-7291 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Problem Statement * Packaged rooftop units (RTUs)...

285

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'OQOl - United States Government - Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration memorandum January 19, 201 1 DATE. REPLY TO ATTN OF: Y12-60:Gorman SUBJECT ANNUAL...

286

UnitOverview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNIT OVERVIEW A general overview of LHC physics, accelerator and detector design, and how data inform claims and reasoning begins with an exploration of the "Big Questions" that...

287

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel comes in many forms; oxide fuel is the most commonly used in current reactor systems while metal fuel is a promising fuel type for future reactors due to neutronic performance and increased thermal conductivity. As a key heat transfer parameter, thermal conductivity describes the heat transport properties of a material based upon the density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. A materials ability to transport thermal energy through its structure is a measurable property known as thermal diffusivity; the units for thermal diffusivity are given in area per unit time (e.g., m2/s). Current measurement methods for thermal diffusivity include LASER (or light) Flash Analysis and the hot-wire method. This study examines an approach that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA), and it induces a radial transient across a packed sample of microspheres then monitors the temperature profile using an array of thermocouples located at different distances from the source of the thermal transient. From the thermocouple data and an accurate time log, the thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated. Results indicate that DU microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer. At 500C, the thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was 0.431 13% W/m-K compared to approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal. Characterization of the developed apparatus revealed a method that may be useful for measuring the thermal diffusivity of powders and liquids.

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam  

oriented graphite planes, similar to high performance carbon fibers, which have been estimated to exhibit a thermal conductivity greater than 1700 ...

290

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

291

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Composite stabilizer unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sadler, Collin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Carter, Gary D. (Espanola, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Associative list processing unit  

SciTech Connect

An associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and permitting inserts to occur in a single clock cycle if all of the cell blocks are not full. Also, an associative list processing unit and method comprising employing a plurality of prioritized cell blocks and using a tree of prioritized multiplexers descending from the plurality of cell blocks.

Hemmert, Karl Scott; Underwood, Keith D.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Energy Efficiency Rebate Program United Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $2,500 + $150/ton TSGT rebate* Air-Source Heat Pumps: $400 + $125-150/ton TSGT rebate Terminal Units: $235 Energy Star Heat Pump Bonus: $100 - $150 Electric Water Heater: $70 - $650, depending on conditions and features Electric Resistive Heat Units: $350/unit Electric Thermal Storage Units: $350/unit + $16/kW TSGT rebate Energy Star Appliances Refrigerator/Freezer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $75

298

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

299

Thermal masses in leptogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the validity of using thermal masses in the kinematics of final states in the decay rate of heavy neutrinos in leptogenesis calculations. We find that using thermal masses this way is a reasonable approximation, but corrections arise through quantum statistical distribution functions and leptonic quasiparticles.

Kiessig, Clemens P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Asphalt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) adopted the thermal conversion factor of 6.636 million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1956. Aviation Gasoline. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation publication Competition and Growth in American Energy Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of historical and projected statistics. Butane. EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of 4.326 million Btu per barrel as published in the California Oil World and Petroleum

303

Window solar heating unit  

SciTech Connect

The unit may be mounted either in a window or between the studs of a building that is to be supplied with solar heat. The bottom of the unit extends farther from the building than the top and is wider than the top of the unit such that the transparent side away from the building has an arcuate form and is gradually flared outwardly in a downward direction to increase the exposure to the sun during the day. A plurality of absorptive tubes within the unit are slanted from the upper portion of the unit downwardly and outwardly to the front arcuate portion of the bottom. Openings between the unit and the building are provided for air flow, and a thermostatically controlled fan is mounted in one of the openings. A baffle is mounted between the absorptive tubes and the mounting side of the solar heating unit, and the surfaces of the baffle and the absorptive tubes are painted a dull black for absorbing heat transmitted from the sun through the transparent, slanting side.

Davis, E.J.

1978-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

307

Next Generation Rooftop Unit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Rooftop Unit - Next Generation Rooftop Unit - CRADA Bo Shen Oak Ridge National Laboratory shenb@ornl.gov; 865-574-5745 April 3, 2013 ET R&D project in support of DOE/BTO Goal of 50% Reduction in Building Energy Use by 2030. CRADA project with Trane TOP US Commercial HVAC Equipment OEM 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: half of all US commercial floor space cooled by packaged AC units, consumes more than 1.0 Quad source energy/year; highly efficient systems needed

308

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the 2009 Poverty Guidelines for families published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use...

309

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 3Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

310

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 4Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

311

United Cool Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

While our process may start with a "basic model" it is seldom that we fabricate more than a few units that are identical. Therefore, the definition of "basic model" has a large impact on the...

312

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

313

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

314

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

315

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

"- .-A*" (MQ) EfG (07-W) United States Government rrla.g-a Department of Energy memorandum DATE: tlEC 1 F: l??? REPLYTo EM-421 (W. A. W illiams , 903-8149) AJTN OF: SUBJECT:...

316

Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

Guidotti, Ronald Armand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

318

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Performance Analysis of Dual-Fan, Dual-Duct Constant Volume Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units introduce outside air directly into the cooling duct and use two variable speed devices to independently maintain the static pressure of the hot and the cold air ducts. Analytical models have been developed to compare fan power and thermal energy consumption of dualfan, dual-duct constant volume air-handling units with single-fan, dual-duct constant volume airhandling units. This study shows that the dual-fan, dual-duct system uses less fan power and less thermal energy during winter, and uses more thermal energy during summer. Thermal energy performance can be significantly improved if the thermal energy penalty can be decreased or eliminated.

Joo, I. S.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A new method for stochastic production simulation in generation system with multiple hydro units  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new method of calculating loss of load probability, expected energy generation and production cost for units in a generating system with multiple hydro units. The method uses the equivalent load duration curve (ELDC) obtained by convolving the distributions of the original load and the forced outage power loss of all generators. Hydro units are scheduled on the ELDC according to their assigned energy and available capacity. Then the deconvolution procedure is performed to obtain a load duration curve for an equivalent system without hydro units. The expected energy of the thermal units is achieved by convolving the generating units in an economic merit order of loading.

Chen, S.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Upper-Air Synoptic Climatology of the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated, year-round synoptic climatology is developed for the western United States from rawinsonde observations from 1979 to 1988. The classification uses thermal, moisture, and flow parameters to characterize seasonal and interannual ...

Robert E. Davis; David R. Walker

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Damage Evolution in Thermal Barrier Coatings with Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Thermal barrier coatings typically fail on cooling after prolonged thermal cycling by the growth of sub-critical interface separations. Observations...

323

Efficient thermal management for multiprocessor systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.4 Thermal Modeling . . . . . . . .63 Table 4.3: Thermal Hot Spots . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Performance-Efficient Thermal Management . . . . . . . . . .

Co?kun, Ay?e K?v?lc?m

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Severe Storm Observations Using the Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microwave sounding unit (MSU) aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellites contains four channels in the oxygen band, at 50.30, 53.74, 54.96 and 57.95 GHz, which receive thermal radiation originating primarily from four regions ranging from the ...

Norman C. Grody

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Solar Thermal Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

329

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.810 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 26.304 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short ton 23.651 Residential and commercial .................... million Btu per short ton 20.698 Electric power sector ............................... million Btu per short ton 19.370

330

Review and summary of Solar Thermal Conversion Program planning assistance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Conversion Program comprises a major part of the national solar energy program which must be continuously reviewed and modified where necessary. Modifications are typically required to reflect technical achievements and uncertainties which arise from within the program or from other technical programs, changes in budgets available for supporting the program as well as internal program funding priorities, changing goals such as through acceleration or stretch-out of the program schedule, significant organizational changes involving responsible governmental agencies, the introduction of new project management support contractors, and required budget or schedule changes occurring within individual projects that make up the Solar Thermal Conversion Program. The Aerospace Corporation has provided data to assist in planning, review, coordination, and documentation of the overall Solar Thermal Conversion Program. The Solar Thermal Conversion Program Plan is described in detail. Sections 2.0 through 5.0 cover the discussion and detail planning covering the objectives, justification, basic and alternative plans, budgets, and schedules for the Solar Thermal sub-unit portion of the Solar Electric Applications effort. Appendices B1, B2, and B3 include the March 21, March 28, and April 5, 1975, Program Plan submissions of the complete Solar Electric Applications effort. In Appendix B the Solar Thermal, Solar Photovoltaic, Wind Energy, and Ocean Thermal sub-unit texts have been condensed and formatted for integration in the overall ERDA budget package. (WHK)

Not Available

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge

332

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

334

Comparison of Thermal Insulation Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is about comparing of different thermal insulation materials of different manufactures. In our days there are a lot of different thermal insulation materials (more)

Chaykovskiy, German

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Integrability vs Quantum Thermalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-integrability is often taken as a prerequisite for quantum thermalization. Still, a generally accepted definition of quantum integrability is lacking. With the basis in the driven Rabi model we discuss this careless usage of the term "integrability" in connection to quantum thermalization. The model would be classified as non-integrable according to the most commonly used definitions, for example, the only preserved quantity is the total energy. Despite this fact, a thorough analysis conjectures that the system will not thermalize. Thus, our findings suggest first of all (i) that care should be paid when linking non-integrability with thermalization, and secondly (ii) that the standardly used definitions for quantum integrability are unsatisfactory.

Jonas Larson

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

336

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Properties of Thermal Glueballs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the 0++ glueball at finite temperature using SU(3) quenched lattice QCD. We find a significant thermal effects near T_c. We perform the \\chi^2 fit analyses adopting two Ansaetze for the spectral function, i.e., the conventional narrow-peak Ansatz and an advanced Breit-Wigner Ansatz. The latter is an extension of the former, taking account of the appearance of the thermal width at T>0. We also perform the MEM analysis. These analyses indicate that the thermal effect on the glueball is a significant thermal-width broadening \\Gamma(T_c) \\sim 300 MeV together with a modest reduction in the peak center \\Delta\\omega_0(T_c) \\sim 100 MeV.

Noriyoshi Ishii; Hideo Suganuma

2003-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Thermal springs of Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Solar Thermal Manufacturing Activities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report, Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities, providesan overview and tables with historical data spanning 2000-2009. These tables willcorrespond to similar tables to be presented in the Renewable Energy Annual 2009 andare numbered accordingly.

Michele Simmons

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

344

Second United Nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nations Nations . DISCLAIMER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

345

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG .2/06 WED 17:02 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ . 001 United States Government Department of Energy Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 9, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-07 REPLY TO ATTN OF; IG-32 (A050R014) SUBJECT: Audit of "The Department's Management of United States Enrichment Corporation Site Services" TO: Manager, Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office INTRODUCTTON AND OBJECTIVE The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), located in western Kentucky, was constructed by the Department of Energy (Department) in the early 1950s to enrich uranium for use in various military and commercial applications. The Department operated the plant until the Energy Policy Act of 1992 created the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) as a Government-owned

346

Field Demonstration of a High-Efficiency Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioning Unit at Fort Gordon, Augusta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger program targeting the market transformation of packaged rooftop air conditioning, five high-efficiency rooftop air conditioning products were selected in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Unitary Air Conditioner (UAC) Technology Procurement (http://www.pnl.gov/uac). In February 2003, Fort Gordon in Augusta, Georgia was chosen as the demonstration site. With the goal of validating the field performance and operation of one of the awarded products, a 10-ton high-efficiency packaged rooftop unit (RTU) manufactured by Global Energy Group (GEG) was installed at Fort Gordon in October 2003. Following equipment installation, power metering, air- and refrigerant-side instrumentation was installed on the GEG RTU and a 4-year old typical-efficiency 20-ton RTU manufactured by AAON . The GEG and AAON units were instrumented identically and operated May through July, 2005, to observe performance under a range of conditions. Based on the data collected as part of this demonstration, the GEG equipment performed at least 8% better in stage-1 (single compressor running) cooling and at least 16% better in stage-2 (both compressors running) than the baseline AAON equipment. Performance comparisons are based on what we call application EER normalized to equivalent specific fan power. The full-load, specific-fan-power-normalized application EERs at ARI design conditions were 10.48 Btu/Wh for the GEG and 9.00 Btu/Wh for the baseline machine. With a cost premium of nearly 50%, and slightly higher maintenance costs, the life-cycle cost analysis shows that the GEG technology pays for itself--a positive net-present value (NPV)--only in climates and buildings with long cooling seasons. Manufacture of this equipment on a larger scale can be expected to reduce costs to the point where it is more broadly cost-effective. The assumed 10-ton baseline and new-technology unit costs are $3824.00 and $5525.00 respectively. If the new technology cost is assumed to drop as sales increase to $4674.50 for a 10-ton unit (i.e. the original cost difference is halved), the life-cycle costs improve. A grid of first cost, annual maintenance cost and electricity price is enumerated and the results presented in the report show the sensitivity of life cycle cost to these three financial parameters in each of eight different climates.

Armstrong, Peter R.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

C. Uniform Unit Pricing Regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to permit retail stores that voluntarily provide unit pricing to present prices using various ... with requirements that specify that the unit price is to be ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

348

United Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name United Biofuels Place York, Pennsylvania Product Waste and animal fats to biofuel producer, switched to animal fats from soy in...

349

Exemplary Units Markup Language usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample UnitsML tools and usage. ... Its usage is limited to demonstrating capabilities of plain XSLT processing with the data stored in UnitsML. ...

350

United States lubricant demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines United States Lubricant Demand for Automotive and Industrial Lubricants by year from 1978 to 1992 and 1997. Projected total United States Lubricant Demand for 1988 is 2,725 million (or MM) gallons. Automotive oils are expected to account for 1,469MM gallons or (53.9%), greases 59MM gallons (or 2.2%), and Industrial oils will account for the remaining 1,197MM gallons (or 43.9%) in 1988. This proportional relationship between Automotive and Industrial is projected to remain relatively constant until 1992 and out to 1997. Projections for individual years between 1978 to 1992 and 1997 are summarized.

Solomon, L.K.; Pruitt, P.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermal Performance Engineer's Handbook: Introduction to Thermal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-volume Thermal Performance Engineer Handbook will assist thermal performance engineers in identifying and investigating the cause of megawatt (MWe) losses as well as in proposing new ways to increase MWe output. Volume 1 contains a thermal performance primer to provide a brief review of thermodynamic principles involved in the stream power plant thermal cycle. The primer also contains brief descriptions of the equipment and systems in the cycle that can be sources of thermal losses. Also in Volum...

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Solving Unit Commitment by a Unit Decommitment Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand, and operating constraints such as spinning reserve requirements, over a short time horizon of power unit i is generating in time period t pmin i pmax i : minimum maximum rated capacity of unit i rmax i : maximum reserve for unit i ripit : reserve available from unit i in time period t minrmax i

353

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermal Management ofUniversity of California, Riverside Acknowledgments First, I

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

355

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

COOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The CRU program expects to continue to work with cooperators in identify- ing high priority hiring actions Cooperators' Coalition (NCC) for the CRU program, which targets efforts in CRU to (i) find new ways to workCOOPERATIVE RESEARCH UNITS2009 Year In Review PROGRAM YEAR IN REVIEW In Fiscal Year (FY) 2009

357

High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Solar-thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Solar thermal power systems. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work accomplished by the Aerospace Corporation from April 1973 through November 1979 in the mission analysis of solar thermal power systems is summarized. Sponsorship of this effort was initiated by the National Science Foundation, continued by the Energy Research and Development Administration, and most recently directed by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Solar Thermal Systems. Major findings and conclusions are sumarized for large power systems, small power systems, solar total energy systems, and solar irrigation systems, as well as special studies in the areas of energy storage, industrial process heat, and solar fuels and chemicals. The various data bases and computer programs utilized in these studies are described, and tables are provided listing financial and solar cost assumptions for each study. An extensive bibliography is included to facilitate review of specific study results and methodology.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

(Continued on page 2) Waste-to-Energy Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 7700 Btu/lb University of Iowa Main Power Plant's Boiler 10 A boiler unit rated at 170,000 lb/h steam-fireB Averages 61.3 ± 0.7 0.0060 ± 0.003 131 ± 4 % DifferenceC -17.7% -81.2% -18.3 Iowa Main Power Plant's Boiler value (LHV) of the gas by 8.5%, from 569 British thermal units per standard cubic foot (Btu/scf) to 617

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

362

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

363

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

364

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

365

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

366

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

367

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

368

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1997-Jan : 01/10 : 3.79 : ...

369

Figure 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.1. 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013

370

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

371

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

372

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

373

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

374

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: BTU QuickConverter | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

376

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1963 54.3 228.1 837.6 0.0 na 10.6 10.6 1,130.6 ... 1976 562.9 339.4 778.1 0.0 na 12.5 12.5 1,692.9 ... 2010 7,658.3 2,521.3 r 308.8 r 0.0 0.9 43.5 r ...

377

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuelsa Nuclear Electric Power Renew-able Energyb Total Imports Exports Net Importsc ... fuel ethanol stock change; and biodiesel stock change and balancing item.

378

POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

380

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

382

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

383

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

384

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

385

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

386

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

387

Where Wood Works Harnessing the Energy of Woody Biomass in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Many coal-fired power plants can be adapted to use a blend of wood chips and coal, a process called "co by a central combined heat and power (CHP) power plant fueled by 80% biomass. The system produces up to 25 MW are needed. Heat Energy Measurements. A Btu (British Thermal Unit) is a common measurement of heat. About 1

388

Jerry M. Harris, Olusoga Martins Akintunde*, Tapan Mukerji and Jaime Urban, Department of Geophysics, Stanford University.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................ 223 Figure 29 Mine Void and CoalBed Methane Wells in Indiana Base Realignment And Closure BTU British Thermal Unit CBM CoalBed Methane CCS Carbon Capture Department of Energy ECBM enhanced coal bed methane EIA Energy Information Agency EOR Enhanced Oil

Harris, Jerry M.

389

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy ­ Page 1 Argonne greenhouse gas emissions. In terms of key energy and environmental benefits, cornstarch ethanol comes out. This figure illustrates the energy inputs used to produce and deliver a million British Thermal Units (Btu

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

390

Bronx Zoo Fuel Cell Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 200 kW Fuel Cell has been installed in the Lion House, Bronx Zoo, NY. The Fuel Cell is a 200 kW phosphoric acid type manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and will provide thermal energy at 725,000 Btu/hr.

Hoang Pham

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solar thermal repowering systems integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a solar repowering integration analysis which defines the balance-of-plant characteristics and costs associated with the solar thermal repowering of existing gas/oil-fired electric generating plants. Solar repowering interface requirements for water/steam and salt or sodium-cooled central receivers are defined for unit sizes ranging from 50 MWe non-reheat to 350 MWe reheat. Finally balance-of-plant cost estimates are presented for each of six combinations of plant type, receiver type and percent solar repowering.

Dubberly, L. J.; Gormely, J. E.; McKenzie, A. W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Essentials of the SI: Base & derived units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 1. SI base units. SI base unit. Base quantity, Name, Symbol. length, meter, m. ... Table 2. Examples of SI derived units. SI derived unit. ...

399

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . uv /uu/u* ±.u.. J.OJ..L rAA , *. . 'A4 .. ± OO, I U444 flmI I.j102 ' -f- $I)002 EP<.1 (o-.vu) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: January 30, 2004 REP.YTO: IG-35 (A03DN039) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-10 SUBJECT: Audit of the Safeguards and Security Program at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site To: Frazer Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Field Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Because of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy (Department) instituted additional security requirements beyond those already in place for normal security operations. These "Security Conditions" requirements were established by Department Notice 473.8 (Notice). The requirements are based on

400

l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT lb 15 SUBJECT: THORFJM PROCURENENT PMF'N:TBU Jesse C. Johnson, Gtnager of IRaw Materials Operations3s.Office 3 R. W. Cook, Director of Production ~',LL:::+ I--- DATE: MAR ! 9 1951 The following list of suppliers of thorium and the amounts of materials procured from them by the Mew York Operations Office during calendar year 1950 is being supplied in accordance with Mr. Spelmanls telephone request of March 19. Thorium Lannett Bleachery iinde Air Products Co. Lindsey Light & Chemical Co. lliscellaneous NY0 Liscensing Division Rare Earths, Inc. Wolff-Alport Total - (kilograms) 179 38,2;2 -3 4,210 /vyeoi 4 -q- 2 : i ' \ iti 1 i 0 ;;\I:' --' I F 10 i;;;?/ \ --' L & ;:I :,- :,j( EZi 5 1 :' -I I ri _ I ' R i; .- . )- .i

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ng ng United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: APR 18 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02PR010) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-15 SUBJECT: Audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program TO: Director, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program, EE-2K The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Weatherization Assistance Program. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Weatherization Assistance Program (Program) was established to increase energy efficiency in dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons to reduce their residential energy expenditures and improve their health and safety. Since its inception in 1976, the Program has reported that approximately 5 million dwelling units owned or occupied by low-income individuals have been weatherized.

402

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE r 1325.0 OE r 1325.0 (01.93) United States Government Department of memorandum DATE: March 23, 2006 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-09 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A060R040) SUBJECT: Audit of"The Department of Energy's Management of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve" TO, Deputy Assistant Secrctary for Petroleum Reserves INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Energy Act of 2000 authorized the Secretary of Energy to create a Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (Reserve). The Reserve was established as an "emergency buffer" to supplement commercial supplies should a severe supply disruption occur in the heavily heating oil-dependent northeast United States. The Reserve consists of 2 million barrels of emergency home heating oil, enough to provide Northeast consumers adequate supplies for approximately

403

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States Government United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: July 29, 2005 REPLY TO ATTN TO: IG-34 (A05HQ002) Audit Report No. OAS-L-05-10 SUBJECT: Agreed-Upon Procedures for Federal Payroll TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget, and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin No. 01-02, "Audit Requirements for Federal Financial Statement," dated October 16, 2000, requires an annual audit of civilian payroll of executive departments and other Government agencies. Auditors are required to follow the agreed-upon procedures in Appendix I-1 of OMB Bulletin No. 01-02, to assess the reasonableness of life insurance, health benefits, and retirement withholdings and contributions.

404

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Menxmmhmz 9 Menxmmhmz 9 1 / UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT i TO : ThcFFles . mx.f I A. B. Piccct, +3lation section : DATE: .@.eti 16, 1949 SUBJECT: VISIT To HAVY OFfDHAlfCE DEPOT, EARIZ, B.J. FmmlTo ,sYmOL: DH:ARP . . : OnJuly 8,&g the uriterattendedameeting at the Navy Oxdnce Depot at Farle, Ii. J. for the purpose of advising the navy on i-adlatlon hazards involved In the dmping of contadnated AEC wastes at /?ea. " Presint were: J. Cook - Traffic & Transportation, AEC ~J.Moren- Utilifation, AEC ..J. Ccnmigl.io - Chief of Middlesex Operaticns A. PIhot -~Hadiation Section, AEC Captain Blossoin - Navy Captain hall - Navy ThefoSkndngwas agreedupcmby AFC andthe l&v. 1. 2. 3. 4. Contaminatedmaterial dnmied, I (loose in case of large contaminated units) loaded on truck&and lsonltored at'

405

United States Environmental Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EPA 60014-91/030 EPA 60014-91/030 Environmental Protection Systems Laboratory DOE/DP00539-063 Agency P.O. Box 93478 Las Vegas NV 891 93-3478 Research and Development Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: 1 - 3 5 Radiation Monitorina Around * / (- P 7 1 United States ~ u c l g a r Test Areas Calendar Year 1990 This page intentionally left blank EPN60014-90 DOWDP Offsite Environmental Monitoring Report: Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1990 Contributors: D.J. Chaloud, B.B. Dicey, D.G. Easterly, C.A. Fontana, R.W. Holloway, A.A. Mullen, V.E. Niemann, W.G. Phillips, D.D. Smith, N.R. Sunderland, D.J. Thome, and Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy under Interagency Agreement Number DE-A108-86-NV10522

406

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS THERMAL PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS ON ULTIMATE HEAT SINKS - COOLING PONDS R. K. Hadlock 0 . B. Abbey Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories Prepared for U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission b + NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, nor assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, pro- duct or process disclosed, nor represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. F Available from National Technical Information Service

407

Laser system preset unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electronic circuit is provided which may be used to preset a digital display unit of a Zeeman-effect layer interferometer system which derives distance measurements by comparing a reference signal to a Doppler signal generated at the output of the interferometer laser head. The circuit presets dimensional offsets in the interferometer digital display by electronically inducing a variation in either the Doppler signal or the reference signal, depending upon the direction of the offset, to achieve the desired display preset.

Goodwin, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Monitored Thermal Performance Results of Second Generation Superwindows in Three Montana Residences.  

SciTech Connect

Simulation studies have shown that highly insulating windows with moderate solar transmittances (R values greater than 6 hr-ft[sup 2]--F/Btu and shading coefficients greater than 0.5) can outperform insulated walls on any orientation, even in a northern US climate. Such superwindows achieve this feat by admitting more useful solar heat gains during the heating season than energy lost through conduction, convection and infrared radiation. Testing of first generation superwindows in three new homes in northern Montana during the winter of 1989--1990, reported in an earlier study, indicated that the glazed areas of superwindows can in fact outperform insulated walls on obstructed off-south orientations. However, this same study also showed that further improvements in the thermal performance of window edges and frames are necessary if the entire window is to outperform an insulated wall. As a result, second generation superwindows with improved frame, edge, and glazing features were installed in these houses during the summer and fall of 1990 and these windows were monitored during the winter of 1990--1991. Results from this monitoring effort, discussed in this paper, showed that while small performance improvements may have been made with these second generation superwindows, the frame and edge still limited performance.

Arasteh, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hoechst plans Mexican unit  

SciTech Connect

Hoechst is considering plans to build its first ethoxylates project in Mexico, Mark Sijthoff, head of surfactants and auxiliaries for Hoechst`s specialty chemical business unit, tells CW. The company expects to make a decision on the 30,000-m.t./year project by the end of the year. Sijthoff would not disclose the site or where ethylene oxide (EO) feed would be obtained. The plan may depend on results of the privatization of Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), which is the only producer of EO in Mexico. Hoechst is part of a consortium bidding on the privatization. Sources say the unit will be built at Quimica Hoechst`s Coatzacoalcos site, close to Pemex`s EO plants at Cangregera and Morelos. A planned EO expansion at Morelos will probably move ahead when the sell-off is completed. Sijthoff says that Hoechst is also looking at improving its US surfactants position, although the company has no plans to expand ethoxylates, as there is {open_quotes}plenty of capacity.{close_quotes} Hoechst started up a 150-million lbs/year plant at Clear Lake, TX last year, ending a tolling agreement with Union Carbide. In addition, Rhone-Poulenc recently started a unit at Marcus Hook, PA, and Condea Vista is doubling its ethoxylation capacity at Lake Charles, LA. Meanwhile, Hoechst is still considering construction of 30,000-m.t./year ethoxylation plant in India or China. A decision is expected later this year.

Wood, A.; Alperowicz, N.

1996-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Reactor Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal barrier coating  

SciTech Connect

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Solar thermal financing guidebook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal contact conductance is highly important in a wide variety of applications, from the cooling of electronic chips to the thermal management of spacecraft. The demand for increased efficiency means that components need to withstand higher temperatures and heat transfer rates. Many situations call for contact heat transfer through nominally cylindrical interfaces, yet relatively few studies of contact conductance through cylindrical interfaces have been undertaken. This study presents a review of the experimental and theoretical investigations of the heat transfer characteristics of composite cylinders, presenting data available in open literature in comparison with relevant correlations. The present investigation presents a study of the thermal contact conductance of cylindrical interfaces. The experimental investigation of sixteen different material combinations offers an opportunity to develop predictive correlations of the contact conductance, in conjunction with an analysis of the interface pressure as a function of the thermal state of the individual cylindrical shells. Experimental results of the present study are compared with previously published conductance data and conductance models.

Ayers, George Harold

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since terminal boxes do not have a modulation damper in constant volume (CV) air handling unit (AHU) systems, zone reheat coils have to be modulated to maintain the space temperature with constant supply airflow. This conventional control sequence causes a significant amount of reheat and constant fan power under partial load conditions. Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) can be installed on these constant air volume systems. The fan speed can be modulated based on the maximum zone load. This paper present the procedure to control the supply fan speed and analyzes the thermal performance and major fan energy and thermal energy savings without expensive VAV retrofit through the actual system operation.

Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mathematical structure of unit systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the mathematical structure of unit systems and the relations between them. Looking over the entire set of unit systems, we can find a mathematical structure that is called preorder (or quasi-order). For some pair of unit systems, there exists a relation of preorder such that one unit system is transferable to the other unit system. The transfer (or conversion) is possible only when all of the quantities distinguishable in the latter system are always distinguishable in the former system. By utilizing this structure, we can systematically compare the representations in different unit systems. Especially, the equivalence class of unit systems (EUS) plays an important role because the representations of physical quantities and equations are of the same form in unit systems belonging to an EUS. The dimension of quantities is uniquely defined in each EUS. The EUS's form a partially ordered set. Using these mathematical structures, unit systems and EUS's are systematically classified and organized as a hierarchical tree.

Masao Kitano

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Design of solar water-heater installations for seasonal users of thermal energy  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed for a solar water-heating unit intended to be employed by seasonal users of thermal energy. The expected characteristics of such units are calculated for an ''average'' operating season.

Valyuzhinich, A.A.; Myshko, Yu.L.; Smirnov, S.I.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

422

Links to on-line unit conversions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Basic physical quantities. General unit, currency, and temperature conversion. ... Many conversions, including unusual and ancient units. ...

423

THERMAL INSULATION MATERIALS TEST METHOD ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... _____ 01/W01 CAN/CGSB-51.2-M88 Thermal Insulation, Calcium Silicate, for Piping, Machinery and Boilers _____ ...

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

NVLAP Thermal Insulation Materials LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for thermal insulation materials. The final report for Round 31 was released in February 2010. Proficiency testing is on hold ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Holographic Thermal Helicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal helicity, defined in arXiv:1211.3850, of a conformal field theory with anomalies in the context of AdS$_{2n+1}$/CFT$_{2n}$. To do so, we consider large charged rotating AdS black holes in the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant using fluid/gravity expansion. We compute the anomaly-induced current and stress tensor of the dual CFT in leading order of the fluid/gravity derivative expansion and show their agreement with the field theoretical replacement rule for the thermal helicity. Such replacement rule is reflected in the bulk by new replacement rules obeyed by the Hall currents around the black hole.

Tatsuo Azeyanagi; R. Loganayagam; Gim Seng Ng; Maria J. Rodriguez

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

Thermally stable diamond brazing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermal spallation drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal spallation drilling is an underdeveloped process with great potential for reducing the costs of drilling holes and mining shafts and tunnels in most very hard rocks. Industry has used this process to drill blast holes for emplacing explosives and to quarry granite. Some theoretical work has been performed, and many signs point to a great future for this process. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has studied the theory of the spallation process and is conducting experiments to prove out the system and to adapt it for use with a conventional rotary rig. This report describes work that has been accomplished at the Laboratory on the development of thermal spallation drilling and some work that is projected for the future on the system. 3 references, 3 figures.

Williams, R.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

431

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 4 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived ...

432

Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphenes thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

Subrina, Samia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arens E. , and Wang D. 2004. "Thermal sensation and comfortin transient non-uniform thermal environments", European7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments Determination of

Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

Ghosh, Suchismita

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Standard 55-2004: Thermal environmental conditionsA behavioural approach to thermal comfort assessment inBerger, X. , 1998. Human thermal comfort at Nimes in summer

Stoops, John L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

Spinrad, B.I.

1960-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

440

Concentrating Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After nearly 20 years of commercial dormancy, concentrating solar thermal (CST) power development and investment activity is heating up globally. Encouraged by volatile energy prices, carbon markets, and renewable-friendly policies, an increasing number of established companies, newcomers, utilities, and government agencies are planning to deploy CST systems to tap the technologies' improving conversion efficiencies and low-cost electricity production potential. This renewable energy technology perspecti...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in...

444

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)...

445

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

446

Thermal regimes of Malaysian sedimentary basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly corrected and calibrated thermal data are important in estimating source-rock maturation, diagenetics, evolution of reservoirs, pressure regimes, and hydrodynamics. Geothermal gradient, thermal conductivity, and heat flow have been determined for the sedimentary succession penetrated by exploratory wells in Malaysia. Geothermal gradient and heat-flow maps show that the highest average values are in the Malay Basin. The values in the Sarawak basin are intermediate between those of the Malay basin and the Sabah Basin, which contains the lowest average values. Temperature data were analyzed from more than 400 wells. An important parameter that was studied in detail is the circulation time. The correct circulation time is essential in determining the correct geothermal gradient of a well. It was found that the most suitable circulation time for the Sabah Basin is 20 hr, 30 hr for the Sarawak Basin and 40 hr for the Malay Basin. Values of thermal conductivity, determined from measurement and calibrated calculations, were grouped according to depositional units and cycles in each basin.

Abdul Halim, M.F. (Petronas Research and Scientific Services, Selangor (Malaysia))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Current Name Academic Unit Request  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current Name Academic Unit Request Department/College/School/Institute/Center Names: New or Changes This form is to be used to request new academic units (departments, colleges, schools, institutes, or centers) or to request changes to existing academic units. Complete the following and submit

Hart, Gus

448

Experience base for Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems: A preliminary survey  

SciTech Connect

In the process of considering thermal technologies for potential treatment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory mixed transuranic contaminated wastes, a preliminary survey of the experience base available from Radioactive Waste Thermal Processing Systems is reported. A list of known commercial radioactive waste facilities in the United States and some international thermal treatment facilities are provided. Survey focus is upon the US Department of Energy thermal treatment facilities. A brief facility description and a preliminary summary of facility status, and problems experienced is provided for a selected subset of the DOE facilities.

Mayberry, J.; Geimer, R.; Gillins, R.; Steverson, E.M.; Dalton, D. (Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Anderson, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Verti Jack Pumping Unit evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Verti Jack Pumping Unit was tested primarily to establish the energy comsumption efficiency of the unit as compared with that of conventional pumping unit. Before the unit was field tested, extensive static testing was performed to determine the effect of the counterbalance system throughout the operational cycle. The field test included comparing the performance of the Verti Jack Unit and conventional pump jacks - a Bethlehem 16 and Cabot 25 pumping unit. The Verti Jack unit was operated at four different pumping conditions. The Verti Jack unit peformed satisfactorily during the testing. Only minor problems that could not be attributed to the design or operation of the unit were encountered. Changing the stroke length was difficult in the field, but such operational problems were expected in operating the first phototype and can be corrected on future models. During the higher pumping rate tests of the Verti Jack unit, the well ceased to deliver fluid quantities at rates adequate to the pumping rate. These data are shown in table 8. Therefore, evaluation data are based on theoretical pump performance and are presented in table 9. The data show that the Verti Jack is more efficient than the conventional units tested. The most direct comparison was the Verti Jack test at 36-inch stroke and 12 1/2 strokes per minute versus the Cabot unit at 37-inch stroke and 12 strokes per minute. In the comparison the Verti Jack operated about 24 percent more efficiently than the Cabot unit. Comparing the summation of all Verti Jack tests with that of all conventional unit tests, the Verti Jack operated about 15 percent more efficiently. Compared to the Cabot unit only, the Verti Jack was about 17 percent more energy efficient. 13 figs., 12 tabs.

Porter, R.; Spence, K.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Solar thermal energy contract list, fiscal year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government has conducted the national Solar Thermal Technology Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of solar thermal technology as an energy option for the United States. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name. Amount of funding milestones are listed.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: March 21, 2008 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-08-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-321 (A07LV042) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Accountability of Sensitive and High Risk Property at the Nevada Site Office" TO: Acting Manager, Nevada Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE and control over sensitive and high risk property because of the vulnerability to loss, theft or misuse and its potential impact on national security interests or proliferation concerns. Items such as portable and desktop computers, ammunition. and firearms are examples of sensitive property. In addition, federal regulations require that Departmental organizations and designated contractors account for and control govemroent-owned high risk property, such as body armor and gas masks,

452

United States Government DATE:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 5oE(E;,8 ' 0 H .2+ L-1 United States Government DATE: MAR 0 8 1994 REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authority Determination -- Former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co., Hamilton, Ohio TO: The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the former Herring-Hall-Marvin Safe Co. facility in Hamilton, Ohio, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The facility was used for the shaping and machining of uranium metal by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) during the Second World War. The following factors are significant in reaching a decision and are discussed in more detail in the attached authority review:

453

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' D;il$;,8 p! A . I I& - ' z United States Government &mtrne&' of Energy DATE: &uG 3, 9 394 REPLY TO AITN OF: EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Toukay and Ms. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

454

Unite2 States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

+39J +39J t% (3740~ - Unite2 States Government m e m o randuin L3 DATE: AU6 3, 9 %g4 REPLY TO All-N OF: m -421 (U. A. W illiams, 427-1719) -. - >' SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Toukay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recouwndations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

455

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LICE F 137: r.e Electr LICE F 137: r.e Electr onic Form App roved by CllR - 1010fJI2002 i/JI~~I United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Admi istration memorandum DATE : REPLY TO AnN OF : KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Stephen Duncan Project Manager - TERS-3 Proposed Action: Removal of de-stabilized and downed trees resulting from a December 200 8 wind storm on the de-energized Lyons Ultra High Voltage Test Line NO.1. PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1309 Budget Information: Work Order # 184006 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart 0, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B 1.3 Routine maintenance/custodial services for buildings, structures, infrastructures, equipment. Location: Fee-owned ROW on the de-energized Lyons UHV Te st Line No .1 to the south of

456

United States Government Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.89) B.89) EFO (07-90) United States Government Department of Energ Memorandum SEP 24 20t DATE: REPLY TO: IG-34 (A04TG032) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-04-21 SUBJECT: Evaluation of "The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Cyber Security Program - 2004" TO: Chairman, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our annual evaluation of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's unclassified cyber security program. This evaluation was initiated in June 2004 and our field work was conducted through September 2004. The evaluation methodology is described in the attachment to this report. Introduction and Objective The Commission's increasing reliance on information technology (IT) is consistent with satisfying the President's Management Agenda initiative of expanding electronic

457

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

/18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- /18/04 THU 11:31 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -- + HQ 1002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: March 17, 2004 Audit Report No. OAS-L-04-1 1 REPLY TO IG-36 (A04DN003) ATTN OF: SUBJECT; Audit of "Requests for Equitable Adjustment at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site" TO: Frazer R. Lockhart, Manager, Rocky Flats Project Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Effective February 1, 2000, the Department of Energy's (Department) Rocky Flats Project Office (RFPO) and Kaiser-Hill Co., LLC (Kaiser-Hill), entered into a cost- plus-incentive-fee contract to close the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) by December 15, 2006. Under the contract terms, Kaiser-Hlill's final incentive fee earned will be based on how well it meets established cost targets. For

458

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . .... ...... ..... .. . .. . . .. . , . . . . ..- - --. -- -. , . . DOEF 1325,8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 1 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-21 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06PR047) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Selected National Nuclear Security Administration Sites TO: Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed fourN* Lti nai-.AL 4 ... :.. ,._*i Amiinistration (NiNSA)SsitCe. Speuiiiu-~l we reviewed executive cormpeisation costs incurred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories, and the Y-12

459

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 23, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-16 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-35 (A04YT023) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Modernization Activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex" TO: Richard Speidel, Director, Policy and Internal Controls Management, NA-66 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex, the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) performs critical roles in strengthening national security and reducing the global threat from weapons of mass destruction. The Y-12 modernization plan (plan) seeks to foster the development of a physical plant that is efficient and effective in serving its national security missions. The

460

. United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,:n5.5.8 ,:n5.5.8 ,849, EfG pw, . United States Government DATE: AUG 2 i994 y#J;; EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sUBJECT: -Elimination of the Robbins & Myers Site, Springfield, Ohio 11179 I The File TO: I have reviewed the attached elimination recommendation and the original historical records for the Myers & Robbins facility in Springfield, Ohio. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at these sites. The only record of activity at this site by Department of Energy predecessors is an equipment test of a pump in March 1975. This test involved limited amounts of radioactive materials and there was a serious effort to decontaminate the equipment at the conclusion of the tests. Based on the above, the Myers & Robbins site in Springfield, Ohio, is

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F 1325.8 DOE F 1325.8 E&M&& +\A .wz United States Government Department of Energy DATE: RUG 3, 9 %g4 y;;;; EM-421 (W. A. W illiaas, 427-1719) "; :+ 1 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tohkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recomendations were made to eliminate then from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

462

Uniter+ States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFG (07-90) EFG (07-90) Uniter+ States Government ~L.aQ-i; Department of Energy inemorandum DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at the Former Dow Chemical Company Facility in M a d ison, Illinois TO: L. Price, OR The site of the Former Dow Chemical Company in M a d ison, Illinois, which is currently owned and operated by the Spectrulite Consortium, is designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This designation is based upon the results of a preliminary radiological survey and other information described in the attached Designation Summary. The authority determination and preliminary survey report also are attached for information. The site has been assigned a low priority under the FUSRAP protocol, as

463

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

# Xx i' # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoumendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

464

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EFS (07-W EFS (07-W United States Government memorandukn Department of Energy j ; I.-- ' -i;: /J DATE: j.gjG 2 9 1994 REPLY TO En-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) AlTN OF: h p)\;--/ ;,;' J ( SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Ur. Doug Tonkay and Us. Michelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoPraendations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

465

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nUnited States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration memorandum REPLY TO AnN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum TO: Robert Macy Project Manager - TELF-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Access road improvement and bridge replacement for the Raver-Paul No. transmission line structure 18/1. Budget Information: Work Order # 00220048 PP&A Project No.: 954 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities .. .for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment. .. routine maintenance activities, corrective ....are required to

466

United States Government Memorandum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION 8/16/07 09:15 FAX 301 903 4656 CAPITAL REGION * 002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Memorandum DATE: August 15, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-22 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A06GT006) SUBJECT: Report on "Hazardous Chemicals Inventory Management at the Savannah River Site" TO: Manager, Savannah River Operations Office BACKGROUND The Savannah River Site (Savannah River) maintains large inventories of hazardous chemicals for its scientific, environmental cleanup and production operations. Many of these chemicals are known carcinogens; some are corrosive, while others are highly flammable. As such, these chemicals can pose serious health and safety risks to workers and members of the public, the environment, and to emergency first responders if not properly managed and controlled.

467

,. United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i. 001 i. 001 DOE F 1325.8 (8-89) EFG (07-90) ,. United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: September 11, 2003 REPLYTO: IG-34 (A03NE045) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-20 SUBJECT: Audit of Procurement Administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TO: Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, ME-1 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our survey of procurement administration at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Laboratory). This review was initiated in May 2003 and fieldwork was conducted through August 2003. Our review methodology is described in an attachment to this report. INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In Fiscal Year (FY) 2002, the Department of Energy's (Department) management contractors procured approximately $6.4 billion worth of goods and services from

468

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 31/07 THU 18:20 FAX 865 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 00 DOE F 1325.8 (08&93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 31, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-13 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07RL048) SUBJECT: Audit of Safety Allegations Related to the Waste Treatment Plant at the Hanford Site TO: Manager, Office of River Protection INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Hanford Site is responsible for treating and preparing 53 million gallons of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste for disposal. Bechtel National, Inc. (Bechtel) is designing, building and commissioning the Waste Treatment Plant (Plant), a category II nuclear facility, which is comprised of a complex of treatment facilities to vitrify and immobilize radioactive waste into a

469

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OEF 1325.8 OEF 1325.8 (U8-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 11, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-I1 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07DN056) SUSJECT: Audit of the Department of Energy's Community and Regulatory Support Funding at the Richland Operations Office TO: Manager, Richland Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management provided $60.1 million in Community and Regulatory Support funding in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005 to a number of Departm- nt sites. The funding is intended to be used for activities indirectly related to nuclear and hazardous waste cleanup, such as agreements with state regulatory agencies and transportation departments. During FY 2005, the Department's Richland

470

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a . a . r-z . "*& ., . .. uoi UA o. --.- flI gj UUX DOE F 1325.8 (08.93) United States Government Department of Ene memorandum DATE: August 19, 2004 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-04-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-36 (A03IF009) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Revised Pit 9 Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" TO: Paul Golan, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (iNEEL) subsurface disposal area was established in 1952 for disposal of solid radioactive waste and now encompasses an area of approximately 88 acres. Wastes from the INEEL and other Department of Energy (Department) sites, rmost notably Rocky Flats, were buried in

471

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vu & . vu & . ,I / v a L U ; .8 " ',X v &..'*. "o uu V"x Ijo tf J ,*- , , i 4 w i tiJ U U 1 OEF S.a 135 (0B93) United States Government - Department of Energy memorandum DATE: February 27, 2007 REPLY TO Audit Repor Number: OAS-L-07-08 ATTN OF: IG-32 (A06ID015) SUBJECT: Audit of the "Design of the Engineered Barrier System at the Yucca Mountain Site" TO: Principal Deputy Director, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTrVE In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for designing, licensing, constructing, and operating a repository, known as Yucca Mountain, for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level -

472

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: August 13, 2007 . . Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-18 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A07PR061) SUBJECT: Audit of Executive Compensation at Brookhaven National Laboratory TO: Manager, Brookhaven Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE As part of a Department of Energy-wide audit of executive compensation, we reviewed executive compensation at the Office of Science's Brookhaven National La --- _ .r . . tc. av .... n . Ou audit covered executive cuupoci'A ;is in curred and claimed for Fiscal Years 2003, 2004, and 2005. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, operated Brookhaven under Department of Energy (Department) contract number DE-AC02-98CH10886. The amount of executive compensation that can be reimbursed to Department

473

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG ')/06 MON 14:28 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG --- HQ 1o001 ,O " F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: April 10, 2006 Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-11 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A05ID043) SUBJECT: Audit of "Contract Transition Activities at the Idaho Operations Office" TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office has ongoing missions focused primarily in the areas of nuclear energy and environmental cleanup. From October 1, 1999 to February 1, 2005, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC (Bechtel) managed facility operations for both of these missions. In Fiscal Year 2005, two separate contracts began in order to add focus and clarity to each respective mission. First, the Idaho National

474

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-93) -93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: July 12, 2007 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-07-15 REPLY TO ATnN OF: IG-32 (A07ID055) SUBJECr: Audit of the Idaho National Laboratory Facility Footprint Reduction TO: Manager, Idaho Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTTVE On February 1, 2005, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) assumed responsibility for managing and operating the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Department of Energy (Department) under a new 10 year contract. ThI m.ion for ,the L s to nntance the Nation's energy security by becoming the preeminent, internationally recognized nuclear energy research, development, and demonstration laboratory.. To accomplish this mission, BEA proposed aggressive infrastructure initiatives

475

United States Government Departmen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 7/05 TUE 07:58 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG -** HQ @]002 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Departmen of Energy memorandum DATE: December 20, 2005 Audit Report Number: OAS-L-06-03 REPLY TO A1TN OF; IG-36 (A05SR025) SUBJECT: Audit of "Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site" TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site stores approximately 36 million gallons of liquid, high-level radioactive waste in 49 underground waste storage tanks. The contents of the waste tanks are broadly characterized as either "sludge waste" or "salt waste". Sludge waste is insoluble and settles to the bottom of a waste tank, beneath a layer of liquid supernate. Salt

476

* United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive contamination at this site. Based on the above, the American Potash and Chemical Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams, PhD Designation and Certification Manager

477

United States Goveinment  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,325.B ,325.B jO8.93) United States Goveinment ~~~rntir-andu~rvi Depr?rtnient of Energy \L, IO' " 1' !ATE:' MAY i o 1995 ,' Kzb9. ":cz$ EM-421 (W.,A. Williams, 301-903-8149) SUBJECT: Records for the West Chicago Site .The File TO: After review.of the available r&rds concerning the former 'Lindsay Light and Chemical.Corhpany site in West Chicago, Illinois. I have determined that it is not necessary to transmit Department of Energy (DOE) records to the municipa,llty to inform public officials of the activities at this ~ site. This site has been licgnsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for many.years, and the nature of the. rare'earth and thorium production at the site, are well known. Remediation of this faci'lity ii~ being addressed by the current owner, 'the NRC, the U.S; Environmental

478

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

479

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'.... '|le , * f C. '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum · UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a perpetual .ease- ment right to a strip of land, 10 feet wide and 3600 feet long. The area is located in North Tonawanda, New York near the Niagara River. Because of the growth of adjacent industries, this particular piece of property has appreciated in value. During its tenure as responsible property management office, Oak

480

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OOE F 1325.8 OOE F 1325.8 - EFgzk3) United States Government tiemorandum 0 wt;? -J Department of Energy DATE: SEP 2 5 1992 REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Diamond Magnesium Site in Painesville, Ohio TO: L. Price, OR The former Diamond Magnesium Company site located at 720 Fairport-Nursery Road in Painesville, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The site is owned by Uniroyal Chemical Company and by Lonza Chemical, Incorporated. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey reports and the authority

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "thermal unit btu" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Z&Et,? y-p . c' Z&Et,? y-p . c' )7q/ I cuq,~ United States Government Department of Energy memoranduin I " . : I ;/ ,I DATE: hufi 2 9 1594 \ ' - y:oTFq M-421 (W. A. Ylllius, 427-1719) ' ii Y - SIJWECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilfzed Sites Remedial Actjon Progru TO The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. reviewed a number of sites that had services to the Fernald facility as sites, recommendations were made to ___ _- _ consideration under Formerly Utiltzed Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the prior elimination of each site froa FUSRAP.

482

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOE F t325.8 DOE F t325.8 (s8s) Dl? l 36-z EFG (07-90) United States Government m e m o randum Department of Energy DATE: LUG 2 ' 3 1394 ",cl,'," EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonkay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites, recoamnendations were aade to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

483

- United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8 8 my EFG (07.90) . - United States Government . * Department of. Energy * inemorandum DATE: DEC :! ;j 1993 REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 (W.'A. W illiams, 903-8149) : NY 41 I .' 41 G I? SUBJECT: Elimination of the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Co., Niagara Falls, New York TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site. summary and elimination recommendation for the T itanium Alloy Manufacturing Company. I have determined that the potential for radiological contamination is low because of the lim ited duration of the activities at the site. Further, at least some of the contractual activities at the site were licensed under the Atomic Energy Act, and the licensed activities are thereby disqualified from further consideration under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites

484

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UOEF 1325.8 UOEF 1325.8 (5831 , - a.. L . . L. . c ,, . . . t ,' <, .* -,. .--1^ a "-2 (J 7 , pe-;L, United States Government memorandum Departmen: of Energy DATEAUG 1 0 1984 REPLY TO Al-fN OF: NE-20 SUBJECT: Action Description Memorandum (ADM) Review: Wayne, New Jersey Proposed 1984 Remedial Actions at TO: File After reviewing all of the pertinent facts including the attached Action Description Memorandum (ADM), I have determined that the remedial action described in the subject ADM is an action which in and of itself will have a clearly insignificant impact on the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq. The Conference Report accompanying the Energy and Water Appropriation Act

485

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I8 891 I8 891 EFG (07.90) United States Government m e m o randum bepartrne% of Energy -P ' ; N. A *I Pi id : DATE: AUG 3, 9 1994 REPLY TO Al-iN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 427-1719) r, )' \, ! c ' d, ' t ' 3 ' 2 -L SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of M r. Doug Tonlsay and Ms. M ichelle Landis, I reviewed a nmber of sites that had formerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recommdations were made to eliminate them from further consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

486

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

81278 81278 United States Government Department of Energy memorandum - ?71 S.EP 23 F; i: 54 DATE: SEP 1 8 1991 REPLY TO ATTNOF: EM-421 (P. Blom, 3-8148) SUBJECT: Approved Categorical Exclusion for Removal Actions at Elza Gate, Tennessee TO: Lester K. Price, OR Attached is a copy of the approved Categorical Exclusion (CX) for removal of contaminated material at the Elza Gate site in Tennessee. The removal action involves the removal of radioactive contaminated soil and concrete as well as the removal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) contaminated soil. This CX was approved by Carol Borgstrom, Office of National Environmental Policy Act Oversight (EH-25), September 9, 1991. Paul F. Blom Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration

487

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 D;F&g,8 C-r-I 3-3 .*. United States Government . memorandum DATE: JUNZO 1994 -... REPLY TO A?TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. Williams, 903-8149) Authority Determination -- Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, SUBJECT: Connecticut To' The File The attached review, documents the basis for determining whether the Department of Energy (DOE) has authority for taking remedial action at the Combustion Engineering (CE) Site in Windsor, Connecticut, under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. CE was a prime contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and performed high-enriched uranium fuel fabrication work from 1955 to 1967. The services furnished at the CE site included some experimental work; however, it primarily consisted of fabrication of high-enriched uranium

488

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 DOEF1325.8 P4 0 * 1 - 1 - Iq \ b- United States Government memorandum pJ .T\ \b Department of Energy DATE: OCT 9 1984 REPLY TO NE-20 All-N OF: .- Authorizations for Actions Under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action SUBJECT: Program (FUSRAP) at the St. Louis Airport Storage Site, St. Louis, MO. and the W. R. Grace Site at Curtis Bay, Md. To: J. LaGrone, Manager Oak Ridge Operations Office St. Louis Airport Storage Site, MO The House and Senate Reports for the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act (P.L. 98-360) directed the Department of Energy "...to take the necessary steps to consolidate and dispose of the waste material from the Latty Avenue site and nearby St. Louis Airport vicinity properties locally, by reacquiring, stabilizing, and using the old 21.7

489

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ooc F r325.8 ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams Designation and Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration Attachment - I . b e e : W e s to n E M - 4 0 ( 3 ) E M - 4 2 ( 2 ) W illiams r

490

United States Attorney General  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) 93, 5 U.S. Op. Off. Legal Counsel 1, 1981 WL 30865 (U.S.A.G.) United States Attorney General ***1 *293 January 16, 1981 **1 The President The White House Washington, D.C. 20500 MY DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: You have asked my opinion concerning the scope of currently existing legal and constitutional authorities for the continuance of government functions during a temporary lapse in appropriations, such as the Government sustained on October 1, 1980. As you know, some initial determination concerning the extent of these authorities had to be made in the waning hours of the last fiscal year in order to avoid extreme administrative confusion that might have arisen from Congress' failure timely to enact 11 of the 13 anticipated regular appropriations bills, FN;B1[FN1]FN;F1 or a

491

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 3/02 TUE 08:59 FAX 423 241 3897 OIG *-* HQ 00o2 DOE F 132,.8 W.I: ((07.9u) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: December 2, 2002 REPLY TO REPLY TO -36 (A02SR013) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-07 ATTN OF: SUBJECT: Audit of Subcontracting Practices at the Savannah River Site TO: Jeffrey M. Allison, Acting Manager, Savannah River Operations Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy (Department) has contracted with Westinghouse Savannah River Company, LLC (Westinghouse) to manage and operate the Savannah River Site (Savannah River) through September 30, 2006. As of August 2, 2002, Westinghouse had 534 open and active service procurements worth $100,000 or more each, with a total value of about $518 million, that it had awarded since October 1996.

492

United States Goverment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 6/03 15:37 FAX 301 903 4656 _ CAPITAL REGION * FORS FIVEA 91002/004 DOE-F 1325.8 (68-93) Depament of Energy United States Goverment Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF .NSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: February 26, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A02CG004) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-03-11 SUBJECT: Audit of the Office of Science Infrastructure Modernization Initiatives TO: Acting Associate Director, Office of Laboratory Operations and Environment, Safety and Health, SC-80 The purpose of this report is to inform you of the results of our audit of the Office of Science's infrastructure modernization initiatives. The audit was performed between May and September 2002 at Departmental Headquarters, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. The audit methodology is described in

493

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. v-w. . v-w. ' ;H; (07.901 United States Government 0' ; Td 2, <.<~ Department of Energy ' m e m o randum DATE: REPLY TO Al-TN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) SUBJECT: Authorization for Remedial Action at Alba Craft Laboratory in Oxford, Ohio L. Price, OR TO: The former Alba Craft Laboratory site at lo-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio, is designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Dr. and M rs. Gilbert Pacey, of Oxford, Ohio, own the site. This designation is based on the results of a radiological survey and conclusions from an authority review as noted in the attached Designation Summary. Copies of the radiological survey letter report and the authority review are provided for your information.