National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermal turbulence velocity

  1. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  2. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  3. Multifractal statistics of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte; F. Toschi

    2004-03-11

    The statistical properties of velocity and acceleration fields along the trajectories of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow are investigated by means of high resolution direct numerical simulations. We present results for Lagrangian velocity structure functions, the acceleration probability density function and the acceleration variance conditioned on the instantaneous velocity. These are compared with predictions of the multifractal formalism and its merits and limitations are discussed.

  4. Measurement of turbulent wind velocities using a rotating boom apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandborn, V.A.; Connell, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The present report covers both the development of a rotating-boom facility and the evaluation of the spectral energy of the turbulence measured relative to the rotating boom. The rotating boom is composed of a helicopter blade driven through a pulley speed reducer by a variable speed motor. The boom is mounted on a semiportable tower that can be raised to provide various ratios of hub height to rotor diameter. The boom can be mounted to rotate in either the vertical or horizontal plane. Probes that measure the three components of turbulence can be mounted at any location along the radius of the boom. Special hot-film sensors measured two components of the turbulence at a point directly in front of the rotating blade. By using the probe rotated 90/sup 0/ about its axis, the third turbulent velocity component was measured. Evaluation of the spectral energy distributions for the three components of velocity indicates a large concentration of energy at the rotational frequency. At frequencies slightly below the rotational frequency, the spectral energy is greatly reduced over that measured for the nonrotating case measurements. Peaks in the energy at frequencies that are multiples of the rotation frequency were also observed. We conclude that the rotating boom apparatus is suitable and ready to be used in experiments for developing and testing sensors for rotational measurement of wind velocity from wind turbine rotors. It also can be used to accurately measure turbulent wind for testing theories of rotationally sampled wind velocity.

  5. Toward Understanding and Modeling Compressibility Effects on Velocity Gradients in Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman, Sawan

    2011-02-22

    Development of improved turbulence closure models for compressible fluid flow simulations requires better understanding of the effects of compressibility on various underlying processes of turbulence. Fundamental studies of turbulent velocity...

  6. Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Contribution of small scale turbulence to burning velocity of flamelets in the thin reaction zone the turbulent burning velocity under the conditions corresponding to the thin reaction zones regime. Approaches turbulence on flam- elet burning velocity. An expression was derived to estimate the contribution of flame

  7. Turbulent Convection in Stellar Interiors. II. The Velocity Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett; Casey Meakin; P. A. Young

    2008-11-25

    We analyze stellar convection with the aid of 3D hydrodynamic simulations, introducing the turbulent cascade into our theoretical analysis. We devise closures of the Reynolds-decomposed mean field equations by simple physical modeling of the simulations (we relate temperature and density fluctuations via coefficients); the procedure (CABS, Convection Algorithms Based on Simulations) is terrestrially testable and is amenable to systematic improvement. We develop a turbulent kinetic energy equation which contains both nonlocal and time dependent terms, and is appropriate if the convective transit time is shorter than the evolutionary time scale. The interpretation of mixing-length theory (MLT) as generally used in astrophysics is incorrect; MLT forces the mixing length to be an imposed constant. Direct tests show that the damping associated with the flow is that suggested by Kolmogorov. The eddy size is approximately the depth of the convection zone, and this dissipation length corresponds to the "mixing length". New terms involving local heating by turbulent dissipation should appear in the stellar evolution equations. The enthalpy flux ("convective luminosity") is directly connected to the buoyant acceleration, and hence the velocity scale. MLT tends to systematically underestimate this velocity scale. Quantitative comparison with a variety of 3D simulations reveals a previously recognized consistency. Examples of application to stellar evolution will be presented in subsequent papers in this series.

  8. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  9. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shupe, Matthew

    2013-05-22

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  10. Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation Rate Retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Time-height fields of retrieved in-cloud vertical wind velocity and turbulent dissipation rate, both retrieved primarily from vertically-pointing, Ka-band cloud radar measurements. Files are available for manually-selected, stratiform, mixed-phase cloud cases observed at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site during periods covering the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE, late September through early November 2004) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC, April-early May 2008). These time periods will be expanded in a future submission.

  11. Experimental study of Markstein number effects on laminar flamelet velocity in turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, M.; Zarzalis, N. [Division of Combustion Technology, Engler-Bunte-Institute, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany); Suntz, R. [Institute for Chemical Technology, University of Karlsruhe (TH), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Effects of turbulent flame stretch on mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}, were investigated experimentally in an explosion vessel at normal temperature and pressure. In this context, the wrinkling, A{sub t}/A{sub l}, and the burning velocity, u{sub t}, of turbulent flames were measured simultaneously. With the flamelet assumption the mean local laminar burning velocity of flamelets, u{sub n}=u{sub t} x (A{sub t}/A{sub l}){sup -1}, was calculated for different turbulence intensities. The results were compared to the influence of stretch on spherically expanding laminar flames. For spherically expanding laminar flames the stretched laminar burning velocity, u{sub n}, varied linearly with the Karlovitz stretch factor, yielding Markstein numbers that depend on the mixture composition. Six different mixtures with positive and negative Markstein numbers were investigated. The measurements of the mean local laminar burning velocity of turbulent flamelets were used to derive an efficiency parameter, I, which reflects the impact of the Markstein number and turbulent flame stretch - expressed by the turbulent Karlovitz stretch factor - on the local laminar burning velocity of flamelets. The results showed that the efficiency is reduced with increasing turbulence intensity and the reduction can be correlated to unsteady effects. (author)

  12. Thermal Instability-Induced Interstellar Turbulence 1 Alexei Kritsuk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kritsuk, Alexei

    Thermal Instability-Induced Interstellar Turbulence 1 Alexei Kritsuk University of California, San Diego, USA Saint Petersburg State University, Russia In collaboration with Mike Norman, UCSD http://akpc.ucsd.edu/Thermal conditions: periodic box Parameters: box size L, 0, T0, heating rate , = 5 3 , metallicity Z = Z Thermal

  13. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN POSITION-POSITION-VELOCITY SPACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Goodman, Alyssa; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2013-06-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is able to create hierarchical structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) that are correlated on a wide range of scales via the energy cascade. We use hierarchical tree diagrams known as dendrograms to characterize structures in synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) emission cubes of isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We show that the structures and degree of hierarchy observed in PPV space are related to the presence of self-gravity and the global sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. Simulations with higher Alfvenic Mach number, self-gravity and supersonic flows display enhanced hierarchical structure. We observe a strong dependency on the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and self-gravity when we apply the statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis) to the leaf and node distribution of the dendrogram. Simulations with self-gravity, larger magnetic field and higher sonic Mach number have dendrogram distributions with higher statistical moments. Application of the dendrogram to three-dimensional density cubes, also known as position-position-position (PPP) cubes, reveals that the dominant emission contours in PPP and PPV are related for supersonic gas but not for subsonic. We also explore the effects of smoothing, thermal broadening, and velocity resolution on the dendrograms in order to make our study more applicable to observational data. These results all point to hierarchical tree diagrams as being a promising additional tool for studying ISM turbulence and star forming regions for obtaining information on the degree of self-gravity, the Mach numbers and the complicated relationship between PPV and PPP data.

  14. The Turbulence Velocity Power Spectrum of Neutral Hydrogen in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepurnov, Alexey; Lazarian, Alex; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS) technique to calculate the velocity power spectrum of turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in 21cm emission. We have obtained a velocity spectral index of -3.85 and an injection scale of 2.3 kpc. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index which is expected for shock-dominated turbulence which is in agreement with past works on the SMC gas dynamics. The injection scale of 2.3 kpc suggests that tidal interactions with the Large Magellanic Cloud are the dominate driver of turbulence in this dwarf galaxy. This implies turbulence maybe driven by multiple mechanisms in galaxies in addition to supernova injection and that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role.

  15. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Li, Xiao - Lin; Gilmm, James G

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the Batchelor scale, allows a feasible approach to the modeling of high Schmidt number flows.

  16. The potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations on drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds in an idealized 2D setup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Blyth, A

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a potential impact of turbulent velocity fluctuations of the air on a drizzle formation in Cumulus clouds. Two different representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations for a microphysics formulated in a Lagrangian framework are discussed - random walk model and the interpolation, and its effect on microphysical properties of the cloud investigated. Turbulent velocity fluctuations significantly enhances velocity differences between colliding droplets, especially those having small sizes. As a result drizzle forms faster in simulations including a representation of turbulence. Both representations of turbulent velocity fluctuations, random walk and interpolation, have similar effect on droplet spectrum evolution, but interpolation of the velocity does account for a possible anisotropy in the air velocity. All discussed simulations show relatively large standard deviation ($\\sim$1${\\mu}m$) of the cloud droplet distribution from the onset of cloud formation is observed. Because coalesen...

  17. Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamak: ETG or TEM Turbulences?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamak: ETG or TEM Turbulences? Z. Lin, L. Chen, Y. Nishimura, H. Qu, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA T. S. Hahm, J. Lewandowski, C. Holland, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA F. Zonca, Associazione

  18. VELOCITY FIELD OF A ROUND TURBULENT TRANSVERSE JET Suman Muppidi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    - bulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio is 5.7 and the Reynolds number is 5000. Mean Jets in crossflow, also called `transverse jets' are defined as the flow field where a jet of fluid enters and interacts with a crossflowing fluid. Examples of jets in crossflow are fuel injectors

  19. Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe J. Salort, X. Riedinger,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe J. Salort, X. Riedinger, E. Rusaouen, J the ther- mal behavior of a square heat pipe, depending on its inclination angle and the applied heat flux (stresses). Heat pipes, or gravital flows in vertical or inclined Also at College of Engineering

  20. Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline ion inertial fusion reactors utilize banks of liquid jets and vortex flow tubes to protect sensitive observations and quantitative data for rectangular and circular jets are compared in an effort to illuminate

  1. Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Effect of initial turbulence intensity and velocity profile on liquid jets for IFE beamline reactors utilize banks of liquid jets and vortex flow tubes to protect sensitive beam line components from for rectangular and circular jets are compared in an effort to illuminate the critical phenomena involved

  2. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  3. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  4. An empirical model for the mean-velocity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer under the effects of surface curvature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huynh, Long Quang

    1994-01-01

    An empirical model has been developed to predict the mean-velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer under the influence of surface curvature. The model proposed is able to determine the profiles for both a convex and concave curvature...

  5. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liubin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Padoan, Paolo, E-mail: lpan@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu [ICREA and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Fast Ion Transport in Microturbulence.................................................................................................1 1.2 Thermal Plasma Transport in Electrostatic Waves

  7. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouransari, Z; Johansson, A V

    2015-01-01

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooli...

  8. Statistical analysis of the velocity and scalar fields in reacting turbulent wall-jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Pouransari; L. Biferale; A. V. Johansson

    2015-02-21

    The concept of local isotropy in a chemically reacting turbulent wall-jet flow is addressed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Different DNS databases with isothermal and exothermic reactions are examined. The chemical reaction and heat release effects on the turbulent velocity, passive scalar and reactive species fields are studied using their probability density functions (PDF) and higher order moments for velocities and scalar fields, as well as their gradients. With the aid of the anisotropy invariant maps for the Reynolds stress tensor the heat release effects on the anisotropy level at different wall-normal locations are evaluated and found to be most accentuated in the near-wall region. It is observed that the small-scale anisotropies are persistent both in the near-wall region and inside the jet flame. Two exothermic cases with different Damkohler number are examined and the comparison revealed that the Damkohler number effects are most dominant in the near-wall region, where the wall cooling effects are influential. In addition, with the aid of PDFs conditioned on the mixture fraction, the significance of the reactive scalar characteristics in the reaction zone is illustrated. We argue that the combined effects of strong intermittency and strong persistency of anisotropy at the small scales in the entire domain can affect mixing and ultimately the combustion characteristics of the reacting flow.

  9. Progress in Simulating Turbulent Electron Thermal Transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, Walter; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Peterson, J. L.; Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-17

    Nonlinear simulations based on multiple NSTX discharge scenarios have progressed to help differentiate unique instability mechanisms and to validate with experimental turbulence and transport data. First nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing (MT) turbulence in a high-beta NSTX H-mode discharge predict experimental levels of electron thermal transport that are dominated by magnetic flutter and increase with collisionality, roughly consistent with energy confinement times in dimensionless collisionality scaling experiments. Electron temperature gradient (ETG) simulations predict significant electron thermal transport in some low and high beta discharges when ion scales are suppressed by E x B shear. Although the predicted transport in H-modes is insensitive to variation in collisionality (inconsistent with confinement scaling), it is sensitive to variations in other parameters, particularly density gradient stabilization. In reversed shear (RS) Lmode discharges that exhibit electron internal transport barriers, ETG transport has also been shown to be suppressed nonlinearly by strong negative magnetic shear, s<<0. In many high beta plasmas, instabilities which exhibit a stiff beta dependence characteristic of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) are sometimes found in the core region. However, they do not have a distinct finite beta threshold, instead transitioning gradually to a trapped electron mode (TEM) as beta is reduced to zero. Nonlinear simulations of this "hybrid" TEM/KBM predict significant transport in all channels, with substantial contributions from compressional magnetic perturbations. As multiple instabilities are often unstable simultaneously in the same plasma discharge, even on the same flux surface, unique parametric dependencies are discussed which may be useful for distinguishing the different mechanisms experimentally.

  10. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 ; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS ; Pavan, J.

    2014-01-15

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense.

  11. Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-12-25

    It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

  12. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  13. Optimal thermalization in a shell model of homogeneous turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalabard, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence-induced dissipation of the large scales in a statistically homogeneous flow using an "optimal closure," which one of us (BT) has recently exposed in the context of Hamiltonian dynamics. This statistical closure employs a Gaussian model for the turbulent scales, with corresponding vanishing third cumulant, and yet it captures an intrinsic damping. The key to this apparent paradox lies in a clear distinction between true ensemble averages and their proxies, most easily grasped when one works directly with the Liouville equation rather than the cumulant hierarchy. We focus on a simple problem for which the optimal closure can be fully and exactly worked out: the relaxation arbitrarily far-from-equilibrium of a single energy shell towards Gibbs equilibrium in an inviscid shell model of 3D turbulence. The predictions of the optimal closure are validated against DNS and contrasted with those derived from EDQNM closure.

  14. Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2008-06-05

    The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

  15. Logarithmic corrections to scaling in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dubrulle

    2001-01-04

    We use an analytic toy model of turbulent convection to show that most of the scaling regimes are spoiled by logarithmic corrections, in a way consistent with the most accurate experimental measurements available nowadays. This sets a need for the search of new measurable quantities which are less prone to dimensional theories.

  16. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01

    In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

  17. Scalar and tensor spherical harmonics expansion of the velocity correlation in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Kurien, Susan; Cambon, Claude

    2015-06-22

    The representation theory of the rotation group is applied to construct a series expansion of the correlation tensor in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The resolution of angular dependence is the main analytical difficulty posed by anisotropic turbulence; representation theory parametrises this dependence by a tensor analogue of the standard spherical harmonics expansion of a scalar. As a result, the series expansion is formulated in terms of explicitly constructed tensor bases with scalar coefficients determined by angular moments of the correlation tensor.

  18. A Bayesian fusion model for space-time reconstruction of finely resolved velocities in turbulent flows from low resolution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Linh; Chainais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The study of turbulent flows calls for measurements with high resolution both in space and in time. We propose a new approach to reconstruct High-Temporal-High-Spatial resolution velocity fields by combining two sources of information that are well-resolved either in space or in time, the Low-Temporal-High-Spatial (LTHS) and the High-Temporal-Low-Spatial (HTLS) resolution measurements. In the framework of co-conception between sensing and data post-processing, this work extensively investigates a Bayesian reconstruction approach using a simulated database. A Bayesian fusion model is developed to solve the inverse problem of data reconstruction. The model uses a Maximum A Posteriori estimate, which yields the most probable field knowing the measurements. The DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at moderate Reynolds number is used to validate and assess the performances of the present approach. Low resolution measurements are subsampled in time and space from the fully resolved data. Reconstructed velocities ar...

  19. Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors J¨org M¨uller Oliver Paul Wolfram Burgard Abstract-- Recently, autonomous miniature airships have be- come a growing research field. Whereas airships are attractive as they can move freely in the three

  20. Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Chapter 9 Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall shape and velocity structure. The first jets being considered are those penetrating in homogeneous terminology. Continuous Intermittent injection injection Momentum only Jet Puff Buoyancy only Plume Thermal

  1. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

  2. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  3. A velocity transformation for heat and mass transfer Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford, California 94305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    and transpiration is identified. Note that M M cf/2 so that for typical ``low speed'' values of M 0.05 and cf 0 or cooling, Eq. 4 can be rewritten in the form: UVD 2 W 1 WU 1 O M2 . 5 The first-order term in Eq. 5 , i parameter is W Vinj , the characteristic transpiration velocity being in wall units. Thus, the ``mixing

  4. Anomalous scaling of low-order structure functions of turbulent velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. Chen; B. Dhruva; S. Kurien; K. R. Sreenivasan; M. A. Taylor

    2004-11-30

    It is now believed that the scaling exponents of moments of velocity increments are anomalous, or that the departures from Kolmogorov's (1941) self-similar scaling increase nonlinearly with the increasing order of the moment. This appears to be true whether one considers velocity increments themselves or their absolute values. However, moments of order lower than 2 of the absolute values of velocity increments have not been investigated thoroughly for anomaly. Here, we discuss the importance of the scaling of non-integer moments of order between +2 and -1, and obtain them from direct numerical simulations at moderate Reynolds numbers (Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers $R_\\lambda \\le$ 450) and experimental data at high Reynolds numbers ($R_\\lambda \\approx$ 10,000). The relative difference between the measured exponents and Kolmogorov's prediction increases as the moment order decreases towards -1, thus showing that the anomaly that is manifest in high-order moments is present in low-order moments as well. This conclusion provides a motivation for seeking a theory of anomalous scaling as the order of the moment vanishes. Such a theory does not have to consider rare events--which may be affected by non-universal features such as shear--and so may be regarded as advantageous to consider and develop.

  5. Turbulent thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Berges; Björn Schenke; Sören Schlichting; Raju Venugopalan

    2014-09-05

    We discuss the onset of the thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions from a weak coupling perspective, using classical-statistical real-time lattice simulations as a first principles tool to study the pre-equilibrium dynamics. Most remarkably, we find that the thermalization process is governed by a universal attractor, where the space-time evolution of the plasma becomes independent of the initial conditions and exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. We discuss the consequences of our weak coupling results for the thermalization process in heavy-ion experiments and briefly comment on the use of weak coupling techniques at larger values of the coupling.

  6. Thermal creep assisted dust lifting on Mars: Wind tunnel experiments for the entrainment threshold velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Küpper, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present laboratory measurements on the reduction of the threshold friction velocity necessary for lifting dust if the dust bed is illuminated. Insolation of a porous soil establishes a temperature gradient. At low ambient pressure this gradient leads to thermal creep gas flow within the soil. This flow leads to a sub-surface overpressure which supports lift imposed by wind. The wind tunnel was run with Mojave Mars Simulant and air at 3, 6 and 9 mbar, to cover most of the pressure range at martian surface levels. Our first measurements imply that the insolation of the martian surface can reduce the entrainment threshold velocity between 4 % and 19 % for the conditions sampled with our experiments. An insolation activated soil might therefore provide additional support for aeolian particle transport at low wind speeds.

  7. Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nauroy, Jean-François; Guy, N; Baroni, Axelle; Delage, Pierre; Mainguy, Marc; 10.2516/ogst/2012027

    2013-01-01

    In thermally enhanced recovery processes like cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) or steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), continuous steam injection entails changes in pore fluid, pore pressure and temperature in the rock reservoir, that are most often unconsolidated or weakly consolidated sandstones. This in turn increases or decreases the effective stresses and changes the elastic properties of the rocks. Thermally enhanced recovery processes give rise to complex couplings. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a case study so as to provide an estimation of the evolution of pressure, temperature, pore fluid saturation, stress and strain in any zone located around the injector and producer wells. The approach of Ciz and Shapiro (2007) - an extension of the poroelastic theory of Biot-Gassmann applied to rock filled elastic material - has been used to model the velocity dispersion in the oil sand mass under different conditions of temperature and stress. A good agreement has been found between these pre...

  8. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  9. Turbulent thermalization process in heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berges; K. Boguslavski; S. Schlichting; R. Venugopalan

    2014-03-02

    The non-equilibrium evolution of heavy-ion collisions is studied in the limit of weak coupling at very high energy employing lattice simulations of the classical Yang-Mills equations. Performing the largest classical-statistical simulations to date, we find that the dynamics of the longitudinally expanding plasma becomes independent of the details of the initial conditions. After a transient regime dominated by plasma instabilities and free streaming, the subsequent space-time evolution is governed by a nonthermal fixed point, where the system exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. This allows us to distinguish between different kinetic scenarios in the classical regime. Within the accuracy of our simulations, the scaling behavior found is consistent with the ``bottom-up" thermalization scenario.

  10. TiO{sub 2} Film Deposition by Atmospheric Thermal Plasma CVD Using Laminar and Turbulence Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, Yasutaka; Tobe, Shogo [Ashikaga Institute of Technology, 268-1 Omae, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan); Tahara, Hirokazu [Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-Ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan)

    2008-02-21

    In this study, to provide continuous plasma atmosphere on the substrate surface in the case of atmospheric thermal plasma CVD, TiO{sub 2} film deposition by thermal plasma CVD using laminar plasma jet was carried out. For comparison, the film deposition using turbulence plasma jet was conducted as well. Consequently, transition of the plasma jet from laminar to turbulent occurred on the condition of over 3.5 1/min in Ar working gas flow rate and the plasma jet became turbulent on the condition of over 10 1/min. In the case of the turbulent plasma jet use, anatase rich titanium oxide film could be obtained though plasma jet could not contact with the surface of the substrate continuously even on the condition that feedstock material was injected into the plasma jet. On the other hand,, in the case of laminar gas flow rate, the plasma jet could contact with the substrate continuously without melt down of the substrate during film deposition. Besides, titanium oxide film could be obtained even in the case of the laminar plasma jet use. From these results, this technique was thought to have high potential for atmospheric thermal plasma CVD.

  11. Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Analysis of a Wire- Feed, High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Gas Flow Charac- teristics in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel

  12. Spatially evolving vortex-gas turbulent free shear layers: Part 1. Effect of velocity ratio, and upstream and downstream conditions on spread-rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers in an inviscid incompressible fluid has recently been established by extensive numerical simulations (Suryanarayanan et al, Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009, 2014). Here, the effects of the velocity ratio across a spatially evolving 2D free shear layer are investigated by vortex-gas simulations, using a computational model based on Basu et al (1992, 1995), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. These are carried out for a range of values of the velocity ratio parameter $\\lambda= (U_1-U_2)/(U_1+U_2)$, where $U_1$ and $U_2$ ($< U_1$) are respective velocities across the layer. The simulations show that the conditions imposed at the beginning of the free shear layer and at the exit to the domain can affect the flow evolution in their respective neighborhoods, the latter being particularly strong as $\\lambda \\rightarrow 1$. In between the two neighborhoods is a re...

  13. DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant volume, and comparison with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant of Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 Abstract The influence of thermal stratification on auto-ignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by Direct Numerical Simulation

  14. Polymer heat transport enhancement in thermal convection: the case of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Boffetta; A. Mazzino; S. Musacchio; L. Vozella

    2010-01-19

    We study the effects of polymer additives on turbulence generated by the ubiquitous Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical simulations of complete viscoelastic models provide clear evidence that the heat transport is enhanced up to 50% with respect to the Newtonian case. This phenomenon is accompanied by a speed up of the mixing layer growth. We give a phenomenological interpretation of these results based on small-scale turbulent reduction induced by polymers.

  15. Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Lazarian

    2007-07-05

    We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

  16. Turbulent Energy Transport in Nonradiative Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus

    2003-09-24

    Just as correlations between fluctuating radial and azimuthal velocities produce a coherent stress contributing to the angular momentum transport in turbulent accretion disks, correlations in the velocity and temperature fluctuations produce a coherent energy flux. This nonadvective energy flux is always of secondary importance in thin radiative disks, but cannot be neglected in nonradiative flows, in which it completes the mean field description of turbulence. It is, nevertheless, generally ignored in accretion flow theory, with the exception of models explicitly driven by thermal convection, where it is modeled phenomenologically. This flux embodies both turbulent thermal convection as well as wave transport, and its presence is essential for a proper formulation of energy conservation, whether convection is present or not. The sign of the thermal flux is likely to be outward in real systems, but the restrictive assumptions used in numerical simulations may lead to inward thermal transport, in which case qualitatively new effects may be exhibited. We find, for example, that a static solution would require inward, not outward, thermal transport. Even if it were present, thermal convection would be unlikely to stifle accretion, but would simply add to the outward rotational energy flux that must already be present.

  17. Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

  18. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

    2003-08-06

    The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

  19. Angular velocity distribution of a granular planar rotator in a thermalized bath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Piasecki; J. Talbot; P. Viot

    2006-10-04

    The kinetics of a granular planar rotator with a fixed center undergoing inelastic collisions with bath particles is analyzed both numerically and analytically by means of the Boltzmann equation. The angular velocity distribution evolves from quasi-gaussian in the Brownian limit to an algebraic decay in the limit of an infinitely light particle. In addition, we compare this model with a planar rotator with a free center. We propose experimental tests that might confirm the predicted behaviors.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  1. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  2. 3 - 4 Turbulent combustion Princeton.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speed (s T ) Turbulent RMS velocity in the fresh gas (u') Low turbulence zone s T a u' Bending zone Quenching l i m i t s L 0 Problem: these functions are configuration...

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations of Velocity in Turbulence with Helicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procaccia, Itamar

    PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS Submitted 21 May 1997 Exact Result for the 3rd Order Correlations conservation. This law states that the energy flux expressed as a spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity as a second spatial derivative of the 3rd order velocity correlator with the rate of helicity dissipation

  4. The canopy horizontal array turbulence study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    velocity shear and thermal stratification at the canopy top;thermal canopy when the overlying atmosphere is unstably stratification

  5. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  6. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  7. Thermal radiation and blackbody radiation drag of a large-sized perfectly black particle moving with relativistic velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyasov, A A

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a self-consistent description of the radiation heat transfer and dynamics of large perfectly black spherical bodies with sizes much greater than the characteristic wavelength of radiation moving in a photon gas with relativistic velocity. The results can be important in astrophysics.

  8. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Seemawute, Panida [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Wongcharee, Khwanchit [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand)

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  9. Structure of turbulent hydrogen jet diffusion flames with or without swirl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Vangsness, M.D.; Durbin, M.D.; Schmoll, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    The aerodynamic and thermal structure of double-concentric turbulent hydrogen jet diffusion flames with or without swirl has been investigated using three-component laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. The LDV data were conditionally sampled upon the origin of the fluid (jet, annulus, or external) to avoid the velocity-bias problem and to gain more detailed information on the turbulent structure. As the mean jet velocity was increased, the turbulent flame zone shifted inward and the thermal layer became thinner, whereas swirl created a radial velocity even at the annulus air exit, thereby shifting the flame zone outward and broadening the thermal layer. The probability-density functions (pdf) of velocity components,m their 21 moments (up to fourth order), temperature pdf, mean, and root-mean-square fluctuation temperature were determined at numerous radial locations at seven axial heights in the near field (<26.5 jet diameters). The data can be used to validate computational models.

  10. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  11. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  12. Feasibility and preliminary design study for a high velocity, low density wind tunnel utilizing the thermal creep effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen, Alton Lee

    1968-01-01

    FE7 SE'BID 1'"Y AND PB I '&NAEY DLS1GN STUDY POR A H. GH V' LOCITY, 10iif DFN ITY BIND UNNEL UT1LI71NG THE THEP". AL CREEP EFFECT A Thesis Alton Lee Steghens, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AKN University in partial fulf... illment o- the regui ements for the degree NASTEP. 0 SCIENCE Aug st 1968 Yajor Subject: A rospa. e Engineering FEASIBILITY AND PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY FOR A HIGH VELOCITY, LOW DENSITY HIND TUNNEL UTILIZING THE THERiMAL CREEP EFFECT A Thesis Alton...

  13. Simple Models for Turbulent Self-Regulation in Galaxy Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    1999-07-29

    We propose that turbulent heating, wave pressure and gas exchanges between different regions of disks play a dominant role in determining the preferred, quasi-equilibrium, self-similar states of gas disks on large-scales. We present simple families of analytic, thermohydrodynamic models for these global states, which include terms for turbulent pressure and Reynolds stresses. Star formation rates, phase balances, and hydrodynamic forces are all tightly coupled and balanced. The models have stratified radial flows, with the cold gas slowly flowing inward in the midplane of the disk, and with the warm/hot phases that surround the midplane flowing outward. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions, including the following. 1) The large-scale gas density and thermal phase distributions in galaxy disks can be explained as the result of turbulent heating and spatial couplings. 2) The turbulent pressures and stresses that drive radial outflows in the warm gas also allow a reduced circular velocity there. This effect was observed by Swaters, Sancisi and van der Hulst in NGC 891, a particularly turbulent edge-on disk. The models predict that the effect should be universal in such disks. 3) They suggest that a star formation rate like the phenomenological Schmidt Law is the natural result of global thermohydrodynamical balance, and may not obtain in disks far from equilibrium. (Abridged)

  14. Development of a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for measurements of electron velocity distribution function anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishioka, T.; Shikama, T.; Nagamizo, S.; Fujii, K.; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)] [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Uchida, M.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T. [Department of Fundamental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Department of Fundamental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwamae, A. [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, Fukui University, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)] [Research Center for Development of Far-Infrared Region, Fukui University, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    The anisotropy of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) in plasmas can be deduced from the polarization of emissions induced by anisotropic electron-impact excitation. In this paper, we develop a compact thermal lithium atom beam source for spatially resolved measurements of the EVDF anisotropy in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The beam system is designed such that the ejected beam has a slab shape, and the beam direction is variable. The divergence and flux of the beam are evaluated by experiments and calculations. The developed beam system is installed in an ECR plasma device with a cusp magnetic field, and the LiI 2s–2p emission (670.8 nm) is observed in low-pressure helium plasma. The two-dimensional distributions of the degree and direction of the polarization in the LiI emission are measured by a polarization imaging system. The evaluated polarization distribution suggests the spatial variation of the EVDF anisotropy.

  15. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps substantially exceeds its laminar value, which results in a disproportionately large contribution of cusps to S{sub T} compared with the flame surface area in them. (7) A criterion is established for transition to the regime significantly influenced by cusp formation. In particular, at Karlovitz numbers Ka >or similar 20, flame collisions provide an important mechanism controlling S{sub T}, in addition to the increase of A{sub T} by large-scale motions and the potential enhancement of diffusive transport by small-scale turbulence. (author)

  16. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R.; Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 ; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.; CMTFO and CASS, University of California, San Diego 92093-0424, California

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  17. ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems ChapterChapterChapterChapter 7777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Qahtani, Hussain M.

    & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems 2/9 laminar flow and is characterized by a smooth is compressible. 7.2 MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF LIQUID LEVEL SYSTEMS Steady State Flow Laminar Turbulent D Figure 7.1 (a) Velocity profile for laminar flow Flow dominated by viscosity forces is called Figure 7.1 (b

  18. Dissipative structures of diffuse molecular gas III -- Small-scale intermittency of intense velocity-shears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Hily-Blant; Edith Falgarone; Jerome Pety

    2008-02-06

    We further characterize the structures tentatively identified on thermal and chemical grounds as the sites of dissipation of turbulence in molecular clouds (Papers I and II). Our study is based on two-point statistics of line centroid velocities (CV), computed from three large 12CO maps of two fields. Probability density functions (PDF) of the CO line centroid velocity increments (CVI) over lags varying by an order of magnitude and structure functions of the line CV, up to the 6th order, are computed. We show that the line CV bear the three signatures of intermittency in a turbulent velocity field: (1) the non-Gaussian tails in the CVI PDF grow as the lag decreases, (2) the departure from Kolmogorov scaling of the high-order structure functions is more pronounced in the more turbulent field, (3) the positions contributing to the CVI PDF tails delineate narrow filamentary structures (thickness ~ 0.02 pc), uncorrelated to dense gas structures and spatially coherent with thicker ones (~0.18 pc) observed on larger scales. The confrontation with theoretical predictions leads us to identify these small-scale filamentary structures with extrema of velocity-shears associated with gas warmer than the bulk. Last, their average direction is parallel (or close) to that of the local magnetic field projection. Turbulence in these translucent fields exhibits the statistical and structural signatures of small-scale and inertial-range intermittency. The more turbulent field on the 30 pc-scale is also the more intermittent on small scales. The small-scale intermittent structures coincide with those formerly identified as sites of enhanced dissipation. They are organized into parsec-scale coherent structures, coupling a broad range of scales.

  19. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  20. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Vivek N; Ramos, Fabio Ernesto Mancilla; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We conduct experiments in a turbulent bubbly flow to study the unknown nature of the transition between the classical -5/3 energy spectrum scaling for a single-phase turbulent flow and the -3 scaling for a swarm of bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid and of bubble-dominated turbulence. The bubblance parameter, b, which measures the ratio of the bubble-induced kinetic energy to the kinetic energy induced by the turbulent liquid fluctuations before bubble injection, is used to characterise the bubbly flow. We vary b from $b = \\infty$ (pseudo-turbulence) to b = 0 (single-phase flow) over 2-3 orders of magnitude: ~O(0.01, 0.1, 5) to study its effect on the turbulent energy spectrum and liquid velocity fluctuations. The experiments are conducted in a multi-phase turbulent water tunnel with air bubbles of diameters 2-4 mm and 3-5 mm. An active-grid is used to generate nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in the liquid flow. The liquid speeds and gas void fractions are varied to achieve the above mentioned b...

  1. Wind reversals in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Fontenele Araujo; S. Grossmann; D. Lohse

    2005-08-29

    The phenomenon of irregular cessation and subsequent reversal of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is theoretically analysed. The force and thermal balance on a single plume detached from the thermal boundary layer yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations, whose dynamics is related to the Lorenz equations. For Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range $10^{-2} \\leq \\Pr \\leq 10^{3}$ and $10^{7} \\leq \\Ra \\leq 10^{12}$, the model has the following features: (i) chaotic reversals may be exhibited at Ra $\\geq 10^{7}$; (ii) the Reynolds number based on the root mean square velocity scales as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Ra^{[0.41 ... 0.47]}$ (depending on Pr), and as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Pr^{-[0.66 ... 0.76]}$ (depending on Ra); and (iii) the mean reversal frequency follows an effective scaling law $\\omega / (\

  2. Action of an electromagnetic pulse on a plasma with a high level of ion-acoustic turbulence. Field diffusion and subdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, K. N.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Specific features of the interaction of a relatively weak electromagnetic pulse with a nonisothermal current-carrying plasma in which the electron drift velocity is much higher than the ion-acoustic velocity, but lower than the electron thermal velocity, are studied. If the state of the plasma with ion-acoustic turbulence does not change during the pulse action, the field penetrates into the plasma in the ordinary diffusion regime, but the diffusion coefficient in this case is inversely proportional to the anomalous conductivity. If, during the pulse action, the particle temperatures and the current-driving field change due to turbulent heating, the field penetrates into the plasma in the subdiffusion regime. It is shown how the presence of subdiffusion can be detected by measuring the reflected field.

  3. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 62: 295333, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDF of velocity and turbulent frequency or the joint PDF of velocity, wave vector, and turbulent implemented in conjunction with several velocity models. The complete model yields good comparisons and reaction are treated without mod- eling assumption [3, 4]. In contrast, standard moment closure methods

  4. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Che-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results corres...

  5. THE EFFICIENCY OF SECOND-ORDER FERMI ACCELERATION BY WEAKLY COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Parrish, Ian J.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the effects of pitch-angle scattering on the efficiency of particle heating and acceleration by MHD turbulence using phenomenological estimates and simulations of non-relativistic test particles interacting with strong, subsonic MHD turbulence. We include an imposed pitch-angle scattering rate, which is meant to approximate the effects of high-frequency plasma waves and/or velocity space instabilities. We focus on plasma parameters similar to those found in the near-Earth solar wind, though most of our results are more broadly applicable. An important control parameter is the size of the particle mean free path ?{sub mfp} relative to the scale of the turbulent fluctuations L. For small scattering rates, particles interact quasi-resonantly with turbulent fluctuations in magnetic field strength. Scattering increases the long-term efficiency of this resonant heating by factors of a few times 10, but the distribution function does not develop a significant non-thermal power-law tail. For higher scattering rates, the interaction between particles and turbulent fluctuations becomes non-resonant, governed by particles heating and cooling adiabatically as they encounter turbulent density fluctuations. Rapid pitch-angle scattering can produce a power-law tail in the proton distribution function, but this requires fine-tuning of parameters. Moreover, in the near-Earth solar wind, a significant power-law tail cannot develop by this mechanism because the particle acceleration timescales are longer than the adiabatic cooling timescale set by the expansion of the solar wind. Our results thus imply that MHD-scale turbulent fluctuations are unlikely to be the origin of the v {sup –5} tail in the proton distribution function observed in the solar wind.

  6. The Origin of Molecular Cloud Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugboelle, Troels; Nordlund, Ake

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. It has been shown that interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by SN explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)^3, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence. This also means that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find the same scaling laws extend to the interior of MCs, and their normal...

  7. Application of an EASM model for turbulent convective heat transfer in ribbed duct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, A.; Sunden, B.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical investigation is performed to predict local and mean thermal-hydraulic characteristics in rib-roughened ducts. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations, and a low-Re number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model are solved with two methods for determination of the Reynolds stresses, eddy viscosity model (EVM) and explicit algebraic stress model (EASM). The numerical solution procedure uses a collocated grid, and the pressure-velocity coupling is handled by the SIMPLEC algorithm. The assumption of fully developed periodic conditions is applied. The calculated mean and local heat transfer enhancement values are compared with experimental data and fairly good agreement on mean Nu numbers is achieved. The prediction capabilities of the two turbulence models (EVM and EASM) are discussed. Both models have similar ability to predict the mean Nusselt numbers but the EASM model is superior in description of the flow field structure.

  8. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  9. Experimental Study of the Normal Zone Propagation Velocity in Double-layer 2G-HTS wires by Thermal and Electrical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Z.; Ruiz, H. S.; Lai, L.; Huang, Z.; Wang, W.; Coombs, T.

    2014-11-20

    the cladding/substrate and into the nitrogen. At 77 K, the YBCO itself has a thermal conductivity of 17.25 Wm-1K, this combined with a thickness of 1 micron allows for a heat flux of 1.725×10-5 watt per degree. The steel is thicker and has a thermal... subsequent measurements. An Agilent 6680A system power supply was applied as the current source. Then, a heat pulse with a fixed width of 200 ms was generated by a DC power supply (Agilent E3634A). Initially, a relatively small heat pulse was applied...

  10. DNS of heat transfer in a transitional channel flow accompanied by a turbulent puff-like structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent heat transfer in fully-developed channel flows have been performed in a range of friction Reynolds number between 60 and 180, based on the friction velocity and the channel half width $\\delta$, with emphasis on a puff-like structure, large-scale spatial intermittency. For the Reynolds numbers lower than 80 with a large computational domain of 51.2 x 2 x 22.5, the turbulent puff was observed and its significant influences on the momentum and heat transports were found. The spatial structure of the equilibrium puff, or the localized turbulence, was examined with taking account of two different thermal boundary conditions: the uniform heat-flux heating and the constant temperature difference between the walls. It was revealed that there existed a localized strong turbulent region in the form of an oblique band, along which a spanwise secondary flow was induced. In consequence, at the present lowest Reynolds number as low as 60, the flow remained turbulent and the larger ...

  11. Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

    2005-11-01

    and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic...

  12. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  13. On the role of large-scale structures in wall turbulence Ivan Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    On the role of large-scale structures in wall turbulence Ivan Marusic Citation: Phys. Fluids 13. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor in a turbulent in a turbulent boundary layer: Non-local closures for particle dispersion tensors accounting for particle

  14. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Turbulent Combustion Turbulent CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:39:47+00...

  15. Inhomogeneous distribution of droplets in cloud turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in turbulent flow with small ratio of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. The pair-correlation function of concentration obeys a power-law in distance with negative exponent. Divergence at zero signifies singular distribution of particles in space. Independently of particle size the exponent is ratio of integral of energy spectrum of turbulence times the wavenumber to $g$ times numerical factor. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions by direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The predictions include typical case of water droplets in clouds. This significant progress in the study of turbulent transport is possible because strong gravity makes the particle's velocity at a given point unique.

  16. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan J. Carroll; Adam Frank; Eric G. Blackman; Andrew J. Cunningham; Alice C. Quillen

    2008-05-30

    In this paper we explore the relationship between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. Using 3-D numerical simulations we focus on the hydrodynamics of multiple outflows interacting within a parsec scale volume. We explore the extent to which transient outflows injecting directed energy and momentum into a sub-volume of a molecular cloud can be converted into random turbulent motions. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. We compare the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of isotropically forced hydrodynamic turbulence finding that in outflow driven turbulence a power law is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum (beta ~ 3) is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations (beta ~ 2). We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for these results as well and their implications for turbulence in molecular clouds where outflows will act in concert with other processes such as gravitational collapse.

  17. Gyrokinetic turbulence: a nonlinear route to dissipation through phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Schekochihin; S. C. Cowley; W. Dorland; G. W. Hammett; G. G. Howes; G. G. Plunk; E. Quataert; T. Tatsuno

    2008-11-04

    This paper describes a conceptual framework for understanding kinetic plasma turbulence as a generalized form of energy cascade in phase space. It is emphasized that conversion of turbulent energy into thermodynamic heat is only achievable in the presence of some (however small) degree of collisionality. The smallness of the collision rate is compensated by the emergence of small-scale structure in the velocity space. For gyrokinetic turbulence, a nonlinear perpendicular phase mixing mechanism is identified and described as a turbulent cascade of entropy fluctuations simultaneously occurring at spatial scales smaller than the ion gyroscale and in velocity space. Scaling relations for the resulting fluctuation spectra are derived. An estimate for the collisional cutoff is provided. The importance of adequately modeling and resolving collisions in gyrokinetic simulations is biefly discussed, as well as the relevance of these results to understanding the dissipation-range turbulence in the solar wind and the electrostatic microturbulence in fusion plasmas.

  18. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  19. Model turbulent floods with the Smagorinski large eddy closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts; D. J. Georgiev; D. V. Strunin

    2008-05-21

    Floods, tides and tsunamis are turbulent, yet conventional models are based upon depth averaging inviscid irrotational flow equations. We propose to change the base of such modelling to the Smagorinksi large eddy closure for turbulence in order to appropriately match the underlying fluid dynamics. Our approach allows for large changes in fluid depth to cater for extreme inundations. The key to the analysis underlying the approach is to choose surface and bed boundary conditions that accommodate a constant turbulent shear as a nearly neutral mode. Analysis supported by slow manifold theory then constructs a model for the coupled dynamics of the fluid depth and the mean turbulent lateral velocity. The model resolves the internal turbulent shear in the flow and thus may be used in further work to rationally predict erosion and transport in turbulent floods.

  20. The deterministic chaos and random noise in turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2014-06-01

    A turbulent flow is usually treated as a superposition of coherent structure and incoherent turbulence. In this paper, the largest Lyapunov exponent and the random noise in the near field of round jet and plane jet are estimated with our previously proposed method of chaotic time series analysis [T. L. Yao, et al., Chaos 22, 033102 (2012)]. The results show that the largest Lyapunov exponents of the round jet and plane jet are in direct proportion to the reciprocal of the integral time scale of turbulence, which is in accordance with the results of the dimensional analysis, and the proportionality coefficients are equal. In addition, the random noise of the round jet and plane jet has the same linear relation with the Kolmogorov velocity scale of turbulence. As a result, the random noise may well be from the incoherent disturbance in turbulence, and the coherent structure in turbulence may well follow the rule of chaotic motion.

  1. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  2. Aspects of wave turbulence in preheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crespo, José A.; De Oliveira, H.P., E-mail: jaacrespo@gmail.com, E-mail: oliveira@dft.if.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física - Departamento de Física Teórica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 20550-013 Brazil. (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of several inflationary models. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since the matter contents are fields instead of usual fluids. Turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the scalar fields. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number that indicates the energy transfer through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  3. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  4. Second-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillat and E. Kaminski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Second-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillat and E.1063/1.4767535 Investigations on the local entrainment velocity in a turbulent jet Phys. Fluids 24, 105110 (2012); 10-order model of entrainment in planar turbulent jets at low Reynolds number S. Paillata) and E. Kaminski

  5. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  6. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  7. THE FATE OF PLANETESIMALS IN TURBULENT DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES. I. THE TURBULENT STIRRING RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Turbulence in protoplanetary disks affects planet formation in many ways. While small dust particles are mainly affected by the aerodynamical coupling with turbulent gas velocity fields, planetesimals and larger bodies are more affected by gravitational interaction with gas density fluctuations. For the latter process, a number of numerical simulations have been performed in recent years, but a fully parameter-independent understanding has not been yet established. In this study, we present simple scaling relations for the planetesimal stirring rate in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI), taking into account the stabilization of MRI due to ohmic resistivity. We begin with order-of-magnitude estimates of the turbulence-induced gravitational force acting on solid bodies and associated diffusion coefficients for their orbital elements. We then test the predicted scaling relations using the results of recent ohmic-resistive MHD simulations by Gressel et al. We find that these relations successfully explain the simulation results if we properly fix order-of-unity uncertainties within the estimates. We also update the saturation predictor for the density fluctuation amplitude in MRI-driven turbulence originally proposed by Okuzumi and Hirose. Combination of the scaling relations and saturation predictor allows us to know how the turbulent stirring rate of planetesimals depends on disk parameters such as the gas column density, distance from the central star, vertical resistivity distribution, and net vertical magnetic flux. In Paper II, we apply our recipe to planetesimal accretion to discuss its viability in turbulent disks.

  8. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  9. Quantum Gravity and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

    2010-05-18

    We apply recent advances in quantum gravity to the problem of turbulence. Adopting the AdS/CFT approach we propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. In the gravitational context, turbulence is intimately related to the properties of spacetime, or quantum, foam.

  10. Convection Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Separated/Reattached Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassem F. Armaly

    2007-10-31

    The measurements and the simulation of convective heat transfer in separated flow have been a challenge to researchers for many years. Measurements have been limited to two-dimensional flow and simulations failed to predict accurately turbulent heat transfer in the separated and reattached flow region (prediction are higher than measurements by more than 50%). A coordinated experimental and numerical effort has been initiated under this grant for examining the momentum and thermal transport in three-dimensional separated and reattached flow in an effort to provide new measurements that can be used for benchmarking and for improving the simulation capabilities of 3-D convection in separated/reattached flow regime. High-resolution and non-invasive measurements techniques are developed and employed in this study to quantify the magnitude and the behavior of the three velocity components and the resulting convective heat transfer. In addition, simulation capabilities are developed and employed for improving the simulation of 3-D convective separated/reattached flow. Such basic measurements and simulation capabilities are needed for improving the design and performance evaluation of complex (3-D) heat exchanging equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) convective air flow adjacent to backward-facing step in rectangular channel is selected for the experimental component of this study. This geometry is simple but it exhibits all the complexities that appear in any other separated/reattached flow, thus making the results generated in this study applicable to any other separated and reattached flow. Boundary conditions, inflow, outflow, and wall thermal treatment in this geometry can be well measured and controlled. The geometry can be constructed with optical access for non-intrusive measurements of the flow and thermal fields. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is employed to measure simultaneously the three-velocity components and their turbulent fluctuations. Infrared thermography is utilized to measure the wall temperature and that information is used to determine the local convective heat transfer coefficient. FLUENT – CFD code is used as the platform in the simulation effort and User Defined Functions are developed for incorporating advanced turbulence models into this simulation code. Predictions of 3-D turbulent convection in separated flow, using the developed simulation capabilities under this grant, compared well with measured results. Results from the above research can be found in the seventeen refereed journal articles, and thirteen refereed publications and presentations in conference proceedings that have been published by the PI during the this grant period. The research effort is still going on and several publications are being prepared for reporting recent results.

  11. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  12. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  13. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  14. Contribution to the numerical study of turbulence in high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaziz, S.; Ben Ahmed, R.; Helali, H.; Gazzah, H.; Charrada, K. [Unite d'Etude des Milieux Ionises et Reactifs, IPEIM, 5019 route de Kairouan Monastir (Tunisia)

    2011-07-15

    We present in this paper a comparison between results obtained with a laminar and turbulent models for high-pressure mercury arc. The two models are based on the resolution of bidimensional time-dependent equations by a semi-implicit finite-element code. The numerical computation of turbulent model is solved with large eddy simulation model; this approach takes into account the various scales of turbulence by a filtering method on each scale. The results show the quantitative influence of turbulence on the flow fields and also the difference between laminar and turbulent effects on the dynamic thermal behaviour and on the characteristics of the discharge.

  15. Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

    2011-10-21

    evolution shows three distinct stages. The physics of each stage is clearly explained. Next, the influence of initial velocity and thermodynamic fluctuations on the flow field are investigated. The evolution of turbulence is shown to be strongly dependent...

  16. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a, *, J the square of the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient and if the flow is laminar, which­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed waterways

  17. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a,*, J is laminar, which is the usual case, the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient. This last result: Darcy; Darcy­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed

  18. Testing ASTRO-H Measurements of Bulk and Turbulent Gas Motions in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ota, Naomi; Lau, Erwin T

    2015-01-01

    Gas motions in galaxy clusters play important roles in determining the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) and constraining cosmological parameters using X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations of galaxy clusters. The upcoming ASTRO-H mission, equipped with high-resolution X-ray spectrometer, will make the first direct measurements of gas motions in galaxy clusters through measurements of Doppler shifting and broadening of emission lines. However, the physical interpretation of the data will be challenging due to the complex thermal and velocity structures of the ICM. In this work, we investigate how well we can measure bulk and turbulent gas motions in the ICM with ASTRO-H, by analyzing mock ASTRO-H simulations of galaxy clusters extracted from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We assess how photon counts, spectral fitting methods, multiphase ICM structure, deprojections, and region selection affect the measurements of gas motions. We show that while ASTRO-H is capable of recovering the...

  19. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H Gibson

    2012-11-25

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  20. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  1. Spark ignition of lifted turbulent jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.F.; Mastorakos, E. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents experiments on ignition and subsequent edge flame propagation in turbulent nonpremixed methane jets in air. The spark position, energy, duration, electrode diameter and gap, and the jet velocity and air premixing of the fuel stream are examined to study their effects on the ignition probability defined as successful flame establishment. The flame is visualized by a high-speed camera and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It was found that after an initially spherical shape, the flame took a cylindrical shape with a propagating edge upstream. The probability of successful ignition increases with high spark energy, thin electrode diameter and wide gap, but decreases with increasing dilution of the jet with air. The flame kernel growth rate is high when the ignition probability is high for all parameters, except for jet velocity. Increasing the jet velocity decreases the ignition probability at all locations. The average flame position as a function of time from the spark was measured and the data were used to estimate a net propagation speed, which then resulted in an estimate of the average edge flame speed relative to the incoming flow. This was about 3 to 6 laminar burning velocities of a stoichiometric mixture. The measurements can assist theoretical models for the probability of ignition of nonpremixed flames and for edge flame propagation in turbulent inhomogeneous mixtures, both of which determine the success of ignition in practical combustion systems. (author)

  2. The effect of turbulent kinetic energy on inferred ion temperature from neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T. J., E-mail: tjmurphy@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Measuring the width of the energy spectrum of fusion-produced neutrons from deuterium (DD) or deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas is a commonly used method for determining the ion temperature in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In a plasma with a Maxwellian distribution of ion energies, the spread in neutron energy arises from the thermal spread in the center-of-mass velocities of reacting pairs of ions. Fluid velocities in ICF are of a similar magnitude as the center-of-mass velocities and can lead to further broadening of the neutron spectrum, leading to erroneous inference of ion temperature. Motion of the reacting plasma will affect DD and DT neutrons differently, leading to disagreement between ion temperatures inferred from the two reactions. This effect may be a contributor to observations over the past decades of ion temperatures higher than expected from simulations, ion temperatures in disagreement with observed yields, and different temperatures measured in the same implosion from DD and DT neutrons. This difference in broadening of DD and DT neutrons also provides a measure of turbulent motion in a fusion plasma.

  3. SCALING PROPERTIES OF SMALL-SCALE FLUCTUATIONS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto E-mail: j.mason@exeter.ac.uk E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-09-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale—the Alfvén velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this also imposes stringent conditions on numerical studies of MHD turbulence. In contrast with the hydrodynamic case, the discretization scale in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence should decrease faster than the dissipation scale, in order for the simulations to remain resolved as the Reynolds number increases.

  4. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  5. The dynamics of transition to turbulence in plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanath, D

    2007-01-01

    In plane Couette flow, the incompressible fluid between two plane parallel walls is driven by the motion of those walls. The laminar solution, in which the streamwise velocity varies linearly in the wall-normal direction, is known to be linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers ($Re$). Yet, in both experiments and computations, turbulence is observed for $Re \\gtrsim 360$. In this article, we show that when the laminar flow is perturbed on to the transition {\\it threshold}, the flow approaches either steady or traveling wave solutions. These solutions exhibit some aspects of turbulence but are not fully turbulent even at $Re=4000$. However, these solutions are linearly unstable and flows that evolve along their unstable directions become fully turbulent. The solution approached by a threshold perturbation depends upon the nature of the perturbation. Surprisingly, the positive eigenvalue that corresponds to one family of solutions decreases in magnitude with increasing $Re$, with the rate of decrease given by $Re...

  6. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  7. TOWARD A THEORY OF ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMA TURBULENCE AT SUBPROTON SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Horaites, Konstantinos; Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-01

    We present an analytical study of subproton electromagnetic fluctuations in a collisionless plasma with a plasma beta of the order of unity. In the linear limit, a rigorous derivation from the kinetic equation is conducted focusing on the role and physical properties of kinetic-Alfvén and whistler waves. Then, nonlinear fluid-like equations for kinetic-Alfvén waves and whistler modes are derived, with special emphasis on the similarities and differences in the corresponding plasma dynamics. The kinetic-Alfvén modes exist in the lower-frequency region of phase space, ? << k v{sub Ti} , where they are described by the kinetic-Alfvén system. These modes exist both below and above the ion-cyclotron frequency. The whistler modes, which are qualitatively different from the kinetic-Alfvén modes, occupy a different region of phase space, k v{sub Ti} << ? << k{sub z}v{sub Te} , and they are described by the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system or the reduced electron MHD system if the propagation is oblique. Here, k{sub z} and k are the wavenumbers along and transverse to the background magnetic field, respectively, and v{sub Ti} and v{sub Te} are the ion and electron thermal velocities, respectively. The models of subproton plasma turbulence are discussed and the results of numerical simulations are presented. We also point out possible implications for solar-wind observations.

  8. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  9. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  10. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are compared with plasma and magnetic field observations on WIND, Ulysses, and Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  11. Global NOx Measurements in Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-03-01

    Turbulent hydrogen diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen are currently being studied to assess their ability to achieve the DOE Turbine Program’s aggressive emissions goal of 2 ppm NOx in a hydrogen-fueled IGCC gas turbine combustor. Since the unstrained adiabatic flame temperatures of these diluted flames are not low enough to eliminate thermal NOx formation the focus of the current work is to study how the effects of flame residence time and global flame strain can be used to help achieve the stated NOx emissions goal. Dry NOx measurements are presented as a function of jet diameter nitrogen dilution and jet velocity for a turbulent hydrogen/nitrogen jet issuing from a thin-lipped tube in an atmospheric pressure combustor. The NOx emission indices from these experiments are normalized by the flame residence time to ascertain the effects of global flame strain and fuel Lewis Number on the NOx emissions. In addition dilute hydrogen diffusion flame experiments were performed in a high-pressure combustor at 2 4 and 8 atm. The NOx emission data from these experiments are discussed as well as the results from a Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling effort currently underway to help explain the experimental data.

  12. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion...

  13. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  14. The Kinematics of Molecular Cloud Cores in the Presence of Driven and Decaying Turbulence: Comparisons with Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offner, S R; Krumholz, M R; Klein, R I; McKee, C F

    2008-04-18

    In this study we investigate the formation and properties of prestellar and protostellar cores using hydrodynamic, self-gravitating Adaptive Mesh Refinement simulations, comparing the cases where turbulence is continually driven and where it is allowed to decay. We model observations of these cores in the C{sup 18}O(2 {yields} 1), NH{sub 3}(1,1), and N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1 {yields} 0) lines, and from the simulated observations we measure the linewidths of individual cores, the linewidths of the surrounding gas, and the motions of the cores relative to one another. Some of these distributions are significantly different in the driven and decaying runs, making them potential diagnostics for determining whether the turbulence in observed star-forming clouds is driven or decaying. Comparing our simulations with observed cores in the Perseus and {rho} Ophiuchus clouds shows reasonably good agreement between the observed and simulated core-to-core velocity dispersions for both the driven and decaying cases. However, we find that the linewidths through protostellar cores in both simulations are too large compared to the observations. The disagreement is noticeably worse for the decaying simulation, in which cores show highly supersonic infall signatures in their centers that decrease toward their edges, a pattern not seen in the observed regions. This result gives some support to the use of driven turbulence for modeling regions of star formation, but reaching a firm conclusion on the relative merits of driven or decaying turbulence will require more complete data on a larger sample of clouds as well as simulations that include magnetic fields, outflows, and thermal feedback from the protostars.

  15. Velocity-selected molecular pulses produced by an electric guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C.; Motsch, M.; Chervenkov, S.; Buuren, L. D. van; Zeppenfeld, M.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Rempe, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Electrostatic velocity filtering is a technique for the production of continuous guided beams of slow polar molecules from a thermal gas. We extended this technique to produce pulses of slow molecules with a narrow velocity distribution around a tunable velocity. The pulses are generated by sequentially switching the voltages on adjacent segments of an electric quadrupole guide synchronously with the molecules propagating at the desired velocity. This technique is demonstrated for deuterated ammonia (ND{sub 3}), delivering pulses with a velocity in the range of 20-100 m/s and a relative velocity spread of (16{+-}2)% at full width at half maximum. At velocities around 60 m/s, the pulses contain up to 10{sup 6} molecules each. The data are well reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations, which provide useful insight into the mechanisms of velocity selection.

  16. A new velocity map for Byrd Glacier, East Antarctica, derived from high-resolution satellite imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Leigh; Hamilton, Gordon

    2005-06-01

    New ice-velocity measurements are obtained for the main trunk of Byrd Glacier, East Antarctica, using recently acquired Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imagery. The velocities are derived from the application...

  17. 43rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Jan 1013, Reno, Nevada Direct numerical simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    simulation of turbulent jets in crossflow Suman Muppidi and Krishnan Mahesh University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA Direct numerical simulations are used to study a round turbulent jet in a laminar crossflow. The velocity ratio of the jet to that of the crossflow is 5.7 and the Reynolds number based

  18. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  19. Energy Spectrum of Superfluid Turbulence without Normal Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunehiko Araki; Makoto Tsubota; Sergey K. Nemirovskii

    2002-09-03

    The energy spectrum of the superfluid turbulence without the normal fluid is studied numerically under the vortex filament model. Time evolution of the Taylor-Green vortex is calculated under the full nonlocal Biot-Savart law. It is shown that for kenergy spectrum is very similar to the Kolmogorov's -5/3 law which is the most important statistical property of the conventional turbulence, where k is the wave number of the Fourier component of the velocity field and 1 the average intervortex spacing. The vortex length distribution becomes to obey a scaling property reflecting the self-similarity of the tangle.

  20. Flame Interactions in Turbulent Premixed Twin V-flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunstan, T. D.; Swaminathan, N.; Bray, K. N. C.; Kingsbury, N. G.

    2013-01-16

    in Table 2, where u?in is the inlet rms velocity fluctuation, and l0 is the integral length scale in the frozen turbulence. The Karlovitz number is estimated from Ka ? (u?in/sL) 3 2 (l0/?)? 12 . The turbulent Reynolds and Damko¨hler numbers are Rel0 = u?inl... volume at a given location: ?c?=0.8 = (|?c|c?=0.8)P(c?), where P(c?) is the probability of finding c? = 0.8 at a given spatial location (Pope, 1988). The mean conditional gradient, |?c|c?=0.8, does not change significantly through 21 the flame brush...

  1. Multidimensional turbulence spectra -identifying properties of turbulent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevlahan, Nicholas

    Sweden 2 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada * E turbulent structures are presented. Results from analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy in turbulent energy associated with a coherent vortex defined using different vortex identification methods

  2. Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics Josselin Garnier,1, * Mietek optical waves have been reported in the literature. This article is aimed at providing a generalized wave, the process of optical wave thermalization to thermo- dynamic equilibrium, which slows down significantly

  3. Extracting Energy from Atmospheric Turbulence Chinmay K. Patel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ;2 thermal convection, birds also exploit the energy from wind shear and random gusts. Albatross, for example1 Extracting Energy from Atmospheric Turbulence Chinmay K. Patel Acuity Technologies Inc. Menlo@stanford.edu XXIX OSTIV Congress, Lüsse-Berlin, Germany, 6 August - 13 August 2008 Abstract Birds frequently use

  4. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  5. Measurements of Non-Thermal Line Widths in Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, David H

    2015-01-01

    Spectral line widths are often observed to be larger than can be accounted for by thermal and instrumental broadening alone. This excess broadening is a key observational constraint for both nanoflare and wave dissipation models of coronal heating. Here we present a survey of non-thermal velocities measured in the high temperature loops (1--5MK) often found in the cores of solar active regions. This survey of $\\textit{Hinode}$ Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations covers 15 non-flaring active regions that span a wide range of solar conditions. We find relatively small non-thermal velocities, with a mean value of 17km s$^{-1}$, and no significant trend with temperature or active region magnetic flux. These measurements appear to be inconsistent with those expected from reconnection jets in the corona, chromospheric evaporation induced by coronal nanoflares, and Alfv\\'en wave turbulence models. Furthermore, because the observed non-thermal widths are generally small their measurements are ...

  6. A comparison of experimental and numerical results on convective thermal mixing of three vertical, quasi-planar jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, A.T.; Kimura, N.; Nishimura, M.; Kobayashi, J.; Miyakoshi, H.

    1999-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic mixing of three quasi-planar vertical water jets was experimentally and numerically investigated. The central jet was initially 5 C lower in temperature than the other two. The hydraulic diameter and average exit velocity-based Reynolds and Richardson numbers were, Re{sub D} = 2 x 10{sup 4}, Ri{sub D} = 0.002. Besides temperature measurements from a traversing array of 37 thermocouples, velocity measurements were made using laser and ultrasound Doppler velocimetries (LDV and UDV). In parallel the in-house code, CASCADE, featuring a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was used to simulate the experimental flow configuration. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results showed that code validation by LDV/UDV was possible and in particular that time-averaged field and frequency characteristics of transversely swaying jets, even under Reynolds averaging of the conservation equations, could be simulated. A representative comparison of the amplitude of oscillation is shown in Figure A-1 with an inset of the visualized flow and sample time-series of the temperature fluctuations at the position indicated. The difference in the predominant frequency, the numerically predicted {approximately}1.6 Hz versus the experimental {approximately}2.25 Hz, is attributed to the turbulence model that overestimate thus effective fluid viscosity. Development of an accurate numerical simulation is of relevance to the design of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), where the lack of mixing of the cold sodium may initiate thermal striping; that is, poorly mixed hot and cold streams may thermally stress the components onto which they impinge. Turbulent mixing of jets is equally of general interest to environmental and material processing flows.

  7. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter ?{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  8. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  9. Characterization of Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand if and how the characteristics of relativistic MHD turbulence may differ from those of nonrelativistic MHD turbulence. We accomplish this by studying the invariants in the relativistic case and comparing them to what we know of nonrelativistic turbulence. Although much work has been done to understand the dynamics of nonrelativistic systems (mostly for ideal incompressible fluids), there is minimal literature explicitly describing the dynamics of relativistic MHD turbulence. Many authors simply assume that relativistic turbulence has the same invariants and obeys the same inverse energy cascade as non-relativistic systems.

  10. Scaling Relations for Collision-less Dark Matter Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akika Nakamichi; Masahiro Morikawa

    2009-06-15

    Many scaling relations are observed for self-gravitating systems in the universe. We explore the consistent understanding of them from a simple principle based on the proposal that the collision-less dark matter fluid terns into a turbulent state, i.e. dark turbulence, after crossing the caustic surface in the non-linear stage. The dark turbulence will not eddy dominant reflecting the collision-less property. After deriving Kolmogorov scaling laws from Navier-Stokes equation by the method similar to the one for Smoluchowski coagulation equation, we apply this to several observations such as the scale-dependent velocity dispersion, mass-luminosity ratio, magnetic fields, and mass-angular momentum relation, power spectrum of density fluctuations. They all point the concordant value for the constant energy flow per mass: $0.3 cm^2/sec^3$, which may be understood as the speed of the hierarchical coalescence process in the cosmic structure formation.

  11. Lagrangian view of time irreversibility of fluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    A turbulent flow is maintained by an external supply of kinetic energy, which is eventually dissipated into heat at steep velocity gradients. The scale at which energy is supplied greatly differs from the scale at which energy is dissipated, the more so as the turbulent intensity (the Reynolds number) is larger. The resulting energy flux over the range of scales, intermediate between energy injection and dissipation, acts as a source of time irreversibility. As it is now possible to follow accurately fluid particles in a turbulent flow field, both from laboratory experiments and from numerical simulations, a natural question arises: how do we detect time irreversibility from these Lagrangian data? Here we discuss recent results concerning this problem. For Lagrangian statistics involving more than one fluid particle, the distance between fluid particles introduces an intrinsic length scale into the problem. The evolution of quantities dependent on the relative motion between these fluid particles, including t...

  12. Bottleneck effect in three-dimensional turbulence simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Dobler; Nils Erland L. Haugen; Tarek A. Yousef; Axel Brandenburg

    2003-08-27

    At numerical resolutions around $512^3$ and above, three-dimensional energy spectra from turbulence simulations begin to show noticeably shallower spectra than $k^{-5/3}$ near the dissipation wavenumber (`bottleneck effect'). This effect is shown to be significantly weaker in one-dimensional spectra such as those obtained in wind tunnel turbulence. The difference can be understood in terms of the transformation between one-dimensional and three-dimensional energy spectra under the assumption that the turbulent velocity field is isotropic. Transversal and longitudinal energy spectra are similar and can both accurately be computed from the full three-dimensional spectra. Second-order structure functions are less susceptible to the bottleneck effect and may be better suited for inferring the scaling exponent from numerical simulation data.

  13. Can Protostellar Jets Drive Supersonic Turbulence in Molecular Clouds?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen; Christian Fendt

    2007-06-25

    Jets and outflows from young stellar objects are proposed candidates to drive supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. Here, we present the results from multi-dimensional jet simulations where we investigate in detail the energy and momentum deposition from jets into their surrounding environment and quantify the character of the excited turbulence with velocity probability density functions. Our study include jet--clump interaction, transient jets, and magnetised jets. We find that collimated supersonic jets do not excite supersonic motions far from the vicinity of the jet. Supersonic fluctuations are damped quickly and do not spread into the parent cloud. Instead subsonic, non-compressional modes occupy most of the excited volume. This is a generic feature which can not be fully circumvented by overdense jets or magnetic fields. Nevertheless, jets are able to leave strong imprints in their cloud structure and can disrupt dense clumps. Our results question the ability of collimated jets to sustain supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds.

  14. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

    2011-08-30

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  15. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  17. Average Angular Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Essen

    2004-01-28

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  18. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  19. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    House, Palmer A. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  20. Proton Heating in Solar Wind Compressible Turbulence with Collisions between Counter-propagating Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Jiansen; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian; Zhang, Lei; Salem, Chadi S; Bale, Stuart D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating the laboratorial, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. Different from the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfv\\'en waves, anti-sunward Alfv\\'en waves (AWs) are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond respectively to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Els\\"asser variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orth...

  1. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  2. Cap Bubble Drift Velocity in a Confined Test Section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Mamoru Ishii; Frank W. Lincoln; Stephen G. Beus

    2002-10-09

    In the two-group interfacial area transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as group 1 and cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as group 2. The bubble rise velocities for both groups of bubbles may be estimated by the drift flux model by applying different distribution parameters and drift velocities for both groups. However, the drift velocity for group 2 bubbles is not always applicable (when the wall effect becomes important) as in the current test loop of interest where the flow channel is confined by two parallel flat walls, with a dimension of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. The previous experiments indicated that no stable slug flow existed in this test section, which was designed to permit visualization of the flow patterns and bubble characteristics without the distortion associated with curved surfaces. In fact, distorted cap bubbly and churn-turbulent flow was observed. Therefore, it is essential to developed a correlation for cap bubble drift velocity in this confined flow channel. Since the rise velocity of a cap bubble depends on its size, a high-speed movie camera is used to capture images of cap bubbles to obtain the bubble size information. Meanwhile, the rise velocity of cap and elongated bubbles (called cap bubbles hereafter) is investigated by examining the captured images frame by frame. As a result, the conventional correlation of drift velocity for slug bubbles is modified and acceptable agreements between the measurements and correlation estimation are achieved.

  3. A new robust consistent hybrid finite-volume/particle method for solving the PDF model equations of turbulent reactive flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    and pollution are directly related to the conversion of chemical energy into thermal energy via combustion Available online 10 September 2014 Keywords: PDF methods Consistent hybrid method Turbulent combustion Bluff rights reserved. 1. Introduction Turbulent combustion continues to be a key technology in energy

  4. Numerical simulations of the decay of primordial magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 23, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of forced and freely decaying 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in order to model magnetic field evolution during cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe. Our approach assumes the existence of a magnetic field generated either by a process during inflation or shortly thereafter, or by bubble collisions during a phase transition. We show that the final configuration of the magnetic field depends on the initial conditions, while the velocity field is nearly independent of initial conditions.

  5. Measurement of entropy production rate in compressible turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Bandi; W. I. Goldburg; J. R. Cressman Jr

    2006-10-22

    The rate of change of entropy $\\dot S$ is measured for a system of particles floating on the surface of a fluid maintained in a turbulent steady state. The resulting coagulation of the floaters allows one to relate $\\dot S$ to the velocity divergence and to the Lyapunov exponents characterizing the behavior of this system. The quantities measured from experiments and simulations are found to agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  6. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mohy [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve [Institute of Combustion Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  7. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ?10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  8. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  9. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    Seismic images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Algorithms producing the seismic velocities from thethe Dix velocities and the true seismic velocities in 2D . .

  10. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  11. Few-Freedom Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Chirikov; V. G. Davidovsky

    2000-06-15

    The results of numerical experiments on the structure of chaotic attractors in the Khalatnikov - Kroyter model of two freedoms are presented. This model was developed for a qualitative description of the wave turbulence of the second sound in helium. The attractor dimension, size, and the maximal Lyapunov exponent in dependence on the single dimensionless parameter $F$ of the model are found and discussed. The principal parameter $F$ is similar to the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic turbulence. We were able to discern four different attractors characterized by a specific critical value of the parameter ($F=F_{cr}$), such that the attractor exists for $F>F_{cr}$ only. A simple empirical relation for this dependence on the argument ($F-F_{cr}$) is presented which turns out to be universal for different attractors with respect to the dimension and dimensionless Lyapunov exponents. Yet, it differs as to the size of attractor. In the main region of our studies the dependence of all dimensionless characteristics of the chaotic attractor on parameter $F$ is very slow (logarithmic) which is qualitatively different as compared to that of a multi-freedom attractor, e.g., in hydrodynamic turbulence (a power law). However, at very large $F\\sim 10^7$ the transition to a power-law dependence has been finally found, similar to the multi-freedom attractor. Some unsolved problems and open questions are also discussed.

  12. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  13. Simulation of microtearing turbulence in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Ren, Y.; Candy, J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.; Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Yuh, H.

    2012-05-15

    Thermal energy confinement times in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) dimensionless parameter scans increase with decreasing collisionality. While ion thermal transport is neoclassical, the source of anomalous electron thermal transport in these discharges remains unclear, leading to considerable uncertainty when extrapolating to future spherical tokamak (ST) devices at much lower collisionality. Linear gyrokinetic simulations find microtearing modes to be unstable in high collisionality discharges. First non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing turbulence in NSTX show they can yield experimental levels of transport. Magnetic flutter is responsible for almost all the transport ({approx}98%), perturbed field line trajectories are globally stochastic, and a test particle stochastic transport model agrees to within 25% of the simulated transport. Most significantly, microtearing transport is predicted to increase with electron collisionality, consistent with the observed NSTX confinement scaling. While this suggests microtearing modes may be the source of electron thermal transport, the predictions are also very sensitive to electron temperature gradient, indicating the scaling of the instability threshold is important. In addition, microtearing turbulence is susceptible to suppression via sheared E Multiplication-Sign B flows as experimental values of E Multiplication-Sign B shear (comparable to the linear growth rates) dramatically reduce the transport below experimental values. Refinements in numerical resolution and physics model assumptions are expected to minimize the apparent discrepancy. In cases where the predicted transport is strong, calculations suggest that a proposed polarimetry diagnostic may be sensitive to the magnetic perturbations associated with the unique structure of microtearing turbulence.

  14. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    2006-01-01

    cant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred2006: An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the

  15. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and they form the basis for the creation of validated submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab...

  16. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  17. Gravity as the main driver of non-thermal motions in massive star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traficante, A; Smith, R; Billot, N; Duarte-Cabral, A; Peretto, N; Molinari, S; Pineda, J E

    2015-01-01

    The origin of non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions can be ascribed to turbulence acting against the gravitational collapse, or to the self-gravity itself driving the rapid global collapse. The dependence between velocity dispersion, radius and clouds surface density found by Heyer et al. (2009), $\\sigma/R^{1/2}\\propto \\Sigma^{1/2}$, has been interpreted in terms of global collapse of clouds. In this work we demonstrate that this relation is an expression of a more general relation between accelerations. We introduce the gravo-turbulent acceleration, a$_k$, which describe the non-thermal motions in each region, and the acceleration generated by the gravitational field a$_G$, which is proportional to $\\Sigma$. We also introduce a new coefficient, the force partition coefficient $\\alpha_{for}$ which is equivalent to the virial parameter but does not distinguish between collapsing and non-collapsing regions. In this work we use the a$_k$ - a$_G$ formalism in the analysis of a new sample of 16 massi...

  18. Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    Passive scalar in a large-scale velocity field I. Kolokolov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics advection of a passive scalar (t,r) by an incompressible large-scale turbulent flow. In the framework of and for the passive scalar difference (r1) (r2) for separations r1 r2 lying in the convective interval are found

  19. Evidence for internal structures of spiral turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-21

    Dec 22, 2009 ... ary laminar-turbulent pattern in plane Couette flow. ... flow internal to the turbulent and laminar spirals, and unique ... 2 ( is the fluid density).

  20. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space weather...

  1. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

  2. Dark Matter Velocity Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Speckhard; Kenny C. Y. Ng; John F. Beacom; Ranjan Laha

    2015-07-31

    Dark matter decays or annihilations that produce line-like spectra may be smoking-gun signals. However, even such distinctive signatures can be mimicked by astrophysical or instrumental causes. We show that velocity spectroscopy-the measurement of energy shifts induced by relative motion of source and observer-can separate these three causes with minimal theoretical uncertainties. The principal obstacle has been energy resolution, but upcoming experiments will reach the required 0.1% level. As an example, we show that the imminent Astro-H mission can use Milky Way observations to separate possible causes of the 3.5-keV line. We discuss other applications.

  3. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  4. Turbulence structure of drag-reducing surfactant solution in two-dimensional channel with additional heat transfer enhancement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P.W.; Daisaka, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yabe, A.; Hishida, K.; Maeda, M.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent characteristics of a surfactant water solution in changing from drag-reducing flow to turbulent flow inside a two-dimensional smooth channel and in changing from turbulent flow to drag-reducing flow in the same channel with a mesh plug were investigated through LDV measurement in this study. The mesh plug was used to exert high shear stress to destroy micelle structures in the surfactant solution so that turbulence could be produced for better heat transfer. The two-component LDV system was installed on a movable platform, which could be moved streamwise of the flow to measure the two-dimensional velocity at different stations downstream from the mesh plug. The surfactant tested was Cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cl, abbreviated as CTAC). Local tap water was used as solvent and same weight concentration of sodium salicylate was used as the counter-ion material. The investigation of turbulent parameters for the drag-reducing flow with increasing Reynolds number showed that when the Reynolds number exceeded the drag-reducing region, the turbulent character was the same as that of water. The turbulent parameters of surfactant flow downstream the mesh plug showed that the high heat transfer region had the same turbulent intensity as that of water flow. As the critical Reynolds number was approached, it became easier to obtain such a turbulent region by mesh plug. In such cases, the mesh helped to create high wall shear stress and therefore to destroy the super-ordered structures of rod-like micelles for introducing turbulence. However, it was found that the turbulent intensities of the velocity gradually decreased to the same as those of drag-reducing flow downstream from the mesh because the mesh plug only produced a local high shear stress.

  5. The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet J-similar turbulent jet at Re=2·103 is investigated ex- perimentally by means of combined particle image velo- cimetry (PIV) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The jet fluid contains a fluorescent dye so

  6. NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

  7. Study of Nonlinear Interaction and Turbulence of Alfven Waves in LAPD Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-29

    The complete project had two major goals — investigate MHD turbulence generated by counterpropagating Alfven modes, and study such processes in the LAPD device. In order to study MHD turbulence in numerical simulations, two codes have been used: full MHD, and reduced MHD developed specialy for this project. Quantitative numerical results are obtained through high-resolution simulations of strong MHD turbulence, performed through the 2010 DOE INCITE allocation. We addressed the questions of the spectrum of turbulence, its universality, and the value of the so-called Kolmogorov constant (the normalization coefficient of the spectrum). In these simulations we measured with unprecedented accuracy the energy spectra of magnetic and velocity fluctuations. We also studied the so-called residual energy, that is, the difference between kinetic and magnetic energies in turbulent fluctuations. In our analytic work we explained generation of residual energy in weak MHD turbulence, in the process of random collisions of counterpropagating Alfven waves. We then generalized these results for the case of strong MHD turbulence. The developed model explained generation of residual energy is strong MHD turbulence, and verified the results in numerical simulations. We then analyzed the imbalanced case, where more Alfven waves propagate in one direction. We found that spectral properties of the residual energy are similar for both balanced and imbalanced cases. We then compared strong MHD turbulence observed in the solar wind with turbulence generated in numerical simulations. Nonlinear interaction of Alfv´en waves has been studied in the upgraded Large Plasma Device (LAPD). We have simulated the collision of the Alfven modes in the settings close to the experiment. We have created a train of wave packets with the apltitudes closed to those observed n the experiment, and allowed them to collide. We then saw the generation of the second harmonic, resembling that observed in the experiment.

  8. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies. I: The Case of Pure Self-Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2015-01-01

    The role of gravitational instability-driven turbulence in determining the structure and evolution of disk galaxies, and the extent to which gravity rather than feedback can explain galaxy properties, remains an open question. To address it, we present high resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of Milky Way-like isolated disk galaxies, including realistic heating and cooling rates and a physically motivated prescription for star formation, but no form of star formation feedback. After an initial transient, our galaxies reach a state of fully-nonlinear gravitational instability. In this state, gravity drives turbulence and radial inflow. Despite the lack of feedback, the gas in our galaxy models shows substantial turbulent velocity dispersions, indicating that gravitational instability alone may be able to power the velocity dispersions observed in nearby disk galaxies on 100 pc scales. Moreover, the rate of mass transport produced by this turbulence approaches $\\sim 1$ $M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ for Milky ...

  9. Simulating Astro-E2 Observations of Galaxy Clusters: the Case of Turbulent Cores Affected by Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Keiichi Wada; Tae Furusho

    2004-12-14

    This is the first attempt to construct detailed X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies from the results of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and simulate X-ray observations in order to study velocity fields of the intracluster medium (ICM). The hydrodynamic simulations are based on the recently proposed tsunami model, in which cluster cores are affected by bulk motions of the ICM and turbulence is produced. We note that most other solutions of the cooling flow problem also involve the generation of turbulence in cluster cores. From the mock X-ray observations with Astro-E2 XRS, we find that turbulent motion of the ICM in cluster cores could be detected with the satellite. The Doppler shifts of the metal lines could be used to discriminate among turbulence models. The gas velocities measured through the mock observations are consistent with the line-emission weighted values inferred directly from hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. Understanding and modeling turbulent fluxes and entrainment in a gravity current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odier, P; Ecke, R E

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current flowing on an inclined plane. The turbulent transport of momentum and density can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and density are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient, the square of the mixing length, is approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ($\\epsilon$/$\\partial$ z u^3)^1/2. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to mixing and to the entrainment/detrainment balance. We suggest a quantitative measure of local entrainment and detrainment derived from observed conditional correlations of density flux and density or vertical velocity fluctuations.

  11. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 103306 (2012) Numerical simulation of turbulent sediment transport,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 24, 103306 (2012) Numerical simulation of turbulent sediment transport, from bed October 2012) Sediment transport is studied as a function of the grain to fluid density ratio using two), vertical velocities are so small that sediment transport occurs in a thin layer at the surface

  12. Non-Gaussian Invariant Measures for the Majda Model of Decaying Turbulent Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    challenges for an even- tual statistical theory of hydrodynamic turbulence. In this context, many recent, the scalar can experience rare but very large fluctuations in amplitude, and its statistics can depart.1) in the large time limit in terms of the velocity field u and the initial Communications on Pure and Applied

  13. Diffusive radiation in one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence G. D. Fleishman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular sensi- tively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.76.017401 PACS number s : 52.25.Os, 52.35.Ra

  14. PLASMA PHYSICS:Turbulence and Sheared Flow --Burrell 281 (5384): 1816 --Science q My Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    About the Journal Home > Science Magazine > 18 September 1998 > Burrell , pp. 1816 - 1817 Article Views with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. Usually heating or fueling. Although there are a few cases where neutral fluids exhibit velocity shear

  15. Emergence of Jets from Turbulence in the Shallow-Water Equations on an Equatorial Beta Plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian F.

    Emergence of Jets from Turbulence in the Shallow-Water Equations on an Equatorial Beta Plane BRIAN (Manuscript received 2 September 2008, in final form 24 April 2009) ABSTRACT Coherent jets, such as the Jovian the essential mechanism of jet formation, which is systematic eddy mo- mentum flux directed up the mean velocity

  16. STATISTICS OF TURBULENT FIELD VARIATIONS, NON-GAUSSIANITY AND INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragot, B. R

    2009-05-10

    Statistics of magnetic field and velocity variations are important to the study of turbulence. Their departure from Gaussianity on the short separation scales has long been recognized and ascribed to intermittency. Non-Gaussian log-normal statistics of field-line separations are now predicted, however, from simple nonfluctuating turbulence Fourier spectra that do not model any intermittency, and one may wonder how this result may impact our interpretation of the statistics of field variations. It is shown in this paper how the intermittency of the turbulence can be taken into account to estimate the distributions of field-line separations and of field variations from the simple Fourier-spectra calculations. The first accurate theory/modeling predictions for the observed in situ distributions of turbulent field variations are thereby made, free of parameter adjustment. Magnetic field data from Helios 2 and Wind are used for the validation. Because the field variations are measured between points of constant separation and not between real field lines, intermittency remains the main cause for the observed non-Gaussianity of the statistics of field variations on the short scales, even if spatial limitations and/or short-scale phase correlations could also contribute to the deviations from Gaussianity.

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral Scaling on the Heating of the Solar Wind C. S. Ng), Kraichnan (1965) #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed wind with uniform speed Vsw 1D (radial position r) Turbulence characterized by two fields

  18. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  19. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  20. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  1. Relating turbulent pressure and macroturbulence across the HR diagram with a possible link to \\gamma-Dor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassitelli, Luca; Langer, Norbert; Miglio, Andrea; Istrate, Alina Georgiana; Sanyal, Debashis

    2015-01-01

    A significant fraction of the envelope of low- and intermediate-mass stars is unstable to convection, leading to sub-surface turbulent motion. Here, we consider and include the effects of turbulence pressure in our stellar evolution calculations. In search of an observational signature, we compare the fractional contribution of turbulent pressure to the observed macroturbulent velocities in stars at different evolutionary stages. We find a strong correlation between the two quantities, similar to what was previously found for massive OB stars. We therefore argue that turbulent pressure fluctuations of finite amplitude may excite high-order, high-angular degree stellar oscillations, which manifest themselves at the surface an additional broadening of the spectral lines, i.e., macroturbulence, across most of the HR diagram. When considering the locations in the HR diagram where we expect high-order oscillations to be excited by stochastic turbulent pressure fluctuations, we find a close match with the observati...

  2. Rotation Rate of Particle Pairs in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of particles in turbulent flow is important in many environmental and industrial applications. In this paper, the statistics of particle pair orientation is numerically studied in homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, with Taylor microscale Rynolds number of 300. It is shown that the Kolmogorov scaling fails to predict the observed probability density functions (PDFs) of the pair rotation rate and the higher order moments accurately. Therefore, a multifractal formalism is derived in order to include the intermittent behavior that is neglected in the Kolmogorov picture. The PDFs of finding the pairs at a given angular velocity for small relative separations, reveals extreme events with stretched tails and high kurtosis values. Additionally, The PDFs are found to be less intermittent and follow a complementary error function distribution for larger separations.

  3. Modelling of unidirectional thermal diffusers in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joseph Hun-Wei

    1977-01-01

    This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of the temperature field and velocity field induced by a unidirectional thermal diffuser in shallow water. A multiport thermal diffuser is essentially a pipe laid ...

  4. On the invariant thermal Proca - Klein - Gordon equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Pelc

    2007-10-14

    In this paper we discuss the invariant thermal Proca - Klein - Gordon equation (PKG). We argue that for the thermal PKG equation the absolute velocity is equal v = alpha*c, where alpha is the fine stucture constant for electromagnetic interaction.

  5. Relation between plasma plume density and gas flow velocity in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Taka, Shogo; Ogura, Kazuo [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and copper foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. To study the properties of the plasma plume, the plasma plume current is estimated from the difference in currents on the circuit, and the drift velocity is measured using a photodetector. The relation of the plasma plume density n{sub plu}, which is estimated from the current and the drift velocity, and the gas flow velocity v{sub gas} is examined. It is found that the dependence of the density on the gas flow velocity has relations of n{sub plu} ? log(v{sub gas}). However, the plasma plume density in the laminar flow is higher than that in the turbulent flow. Consequently, in the laminar flow, the density increases with increasing the gas flow velocity.

  6. Reynolds number of transition and large-scale properties of strong turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakhot, Victor

    2014-01-01

    A turbulent flow is characterized by velocity fluctuations excited in an extremely broad interval of wave numbers $k> \\Lambda_{f}$ where $\\Lambda_{f}$ is a relatively small set of the wave-vectors where energy is pumped into fluid by external forces. Iterative averaging over small-scale velocity fluctuations from the interval $\\Lambda_{f}statistics of spatial velocity derivatives. The calculated relation $Re(\\Lambda_{f})=Re_{tr}$ "selects" the lowest - order non-linearity as the only relevant one. This means that in the infra-red limit $k\\rightarrow \\Lambda_{f...

  7. Characterizing the convective velocity fields in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M., E-mail: manolis@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We apply the mathematical formalism of vector spherical harmonics decomposition to convective stellar velocity fields from multidimensional hydrodynamics simulations and show that the resulting power spectra furnish a robust and stable statistical description of stellar convective turbulence. Analysis of the power spectra helps identify key physical parameters of the convective process such as the dominant scale of the turbulent motions that influence the structure of massive evolved pre-supernova stars. We introduce the numerical method that can be used to calculate vector spherical harmonics power spectra from two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convective shell simulation data. Using this method we study the properties of oxygen shell burning and convection for a 15 M {sub ?} star simulated by the hydrodynamics code FLASH in 2D and 3D. We discuss the importance of realistic initial conditions to achieving successful core-collapse supernova explosions in multidimensional simulations. We show that the calculated power spectra can be used to generate realizations of the velocity fields of presupernova convective shells. We find that the slope of the solenoidal mode power spectrum remains mostly constant throughout the evolution of convection in the oxygen shell in both 2D and 3D simulations. We also find that the characteristic radial scales of the convective elements are smaller in 3D than in 2D, while the angular scales are larger in 3D.

  8. Turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow with heat transfer was performed at very low Reynolds numbers. Two different thermal boundary conditions were studied, and temperature was considered as a passive scalar. The computations were carried out with huge computational boxes (up to 327.7 x 2 x 128 in the streamwise, wall-normal, and spanwise directions, respectively). The emphases of this paper are to investigate the large-scale structure (puff) in the intermittent-turbulent flow including the scalar fields and to provide the values of the transitional and critical Reynolds numbers, below which the turbulent flow becomes intermittent and laminar, respectively. The statistics, such as the skin friction and the Stanton number, were also examined: they suggest that the puff should be effective in sustaining turbulence and in heat transfer enhancement.

  9. Inversion Of Travel Time For Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Common source velocities and borehole compensated (BC) estimates have been used to obtain formation velocity estimates from full waveform acoustic

  10. Dissipation via Landau Damping in Two- and Three-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tak Chu; Klein, Kristopher G; TenBarge, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Plasma turbulence is ubiquitous in space and astrophysical plasmas, playing an important role in plasma energization, but the physical mechanisms that lead to dissipation of the turbulent energy remain to be definitively identified. This work addresses the fundamental physics of turbulent dissipation by examining the velocity-space structure that develops as a result of the collisionless interaction between the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations and the particles in a low beta plasma. Both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations show an electron velocity-space signature qualitatively similar to that of the linear Landau damping of Alfv\\'en waves in a 3D linear simulation. This evidence strongly suggests that the turbulent energy is transferred by Landau damping to electrons in low beta plasmas in both 2D and 3D, making possible the ultimate irreversible heating of the plasma. Although, in the 2D case with no variation along the equilibrium magnetic field, it may be expecte...

  11. Numerical Simulations of MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; John F. Hawley

    2002-03-20

    We review numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. The last decade has witnessed fundamental advances both in the technical capabilities of direct numerical simulation, and in our understanding of key physical processes. Magnetic fields tap directly into the free energy sources in a sufficiently ionized gas. The result is that adverse angular velocity and adverse temperature gradients, not the classical angular momentum and entropy gradients, destabilize laminar and stratified flow. This has profound consequences for astrophysical accretion flows, and has opened the door to a new era of numerical simulation experiments.}

  12. Bedforms in a turbulent stream.Part 1: Turbulent flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fourrière; P. Claudin; B. Andreotti

    2008-11-14

    In the context of subaqueous ripple and dune formation, we present here a Reynolds averaged calculation of the turbulent flow over a topography. We perform a weakly non-linear expansion of the velocity field, sufficiently accurate to recover the separation of streamlines and the formation of a recirculation bubble above some aspect ratio. The basal stresses are investigated in details; in particular, we show that the phase shift of the shear stress with respect to the topography, responsible for the formation of bedforms, appears in an inner boundary layer where shear stress and pressure gradients balance. We study the sensitivity of the calculation with respect to (i) the choice of the turbulence closure, (ii) the motion of the bottom (growth or propagation), (iii) the physics at work in the surface layer, responsible for the hydrodynamic roughness of the bottom, (iv) the aspect ratio of the bedform and (v) the effect of the free surface, which can be interpreted in terms of standing gravity waves excited by topography. The most important effects are those of points (iii) to (v). We show that the dynamical mechanisms controlling the hydrodynamical roughness (mixing due to roughness elements, viscosity, sediment transport, etc) have an influence on the basal shear stress when the thickness of the surface layer is comparable to that of the inner layer. We evidence that non-linear effects tend to oppose linear ones and are of the same order for bedform aspect ratios of the order of 1/10. We show that the influence of the free surface on the basal shear stress is dominant when the wavelength is large compared to the flow depth, so that the inner layer extends throughout the flow and in the resonant conditions, and when the downstream material velocity balances the upstream wave propagation.

  13. Turbulent AGN tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schartmann; K. Meisenheimer; H. Klahr; M. Camenzind; S. Wolf; Th. Henning

    2008-08-05

    Recently, the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the VLTI has shown that dust tori in the two nearby Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy are geometrically thick and can be well described by a thin, warm central disk, surrounded by a colder and fluffy torus component. By carrying out hydrodynamical simulations with the help of the TRAMP code (Klahr et al. 1999), we follow the evolution of a young nuclear star cluster in terms of discrete mass-loss and energy injection from stellar processes. This naturally leads to a filamentary large scale torus component, where cold gas is able to flow radially inwards. The filaments open out into a dense and very turbulent disk structure. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions or images with the help of the 3D radiative transfer code MC3D (Wolf 2003). Good agreement is found in comparisons with data due to the existence of almost dust-free lines of sight through the large scale component and the large column densities caused by the dense disk.

  14. Time-resolved heat transfer in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse-combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The need for efficient combustion systems has led to active research in pulse combustion. One advantage of pulse combustor heating systems is a high rate of heat transfer in the tail pipe. These high heat transfer rates result from large velocity oscillations, which occur in the tailpipe as a result of the acoustic resonance of the pulse combustor. Past research on the effects of flow oscillations on heat transfer rates is inconclusive; however, some oscillating turbulent flows have been shown to have Nusselt numbers, which are much higher than those to steady turbulent flow at the same mean Reynolds number. An experimental study of the heat transfer rates and convective transport processes in a pulse combustor tail pipe was conducted. A test combustor was used, in which the oscillation frequencies could be varied from 54 to 101 Hz, with peak-to-peak velocity oscillations from zero (steady flow) to 10 times the mean velocity, and mean Reynolds numbers from 3100 to 4750. Nusselt numbers in the tail pipe are enhanced by the oscillations up to a factor of 2.5 times the expected value for steady turbulent flow. The Nusselt number enhancement increases with both oscillation frequency and velocity oscillation amplitude. Increases in the mean Reynolds number decreased the enhancement. Possible causes for the heat-transfer enhancement in oscillating flows are discussed. The data indicate that the heat transfer enhancement results from a combination of increased turbulence intensity and transverse flows generated during the streamwise velocity reversals.

  15. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  16. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

  17. HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND BARYON FRACTION, TURBULENT PRESSURE EFFECTS, AND THE ORIGIN OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkert, A.; Naab, T. [University Observatory Munich (USM), Scheinerstrasse 1, 81679 Munich (Germany); Genzel, R.; Bouche, N.; Cresci, G.; Khochfar, S.; Schreiber, N. Foerster; Tacconi, L.; Hicks, E.; Lutz, D.; Davies, R.; Buschkamp, P.; Genel, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Sommer-Larsen, J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Marie Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sternberg, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shapiro, K., E-mail: burkert@usm.uni-muenchen.d, E-mail: genzel@mpe.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-20

    The structure of a sample of high-redshift (z {approx} 2), rotating galaxies with high star formation rates and turbulent gas velocities of {sigma} {approx} 40-80 km s{sup -1} is investigated. Fitting the observed disk rotational velocities and radii with a Mo et al. (MMW) model requires unusually large disk spin parameters {lambda}{sub d}>0.1 and disk-to-dark halo mass fractions of m{sub d} {approx} 0.2, close to the cosmic baryon fraction. The galaxies segregate into dispersion-dominated systems with 1 {<=} v{sub max}/{sigma} {<=} 3, maximum rotational velocities v{sub max{<=}} 200 km s{sup -1}, and disk half-light radii r{sub 1/2{approx}} 1-3 kpc, and rotation-dominated systems with v{sub max}> 200 km s{sup -1}, v{sub max}/{sigma}>3, and r{sub 1/2{approx}} 4-8 kpc. For the dispersion-dominated sample, radial pressure gradients partly compensate the gravitational force, reducing the rotational velocities. Including this pressure effect in the MMW model, dispersion-dominated galaxies can be fitted well with spin parameters of {lambda}{sub d} = 0.03-0.05 for high disk mass fractions of m{sub d} {approx} 0.2 and with {lambda}{sub d} = 0.01-0.03 for m{sub d} {approx} 0.05. These values are in good agreement with cosmological expectations. For the rotation-dominated sample, however, pressure effects are small and better agreement with theoretically expected disk spin parameters can only be achieved if the dark halo mass contribution in the visible disk regime (2-3 x r{sub 1/2}) is smaller than predicted by the MMW model. We argue that these galaxies can still be embedded in standard cold dark matter halos if the halos do not contract adiabatically in response to disk formation. In this case, the data favor models with small disk mass fractions of m{sub d} = 0.05 and disk spin parameters of {lambda}{sub d} {approx} 0.035. It is shown that the observed high turbulent gas motions of the galaxies are consistent with a Toomre instability parameter Q = 1 which is equal to the critical value, expected for gravitational disk instability to be the major driver of turbulence. The dominant energy source of turbulence is then the potential energy of the gas in the disk.

  18. Thermal instability in X-ray photoionized media in Active Galactic Nuclei: Influence on the gas structure and spectral features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Goncalves; S. Collin; A. -M. Dumont; L. Chevallier

    2006-12-01

    A photoionized gas in thermal equilibrium can display a thermal instability, with 3 or more solutions in the multi-branch region of the S-shape curve giving the temperature versus the radiation-to-gas-pressure ratio. Many studies have been devoted to this curve and to its dependence on different parameters, always in the optically thin case. The purpose of our study is the thermal instability in optically thick, stratified media, in total pressure equilibrium. We have developped a new algorithm to select the hot/cold stable solution, and thereof to compute a fully consistent photoionization model. We have implemented it in the TITAN code and computed a set of models encompassing the range of conditions valid for the Warm Absorber in Active Galactic Nuclei. We have demonstrated that the thermal instability problem is quite different in thin or thick media. In thick media the spectral distribution changes as the radiation progresses inside the ionized gas. This has observational implications in the emitted/absorbed spectra, ionization states, and variability. However impossible to know what solution the plasma will adopt when attaining the multi-solutions regime, we expect the emitted/absorbed spectrum to be intermediate between those resulting from pure cold and hot models. Large spectral fluctuations corresponding to the onset of a cold/hot solution could be observed in timescales of the order of the dynamical time. A strong turbulence implying supersonic velocities should permanently exist in the multi-branch region of thick, stratified, pressure equilibrium media.

  19. Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers the effect of turbulence fluctuations on surface heating rate by conducting direct numerical simulations (DNS subtle influence on the mean heating rate. We also find that the effect of turbulence

  20. Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian reaction. The influence of chemical reactions on temperature fluctuation variance, Reynolds stresses that the recombination reaction enhances turbulence, while the dissociation reaction damps turbulence. Chemical reactions

  1. The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viñas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 ; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2014-01-15

    Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron–proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

  2. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01

    capitalizes on recent advances in active turbulent drag reduction and active material based actuation to develop an active or "smart" skin for turbulent drag reduction in realistic flight conditions. The skin operation principle is based on computational...

  3. Transport relaxation time and length scales in turbulent suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; F. Charru; B. Andreotti

    2010-11-03

    We show that in a turbulent flow transporting suspended sediment, the unsaturated sediment flux $q(x,t)$ can be described by a first-order relaxation equation. From a mode analysis of the advection-diffusion equation for the particle concentration, the relaxation length and time scales of the dominant mode are shown to be the deposition length $H U/V_{\\rm fall}$ and deposition time $H/V_{\\rm fall}$, where $H$ is the flow depth, $U$ the mean flow velocity and $V_{\\rm fall}$ the sediment settling velocity. This result is expected to be particularly relevant for the case of sediment transport in slowly varying flows, where the flux is never far from saturation. Predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with flume experiments, for both net erosion and net deposition situations.

  4. Predicted Impacts of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Kristopher G

    2015-01-01

    Particle velocity distributions measured in the weakly collisional solar wind are frequently found to be non-Maxwellian, but how these non-Maxwellian distributions impact the physics of plasma turbulence in the solar wind remains unanswered. Using numerical solutions of the linear dispersion relation for a collisionless plasma with a bi-Maxwellian proton velocity distribution, we present a unified framework for the four proton temperature anisotropy instabilities, identifying the associated stable eigenmodes, highlighting the unstable region of wavevector space, and presenting the properties of the growing eigenfunctions. Based on physical intuition gained from this framework, we address how the proton temperature anisotropy impacts the nonlinear dynamics of the \\Alfvenic fluctuations underlying the dominant cascade of energy from large to small scales and how the fluctuations driven by proton temperature anisotropy instabilities interact nonlinearly with each other and with the fluctuations of the large-scal...

  5. Taylor-Couette turbulence at radius ratio $\\eta=0.5$: scaling, flow structures and plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Roeland C A; Merbold, Sebastian; Harlander, Uwe; Egbers, Christoph; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution particle image velocimetry we measure velocity profiles, the wind Reynolds number and characteristics of turbulent plumes in Taylor-Couette flow for a radius ratio of 0.5 and Taylor number of up to $6.2\\cdot10^9$. The extracted angular velocity profiles follow a log-law more closely than the azimuthal velocity profiles due to the strong curvature of this $\\eta=0.5$ setup. The scaling of the wind Reynolds number with the Taylor number agrees with the theoretically predicted 3/7-scaling for the classical turbulent regime, which is much more pronounced than for the well-explored $\\eta=0.71$ case, for which the ultimate regime sets in at much lower Ta. By measuring at varying axial positions, roll structures are found for counter-rotation while no clear coherent structures are seen for pure inner cylinder rotation. In addition, turbulent plumes coming from the inner and outer cylinder are investigated. For pure inner cylinder rotation, the plumes in the radial velocity move away from the inn...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade of coronal loop magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Delaware 19716 (United States); Velli, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Parker model for coronal heating is investigated through a high resolution simulation. An inertial range is resolved where fluctuating magnetic energy E{sub M}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -2.7} exceeds kinetic energy E{sub K}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -0.6}. Increments scale as {delta}b{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup -0.85}and {delta}u{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup +0.2} with velocity increasing at small scales, indicating that magnetic reconnection plays a prime role in this turbulent system. We show that spectral energy transport is akin to standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence even for a system of reconnecting current sheets sustained by the boundary. In this new MHD turbulent cascade, kinetic energy flows are negligible while cross-field flows are enhanced, and through a series of ''reflections'' between the two fields, cascade more than half of the total spectral energy flow.

  7. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-08-22

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  8. Mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; G. Hazak; I. Rogachevskii; O. Sadot; I. Sapir-Katiraie

    2009-05-11

    We study experimentally and theoretically mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. In the experimental study we use Particle Image Velocimetry and an Image Processing Technique based on the analysis of the intensity of the Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of tracer particles. An air jet is seeded with the incense smoke particles which are characterized by large Schmidt number and small Stokes number. We determine the spatial distributions of the jet fluid characterized by a high concentration of the particles and of the ambient fluid characterized by a low concentration of the tracer particles. In the data analysis we use two approaches, whereby one approach is based on the measured phase function for the study of the mixed state of two fluids. The other approach is based on the analysis of the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density fluctuations generated by tangling of the gradient of the mean particle number density by the turbulent velocity field. This gradient is formed at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. We demonstrate that PDF of the phase function of a jet fluid penetrating into an external flow and the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density do not have universal scaling and cannot be described by a power-law function. The theoretical predictions made in this study are in a qualitative agreement with the obtained experimental results.

  9. Helical mode interactions and spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz F. Linkmann; Arjun Berera; Mairi E. McKay; Julia Jäger

    2015-09-01

    Spectral transfer processes in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are investigated analytically by decomposition of the velocity and magnetic fields in Fourier space into helical modes. Steady solutions of the dynamical system which governs the evolution of the helical modes are determined, and a stability analysis of these solutions is carried out. The interpretation of the analysis is that unstable solutions lead to energy transfer between the interacting modes while stable solutions do not. From this, a dependence of possible interscale energy and helicity transfers on the helicities of the interacting modes is derived. As expected from the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in 3D MHD turbulence, mode interactions with like helicities lead to transfer of energy and magnetic helicity to smaller wavenumbers. However, some interactions of modes with unlike helicities also contribute to an inverse energy transfer. As such, an inverse energy cascade for nonhelical magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Furthermore, it is found that high values of the cross-helicity may have an asymmetric effect on forward and reverse transfer of energy, where forward transfer is more quenched in regions of high cross-helicity than reverse transfer. This conforms with recent observations of solar wind turbulence. For specific helical interactions the relation to dynamo action is established.

  10. MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy’s Chief of Nuclear Safety hosted a MACCS2/Deposition Velocity Workshop on June 5-6, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. Approximately 70 participants attended. The purpose of...

  11. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  12. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of cross-shaped spiral fuel in high power density BWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conboy, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of the cross-shaped spiral (CSS) fuel assembly suggests great thermal-hydraulic upside. According to computational models, the increase in rod surface area, combined with an increase in coolant turbulence ...

  13. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  14. Gravitational Collapse in Turbulent Molecular Clouds. II. Magnetohydrodynamical Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Heitsch; M. -M. Mac Low; R. S. Klessen

    2000-09-14

    Hydrodynamic supersonic turbulence can only prevent local gravitational collapse if the turbulence is driven on scales smaller than the local Jeans lengths in the densest regions, a very severe requirement (Paper I). Magnetic fields have been suggested to support molecular clouds either magnetostatically or via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Whereas the first mechanism would form sheet-like clouds, the second mechanism not only could exert a pressure onto the gas counteracting the gravitational forces, but could lead to a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy down to smaller spatial scales via MHD wave interactions. This turbulent magnetic cascade might provide sufficient energy at small scales to halt local collapse. We test this hypothesis with MHD simulations at resolutions up to 256^3 zones, done with ZEUS-3D. We first derive a resolution criterion for self-gravitating, magnetized gas: in order to prevent collapse of magnetostatically supported regions due to numerical diffusion, the minimum Jeans length must be resolved by four zones. Resolution of MHD waves increases this requirement to roughly six zones. We then find that magnetic fields cannot prevent local collapse unless they provide magnetostatic support. Weaker magnetic fields do somewhat delay collapse and cause it to occur more uniformly across the supported region in comparison to the hydrodynamical case. However, they still cannot prevent local collapse for much longer than a global free-fall time.

  15. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Beus, Stephen G. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Post Office Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122-0079 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  16. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  17. Multi-Scale Gradient Expansion of the Turbulent Stress Tensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2005-12-10

    We develop an expansion of the turbulent stress tensor into a double series of contributions from different scales of motion and different orders of space-derivatives of velocity, a Multi-Scale Gradient (MSG) expansion. The expansion is proved to converge to the exact stress, as a consequence of the locality of cascade both in scale and in space. Simple estimates show, however, that the convergence rate may be slow for the expansion in spatial gradients of very small scales. Therefore, we develop an approximate expansion, based upon an assumption that similar or `coherent' contributions to turbulent stress are obtained from disjoint subgrid regions. This Coherent-Subregions Approximation (CSA) yields an MSG expansion that can be proved to converge rapidly at all scales and is hopefully still reasonably accurate. As an application, we consider the cascades of energy and helicity in three-dimensional turbulence. To first order in velocity-gradients, the stress has three contributions: a tensile stress along principal directions of strain, a contractile stress along vortex lines, and a shear stress proportional to `skew-strain.' While vortex-stretching plays the major role in energy cascade, there is a second, less scale-local contribution from `skew-strain'. For helicity cascade the situation is reversed, and it arises scale-locally from `skew-strain' while the stress along vortex-lines gives a secondary, less scale-local contribution. These conclusions are illustrated with simple exact solutions of 3D Euler equations. In the first, energy cascade occurs by Taylor's mechanism of stretching and spin-up of small-scale vortices due to large-scale strain. In the second, helicity cascade occurs by `twisting' of small-scale vortex filaments due to a large-scale screw.

  18. Evaluation of three lidar scanning strategies for turbulence measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, J. F.; Klein, P. M.; Wharton, S.; Sathe, A.; Bonin, T. A.; Chilson, P. B.; Muschinski, A.

    2015-11-24

    Several errors occur when a traditional Doppler-beam swinging (DBS) or velocity–azimuth display (VAD) strategy is used to measure turbulence with a lidar. To mitigate some of these errors, a scanning strategy was recently developed which employs six beam positions to independently estimate the u, v, and w velocity variances and covariances. In order to assess the ability of these different scanning techniques to measure turbulence, a Halo scanning lidar, WindCube v2 pulsed lidar and ZephIR continuous wave lidar were deployed at field sites in Oklahoma and Colorado with collocated sonic anemometers. Results indicate that the six-beam strategy mitigates somemore »of the errors caused by VAD and DBS scans, but the strategy is strongly affected by errors in the variance measured at the different beam positions. The ZephIR and WindCube lidars overestimated horizontal variance values by over 60 % under unstable conditions as a result of variance contamination, where additional variance components contaminate the true value of the variance. A correction method was developed for the WindCube lidar that uses variance calculated from the vertical beam position to reduce variance contamination in the u and v variance components. The correction method reduced WindCube variance estimates by over 20 % at both the Oklahoma and Colorado sites under unstable conditions, when variance contamination is largest. This correction method can be easily applied to other lidars that contain a vertical beam position and is a promising method for accurately estimating turbulence with commercially available lidars.« less

  19. Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic of Physics. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Evolution

  20. Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, T. J.

    2010-10-12

    fundamental decaying mesh turbulent flow field with passive grids. Vibrational non-equilibrium was achieved via a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge which required an operating pressure of 30 Torr. The flow velocity was 30 m/s. Data...

  1. Marine and River Dune Dynamics MARID IV 15 & 16 April 2013 -Bruges, Belgium Numerical simulation of turbulent sediment transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, Philippe

    simulation of turbulent sediment transport O. Durán (1,2) , B. Andreotti (1) , P. Claudin (1) 1. Laboratoire Carolina 27515, USA Abstract Sediment transport is studied by means of two phase numerical simulations to empirical transport laws. The vertical velocities of the grains are small and sediment transport occurs

  2. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  3. The Effect of Coherent Structures on Stochastic Acceleration in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzner, K; Carati, D; Denewet, N; Vlahos, L; Arzner, Kaspar; Knaepen, Bernard; Carati, Daniele; Denewet, Nicolas; Vlahos, Loukas

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the influence of coherent structures on particle acceleration in the strongly turbulent solar corona. By randomizing the Fourier phases of a pseudo-spectral simulation of isotropic MHD turbulence (Re $\\sim 300$), and tracing collisionless test protons in both the exact-MHD and phase-randomized fields, it is found that the phase correlations enhance the acceleration efficiency during the first adiabatic stage of the acceleration process. The underlying physical mechanism is identified as the dynamical MHD alignment of the magnetic field with the electric current, which favours parallel (resistive) electric fields responsible for initial injection. Conversely, the alignment of the magnetic field with the bulk velocity weakens the acceleration by convective electric fields $- \\bfu \\times \\bfb$ at a non-adiabatic stage of the acceleration process. We point out that non-physical parallel electric fields in random-phase turbulence proxies lead to artificial acceleration, and that the dynamical MHD al...

  4. Experimental observations on transition to turbulence in confined coaxial jets and other boundary layer flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Crowe, C.T. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering); Bejan, A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1990-01-01

    Experiments performed demonstrate the transition to turbulent flow of water jets discharging coaxially into a stream confined in a round duct. The critical Reynolds number is shown to be a strong function of velocity ratio. From the flow visualization it is shown that a proportionality between the laminar length of the jet (L) and the wavelength ({lambda}) can be seen in the region of transition to turbulence. The proportionality coincides with similar observations concerning the transition to turbulence in various other flows. A brief argument based on scale analysis is presented for the confined coaxial jet and round plume. The apparent universality of the L/{lambda} {approximately} O(10) scaling law supports the conclusion that the laminar sections of all naturally progressing boundary layer-type flows are geometrically similar. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Collision-dependent power law scalings in two dimensional gyrokinetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerri, S. S. Bañón Navarro, A.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.

    2014-08-15

    Nonlinear gyrokinetics provides a suitable framework to describe short-wavelength turbulence in magnetized laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In the electrostatic limit, this system is known to exhibit a free energy cascade towards small scales in (perpendicular) real and/or velocity space. The dissipation of free energy is always due to collisions (no matter how weak the collisionality), but may be spread out across a wide range of scales. Here, we focus on freely decaying two dimensional electrostatic turbulence on sub-ion-gyroradius scales. An existing scaling theory for the turbulent cascade in the weakly collisional limit is generalized to the moderately collisional regime. In this context, non-universal power law scalings due to multiscale dissipation are predicted, and this prediction is confirmed by means of direct numerical simulations.

  6. Velocity tuning of friction with two trapped atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangloff, Dorian; Counts, Ian; Jhe, Wonho; Vuleti?, Vladan

    2015-01-01

    Friction is the basic, ubiquitous mechanical interaction between two surfaces that results in resistance to motion and energy dissipation. In spite of its technological and economic significance, our ability to control friction remains modest, and our understanding of the microscopic processes incomplete. At the atomic scale, mismatch between the two contacting crystal lattices can lead to a reduction of stick-slip friction (structural lubricity), while thermally activated atomic motion can give rise to a complex velocity dependence, and nearly vanishing friction at sufficiently low velocities (thermal lubricity). Atomic force microscopy has provided a wealth of experimental results, but limitations in the dynamic range, time resolution, and control at the single-atom level have hampered a full quantitative description from first principles. Here, using an ion-crystal friction emulator with single-atom, single substrate-site spatial resolution and single-slip temporal resolution, we measure the friction force...

  7. Elementary Vortex Processes in Thermal Superfluid Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kivotides, Demosthenes; Wilkin, S. Louise

    2009-01-01

    a complex system of vortex tubes has only (a vigorouslyIn this context, the vortex tube model (VTM) of Kivotidesstraight normal ?uid vortex tube, suggested an explicit

  8. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  9. Thermal initiation caused by fragment impact on cased explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnurr, N.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Numerical calculations have been used to predict the velocity threshold for thermal initiation of a cased explosive caused by fragment impact. A structural analysis code was used to determine temperature profiles and a thermal analysis code was used to calculate reaction rates. Results generated for the United States Air Force MK 82 bomb indicate that the velocity threshold for thermal initiation is slightly higher than that for the shock-to-detonation process. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  11. Small-scale Interaction of Turbulence with Thermonuclear Flames in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; W. K. Bushe; G. R. Ruetsch

    1999-05-07

    Microscopic turbulence-flame interactions of thermonuclear fusion flames occuring in Type Ia Supernovae were studied by means of incompressible direct numerical simulations with a highly simplified flame description. The flame is treated as a single diffusive scalar field with a nonlinear source term. It is characterized by its Prandtl number, Pr << 1, and laminar flame speed, S_L. We find that if S_L ~ u', where u' is the rms amplitude of turbulent velocity fluctuations, the local flame propagation speed does not significantly deviate from S_L even in the presence of velocity fluctuations on scales below the laminar flame thickness. This result is interpreted in the context of subgrid-scale modeling of supernova explosions and the mechanism for deflagration-detonation-transitions.

  12. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, E R

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of planar Couette flow is presented for the minimal channel in which turbulence structures can be sustained. Evolution over a single breakdown and regeneration cycle is compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Qualitative similar structures are observed and turbulent statistics show excellent quantitative agreement. The molecular scale law of the wall is presented in which stick-slip molecular wall-fluid interactions replace the no-slip conditions. The impact of grid resolution is explored and the observed structures are seen to be dependant on averaging time and length scales. The kinetic energy spectra show a range of scales are present in the molecular system and that spectral content is dependent on the grid resolution employed. The subgrid velocity of the molecules is compared to spatial averaged velocity using joint probability density functions. Molecular trajectories, diffusions and Lagrangian statistics are presented. The importance of sub-grid ...

  13. On the Two-point Correlation of Potential Vorticity in Rotating and Stratified Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susan Kurien; Leslie M. Smith; Beth Wingate

    2006-03-15

    A framework is developed to describe the two-point statistics of potential vorticity in rotating and stratified turbulence as described by the Boussinesq equations. The Karman-Howarth equation for the dynamics of the two-point correlation function of potential vorticity reveals the possibility of inertial-range dynamics in certain regimes in the Rossby, Froude, Prandtl and Reynolds number parameters. For the case of large Rossby and Froude numbers, and for the case of quasi-geostrophic dynamics, a linear scaling law with 2/3 prefactor is derived for the third-order mixed correlation between potential vorticity and velocity, a result that is analogous to the Kolmogorov 4/5-law for the third-order velocity structure function in turbulence theory.

  14. Random Vortex-Street Model for a Self-Similar Plane Turbulent Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor L'vov; Anna Pomyalov; Itamar Procaccia; Rama Govindarajan

    2008-03-18

    We ask what determines the (small) angle of turbulent jets. To answer this question we first construct a deterministic vortex-street model representing the large scale structure in a self-similar plane turbulent jet. Without adjustable parameters the model reproduces the mean velocity profiles and the transverse positions of the large scale structures, including their mean sweeping velocities, in a quantitative agreement with experiments. Nevertheless the exact self similar arrangement of the vortices (or any other deterministic model) necessarily leads to a collapse of the jet angle. The observed (small) angle results from a competition between vortex sweeping tending to strongly collapse the jet and randomness in the vortex structure, with the latter resulting in a weak spreading of the jet.

  15. An Enhanced Nonlinear Critical Gradient for Electron Turbulent Transport due to Reversed Magnetic Shear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J. L.; Hammet, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2011-05-11

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment show that reversed magnetic shear can suppress thermal transport by increasing the nonlinear critical gradient for electron-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence to three times its linear critical value. An interesting feature of this turbulence is non- linearly driven off-midplane radial streamers. This work reinforces the experimental observation that magnetic shear is likely an effective way of triggering and sustaining e-ITBs in magnetic fusion devices.

  16. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  17. Sheared stably stratified turbulence and large-scale waves in a lid driven cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, N; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated experimentally stably stratified turbulent flows in a lid driven cavity with a non-zero vertical mean temperature gradient in order to identify the parameters governing the mean and turbulent flows and to understand their effects on the momentum and heat transfer. We found that the mean velocity patterns (e.g., the form and the sizes of the large-scale circulations) depend strongly on the degree of the temperature stratification. In the case of strong stable stratification, the strong turbulence region is located in the vicinity of the main large-scale circulation. We detected the large-scale nonlinear oscillations in the case of strong stable stratification which can be interpreted as nonlinear internal gravity waves. The ratio of the main energy-containing frequencies of these waves in velocity and temperature fields in the nonlinear stage is about 2. The amplitude of the waves increases in the region of weak turbulence (near the bottom wall of the cavity), whereby the vertical mean temperat...

  18. Sedimentation of finite-size spheres in quiescent and turbulent environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fornari, Walter; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation of a solid phase is widely encountered in applications and environmental flows, yet little is known about the behavior of finite-size particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. To fill this gap, we perform Direct Numerical Simulations of sedimentation in quiescent and turbulent environments using an Immersed Boundary Method to account for the dispersed rigid spherical particles. The solid volume fractions considered are 0.5-1%, while the solid to fluid density ratio is 1.02. The particle radius is chosen to be approximately 6 Komlogorov lengthscales. The results show that the mean settling velocity is lower in an already turbulent flow than in a still fluid. The reduction with respect to a single particle in quiescent fluid is about 12% and 14% for the two volume fractions investigated. The probability density function of the particle velocity is almost Gaussian in a turbulent flow, whereas it displays large positive tails in still fluid. These tails are associated to the rare fast sedimenta...

  19. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Belen Martinez Carmona; Jose L. Muñoz Martinez

    2015-11-19

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  20. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  1. Origin of ion-cyclotron turbulence in the downward Birkeland current region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, B.; Jasperse, J. R.; Lund, E. J.; Grossbard, N.

    2011-02-15

    Linear stability analysis of the electron velocity distributions, which are observed in the FAST satellite measurements in the downward Birkeland current region of the magnetosphere, is presented. The satellite-measured particle (electrons and protons) velocity distributions are fitted with analytic functions and the dispersion relation is derived in terms of the plasma dispersion functions associated with those distribution functions. Numerical solutions of the dispersion relation show that the bump-on-tail structure of the electron velocity distribution can excite electrostatic ion-cyclotron instabilities by the Landau resonance mechanism. Nonlinear evolution of these instabilities may explain the observed electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in the Birkeland current region. Excitation of other types of instabilities by the fitted electron velocity distributions and their relevance are also discussed.

  2. Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Noushin

    2012-02-14

    applying two different experimental methods. The first study involves the investigation of turbulent impinging jets through a staggered array of rods with or without crossflow. Such flows are crucial in various engineering disciplines. This experiment... ................................................................................................... 47 II.3.1. Time-Averaged Velocity Fields ................................................ 48 II.3.1.1. Single Impinging Jet in the Corner of Mid-Plane ...... 48 II.3.1.2. Single Impinging Jet in the Middle of the Measurement Plane...

  3. Test of the Fluctuation Relation in lagrangian turbulence on a free surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Bandi; J. R. Cressman Jr.; W. I. Goldburg

    2007-03-07

    The statistics of lagrangian velocity divergence are studied for an assembly of particles in compressible turbulence on a free surface. Under an appropriate definition of entropy, the two-dimensional lagrangian velocity divergence of a particle trajectory represents the local entropy rate, a random variable. The statistics of this rate are shown to be in agreement with the fluctuation relation (FR) over a limited range. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) obtained in this analysis exhibit features different from those observed in previous experimental tests.

  4. Time-resolved gas temperatures in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Keller, J.O. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA). Combustion Research Faclity)

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the cyclic behavior of the gas temperature in the oscillating turbulent flow in a pulse combustor tail pipe studied using two-line atomic fluorescence. In this flow, the oscillations result from an acoustic resonance, and have amplitudes of up to 5 times the mean velocity. Oscillation frequencies were varied from 67 to 101 Hz. Spatially resolved temperature measurements were made to within 400 {mu}m of the wall, providing cycle-resolved profiles of the temperature and the random temperature fluctuations. The combustor-cycle phase relationships among the gas temperature, random-temperature-fluctuation intensity, velocity, and combustion chamber pressure, are compared.

  5. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-07-25

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits.

  6. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  7. Thermal engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnes, T.E.; Trupin, R.J.

    1984-01-03

    A thermal engine utilizing a strip of nitinol material or other thermally responsive shape memory effect material to drive a reciprocating output shaft, said strip of material forming a common wall between two different alternating temperature sources which thermally cycle the material.

  8. Three-dimensional hybrid simulation study of anisotropic turbulence in the proton kinetic regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Markovskii, Sergei A.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: sergei.markovskii@unh.edu

    2014-06-20

    Three-dimensional numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and quasi-neutralizing fluid electrons are conducted for a freely decaying turbulence that is anisotropic with respect to the background magnetic field. The turbulence evolution is determined by both the combined root-mean-square (rms) amplitude for fluctuating proton bulk velocity and magnetic field and by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. This kind of relationship had been considered in the past with regard to interplanetary turbulence. The fluctuations nonlinearly evolve to a turbulent phase whose net wave vector anisotropy is usually more perpendicular than the initial one, irrespective of the initial ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. Self-similar anisotropy evolution is found as a function of the rms amplitude and parallel wavenumber. Proton heating rates in the turbulent phase vary strongly with the rms amplitude but only weakly with the initial wave vector anisotropy. Even in the limit where wave vectors are confined to the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field, the heating rate remains close to the corresponding case with finite parallel wave vector components. Simulation results obtained as a function of proton plasma to background magnetic pressure ratio ? {sub p} in the range 0.1-0.5 show that the wave vector anisotropy also weakly depends on ? {sub p}.

  9. Turbulent mixing layers in supersonic protostellar outflows, with application to DG Tauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marc C; Sutherland, Ralph S; Salmeron, Raquel; McGregor, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent entrainment processes may play an important role in the outflows from young stellar objects at all stages of their evolution. In particular, lateral entrainment of ambient material by high-velocity, well-collimated protostellar jets may be the cause of the multiple emission-line velocity components observed in the microjet-scale outflows driven by classical T Tauri stars. Intermediate-velocity outflow components may be emitted by a turbulent, shock- excited mixing layer along the boundaries of the jet. We present a formalism for describing such a mixing layer based on Reynolds decomposition of quantities measuring fundamental properties of the gas. In this model, the molecular wind from large disc radii provides a continual supply of material for entrainment. We calculate the total stress profile in the mixing layer, which allows us to estimate the dissipation of turbulent energy, and hence the luminosity of the layer. We utilize MAPPINGS IV shock models to determine the fraction of total emission t...

  10. Planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and transition to turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ristorcelli, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    Extensive recent work has demonstrated that predictive under-resolved simulations of the velocity fields in turbulent flows are possible without resorting to explicit subgrid models. When using a class of physics-capturing high-resolution finite-volume numerical algorithms. This strategy is denoted implicit large eddy simulation (ILES, MILES). The performance of ILES in the substantially more difficult problem of under-resolved material mixing driven by under-resolved velocity fields and initial conditions (ICs) is a focus of the present work. Progress is presented in analyzing the effects of IC combined spectral content and thickness parametrizations. In the large eddy simulation (LES). the large energy containing structures are resolved, the smaller, presumably more isotropic, structures are filtered out, and effects of subgrid scales (SGS) are modeled. ILES effectively addresses the seemingly insurmountable issues posed to LES by under-resolution. by relying on the use of SGS modeling and filtering provided implicitly by a class of physics capturing numerics; extensive verification and validation in areas of engineering. geophysics. and astrophysics has been reported. In many areas of interest such as. inertial confinement fusion. understanding the collapse of the outer cores of supernovas. and supersonic combustion engines, vorticity is introduced at material interfaces by the impulsive loading of shock waves. and turbulence is generated via Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities (RMI). Given that ILES is based on locally-adaptive, non-oscillatory. finite-volume methods it is naturally suited to emulate shock physics. The unique combination of shock and turbulence emulation capabilities supports direct use of ILES as an effective simulation anzatz for RMI. Here, we further test this approach using a particular strategy based on a nominally-inviscid, Schmidt number {approx} 1, simulation model that uses the LANL RAGE code to investigate planar RMI. Issues of initial material interface characterization and modeling difficulties, and effects of IC resolved spectral content on transitional and late-time turbulent mixing were examined in our previous work. The focus here is to carry out a systematic analysis of effects of combined IC spectral content and thickness.

  11. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Goodwin; Charles Jenkins; Andrew Lambert

    2007-06-19

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  12. Reprocessing of Ices in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks: Carbon and Nitrogen Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) are two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The fo...

  13. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-02-15

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones, and the 3D simulation turns out to be more accurate than the 2D simulation as a result of a relatively precise description of the turbulent phenomena inside the torch using a more realistic model of arc root attachment. Finally, it is suggested that the 3D transient formulation is indeed required for describing the real arc discharge phenomena inside the torch, while the 2D stationary approach is sometimes useful for getting practical information about the time-averaged plasma characteristics outside the torch because of its simplicity and rapidness in computation.

  14. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  15. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel. Large increases in Reynolds stress occur due to onset of the small-scale concentrations of vorticity immediately downstream of separation; substantial increases at locations further downstream arise from development of the large-scale vorticity concentrations.

  16. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bittencourt, L. S. (2010) Air movement acceptability limitsthermal acceptability and air movement assessments in a hot-e úmidos. (Applicability of air velocity limits for thermal

  17. Flame Surface Fractal Characteristics in Premixed Turbulent Combustion at High Turbulence Intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Flame Surface Fractal Characteristics in Premixed Turbulent Combustion at High Turbulence of the flame surfaces in premixed turbulent combustion, the fractal approach is considered to be one with diameters of 11.2 and 22.4 mm, with flames of propane­air with equivalence ratios of 0.8 and 1

  18. Turbulent Supersonic Channel Flow: Direct Numerical Simulation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    modeling: the turbulence frequency production mechanism, wall damping effects on turbulence model frequency production mechanisms and wall damping effects may be explained very well on the basis, Chik w = wall viscosity = kinematic viscosity, = T = turbulent kinematic viscosity, Ck d = pressure

  19. the surrounding thermals become less effective as the pool size With regard to the downflow mode mentioned previously, it is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    rates in the presence of thermal convection should have been nearly the same as those measured under iso in the Interfacial Boundary Layer Measured in an Open Tank of Water in Turbulent Free Convection," J. Fluid Meek Vol

  20. Field evidence for the upwind velocity shift at the crest of low dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; G. F. S. Wiggs; B. Andreotti

    2013-02-11

    Wind topographically forced by hills and sand dunes accelerates on the upwind (stoss) slopes and reduces on the downwind (lee) slopes. This secondary wind regime, however, possesses a subtle effect, reported here for the first time from field measurements of near-surface wind velocity over a low dune: the wind velocity close to the surface reaches its maximum upwind of the crest. Our field-measured data show that this upwind phase shift of velocity with respect to topography is found to be in quantitative agreement with the prediction of hydrodynamical linear analysis for turbulent flows with first order closures. This effect, together with sand transport spatial relaxation, is at the origin of the mechanisms of dune initiation, instability and growth.

  1. Field evidence for the upwind velocity shift at the crest of low dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudin, P; Andreotti, B

    2012-01-01

    Wind topographically forced by hills and sand dunes accelerates on the upwind (stoss) slopes and reduces on the downwind (lee) sides. This secondary wind regime, however, possesses a subtle effect, reported here for the first time from field measurements of near-surface wind velocity over a low dune: the wind velocity close to the surface reaches its maximum upwind of the crest. Our field-measured data show that this upwind phase shift of velocity with respect to topography is found to be in quantitative agreement with the prediction of hydrodynamical linear analysis for turbulent flows with first order closures. This effect, together with sand transport spatial relaxation, is at the origin of the dune instability mechanism.

  2. Principal Component Analysis studies of turbulence in optically thick gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correia, Caio; Burkhart, Blakesley; Pogosyan, Dmitri; De Medeiros, José Renan

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) sensitivity to the velocity power spectrum in high opacity regimes of the interstellar medium (ISM). For our analysis we use synthetic Position-Position-Velocity (PPV) cubes of fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, post processed to include radiative transfer effects from CO. We find that PCA analysis is very different from the tools based on the traditional power spectrum of PPV data cubes. Our major finding is that PCA is also sensitive to the phase information of PPV cubes and this allows PCA to detect the changes of the underlying velocity and density spectra at high opacities, where the spectral analysis of the maps provides the universal -3 spectrum in accordance with the predictions of Lazarian \\& Pogosyan (2004) theory. This makes PCA potentially a valuable tool for studies of turbulence at high opacities provided that the proper gauging of the PCA index is made. The later, however, we found t...

  3. Three axis velocity probe system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Jr., Nelson S. (Morgantown, WV); Utt, Carroll E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01

    A three-axis velocity probe system for determining three-axis positional velocities of small particles in fluidized bed systems and similar applications. This system has a sensor head containing four closely-spaced sensing electrodes of small wires that have flat ends to establish a two axis plane, e.g. a X-Y plane. Two of the sensing electrodes are positioned along one of the axes and the other two are along the second axis. These four sensing electrodes are surrounded by a guard electrode, and the outer surface is a ground electrode and support member for the sensing head. The electrodes are excited by, for example, sinusoidal voltage having a peak-to-peak voltage of up to 500 volts at a frequency of 2 MHz. Capacitive currents flowing between the four sensing electrodes and the ground electrode are influenced by the presence and position of a particle passing the sensing head. Any changes in these currents due to the particle are amplified and synchronously detected to produce positional signal values that are converted to digital form. Using these digital forms and two values of time permit generation of values of the three components of the particle vector and thus the total velocity vector.

  4. Use of a Seeing Monitor to Determine the Velocities of Turbulent Atmospheric Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisner, Jeff

    with ground based interferometers and adaptive optics systems, as well as in statistical studies of seeing- tical astronomical images well beyond the di#11;raction limit of the telescopes. An adaptive optics;erential atmospheric delay a#11;ecting the light received at separated points. In all such ground

  5. Mean and turbulent velocity fields near rigid and flexible plants and the implications for deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Alejandra Campbell

    The transport of fine sediment and organic matter plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of shallow aquatic systems, and the fate of these particles is closely linked to vegetation. We describe the mean and ...

  6. Descriptive analysis of the turbulent velocity profiles for two cross sections in a river confluence zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VILLAMIZAR AMAYA, SANDRA ROCIO

    2007-01-01

    Developments in Fluvial Sedimentology: Contributions fromThird International Fluvial Sedimentology Conference, Tulsa,

  7. ARM - PI Product - Cloud-Scale Vertical Velocity and Turbulent Dissipation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related LinksOxidesProductsCloud PropertiesRate

  8. ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges...

  9. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01

    dynamics of turbulent thermonuclear ?ames are essential tostudy of turbulent thermonuclear ? ames that explores aadapted to the study of thermonuclear ?ames, as described in

  10. Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion...

  11. Large eddy simulation and experimental measurements of the near-field of a large turbulent helium plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DesJardin, Paul E.

    diameters from the fuel source are of greatest interest since the bulk of the combustion takes place a fire requires accurate modeling of turbulent, combustion, and thermal radiation processes. A full description of all these processes has proven to be an enormous challenge for CFD modeling. The approach

  12. Deposition Velocities of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Slurries in Pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Adkins, Harold E.; Abrefah, John; Casella, Andrew M.; Hohimer, Ryan E.; Nigl, Franz; Minette, Michael J.; Toth, James J.; Tingey, Joel M.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-03-25

    The WTP pipe plugging issue, as stated by the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Executive Summary, is as follows: “Piping that transports slurries will plug unless it is properly designed to minimize this risk. This design approach has not been followed consistently, which will lead to frequent shutdowns due to line plugging.” A strategy was employed to perform critical-velocity tests on several physical simulants. Critical velocity is defined as the point where a stationary bed of particles deposits on the bottom of a straight horizontal pipe during slurry transport operations. Results from the critical velocity testing provide an indication of slurry stability as a function of fluid rheological properties and transport conditions. The experimental results are compared to the WTP design guide on slurry transport velocity in an effort to confirm minimum waste velocity and flushing velocity requirements as established by calculations and critical line velocity correlations in the design guide. The major findings of this testing is discussed below. Experimental results indicate that the use of the Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation in the design guide is conservative—Slurry viscosity has a greater affect on particles with a large surface area to mass ratio. The increased viscous forces on these particles result in a decrease in predicted critical velocities from this traditional industry derived equations that focus on particles large than 100 ?m in size. Since the Hanford slurry particles generally have large surface area to mass ratios, the reliance on such equations in the Hall (2006) design guide is conservative. Additionally, the use of the 95% percentile particle size as an input to this equation is conservative. However, test results indicate that the use of an average particle density as an input to the equation is not conservative. Particle density has a large influence on the overall result returned by the correlation. Lastly, the viscosity correlation used in the WTP design guide has been shown to be inaccurate for Hanford waste feed materials. The use of the Thomas (1979) correlation in the design guide is not conservative—In cases where 100% of the particles are smaller than 74 ?m or particles are considered to be homogeneous due to yield stress forces suspending the particles the homogeneous fraction of the slurry can be set to 100%. In such cases, the predicted critical velocity based on the conservative Oroskar and Turian (1980) correlation is reduced to zero and the design guide returns a value from the Thomas (1979) correlation. The measured data in this report show that the Thomas (1979) correlation predictions often fall below that measured experimental values. A non-Newtonian deposition velocity design guide should be developed for the WTP— Since the WTP design guide is limited to Newtonian fluids and the WTP expects to process large quantities of such materials, the existing design guide should be modified address such systems. A central experimental finding of this testing is that the flow velocity required to reach turbulent flow increases with slurry rheological properties due to viscous forces dampening the formation of turbulent eddies. The flow becomes dominated by viscous forces rather than turbulent eddies. Since the turbulent eddies necessary for particle transport are not present, the particles will settle when crossing this boundary called the transitional deposition boundary. This deposition mechanism should be expected and designed for in the WTP.

  13. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle ??(?)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  14. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  15. Diffusive Radiation in One-dimensional Langmuir Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2007-01-01

    We calculate spectra of radiation produced by a relativistic particle in the presence of one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular, in the shock front or at the shock-shock interactions. The shape of the radiation spectra is shown to depend sensitively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation spectrum in the case of exactly transverse particle motion is degenerate and similar to that of spatially uniform Langmuir oscillations. In case of oblique propagation, the spectrum is more complex, it consists of a number of power-law regions and may contain a distinct high-frequency spectral peak. %at $\\omega=2\\omega\\pe \\gamma^2$. The emission process considered is relevant to various laboratory plasma settings and for astrophysical objects as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets.

  16. Diffusive Radiation in One-dimensional Langmuir Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory D. Fleishman; Igor N. Toptygin

    2007-05-21

    We calculate spectra of radiation produced by a relativistic particle in the presence of one-dimensional Langmuir turbulence which might be generated by a streaming instability in the plasma, in particular, in the shock front or at the shock-shock interactions. The shape of the radiation spectra is shown to depend sensitively on the angle between the particle velocity and electric field direction. The radiation spectrum in the case of exactly transverse particle motion is degenerate and similar to that of spatially uniform Langmuir oscillations. In case of oblique propagation, the spectrum is more complex, it consists of a number of power-law regions and may contain a distinct high-frequency spectral peak. %at $\\omega=2\\omega\\pe \\gamma^2$. The emission process considered is relevant to various laboratory plasma settings and for astrophysical objects as gamma-ray bursts and collimated jets.

  17. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >ScientificApplied Turbulent Combustion Home

  18. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-15

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  19. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  20. Turbulence of a Unidirectional Flow Bjorn Birnir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    -flying aircraft. Turbulent drag also prevents the design of more fuel-efficient cars and aircrafts. Turbulence plays a role in the heat trans- fer in nuclear reactors, causes drag in oil pipelines and influence and intrigued people for centuries. Five centuries ago a fluid engineer by the name of Leonardo da Vinci tackled

  1. Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion N. Peters RWTH Aachen Ercoftac Summer School in Combustion Systems 1 Lecture 2: Calculation of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures and Chemical Equilibria 20: Laminar Diffusion Flames: Different Flow Geometries 156 Lecture 11: Turbulent Combustion: Introduction

  2. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  3. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  4. Newberry EGS Seismic Velocity Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01

    We use ambient noise correlation (ANC) to create a detailed image of the subsurface seismic velocity at the Newberry EGS site down to 5 km. We collected continuous data for the 22 stations in the Newberry network, together with 12 additional stations from the nearby CC, UO and UW networks. The data were instrument corrected, whitened and converted to single bit traces before cross correlation according to the methodology in Benson (2007). There are 231 unique paths connecting the 22 stations of the Newberry network. The additional networks extended that to 402 unique paths crossing beneath the Newberry site.

  5. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wensink, Henricus H; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E; Löwen, Hartmut; Yeomans, Julia M

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis su...

  6. Numerical simulations of strong incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, J.; Cattaneo, F.; Perez, J. C.; Boldyrev, S.

    2012-05-15

    Magnetised plasma turbulence pervades the universe and is likely to play an important role in a variety of astrophysical settings. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest theoretical framework in which phenomenological models for the turbulent dynamics can be built. Numerical simulations of MHD turbulence are widely used to guide and test the theoretical predictions; however, simulating MHD turbulence and accurately measuring its scaling properties is far from straightforward. Computational power limits the calculations to moderate Reynolds numbers and often simplifying assumptions are made in order that a wider range of scales can be accessed. After describing the theoretical predictions and the numerical approaches that are often employed in studying strong incompressible MHD turbulence, we present the findings of a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We discuss the effects that insufficiencies in the computational approach can have on the solution and its physical interpretation.

  7. Shedding of Vortex Rings from an Oscillating Sphere in Superfluid He-4 below 0.5 K - The Origin of the Turbulent Drag Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoepe, W

    2013-01-01

    The onset of turbulent flow around an oscillating sphere is known to occur at a critical velocity vc ~ sqrt(kappa omega) where kappa is the circulation quantum and omega is the oscillation frequency. However, in a small interval of driving force amplitudes F (or corresponding velocity amplitudes of few percent above vc) the turbulent flow is found to be unstable. The flow pattern switches intermittently between potential flow and turbulence. The lifetimes of the turbulent phases have an exponential distribution and the mean lifetimes tau grow very rapidly with increasing driving force, namely as tau(F) ~ exp [(F/F1)^2]. In this work this experimental result is analyzed in more detail than before, in particular the force F1 is identified. As a result, the turbulent drag force F(v) ~ (v^2 - vc^2) can be ascribed quantitatively to the shedding of vortex rings having the size of the sphere. Moreover, we can infer the average number of vortex rings that are shed per half-period at any given velocity v on the turbu...

  8. Azimuthally Anisotropic 3D Velocity Continuation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burnett, William; Fomel, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We extend time-domain velocity continuation to the zero-offset 3D azimuthally anisotropic case. Velocity continuation describes how a seismic image changes given a change in migration velocity. This description turns out to be of a wave propagation process, in which images change along a velocity axis. In the anisotropic case, the velocity model is multiparameter. Therefore, anisotropic image propagation is multidimensional. We use a three-parameter slowness model, which is related to azimuthal variations in velocity, as well as their principal directions. This information is useful for fracture and reservoir characterization from seismic data. We provide synthetic diffraction imaging examples to illustratemore »the concept and potential applications of azimuthal velocity continuation and to analyze the impulse response of the 3D velocity continuation operator.« less

  9. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Solar Thermal Collectors .is solar energy. Solar thermal collector arrays can be usedon integrating solar thermal collectors with desalination

  10. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  11. Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

    2006-01-01

    The classrooms in Chongqing are taken as a study subject in this paper. Measurements of the indoor thermal environmental parameters, e.g., indoor dry/wet bulb temperature, and air velocity, were taken. Combined with the questionnaire, which included...

  12. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"aided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  13. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  14. ON QUIET-TIME SOLAR WIND ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN DYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH LANGMUIR TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaheer, S.; Yoon, P. H.

    2013-10-01

    A recent series of papers put forth a self-consistent theory of an asymptotically steady-state electron distribution function and Langmuir turbulence intensity. The theory was developed in terms of the ? distribution which features Maxwellian low-energy electrons and a non-Maxwellian energetic power-law tail component. The present paper discusses a generalized ? distribution that features a Davydov-Druyvesteyn type of core component and an energetic power-law tail component. The physical motivation for such a generalization is so that the model may reflect the influence of low-energy electrons interacting with low-frequency kinetic Alfvénic turbulence as well as with high-frequency Langmuir turbulence. It is shown that such a solution and the accompanying Langmuir wave spectrum rigorously satisfy the balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced emission processes in both the particle and wave kinetic equations, and approximately satisfy the similar balance requirement between the spontaneous and induced scattering processes, which are nonlinear. In spite of the low velocity modification of the electron distribution function, it is shown that the resulting asymptotic velocity power-law index ?, where f{sub e} ? v {sup –?} is close to the average index observed during the quiet-time solar wind condition, i.e., ? ? O(6.5) whereas ?{sub average} ? 6.69, according to observation.

  15. A Lagrangian model of Copepod dynamics: clustering by escape jumps in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardeshiri, Hamidreza; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Toschi, Federico; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are small crustaceans that have the ability to swim by quick powerful jumps. Such an aptness is used to escape from high shear regions, which may be caused either by flow per- turbations, produced by a large predator (i.e. fish larvae), or by the inherent highly turbulent dynamics of the ocean. Through a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigate the impact of jumping behaviour on the small-scale patchiness of copepods in a turbulent environment. Recorded velocity tracks of copepods displaying escape response jumps in still water are here used to define and tune a Lagrangian Copepod (LC) model. The model is further employed to simulate the behaviour of thousands of copepods in a fully developed hydrodynamic turbulent flow obtained by direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. First, we show that the LC velocity statistics is in qualitative agreement with available experimental observations of copepods in tur- bulence. Second, we quantify the clustering of LC...

  16. Phase mixing vs. nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schekochihin, A A; Highcock, E G; Dellar, P J; Dorland, W; Hammett, G W

    2015-01-01

    A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g., drift-wave turbulence driven by temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating ExB flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. A consistent theory is constructed in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wave-number space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also i...

  17. SHEAR PHOTOSPHERIC FORCING AND THE ORIGIN OF TURBULENCE IN CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Velli, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Einaudi, G., E-mail: rappazzo@iac.e [Dipartimento di Fisica 'E. Fermi', Universita di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-10-10

    We present a series of numerical simulations aimed at understanding the nature and origin of turbulence in coronal loops in the framework of the Parker model for coronal heating. A coronal loop is studied via reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations in Cartesian geometry. A uniform and strong magnetic field threads the volume between the two photospheric planes, where a velocity field in the form of a one-dimensional shear flow pattern is present. Initially, the magnetic field that develops in the coronal loop is a simple map of the photospheric velocity field. This initial configuration is unstable to a multiple tearing instability that develops islands with X and O points in the plane orthogonal to the axial field. Once the nonlinear stage sets in the system evolution is characterized by a regime of MHD turbulence dominated by magnetic energy. A well-developed power law in energy spectra is observed and the magnetic field never returns to the simple initial state mapping the photospheric flow. The formation of X and O points in the planes orthogonal to the axial field allows the continued and repeated formation and dissipation of small-scale current sheets where the plasma is heated. We conclude that the observed turbulent dynamics are not induced by the complexity of the pattern that the magnetic field-line footpoints follow but they rather stem from the inherent nonlinear nature of the system.

  18. MAGNETIC TRANSPORT ON THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE BY LAMINAR AND TURBULENT AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiraki, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu (Japan); Krishan, V. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Masuda, S., E-mail: hiraki.yasutaka@nifs.ac.j [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    The lower solar atmosphere consists of partially ionized turbulent plasmas harboring velocity field, magnetic field, and current density fluctuations. The correlations among these small-scale fluctuations give rise to large-scale flows and magnetic fields which decisively affect all transport processes. The three-fluid system consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral particles supports nonideal effects such as the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion. Here, we study magnetic transport by the laminar- and turbulent-scale ambipolar diffusion processes using a simple model of the magnetic induction equation. Based on a linear analysis of the induction equation, we perform a one-dimensional numerical simulation to study the laminar ambipolar effect on medium-scale magnetic field structures. The nonlinearity of the laminar ambipolar diffusion creates magnetic structures with sharp gradients in the scale of hundreds of kilometers. We expect that these can be amenable to processes such as magnetic reconnection and energy release therefrom for heating and flaring of the solar plasma. Analyzing the characteristic timescales of these processes, we find that the turbulent diffusion timescale is smaller by several orders of magnitude than the laminar diffusion timescale. The effect of the modeled turbulent ambipolar diffusion on the obtained field structures is briefly discussed.

  19. Signatures of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic shocks in turbulent molecular clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low-velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks---fast, intermediate and slow---differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions. Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks propagating at low speeds (a few km/s) in molecular clouds. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where...

  20. Anisotropic characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuznetsov, E A

    2015-01-01

    Statistical characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade for two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence are numerically studied (with spatial resolution $8192\\times 8192$) in the presence of pumping and viscous-like damping. It is shown that quasi-shocks of vorticity and their Fourier partnerships in the form of jets introduce an essential influence in turbulence leading to strong angular dependencies for correlation functions. The energy distribution as a function of modulus $k$ for each angle in the inertial interval has the Kraichnan behavior, $\\sim k^{-4}$, and simultaneously a strong dependence on angles. However, angle average provides with a high accuracy the Kraichnan turbulence spectrum $E_k=C_K\\eta^{2/3} k^{-3}$ where $\\eta$ is enstrophy flux and the Kraichnan constant $C_K\\simeq 1.3$, in correspondence with the previous simulations. Familiar situation takes place for third-order velocity structure function $S_3^L$ which, as for the isotropic turbulence, gives the same scaling with respect to separa...

  1. Anisotropic characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Kuznetsov; E. V. Sereshchenko

    2015-10-30

    Statistical characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade for two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence are numerically studied (with spatial resolution $8192\\times 8192$) in the presence of pumping and viscous-like damping. It is shown that quasi-shocks of vorticity and their Fourier partnerships in the form of jets introduce an essential influence in turbulence leading to strong angular dependencies for correlation functions. The energy distribution as a function of modulus $k$ for each angle in the inertial interval has the Kraichnan behavior, $\\sim k^{-4}$, and simultaneously a strong dependence on angles. However, angle average provides with a high accuracy the Kraichnan turbulence spectrum $E_k=C_K\\eta^{2/3} k^{-3}$ where $\\eta$ is enstrophy flux and the Kraichnan constant $C_K\\simeq 1.3$, in correspondence with the previous simulations. Familiar situation takes place for third-order velocity structure function $S_3^L$ which, as for the isotropic turbulence, gives the same scaling with respect to separation length $R$ and $\\eta$, $S_3^L=C_3\\eta R^3$, but the mean over angles and time $\\bar {C_3}$ differs from its isotropic value.

  2. Stretching of polymers around the Kolmogorov scale in a turbulent shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahanshah Davoudi; Joerg Schumacher

    2006-01-03

    We present numerical studies of stretching of Hookean dumbbells in a turbulent Navier-Stokes flow with a linear mean profile, =Sy. In addition to the turbulence features beyond the viscous Kolmogorov scale \\eta, the dynamics at the equilibrium extension of the dumbbells significantly below eta is well resolved. The variation of the constant shear rate S causes a change of the turbulent velocity fluctuations on all scales and thus of the intensity of local stretching rate of the advecting flow. The latter is measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent lambda_1 which is found to increase as \\lambda_1 ~ S^{3/2}, in agreement with a dimensional argument. The ensemble of up to 2 times 10^6 passively advected dumbbells is advanced by Brownian dynamics simulations in combination with a pseudospectral integration for the turbulent shear flow. Anisotropy of stretching is quantified by the statistics of the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ which measures the alignment with the mean flow axis in the x-y shear plane, and the polar angle theta which determines the orientation with respect to the shear plane. The asymmetry of the probability density function (PDF) of phi increases with growing shear rate S. Furthermore, the PDF becomes increasingly peaked around mean flow direction (phi= 0). In contrast, the PDF of the polar angle theta is symmetric and less sensitive to changes of S.

  3. Great Plains Turbulence Environment: Its Origins, Impact, and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.

    2006-12-01

    This paper summarizes the known impacts of nocturnal turbulence on wind turbine performance and operations.

  4. Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the major radius were measured using the recently upgraded phase-contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic 4. The 32 vertical chords of the PCI system (see Fig. 1 (a)) enables the...

  5. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  6. Planar velocity and scalar concentration measurements in shock-accelerated,unstable fluid interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodenough, C.; Kumar, S.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Boyts, A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Rightley, P. M.; Tomkins, C. D.; Cannon, M. T.; Kamm, J. R.; Rider, William; Zoldi, C. A.; Orlicz, G.; Vorobieff, P. V.

    2004-01-01

    We report applications of several high-speed photographic techniques to diagnose fluid instability and the onset of turbulence in an ongoing experimental study of the evolution of shock-accelerated, heavy-gas cylinders. Results are at Reynolds numbers well above that associated with the turbulent and mixing transitions. Recent developments in diagnostics enable high-resolution, planar (2D) measurements of velocity fields (using particle image velocimetry, or PIV) and scalar concentration (using planar laser-induced fluorescence, or PLIF). The purpose of this work is to understand the basic science of complex, shock-driven flows and to provide high-quality data for code validation and development. The combination of these high-speed optical methods, PIV and PLIF, is setting a new standard in validating large codes for fluid simulations. The PIV velocity measurements provide quantitative evidence of transition to turbulence. In the PIV technique, a frame transfer camera with a 1 ms separation is used to image flows illuminated by two 10 ns laser pulses. Individual particles in a seeded flow are tracked from frame to frame to produce a velocity field. Dynamic PLIF measurements of the concentration field are high-resolution, quantitative dynamic data that reveal finely detailed structure at several instances after shock passage. These structures include those associated with the incipient secondary instability and late-time transition. Multiple instances of the flow are captured using a single frame Apogee camera and laser pulses with 140 {mu}s spacing. We describe tradeoffs of diagnostic instrumentation to provide PLIF images.

  7. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  8. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  9. A Novel Model for Fracture Acidizing with Important Thermal Effects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, John

    2013-12-05

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.3 LB Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3. MODELING REACTIVE TRANSPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.1 LB Method: Fluid Velocity Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3.2 LB... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 6.2 Diffusion and Reaction in a Closed Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 6.3 Advection, Diffusion and Reaction in an Open Channel . . . . . . . . . . 38 7. THERMAL FRACTURE ACIDIZING MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 7.1 Velocity...

  10. A numerical investigation on active and passive scalars in isotropic compressible turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Qionglin; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the statistical differences between active and passive scalars in isotropic compressible turbulence. In the inertial range, the kinetic energy and scalar have the Kolmogorov spectra, and the Kolmogorov and Obukhov-Corrsin constants are 2.06 and 0.87, respectively. The local scaling exponents computed from the second-order structure functions exist plateaus for velocity and active scalar, while that for passive scalar takes first a minimum of 0.61 then a maximum of 0.73. The mixed third-order structure function of velocity and passive scalar satisfies the 4/3-law. For the scaling exponent, the one of velocity and passive scalar mixing is between those of velocity and passive scalar, while the one of velocity and active scalar mixing is below those of velocity and active scalar. At large amplitudes, the p.d.f. of active scalar fluctuations is super-Gaussian, whereas that of passive scalar fluctuations is sub-Gaussian. Moreover, the p.d.f.s of the two scalar increments are concave ...

  11. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  12. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). RIKEN Research Center and Physics Dept.; China Central Normal Univ., Wuhan (China). Physics Dept.; Pawlowski, Jan M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI); Sexty, Dénes [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI)

    2014-10-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  13. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmore »point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.« less

  14. Tracking granules at the Sun's surface and reconstructing velocity fields. II. Error analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tkaczuk; M. Rieutord; N. Meunier; T. Roudier

    2007-07-13

    The determination of horizontal velocity fields at the solar surface is crucial to understanding the dynamics and magnetism of the convection zone of the sun. These measurements can be done by tracking granules. Tracking granules from ground-based observations, however, suffers from the Earth's atmospheric turbulence, which induces image distortion. The focus of this paper is to evaluate the influence of this noise on the maps of velocity fields. We use the coherent structure tracking algorithm developed recently and apply it to two independent series of images that contain the same solar signal. We first show that a k-\\omega filtering of the times series of images is highly recommended as a pre-processing to decrease the noise, while, in contrast, using destretching should be avoided. We also demonstrate that the lifetime of granules has a strong influence on the error bars of velocities and that a threshold on the lifetime should be imposed to minimize errors. Finally, although solar flow patterns are easily recognizable and image quality is very good, it turns out that a time sampling of two images every 21 s is not frequent enough, since image distortion still pollutes velocity fields at a 30% level on the 2500 km scale, i.e. the scale on which granules start to behave like passive scalars. The coherent structure tracking algorithm is a useful tool for noise control on the measurement of surface horizontal solar velocity fields when at least two independent series are available.

  15. Measurement and physical interpretation of the mean motion of turbulent density patterns detected by the BES system on MAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghim, Y -c; Dunai, D; Zoletnik, S; Bardoczi, L; Schekochihin, A A

    2012-01-01

    The mean motion of turbulent patterns detected by a two-dimensional (2D) beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) is determined using a cross-correlation time delay (CCTD) method. Statistical reliability of the method is studied by means of synthetic data analysis. The experimental measurements on MAST indicate that the apparent mean poloidal motion of the turbulent density patterns in the lab frame arises because the longest correlation direction of the patterns (parallel to the local background magnetic fields) is not parallel to the direction of the fastest mean plasma flows (usually toroidal when strong neutral beam injection is present). The experimental measurements are consistent with the mean motion of plasma being toroidal. The sum of all other contributions (mean poloidal plasma flow, phase velocity of the density patterns in the plasma frame, non-linear effects, etc.) to the apparent mean poloidal velocity of the density patterns is found to be negligible...

  16. ANALYSIS OF TURBULENT MIXING JETS IN LARGE SCALE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; Robert Leishear, R; David Stefanko, D

    2007-03-28

    Flow evolution models were developed to evaluate the performance of the new advanced design mixer pump for sludge mixing and removal operations with high-velocity liquid jets in one of the large-scale Savannah River Site waste tanks, Tank 18. This paper describes the computational model, the flow measurements used to provide validation data in the region far from the jet nozzle, the extension of the computational results to real tank conditions through the use of existing sludge suspension data, and finally, the sludge removal results from actual Tank 18 operations. A computational fluid dynamics approach was used to simulate the sludge removal operations. The models employed a three-dimensional representation of the tank with a two-equation turbulence model. Both the computational approach and the models were validated with onsite test data reported here and literature data. The model was then extended to actual conditions in Tank 18 through a velocity criterion to predict the ability of the new pump design to suspend settled sludge. A qualitative comparison with sludge removal operations in Tank 18 showed a reasonably good comparison with final results subject to significant uncertainties in actual sludge properties.

  17. Evidence of Shock-Driven Turbulence in the Solar Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Reardon; F. Lepreti; V. Carbone; A. Vecchio

    2008-09-24

    We study the acoustic properties of the solar chromosphere in the high-frequency regime using a time sequence of velocity measurements in the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). We concentrate on quiet-Sun behavior, apply Fourier analysis, and characterize the observations in terms of the probability density functions (PDFs) of velocity increments. We confirm the presence of significant oscillatory fluctuation power above the cutoff frequency and find that it obeys a power-law distribution with frequency up to our 25 mHz Nyquist limit. The chromospheric PDFs are non-Gaussian and asymmetric and they differ among network, fibril, and internetwork regions. This suggests that the chromospheric high-frequency power is not simply the result of short-period waves propagating upward from the photosphere but rather is the signature of turbulence generated within the chromosphere from shock oscillations near the cutoff frequency. The presence of this pervasive and broad spectrum of motions in the chromosphere is likely to have implications for the excitation of coronal loop oscillations.

  18. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  19. Influence of suprathermal background electrons on strong auroral double layers: Laminar and turbulent regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Sen, N. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    A series of one-dimensional Vlasov simulations [Newman et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072902 (2008), this issue] show that a sufficiently dense and hot suprathermal electron population can stabilize strong laminar double layers over long periods while regulating their strength and velocity. When suprathermals are less dense or absent, the double layers tend to be sporadic and turbulent. A detailed comparison of the laminar and turbulent regimes reveals that the disruption of the laminar state can be triggered by kinetically modified Buneman instabilities on the low-potential side of the double layer, and by density perturbations that develop into nonlinear coherent shocklike structures on the high-potential side. These findings suggest that the suprathermal electrons may be responsible for suppressing both of these routes to disruption of the laminar state.

  20. Particle Resuspension in Turbulent Boundary Layers and the Influence of Non-Gaussian Removal Forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, F; Kissane, M

    2012-01-01

    The work presented is concerned with the way very small micron-size particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. Of particular concern is the remobilization of radioactive particles as a consequence of potential nuclear accidents. In this particular case the focus is on small particles, resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities arising from the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. In this work the model is significantly improved by using values of both the stream-wise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channelflow. Using an...

  1. Controlling Velocity In Bipedal Walking: A Dynamic Programming Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkeson, Christopher G.

    velocity and swing leg angle and angular velocity) to 1 (stance leg angular velocity). RepercussionsControlling Velocity In Bipedal Walking: A Dynamic Programming Approach Thijs Mandersloot their velocity. We control velocity by using dynamic programming to design control laws for each desired velocity

  2. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  3. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  4. Equilibration of an atmosphere by geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Malte F. (Malte Friedrich)

    2013-01-01

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that ...

  5. Selected problems in turbulence theory and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eun-Hwan

    2004-09-30

    pressure-strain correlation is investigated and constraining criteria for the rapid pressure-strain correlation models are developed. In the last topic, "unsteady computation of turbulent flow past a square cylinder using partially-averaged Navier...

  6. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova; A. Kartashov

    2006-09-07

    The model of laminated wave turbulence presented recently unites both types of turbulent wave systems - statistical wave turbulence (introduced by Kolmogorov and brought to the present form by numerous works of Zakharov and his scientific school since nineteen sixties) and discrete wave turbulence (developed in the works of Kartashova in nineteen nineties). The main new feature described by this model is the following: discrete effects do appear not only in the long-wave part of the spectral domain (corresponding to small wave numbers) but all through the spectra thus putting forth a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. In this paper we present a generic algorithm for polynomial dispersion functions and illustrate it by application to gravity and planetary waves.

  7. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  8. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  9. Ion kinetic energy conservation and magnetic field strength constancy in multi-fluid solar wind Alfv\\'enic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteini, L; Pantellini, F; Velli, M; Schwartz, S J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of the plasma fluid motion in the large amplitude low frequency fluctuations of highly Alfv\\'enic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles, which, owing to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfv\\'en speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform proton velocity into the frame of Alfv\\'enic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfv\\'enic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfv\\'enic turbulence, is at the origin of ...

  10. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  11. PIV velocity measurements in the wake of an obstruction simulating a Taylor bubble in a duct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vassallo, P.; Kumar, R.

    1997-06-01

    Mean velocity measurements in the wake of an obstruction simulating a Taylor bubble (or slug) have been obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a duct. Two flow rates were established: one represented the flow behind a large gas slug rising in quiescent fluid and the other represented an idealized slug rising with a higher relative velocity, as typically found in higher void fraction churn-turbulent flow. The results indicate that, in a reference frame fixed to the slug, the flow around the sides of the slug behaves like wall bounded jets which eventually merge downstream of the slug. The ratio of wake volume to slug volume is nearly the same for both Reynolds numbers tested (i.e., 3.0 at Re = 3,628 and 2.9 at Re = 7.257) although the measurements suggest that the wake size decreases somewhat as the Reynolds number is increased.

  12. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  13. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Löwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  14. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  15. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  16. Local Energy Velocity of Classical Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Drozdov; A. A. Stahlhofen

    2007-04-19

    It is proposed to apply a recently developed concept of local wave velocities to the dynamical field characteristics, especially for the canonical field energy density. It is shown that local energy velocities can be derived from the lagrangian directly. The local velocities of zero- and first- order for energy propagation has been obtained for special cases of scalar and vector fields. Some important special cases of these results are discussed.

  17. Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Conductivity in Nanoporous Si Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Conductivity in Nanoporous Si Membranes Stefanie Wolf1 transport in Si nanomeshes. Phonons are treated semiclassically as particles of specific energy and velocity, ii) the roughness amplitude of the pore surfaces on the thermal conductivity of the nanomeshes. We

  18. Creating unstable velocity-space distributions with barium injections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    Large Debye lengths relative to detector dimensions and the absence of confining walls makes space an attractive laboratory for studying fundamental theories of plasma instabilities. However, natural space plasmas are rarely found displaced from equilibrium enough to permit isolation and diagnosis of the controlling parameters and driving conditions. Furthermore, any plasma or field response to the departure from equilibrium can be masked by noise in the natural system. Active experiments provide a technique for addressing the chicken or egg dilemma. Early thermite barium releases were generally conducted at low altitudes from sounding rockets to trace electric fields passively or to study configuration-space instabilities. One can also study velocity-space instabilities with barium releases. Neutral barium vapor releases wherein a typical speed greatly exceeds the thermal speed can be used to produce barium ion velocity-space distributions that should be subject to a number of microinstabilities. We examine the ion velocity-space distributions resulting from barium injections from orbiting spacecraft and shaped-charges.

  19. SUR LES CASCADES D'ENERGIE EN ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosa, Ricardo M. S.

    SUR LES CASCADES D'´ENERGIE EN ´ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS CIPRIAN energy is transferred from low wave number modes to high wave number modes (L. Onsager (1945)). Such a transfer of energy occurs in a spectral range beyond that of injection of energy, and it underlies the so

  20. Displacement speeds in turbulent premixed flame simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Marcus S.; Shepherd, Ian G.; Bell, J.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    elds for reaction rate progress and ?uid velocity. Thefor the velocity ?elds and the scalar measure of reactionvelocity and the temperature. To evaluate the displacement speed we de?ne a reaction

  1. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrie, Robert B

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  2. Measurement of three-dimensional coherent fluid structure in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Thomas Henry

    2012-07-03

    of difference between original and filled-in vectors . . 158 6.22 Restoration of field with 20% missing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6.23 Restoration of field with 50% missing data . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 6.24 Median error in restoration of a field... Binary mask used to relate pixel indices in matrix Wij to the reduced pixel indices in Wrs. ?js Binary mask used to relate voxel indices in matrix Wij to the reduced voxel indices in Wrs. ei Error in the ith velocity component. u?iu ? j u? Turbulent...

  3. The nuclear fusion reaction rate based on relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2002-10-20

    The Coulomb barrier is in general much higher than thermal energy. Nuclear fusion reactions occur only among few protons and nuclei with higher relative energies than Coulomb barrier. It is the equilibrium velocity distribution of these high-energy protons and nuclei that participates in determining the rate of nuclear fusion reactions. In the circumstance it is inappropriate to use the Maxwellian velocity distribution for calculating the nuclear fusion reaction rate. We use the relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution for this purpose. The rate based on the relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution has a reduction factor with respect to that based on the Maxwellian distribution, which factor depends on the temperature, reduced mass and atomic numbers of the studied nuclear fusion reactions. This signifies much to the solar neutrino problem.

  4. Analysis of Ultrasonic Velocities in Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of measurements on ultrasonic velocities of liquid hydrocarbons and mixtures. They found that their dataAnalysis of Ultrasonic Velocities in Hydrocarbon Mixtures James G. Berryman Lawrence Livermore on hydrocarbon mixtures was shown by Wang and Nur [JASA 89, 2725 (1991)] to agree quite well with the predictions

  5. Field comparison of the point velocity probe with other groundwater velocity measurement methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labaky, W.; Devlin, John F.; Gillham, R. W.

    2009-03-14

    Field testing of a new tool for measuring groundwater velocities at the centimeter scale, the point velocity probe (PVP), was undertaken at Canadian Forces Base, Borden, Ontario, Canada. The measurements were performed in a sheet pile...

  6. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  7. Comparison of Poloidal Velocity Meassurements to Neoclassical Theory on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, R E; Kaye, S M; Kolesnikov, R A; LeBlance, B P; Rewolldt, G; Wang, W X

    2010-04-07

    Knowledge of poloidal velocity is necessary for the determination of the radial electric field, Er, which along with its gradient is linked to turbulence suppression and transport barrier formation. Recent measurements of poloidal flow on conventional tokamaks have been reported to be an order of magnitude larger than expected from neoclassical theory. In contrast, recent poloidal velocity measurements on the NSTX spherical torus [S. M. Kaye et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 1977 (2001)] are near or below neoclassical estimates. A novel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic is used, which features active and passive sets of up/down symmetric views to produce line-integrated poloidal velocity measurements that do not need atomic physics corrections. Local profiles are obtained with an inversion. Poloidal velocity measurements are compared with neoclassical values computed with the codes NCLASS [W. A. Houlberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 3230 (1997)] and GTC-Neo [W. X. Wang, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 082501 (2006)], which has been updated to handle impurities. __________________________________________________

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  9. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    of solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solaraided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsobesides MVC require thermal energy as their primary energy

  10. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    15] O. A. Hamed, "THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MULTISTAGE FLASHdesa4.aspx. [18] Encon, "Thermal Evaporators," June 2013. [http://www.evaporator.com/thermal-evaporator. [19] Y. Tian

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  12. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    This requires no thermal storage tanks, but can have athe need for large thermal storage equipment, the evaporatorinclude analysis of thermal storage. A way of keeping the

  13. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  14. Magnetic Turbulence and Thermodynamics in the Inner Region of Protoplanetary Discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirose, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations with realistic opacities and equation of state, and zero net magnetic flux, we have explored thermodynamics in the inner part of protoplanetary discs where magnetic turbulence is expected. The thermal equilibrium curve consists of the upper, lower, and middle branches. The upper (lower) branch corresponds to hot (cool) and optically very (moderately) thick discs, respectively, while the middle branch is characterized by convective energy transport near the midplane. Convection is also the major energy transport process near the low surface density end of the upper branch. There, convective motion is fast with Mach numbers reaching $\\gtrsim 0.01$, and enhances both magnetic turbulence and cooling, raising the ratio of vertically-integrated shear stress to vertically-integrated pressure by a factor of several. This convectively enhanced ratio seems a robust feature in accretion discs having an ionization transition. We have also examined causes of the S-shaped th...

  15. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert I Selkowitz; Eric G. Blackman

    2007-07-31

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation also provides a mechanism for the non-ionizing heat source observed in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium \\citep{Reynolds}. STFA accommodates the proper heating power, and the input energy is rapidly thermalized within the low density Reynolds layer plasma.

  16. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  17. Study of turbulence-chemistry interaction in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    rate, kg/m3 s, or wall-normal velocity, m/s u streamwise velocity, m/s v spanwise velocity, m/mol stoichiometric coefficient, dimensionless k reaction rate coefficient Keq equilibrium constant Ta activation velocity, m/s h specific enthalpy, J/kg Current Address: Research Scientist, National Institute

  18. Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semper, Michael Thomas

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a ...

  19. MICROWAVE IMAGING REFLECTOMETRY FOR THE VISUALIZATION OF TURBULENCE IN TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 MICROWAVE IMAGING REFLECTOMETRY FOR THE VISUALIZATION OF TURBULENCE IN TOKAMAKS E. Mazzucato of density fluctuations in tokamaks. The proposed method is based on microwave reflectometry and consists are discussed. Key words: Tokamak, anomalous transport, turbulent fluctuations, microwave imaging reflectometry

  20. Microwave imaging reflectometry for the visualization of turbulence in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucato, Ernesto

    Microwave imaging reflectometry for the visualization of turbulence in tokamaks E. Mazzucato describes the results of an extensive numerical study of microwave reflectometry in tokamaks showing scheme for the global visualization of turbulent fluctuations in tokamaks is described. 1. Introduction

  1. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  2. Biophysical coupling between turbulence, veliger behavior, and larval supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Heidi L

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this thesis were to quantify the behavior of gastropod larvae (mud snails Ilyanassa obsoleta) in turbulence, and to investigate how that behavior affects larval supply in a turbulent coastal inlet. Gastropod ...

  3. Evolution of an initially turbulent stratified shear layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brucker, Kyle A.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2007-01-01

    the turbulent kinetic energy and potential energy are givenbe- tween potential and kinetic energy, is not positive de?kinetic energy that may be trans- ferred to turbulent potential energy.

  4. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  5. Small-Scale Forcing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorkowski, Thomas

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent ...

  6. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  7. Closure models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Tarbell, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, a simple procedure based on fast and slow reaction asymptotics has been employed to drive first-order closure models for the nonlinear reaction terms in turbulent mass balances from mechanistic models of turbulent mixing and reaction. The coalescence-redispersion (CRD) model, the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the three-environment (3E) model, and the four-environment (4E) model have been used to develop closure equations. The closure models have been tested extensively against experimental data for both single and multiple reactions. The closures based on slow asymptotics for the CRD, 3E and 4E models provide very good predictions of all of the experimental data, while other models available either in the literature or derived here are not adequate. The simple new closure equations developed in this paper may be useful in modeling systems involving turbulent mixing and complex chemical reactions.

  8. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  9. Turbulent density fluctuations in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingale, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of the radio scattering due to density turbulence in the solar wind typically employ asymptotic approximations to the phase structure function. We use a general structure function (GSF) that straddles the asymptotic limits and quantify the relative error introduced by the approximations. We show that the regimes where GSF predictions are accurate than those of its asymptotic approximations is not only of practical relevance, but are where inner scale effects influence the estimate of the scatter-broadening. Thus we propose that GSF should henceforth be used for scatter broadening calculations and estimates of quantities characterizing density turbulence in the solar corona and solar wind. In the next part of this thesis we use measurements of density turbulence in the solar wind from previously publish observations of radio wave scattering and interplanetary scintillations. Density fluctuations are inferred using the GSF for radio scattering data and existing analysis methods for IPS. Assuming that...

  10. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  11. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  12. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poyé, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  13. The Effect of Coherent Structures on Stochastic Acceleration in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaspar Arzner; Bernard Knaepen; Daniele Carati; Nicolas Denewet; Loukas Vlahos

    2005-09-23

    We investigate the influence of coherent structures on particle acceleration in the strongly turbulent solar corona. By randomizing the Fourier phases of a pseudo-spectral simulation of isotropic MHD turbulence (Re $\\sim 300$), and tracing collisionless test protons in both the exact-MHD and phase-randomized fields, it is found that the phase correlations enhance the acceleration efficiency during the first adiabatic stage of the acceleration process. The underlying physical mechanism is identified as the dynamical MHD alignment of the magnetic field with the electric current, which favours parallel (resistive) electric fields responsible for initial injection. Conversely, the alignment of the magnetic field with the bulk velocity weakens the acceleration by convective electric fields $- \\bfu \\times \\bfb$ at a non-adiabatic stage of the acceleration process. We point out that non-physical parallel electric fields in random-phase turbulence proxies lead to artificial acceleration, and that the dynamical MHD alignment can be taken into account on the level of the joint two-point function of the magnetic and electric fields, and is therefore amenable to Fokker-Planck descriptions of stochastic acceleration.

  14. Logarithmic violation of scaling in strongly anisotropic turbulent transfer of a passive vector field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. V. Antonov; N. M. Gulitskiy

    2015-01-21

    Inertial-range asymptotic behavior of a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow, is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, not correlated in time, with the pair correlation function of the form $\\propto \\delta(t-t') / k_{\\bot}^{d-1+\\xi}$, where $k_{\\bot}=|{\\bf k}_{\\bot}|$ and ${\\bf k}_{\\bot}$ is the component of the wave vector, perpendicular to the distinguished direction (`direction of the flow') -- the $d$-dimensional generalization of the ensemble introduced by Avellaneda and Majda [{\\it Commun. Math. Phys.} {\\bf 131}: 381 (1990)]. The stochastic advection-diffusion equation for the transverse (divergence-free) vector field includes, as special cases, the kinematic dynamo model for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and the linearized Navier--Stokes equation. In contrast to the well known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the dependence on the integral turbulence scale $L$ has a logarithmic behavior: instead of power-like corrections to ordinary scaling, determined by naive (canonical) dimensions, the anomalies manifest themselves as polynomials of logarithms of $L$. The key point is that the matrices of scaling dimensions of the relevant families of composite operators appear nilpotent and cannot be diagonalized. The detailed proof of this fact is given for correlation functions of arbitrary order.

  15. Role of ion temperature on scrape-off layer plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Turbulence in Scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamak plasma has been studied numerically using interchange modes with the help of electron continuity, quasineutrality, and ion energy equations. Electron temperature is assumed uniform. We have studied dynamics of seeded plasma blob and plasma turbulence to identify the role of ion temperature and its gradient. The ion temperature elongates the blob poloidally and reduces its radial velocity. Initial dipole nature of the plasma blob potential breaks and generates few more dipoles during its propagation in the SOL. Plasma turbulence simulation shows poloidally elongated density and ion temperature structures that are similar to the seeded blob simulation studies. Fluctuations of the density and ion temperature have been presented as function of scale lengths of the density and ion temperature. Reduction of the SOL width and increase of radial electric field have been measured in the presence of the ion temperature. Particle and energy transports have been also presented as the function of the density and ion temperature scale lengths.

  16. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermal Conductivity Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal ConductivityThermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal

  17. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  18. Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds Oct. 24, 2012 Yan Zhan 1 #12;Outline · Line Plot of TI at the Pipe Exit · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 4 - 9) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ with a weld ­ 2.5M · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 10 - 15) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ without a weld ­ 3

  19. Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Eugene Fiume 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Jos Stam Eugene Fiume 0 Department of Computer Science of smoke, steam, mist and water re­ acting to a turbulent field such as wind is an attractive, and realistic illumina­ tion. We present a model for turbulent wind flow having a deterministic component

  20. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the Solar Wind ADimensionless parameter: [Iroshnikov 1963, Kraichnan 1965] #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed by [Matthaeus et al. 1994, 1996] and later developments: Steady

  1. Intermittency in Turbulent Diffusion Models with a Mean Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Intermittency in Turbulent Diffusion Models with a Mean Gradient Andrew J Majda and Xin T TongE30, 62G32 Submitted to: Nonlinearity 1. Introduction Turbulent diffusion is the transportation and diffusion. Its application ranges from the spread of hazardous plumes and mixing properties of turbulent

  2. Computational aspects of astrophysical MHD and turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2001-09-27

    The advantages of high-order finite difference scheme for astrophysical MHD and turbulence simulations are highlighted. A number of one-dimensional test cases are presented ranging from various shock tests to Parker-type wind solutions. Applications to magnetized accretion discs and their associated outflows are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of dynamo action in three-dimensional turbulent convection and shear flows, which is relevant to stars and astrophysical discs. The generation of large scale fields is discussed in terms of an inverse magnetic cascade and the consequences imposed by magnetic helicity conservation are reviewed with particular emphasis on the issue of alpha-quenching.

  3. Modeling velocity dispersion In Gypsy site, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsaadan, Sami Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Discrepancies in interval velocities estimated from vertical well measurements made with different source central frequencies at Gypsy site could be primarily explained in terms of intrinsic attenuation. Four intervals ...

  4. Recovering Velocity Distributions via Penalized Likelihood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    1996-05-14

    Line-of-sight velocity distributions are crucial for unravelling the dynamics of hot stellar systems. We present a new formalism based on penalized likelihood for deriving such distributions from kinematical data, and evaluate the performance of two algorithms that extract N(V) from absorption-line spectra and from sets of individual velocities. Both algorithms are superior to existing ones in that the solutions are nearly unbiased even when the data are so poor that a great deal of smoothing is required. In addition, the discrete-velocity algorithm is able to remove a known distribution of measurement errors from the estimate of N(V). The formalism is used to recover the velocity distribution of stars in five fields near the center of the globular cluster Omega Centauri.

  5. Renormalization group in the infinite-dimensional turbulence: third-order results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Ts. Adzhemyan; N. V. Antonov; P. B. Gol'din; T. L. Kim; M. V. Kompaniets

    2008-09-08

    The field theoretic renormalization group is applied to the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation with the stirring force correlator of the form k^(4-d-2\\epsilon) in the d-dimensional space, in connection with the problem of construction of the 1/d expansion for the fully developed fluid turbulence beyond the scope of the standard epsilon expansion. It is shown that in the large-d limit the number of the Feynman diagrams for the Green function (linear response function) decreases drastically, and the technique of their analytical calculation is developed. The main ingredients of the renormalization group approach -- the renormalization constant, beta function and the ultraviolet correction exponent omega, are calculated to order epsilon^3 (three-loop approximation). The two-point velocity-velocity correlation function, the Kolmogorov constant C_K in the spectrum of turbulent energy and the inertial-range skewness factor S are calculated in the large-d limit to third order of the epsilon expansion. Surprisingly enough, our results for C_K are in a reasonable agreement with the existing experimental estimates.

  6. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  7. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanBrocklin, Paul G. (Pittsford, NY); Geiger, Gail E. (Caledonia, NY); Moran, Donald James (Rochester, NY); Fournier, Stephane (Rochester, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  8. Magnetic island evolution in the presence of ion-temperature gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishizawa, A.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2013-12-15

    Turbulence is known to drive and sustain magnetic islands of width equal to multiples of the Larmor radius. The nature of the drive is studied here by means of numerical simulations of a fluid electrostatic model in 2D (single helicity) sheared-slab geometry. The electrostatic model eliminates the coalescence of short wavelength islands as a mechanism for sustaining longer wavelength islands. In quiescent islands, the polarization current, which depends on the propagation velocity of the island through the plasma, plays a critical role in determining the growth or decay of island chains. For turbulent islands, the unforced propagation velocity is significantly changed by strong zonal flow. The simulations show, however, that the turbulent fluctuations in the current density are much larger and faster than those in the zonal flow, and that they dominate the steady-state perturbed current density. In order to distinguish the roles of the zonal flow from the direct action of the fluctuations on the islands, a new diagnostic is implemented. This new diagnostic separates the effects of all the sources of parallel current. These are the curvature (which drives Pfirsch-Schlüter currents) and the divergences of the viscous and Reynolds stresses (the latter driving polarization currents). The new diagnostic also enables the contributions from short and long wavelengths to be separated for each term. It shows that in the absence of curvature, the drive is dominated by the contributions to the polarization current from the short wavelength fluctuations, while the long-wavelength fluctuations play a stabilizing role. In the presence of unfavorable curvature, by contrast, the effects of the short- and long-wavelength contributions of the polarization current reverse roles but nearly cancel, leaving the Pfirsch-Schlüter current as the dominant drive.

  9. Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

  10. Shear Turbulence: Onset and Structure Fabian Waleffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    filament in laminar flow (a), and the rapid mixing of the dye and water when the Reynolds number is larger and reproduces the seminal experiments of Osborne Reynolds [24] on the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a pipe, illustrated in Fig. 1. The 2011 Annual Review 1 #12;of Fluid Mechanics article by Tom Mullin [21

  11. Remote optical turbulence sensing: present Andrei Tokovinin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    . model Detector Data products Rytov approx. Biases Amplitude U(x,y, ,t) Figure 1: Remote optical the turbulent volume. Bright stars (one, two, or several) are most convenient ROTS sources available at no cost of these solar-system bodies pre-selects the light path (a ROTS can only work when the source is visible

  12. Orientation of eddy fluxes in geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    of potential vorticity (PV) in geostrophic turbulence. We take two different points of view, a classical of the eddy flux of PV with the appropriate mean gradient or the large-scale gradient of PV is required-temporal characteristics of the flow. One way to improve on this is to adopt unsteady RA. In this case, averages

  13. CHAPTER ____ THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE: TURBULENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Transport processes at gas-liquid interfaces are of importance in a number of areas, such as for equipment be generated by heat losses that give rise to natural convective motions on the liquid side. In the second winds, the turbulence is not only due to shear, but also due to natural convection on the liquid side

  14. Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    Alcator C-Mod Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology Nils P. Basse, S. Zoletnik1, W. L. Rowan2 et al. MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 1KFKI-RMKI, Euratom Association, Budapest, Hungary 2Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin This idea originates from density

  15. A Fresh Approach to Turbulence towards Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact on energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the transport sector, particularly commercial aviation in a variety of systems relevant to stable isotope analysis, including CO2 , N2 O, and methane. We leverage. Theoretical interests aside, flow turbulence has numerous practical implications in the real world, making its

  16. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  17. On-line supplement: The Turbulence Parameterization Scheme The turbulence scheme used in this work is adapted from a more comprehensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    On-line supplement: The Turbulence Parameterization Scheme The turbulence scheme used in this work-gradient turbulent transfer processes for cloud-free conditions. Throughout this supplement w denotes vertical

  18. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  19. Velocity dependence of friction of confined polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Sivebaek; V. N. Samoilov; B. N. J. Persson

    2009-11-18

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (approx. 3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all cases the frictional shear stress increases monotonically with the sliding velocity. For polymer sliding on polymer [case (b)] the friction is much larger, and the velocity dependence is more complex. For hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 140 C-atoms, the number of monolayers of lubricant increases (abruptly) with increasing sliding velocity (from 6 to 7 layers), leading to a decrease of the friction. Before and after the layering transition, the frictional shear stresses are nearly proportional to the logarithm of sliding velocity. For the longest hydrocarbon (1400 C-atoms) the friction shows no dependence on the sliding velocity, and for the shortest hydrocarbon (20 C-atoms) the frictional shear stress increases nearly linearly with the sliding velocity.

  20. Effect of phantom dark energy on the holographic thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng; Xin-Yun Hu; Li-Fang Li

    2015-03-16

    Gravitational collapse of a shell of charged dust surrounded by the phantom dark energy is probed by the minimal area surface, which is dual to probe the thermalization in the boundary quantum field by expectation values of Wilson loop in the framework of the AdS/CFT correspondence. We investigated mainly the effect of the phantom dark energy parameter and chemical potential on the thermalization. The result shows that the smaller the phantom dark energy parameter is, the easier the plasma thermalizes as the chemical potential is fixed, and the larger the chemical potential is, the harder the plasma thermalizes as the dark energy parameter is fixed. We get the fitting function of the thermalization curve and with it, the thermalization velocity and thermalization acceleration are discussed.

  1. Microscopic mechanism of low thermal conductivity in lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Themicroscopic physics behind low-lattice thermal conductivity of single-crystal rock salt lead telluride (PbTe) is investigated. Mode-dependent phonon (normal and umklapp) scattering rates and their impact on thermal conductivity were quantified by first-principles-based anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations that accurately reproduce thermal conductivity in a wide temperature range. The low thermal conductivity of PbTe is attributed to the scattering of longitudinal acoustic phonons by transverse optical phonons with large anharmonicity and small group velocity of the soft transverse acoustic phonons. This results in enhancing the relative contribution of optical phonons, which are usually minor heat carriers in bulk materials.

  2. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  3. Feedback Regulated Turbulence, Magnetic Fields, and Star Formation Rates in Galactic Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the quasi-equilibrium states of galactic disks regulated by star formation feedback. We incorporate effects from massive-star feedback via time-varying heating rates and supernova (SN) explosions. We find that the disks in our simulations rapidly approach a quasi-steady state that satisfies vertical dynamical equilibrium. The star formation rate (SFR) surface density self-adjusts to provide the total momentum flux (pressure) in the vertical direction that matches the weight of the gas. We quantify feedback efficiency by measuring feedback yields, \\eta_c\\equiv P_c/\\Sigma_SFR (in suitable units), for each pressure component. The turbulent and thermal feedback yields are the same for HD and MHD simulations, \\eta_th~1 and \\eta_ turb~4, consistent with the theoretical expectations. In MHD simulations, turbulent magnetic fields are rapidly generated by turbulence, and saturate at a level corresponding to \\eta_mag,t~1. The presence of magn...

  4. Accretion Disc Turbulence and the X-Ray Power Spectra of Black Hole High States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Nowak; Robert V. Wagoner

    1994-10-06

    The high state of black hole candidates is characterized by a quasi- thermal emission component at $kT \\sim 1$ keV. In addition, this state tends to have very low variability which indicates that it is relatively stable, at least on {\\it short} time scales. Most models of the high state imply that the bulk of the emission comes from an optically thick accretion disc; therefore, this state may be an excellent laboratory for testing our ideas about the physics of accretion discs. In this work we consider the implications of assuming that accretion disc viscosity arises from some form of turbulence. Specifically, we consider the simple case of three dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence. It is found that the coupling of such turbulence to acoustic modes in the disc can alter the disc emission. We calculate the amplitude and frequencies of this modulation, and we express our results in terms of the X-ray power spectral density. We compare our calculations with observations of the black hole candidate GS 1124-683, and show that for certain parameters we can reproduce some of the high frequency power. We then briefly explore mechanisms for producing the low frequency power, and note the difficulty that a single variability mechanism has in reproducing the full range of observed variability. In addition, we outline ways in which future spacecraft missions -- such as USA and XTE -- can further constrain our model, especially at frequencies above $\\sim 10^2$ Hz.

  5. Testing neoclassical and turbulent effects on poloidal rotation in the core of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.; Lao, L. L.; Grassie, J. S. de; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, W. X.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Mordijck, S.; Meneghini, O.

    2014-07-15

    Experimental tests of ion poloidal rotation theories have been performed on DIII-D using a novel impurity poloidal rotation diagnostic. These tests show significant disagreements with theoretical predictions in various conditions, including L-mode plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITB), H-mode plasmas, and QH-mode plasmas. The theories tested include standard neoclassical theory, turbulence driven Reynolds stress, and fast-ion friction on the thermal ions. Poloidal rotation is observed to spin up at the formation of an ITB and makes a significant contribution to the measurement of the E{sup ?}×B{sup ?} shear that forms the ITB. In ITB cases, neoclassical theory agrees quantitatively with the experimental measurements only in the steep gradient region. Significant quantitative disagreement with neoclassical predictions is seen in the cores of ITB, QH-, and H-mode plasmas, demonstrating that neoclassical theory is an incomplete description of poloidal rotation. The addition of turbulence driven Reynolds stress does not remedy this disagreement; linear stability calculations and Doppler backscattering measurements show that disagreement increases as turbulence levels decline. Furthermore, the effect of fast-ion friction, by itself, does not lead to improved agreement; in QH-mode plasmas, neoclassical predictions are closest to experimental results in plasmas with the largest fast ion friction. Predictions from a new model that combines all three effects show somewhat better agreement in the H-mode case, but discrepancies well outside the experimental error bars remain.

  6. Characterization of a Dipole Flow System Using Point Velocity Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ian Reed

    2010-11-23

    A direct groundwater velocity measurement tool, the Point Velocity Probe, was developed to measure velocities in the vertical and horizontal directions. The tool was designed and tested in a low-cost laboratory flow-through tank. Following testing...

  7. HYBRID COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH STREAM VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Thacker, Robert J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2013-07-10

    In the early universe, substantial relative ''stream'' velocities between the gas and dark matter arise due to radiation pressure and persist after recombination. To assess the impact of these velocities on high-redshift structure formation, we carry out a suite of high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations, which use smoothed particle hydrodynamic data sets as initial conditions, converted using a new tool developed for this work. These simulations resolve structures with masses as small as a few 100 M{sub Sun }, and we focus on the 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} ''mini-halos'' in which the first stars formed. At z Almost-Equal-To 17, the presence of stream velocities has only a minor effect on the number density of halos below 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, but it greatly suppresses gas accretion onto all halos and the dark matter structures around them. Stream velocities lead to significantly lower halo gas fractions, especially for Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} objects, an effect that is likely to depend on the orientation of a halo's accretion lanes. This reduction in gas density leads to colder, more compact radial profiles, and it substantially delays the redshift of collapse of the largest halos, leading to delayed star formation and possibly delayed reionization. These many differences suggest that future simulations of early cosmological structure formation should include stream velocities to properly predict gas evolution, star formation, and the epoch of reionization.

  8. RECOMMENDED TRITIUM OXIDE DEPOSITION VELOCITY FOR USE IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SAFETY ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, P.; Murphy, C.; Viner, B.; Hunter, C.; Jannik, T.

    2012-04-03

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has recently questioned the appropriate value for tritium deposition velocity used in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Ver. 2 (Chanin and Young 1998) code when estimating bounding dose (95th percentile) for safety analysis (DNFSB 2011). The purpose of this paper is to provide appropriate, defensible values of the tritium deposition velocity for use in Savannah River Site (SRS) safety analyses. To accomplish this, consideration must be given to the re-emission of tritium after deposition. Approximately 85% of the surface area of the SRS is forested. The majority of the forests are pine plantations, 68%. The remaining forest area is 6% mixed pine and hardwood and 26% swamp hardwood. Most of the path from potential release points to the site boundary is through forested land. A search of published studies indicate daylight, tritiated water (HTO) vapor deposition velocities in forest vegetation can range from 0.07 to 2.8 cm/s. Analysis of the results of studies done on an SRS pine plantation and climatological data from the SRS meteorological network indicate that the average deposition velocity during daylight periods is around 0.42 cm/s. The minimum deposition velocity was determined to be about 0.1 cm/s, which is the recommended bounding value. Deposition velocity and residence time (half-life) of HTO in vegetation are related by the leaf area and leaf water volume in the forest. For the characteristics of the pine plantation at SRS the residence time corresponding to the average, daylight deposition velocity is 0.4 hours. The residence time corresponding to the night-time deposition velocity of 0.1 cm/s is around 2 hours. A simple dispersion model which accounts for deposition and re-emission of HTO vapor was used to evaluate the impact on exposure to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MOI) at the SRS boundary (Viner 2012). Under conditions that produce the bounding, 95th percentile MOI exposure, i.e., low wind speed, weak turbulence, night, low deposition velocity, the effect of deposition and re-emission on MOI exposure was found to be very small. The exposure over the two hour period following arrival of the plume was found to be decreased by less than 0.05 %. Furthermore the sensitivity to deposition velocity was low. Increasing deposition velocity to 0.5 cm/s reduced exposure to 0.3 %. After a 24 hour period, an MOI would have been exposed to all of the released material. Based on the low sensitivity of MOI exposure to the value of deposition velocity when re-emission is considered, it is appropriately conservative to use a 0.0 cm/s effective deposition velocity for safety analysis in the MACCS2 code.

  9. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  10. Multi-locality and fusion rules on the generalized structure functions in two-dimensional and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftherios Gkioulekas

    2014-10-23

    Using the fusion rules hypothesis for three-dimensional and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence, we generalize a previous non-perturbative locality proof to multiple applications of the nonlinear interactions operator on generalized structure functions of velocity differences. The resulting cross-terms pose a new challenge requiring a new argument and the introduction of a new fusion rule that takes advantage of rotational symmetry.

  11. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  12. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS A protostellar jet and outflow...

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Minimization of divergence error in volumetric velocity measurements Volumetric velocity measurements taken in incompressible fluids are typically hindered by a nonzero

  14. Numerical analysis of turbulent heat transfer in a nuclear reactor coolant channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrard, Clarence William

    1965-01-01

    of grid points throughout the region of interest occupied by the indepen- dent variables (12). If the independent var1ables are. two space coordinates, r and x, and if the respective grid spacings are 6 r and jlx, then subscripts 1 and J may be used..., Mean Velocity Ini. tial Temperature, etc. Calculate: R and R(1) Jx = 0 Jx = Jx + 1 (Jx + 1) - 11 Delx = 5+Rad Delx = Rad Calculate: Viscosity, Thermal Conductivity, Density Call Velo /Velocity Profile ~/Eddy Diffusivity Calculate: Coefficient...

  15. Sound velocity bound and neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo F. Bedaque; Andrew W. Steiner

    2015-01-25

    It has been conjectured that the velocity of sound in any medium is smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum divided by $\\sqrt{3}$. Simple arguments support this bound in non-relativistic and/or weakly coupled theories. The bound has been demonstrated in several classes of strongly coupled theories with gravity duals and is saturated only in conformal theories. We point out that the existence of neutron stars with masses around two solar masses combined with the knowledge of the equation of state of hadronic matter at "low" densities is in strong tension with this bound.

  16. Locality and stability of the cascades of two-dimensional turbulence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios - Department of Mathematics, University of Texas

    chemical combustion Stabilize plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor Propagation of laser through turbulence;Outline Why study turbulence? Brief overview of K41 theory (3D turbulence) Frisch reformulation of K41 theory. KLB theory (2D turbulence). My reformulation of Frisch to address 2D turbulence Locality

  17. Migration velocity analysis for TI media in the presence of quadratic lateral velocity variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    of lateral heteroge- neity on image gathers obtained after prestack depth migration and found that quadratic that application of prestack depth migration (PSDM) with anisotropic MVA yields sig- nificantly improved imagesMigration velocity analysis for TI media in the presence of quadratic lateral velocity variation

  18. Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Darrell

    Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity on the surface. Currently, geophysicists spend hours, days or weeks in front of monitors tracing curves on images of these cor- respond to the bright spots selected by the geophysicist. Next, a combinatorial optimization

  19. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hiramatsu; Yuhei Miyamoto; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2014-12-25

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  20. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    storage in solar thermal applications," Applied Energy, pp.of Non-Tracking Solar Thermal Technology," 2011. [26] R.C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energy

  1. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evaporator Powered By Solar Thermal Energy 10:00 AM 10:00 AMaided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  2. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"Solar infrastructure should include analysis of thermal storage.storage equipment, the evaporator can be integrated into the current solar

  3. Comparison of Edge Turbulence Imaging at Two Different Poloidal Locations in the Scrape-off Layer of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Zweben, et. al.

    2013-03-29

    This paper describes 2-D imaging measurements of plasma turbulence made in the scrape-off layer of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak simultaneously at two different poloidal locations, one near the outer midplane and the other near the divertor X-point region. These images were made with radial and poloidal resolution using two gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostics, which were not directly connected along a B field line. The turbulence correlation structure has a significantly different tilt angle with respect to the local flux surfaces for the midplane and X-regions, and a slightly different ellipticity and size. The time-averaged turbulence velocities can be different in the midplane and Xregions, even within the same flux surface in the same shot, and in most cases the fluctuations in poloidal velocity in these two regions were not correlated. These structures are partially consistent with a magnetic flux tube mapping model, and the velocities are compared with various poloidal flow models.

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 056408 (2011) Doppler measurement of implosion velocity in fast Z-pinch x-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starobinets, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    in the sun [1], waves in the solar corona [2], the wobble of stars perturbed by exoplanets [3,4], and binary of velocity is important to inferring the plasma kinetic energy, which can be the primary storage reservoir of j × B work accumulated over 100 ns during implosion and then provide plasma heating when thermalized

  5. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettarini, Lapo [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Plasma Astrofysica, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi, 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Landi, Simone [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi, 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Velli, Marco [Dipartimento di Astronomia e Scienza dello Spazio, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Largo E. Fermi, 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Londrillo, Pasquale [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via C. Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  6. Physics of Intrinsic Rotation in Flux-Driven ITG Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, S; Dimond, P H; Dif-Pradalier, G; Kwon, J M; Sarazin, Y; Hahm, T S; Garbet, X; Chang, C S; Latu, G; Yoon, E S; Ghendrih, Ph; Yi, S; Strugarek, A; Solomon, W

    2012-02-23

    Global, heat flux-driven ITG gyrokinetic simulations which manifest the formation of macroscopic, mean toroidal flow profiles with peak thermal Mach number 0.05, are reported. Both a particle-in-cell (XGC1p) and a semi-Lagrangian (GYSELA) approach are utilized without a priori assumptions of scale-separation between turbulence and mean fields. Flux-driven ITG simulations with different edge flow boundary conditions show in both approaches the development of net unidirectional intrinsic rotation in the co-current direction. Intrinsic torque is shown to scale approximately linearly with the inverse scale length of the ion temperature gradient. External momentum input is shown to effectively cancel the intrinsic rotation profile, thus confirming the existence of a local residual stress and intrinsic torque. Fluctuation intensity, intrinsic torque and mean flow are demonstrated to develop inwards from the boundary. The measured correlations between residual stress and two fluctuation spectrum symmetry breakers, namely E x B shear and intensity gradient, are similar. Avalanches of (positive) heat flux, which propagate either outwards or inwards, are correlated with avalanches of (negative) parallel momentum flux, so that outward transport of heat and inward transport of parallel momentum are correlated and mediated by avalanches. The probability distribution functions of the outward heat flux and the inward momentum flux show strong structural similarity

  7. Photoionisation Feedback in a Self-Gravitating, Magnetised, Turbulent Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geen, Sam; Tremblin, Pascal; Rosdahl, Joakim

    2015-01-01

    We present a new set of analytic models for the expansion of HII regions powered by UV photoionisation from massive stars and compare them to a new suite of radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of self-gravitating molecular clouds. To perform these simulations we use RAMSES-RT, an Eulerian adaptive mesh magnetohydrodynamics code with radiative transfer of UV photons. We find two models that fit the simulation results well, and give a physically-motivated criterion for determining which of the models should be used. In one model, the ionisation front is only resisted by the ram pressure from the external medium, which we model as a spherically symmetric power law model. In the other, the front stalls at an equilibrium radius at which the ram pressure from accretion or turbulence in the cloud is balanced by the thermal pressure of the photoionised gas. If this stalling radius is larger than the radius of the cloud, the ionisation front can escape the cloud and expand freely in most directions. Otherwise, t...

  8. Transition to turbulence in duct flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, Damien; Bottaro, Alessandro; 10.1017/S0022112007009536

    2010-01-01

    The transition of the flow in a duct of square cross-section is studied. Like in the similar case of the pipe flow, the motion is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers; this flow is thus a good candidate to investigate the 'bypass' path to turbulence. Initially the so-called 'linear optimal perturbation problem' is formulated and solved, yielding optimal disturbances in the form of longitudinal vortices. Such optimals, however, fail to elicit a significant response from the system in the nonlinear regime. Thus, streamwise-inhomogeneous, sub-optimal disturbances are focussed upon; nonlinear quadratic interactions are immediately evoked by such initial perturbations and an unstable streamwise-homogeneous large amplitude mode rapidly emerges. The subsequent evolution of the flow, at a value of the Reynolds number at the edge between fully developed turbulence and relaminarization, shows the alternance of patterns with two pairs of large scale vortices near opposing parallel walls. Such edge states bear a rese...

  9. Vortex Tubes of Turbulent Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Lele, S K; Wray, A A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of turbulent properties of solar convection is extremely important for understanding of the multi-scale dynamics observed on the solar surface. In particular, recent high-resolution observations revealed ubiquitous vortical structures, and numerical simulations demonstrated links between the vortex tube dynamics and magnetic field organization, and also importance of vortex tube interactions in the mechanism of acoustic wave excitation on the Sun. In this paper we investigate mechanisms of formation of vortex tubes in highly-turbulent convective flows near the solar surface by using realistic radiative hydrodynamic LES simulations. Analysis of data, obtained by the simulations, indicates two basic processes of the vortex tube formation: 1) development of small-scale convective instability inside convective granules, and 2) a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability of shearing flows in intergranular lanes. Our analysis shows that vortex stretching during these processes is a primary source of generatio...

  10. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Kian Tan; Aik Hui Chan; Christian Kurtsiefer

    2015-12-29

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  11. Refined critical balance in strong Alfvenic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mallet; A. A. Schekochihin; B. D. G. Chandran

    2015-08-24

    We present numerical evidence that in strong Alfvenic turbulence, the critical balance principle---equality of the nonlinear decorrelation and linear propagation times---is scale invariant, in the sense that the probability distribution of the ratio of these times is independent of scale. This result only holds if the local alignment of the Elsasser fields is taken into account in calculating the nonlinear time. At any given scale, the degree of alignment is found to increase with fluctuation amplitude, supporting the idea that the cause of alignment is mutual dynamical shearing of Elsasser fields. The scale-invariance of critical balance (while all other quantities of interest are strongly intermittent, i.e., have scale-dependent distributions) suggests that it is the most robust of the scaling principles used to describe Alfvenic turbulence. The quality afforded by situ fluctuation measurements in the solar wind allows for direct verification of this fundamental principle.

  12. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the slow and entropy modes of the conventional MHD). In the "dissipation range" below ion gyroscale, there are again two cascades: the kinetic-Alfven-wave (KAW) cascade governed by two fluid-like Electron Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (ERMHD) equations and a passive cascade of ion entropy fluctuations both in space and velocity. The latter cascade brings the energy of the inertial-range fluctuations that was Landau-damped at the ion gyroscale to collisional scales in the phase space and leads to ion heating. The KAWenergy is similarly damped at the electron gyroscale and converted into electron heat. Kolmogorov-style scaling relations are derived for all of these cascades. The relationship between the theoretical models proposed in this paper and astrophysical applications and observations is discussed in detail.

  13. A dynamically collapsing core and a precursor of a core in a filament supported by turbulent and magnetic pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shinnaga, Hiroko E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.jp

    2014-10-01

    To study physical properties of the natal filament gas around the cloud core harboring an exceptionally young low-mass protostar GF 9-2, we carried out J = 1-0 line observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O molecules using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The mapping area covers ? one-fifth of the whole filament. Our {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O maps clearly demonstrate that the core formed at the local density maxima of the filament, and the internal motions of the filament gas are totally governed by turbulence with Mach number of ?2. We estimated the scale height of the filament to be H = 0.3-0.7 pc, yielding the central density of n {sub c} = 800-4200 cm{sup –3}. Our analysis adopting an isothermal cylinder model shows that the filament is supported by the turbulent and magnetic pressures against the radial and axial collapse due to self-gravity. Since both the dissipation timescales of the turbulence and the transverse magnetic fields can be comparable to the free-fall time of the filament gas of 10{sup 6} yr, we conclude that the local decay of the supersonic turbulence and magnetic fields made the filament gas locally unstable, hence making the core collapse. Furthermore, we newly detected a gas condensation with velocity width enhancement to ?0.3 pc southwest of the GF 9-2 core. The condensation has a radius of ?0.15 pc and an LTE mass of ?5 M {sub ?}. Its internal motion is turbulent with Mach number of ?3, suggesting a gravitationally unbound state. Considering the uncertainties in our estimates, however, we propose that the condensation is a precursor of a cloud core, which would have been produced by the collision of the two gas components identified in the filament.

  14. Entrainment in two coalescing axisymmetric turbulent plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenedese, Claudia; Linden, P. F.

    2014-07-11

    , K. G. & Rona, P. A. 1989 A model of an atlantic and pacific hydrothermal plume. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 94 (C5), 6213–6220. Turner, J. S. 1979 Buoyancy Effects in Fluids. New York: Cambridge University Press. Xu, Y., Rignot, E., Fenty... close together, and the depth at which the coalescing plumes reach their neutral buoyancy level and intrude horizontally in the stratified atmosphere de- pends on the details of this interaction. Buoyant turbulent plumes are produced around oceanic...

  15. Turbulence and its effects upon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    As a neutrino passes through turbulent matter, large amplitude transitions between its eigenstates can occur. These transitions can be modeled as like those of an irradiated polarized atom and we investigate this connection both analytically and numerically. We find a simple theory that makes use of the Rotating Wave Approximation can make predictions for the amplitudes and wavelengths of the transitions that agree very well with those from the numerical solutions.

  16. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect on flame instability is observed for the isomers of butanol. Critical flame radii are the same for the isomers of butanol. Peclet number decreases with the increase in equivalence ratio. (author)

  17. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  18. DNA Engine Thermal Cycler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ® Peltier Thermal Cycler PTC-0200 DNA Engine Cycler Operations Manual Version 4.0 #12;ii Tech Support: 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi The DNA Engine® Peltier Thermal Cycler Introduction

  19. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  1. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Spangler

    2008-06-05

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter $$ than is observed for other pulsars, consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as much expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter $$ is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of ``arcs'' in ``secondary spectra'' of pulsars.

  2. Forecasting Turbulent Modes with Nonparametric Diffusion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrus Berry; John Harlim

    2015-01-27

    This paper presents a nonparametric diffusion modeling approach for forecasting partially observed noisy turbulent modes. The proposed forecast model uses a basis of smooth functions (constructed with the diffusion maps algorithm) to represent probability densities, so that the forecast model becomes a linear map in this basis. We estimate this linear map by exploiting a previously established rigorous connection between the discrete time shift map and the semi-group solution associated to the backward Kolmogorov equation. In order to smooth the noisy data, we apply diffusion maps to a delay embedding of the noisy data, which also helps to account for the interactions between the observed and unobserved modes. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most predictable component of the dynamics. The resulting model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and in the observation noise limit. We will show numerical examples on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Fourier modes of the energy conserving Truncated Burgers-Hopf (TBH) model, the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes, and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. In these examples, forecasting skills of the nonparametric diffusion model are compared to a wide-range of stochastic parametric modeling approaches, which account for the nonlinear interactions between the observed and unobserved modes with white and colored noises.

  3. PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE EFFECTS OF AIR VELOCITY PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP By NATHAN ANDREW WEBER PROFILES IN A RESIDENTIAL HEAT PUMP Thesis Approved: _______________________________________ Thesis Advisor the air speed transducer mount and the Plexiglas model of the heat pump. Ipseng Iu and myself worked side

  4. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  5. Hindered energy cascade in highly helical isotropic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest for the first time a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of non-linear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in...

  6. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, H.

    2014-06-15

    To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the macroscopic effects generated by wave-particle interactions in Buneman instability can be approximately described by a set of electron fluid equations. We show that both energy dissipation and momentum transport along electric current in the current layer are locally quasi-static, but globally dynamic and irreversible. Turbulent drag dissipates both the streaming energy of the current sheet and the associated magnetic energy. The net loss of streaming energy is converted into the electron component heat conduction parallel to the magnetic field and increases the electron Boltzmann entropy. The growth of self-sustained Buneman waves satisfies a Bernoulli-like equation that relates the turbulence-induced convective momentum transport and thermal momentum transport. Electron trapping and de-trapping drive local momentum transports, while phase mixing converts convective momentum into thermal momentum. The drag acts like a micro-macro link in the anomalous heating processes. The decrease of magnetic field maintains an inductive electric field that re-accelerates electrons, but most of the magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into the component heat of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. This heating process is decoupled from the heating of Buneman instability in the current sheets. Ion heating is weak but ions play an important role in assisting energy exchanges between waves and electrons. Cold ion fluid equations together with our electron fluid equations form a complete set of equations that describes the occurrence, growth, saturation and decay of the Buneman instability.

  7. Non-premixed flame-turbulence interaction in compressible turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, D. (Daniel); Madnia, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Nonpremixed turbulent reacting flows are intrinsically difficult to model due to the strong coupling between turbulent motions and reaction. The large amount of heat released by a typical hydrocarbon flame leads to significant modifications of the thermodynamic variables and the molecular transport coefficients and thus alters the fluid dynamics. Additionally, in nonpremixed combustion, the flame has a complex spatial structure. Localized expansions and contractions occur, enhancing the dilatational motions. Therefore, the compressibility of the flow and the heat release are intimately related. However, fundamental studies of the role of compressibility on the scalar mixing and reaction are scarce. In this paper they present results concerning the fundamental aspects of the interaction between non-premixed flame and compressible turbulence.

  8. Vortices within vortices: hierarchical nature of vortex tubes in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Kai; Westermann, Rüdiger; Werner, Suzanne; Lalescu, Cristian C; Szalay, Alexander; Meneveau, Charles; Eyink, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    The JHU turbulence database [1] can be used with a state of the art visualisation tool [2] to generate high quality fluid dynamics videos. In this work we investigate the classical idea that smaller structures in turbulent flows, while engaged in their own internal dynamics, are advected by the larger structures. They are not advected undistorted, however. We see instead that the small scale structures are sheared and twisted by the larger scales. This illuminates the basic mechanisms of the turbulent cascade.

  9. Space-time correlations in turbulent flow: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, James M

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the principal uses, over almost seven decades, of correlations, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, of properties of turbulent flows at variable spatial locations and variable time instants. Commonly called space--time correlations, they have been fundamental to theories and models of turbulence as well as for the analyses of experimental and direct numerical simulation turbulence data.

  10. The Musca cloud: a 6 pc-long velocity-coherent, sonic filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacar, A; Tafalla, M; Beuther, H; Alves, J

    2015-01-01

    Filaments play a key role in the molecular clouds' evolution, but their internal dynamical properties remain poorly characterized. To further explore the physical state of these structures, we have investigated the kinematic properties of the Musca cloud. We have sampled the main axis of this filamentary cloud in $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O (2--1) lines using APEX observations. The different line profiles in Musca shows that this cloud presents a continuous and quiescent velocity field along its $\\sim$6.5 pc of length. With an internal gas kinematics dominated by thermal motions (i.e. $\\sigma_{NT}/c_s\\lesssim1$) and large-scale velocity gradients, these results reveal Musca as the longest velocity-coherent, sonic-like object identified so far in the ISM. The (tran-)sonic properties of Musca present a clear departure from the predicted supersonic velocity dispersions expected in the Larson's velocity dispersion-size relationship, and constitute the first observational evidence of a filament fully decoupled from th...

  11. Local computation of angular velocity in rotational visual motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzywacz, Norberto

    Local computation of angular velocity in rotational visual motion Jose´ F. Barraza and Norberto M discrimination of angular velocity is local. Local discrimination of angular velocity requires an accurate of rotation result in a predictable systematic error when one is estimating local angular velocity. Our

  12. Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miklos Porkolab; Jan Egedal-Pedersen; William Fox

    2010-08-31

    CMPD Final Report Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection Miklos Porkolab, PI, Jan Egedal, co-PI, William Fox, graduate student. This is the final report for Grant DE-FC02-04ER54786, �¢����MIT Participation in the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics,�¢��� which was active from 8/1/2004 to 7/31/2010. This Grant supported the thesis work of one MIT graduate student, William Fox, The thesis research consisted of an experimental study of the fluctuations arising during magnetic reconnection in plasmas on the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). The thesis was submitted and accepted by the MIT physics Department, �¢����W. Fox, Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection, Ph.D. Thesis, MIT (2009)�¢���. In the VTF experiment reconnection and current-sheet formation is driven by quickly changing currents in a specially arranged set of internal conductors. Previous work on this device [Egedal, et al, PRL 98, 015003, (2007)] identified a �¢����spontaneous�¢��� reconnection regime. In this work fluctuations were studied using impedance-matched, high-bandwidth Langmuir probes. Strong, broadband fluctuations, with frequencies extending from near the lower-hybrid frequency [fLH = (fcefci)1/2] to the electron cyclotron frequency fce were found to arise during the reconnection events. Based on frequency and wavelength measurements, lower-hybrid waves and Trivelpiece-Gould waves were identified. The lower-hybrid waves are easiest to drive with strong perpendicular drifts or gradients which arise due to the reconnection events; an appealing possibility is strong temperature gradients. The Trivelpiece-Gould modes can result from kinetic, bump-on-tail instability of a runaway electron population energized by the reconnection events. We also observed that the turbulence is often spiky, consisting of discrete positive-potential spikes, which were identified as �¢����electron phase-space holes,�¢��� a class of nonlinear solitary wave known to evolve from a strong beam-on-tail instability. We established that fast electrons were produced by magnetic reconnection. Overall, these instabilities were found to be a consequence of reconnection, specifically the strong energization of electrons, leading to steep gradients in both coordinate- and velocity-space. Estimates (using quasi-linear theory) of the anomalous resistivity due to these modes did not appear large enough to substantially impact the reconnection process. Relevant publications: �¢���¢ W. Fox, M. Porkolab, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255003 (2008). �¢���¢ W. Fox, M. Porkolab, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 072303, (2010).

  13. Noise-induced Turbulence in Nonlocally Coupled Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoji Kawamura; Hiroya Nakao; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2007-02-22

    We demonstrate that nonlocally coupled limit-cycle oscillators subject to spatiotemporally white Gaussian noise can exhibit a noise-induced transition to turbulent states. After illustrating noise-induced turbulent states with numerical simulations using two representative models of limit-cycle oscillators, we develop a theory that clarifies the effective dynamical instabilities leading to the turbulent behavior using a hierarchy of dynamical reduction methods. We determine the parameter region where the system can exhibit noise-induced turbulent states, which is successfully confirmed by extensive numerical simulations at each level of the reduction.

  14. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  15. DNS/LES of Complex Turbulent Flows | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hot oxygen. The green isocontours illustrate the turbulent structures in the fuel, the blue isocontours show the HO2 radical (an important precursor to autoignition), and the...

  16. Massively Parallel Simulations of Solar Flares and Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauer, Rainer

    in space- and astrophysical plasmasystems include solar flares and hydro- or magnetohydrodynamic turbulence a pure MPI parallelization, which, however requires a careful optimization of the multi

  17. A Model for Turbulent Combustion Simulation of Large Scale Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Model for Turbulent Combustion Simulation of Large Scale Hydrogen Explosions Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Oct 6 2015 - 10:00am...

  18. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Mixed-Mode Combustion Studied in a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbulent Mixed-Mode Combustion Studied in a New Piloted Burner Home Transportation Energy CRF Office of Science Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities Fuel...

  19. Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulent magnetoconvection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, EM; Aurnou, JM

    2015-01-01

    that the magnetostrophic balance is no longer attained (Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulentLorentz and Coriolis forces balance. One can estimate the

  20. Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Barrett Neil

    2013-05-30

    This is the final report for a DOE award that was targeted at understanding and simulating turbulence and transport in plasma fusion devices such as tokamaks.

  1. Sandia Energy - The CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures the Moment of Hydrogen Ignition Home Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities The CRF's...

  2. Vertical stratified turbulent transport mechanism indicated by remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; R. Norris Keeler; Valery G. Bondur

    2007-12-02

    Satellite and shipboard data reveal the intermittent vertical information transport mechanism of turbulence and internal waves that mixes the ocean, atmosphere, planets and stars.

  3. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  4. MHD turbulence model for global simulations of the solar wind and SEP acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2008-08-25

    The aim of the present work is to unify the various transport equations for turbulent waves that are used in different areas of space physics. We mostly focus on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular the Alfvenic turbulence.

  5. A statistical study of SUMER spectral images: events, turbulence, and intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Buchlin; J. -C. Vial; P. Lemaire

    2006-03-16

    We analyze a series of full-Sun observations, which was performed with the SoHO/SUMER instrument between March and October 1996. Some parameters (radiance, shift and width) of the S VI 93.3 nm, S VI 94.4 nm, and Lyman Epsilon line profiles were computed on board. Radiances and line-of-sight velocities in a large central region of the Sun are studied statistically: distributions of solar structures, field Fourier spectra and structure functions are obtained. The structures have distributions with power-law tails, the Fourier spectra of the radiance fields also display power laws, and the normalized structure functions of the radiance and velocity fields increase at small scales. These results support the idea of the existence of small scales, created by turbulence, and of intermittency of the observed fields. These properties may provide insight into the processes needed for heating the transition region, or, if confirmed in the corona, the corona itself. The difficulties encountered in this analysis, especially for the velocity data, underline the needs for sensitive ultraviolet imaging spectrometers.

  6. Time-irreversibility of the statistics of a single particle in a compressible turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Grafke; Anna Frishman; Gregory Falkovich

    2015-08-02

    We investigate time-irreversibility from the point of view of a single particle in Burgers turbulence. Inspired by the recent work for incompressible flows [Xu et al., PNAS 111.21 (2014) 7558], we analyze the evolution of the kinetic energy for fluid markers and use the fluctuations of the instantaneous power as a measure of time irreversibility. For short times, starting from a uniform distribution of markers, we find the scaling $\\leftright>\\propto t$ and $\\leftright> \\propto \\textrm{Re}^{n-1}$ for the power as a function of the Reynolds number. Both observations can be explained using the "flight-crash" model, suggested by Xu et al. Furthermore, we use a simple model for shocks which reproduces the moments of the energy difference including the pre-factor for $\\leftright>$. To complete the single particle picture for Burgers we compute the moments of the Lagrangian velocity difference and show that they are bi-fractal. This arises in a similar manner to the bi-fractality of Eulerian velocity differences. In the above setting time irreversibility is directly manifest as particles eventually end up in shocks. We additionally investigate time irreversibility in the long-time limit when all particles are located inside shocks and the Lagrangian velocity statistics are stationary. We find the same scalings for the power and energy differences as at short times and argue that this is also a consequence of rare "flight-crash" events related to shock collisions.

  7. Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma

    1995-09-05

    In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

  8. Medium-induced jet evolution: wave turbulence and energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Fister; Edmond Iancu

    2014-09-06

    We study the gluon cascade generated via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic parton propagating through a dense QCD medium. We focus on the high-energy regime where the energy $E$ of the leading particle is much larger than the characteristic medium scale $\\omega_c=\\hat q L^2/2$, with $\\hat q$ the jet quenching parameter and $L$ the distance travelled through the medium. In this regime the leading particle loses only a small fraction $\\sim\\alpha_s(\\omega_c/E)$ of its energy and can be treated as a steady source of radiation for gluons with energies $\\omega\\le\\omega_c$. For this effective problem with a source, we obtain exact analytic solutions for the gluon spectrum and the energy flux. The solutions exhibit wave turbulence: the basic physical process is a continuing fragmentation which is `quasi-democratic' (i.e. quasi-local in energy) and which provides an energy transfer from the source to the medium at a rate (the energy flux $\\mathcal{F}$) which is quasi-independent of $\\omega$. The locality of the branching process implies a spectrum of the Kolmogorov-Obukhov type, i.e. a power-law spectrum which is a fixed point of the branching process and whose strength is proportional to the energy flux: $D(\\omega)\\sim\\mathcal{F}/\\sqrt\\omega$ for $\\omega\\ll\\omega_c$. Via this turbulent flow, the gluon cascade loses towards the medium an energy $\\Delta E\\sim\\alpha_s^2\\omega_c$, which is independent of the initial energy $E$ of the leading particle and of the details of the thermalization mechanism at the low-energy end of the cascade. This energy is carried away by very soft gluons, which propagate at very large angles with respect to the jet axis. Our predictions for the value of $\\Delta E$ and for its angular distribution appear to agree quite well, qualitatively and even semi-quantitatively, with the phenomenology of di-jet asymmetry in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC.

  9. Linear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Neural Integrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    . The linear regression method presented here is valid for both fixation and low head velocity VOR dataLinear Regression of Eye Velocity on Eye Position and Head Velocity Suggests a Common Oculomotor Aksay, David W. Tank, and H. S. Seung. Linear regression of eye velocity on eye position and head

  10. Thermal Regimes of Northeast Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Loading (USGS) Stormwater and Streams ­ Optimizing Stormwater Management to Protect the Thermal

  11. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  12. Preparing for an explosion: Hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence in presupernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Nathan; Arnett, W. David, E-mail: nathans@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Both observations and numerical simulations are discordant with predictions of conventional stellar evolution codes for the latest stages of a massive star's life before core collapse. The most dramatic example of this disconnect is in the eruptive mass loss occurring in the decade preceding Type IIn supernovae. We outline the key empirical evidence that indicates severe pre-supernova instability in massive stars, and we suggest that the chief reason that these outbursts are absent in stellar evolution models may lie in the treatment of turbulent convection in these codes. The mixing length theory that is used ignores (1) finite amplitude fluctuations in velocity and temperature and (2) their nonlinear interaction with nuclear burning. Including these fluctuations is likely to give rise to hydrodynamic instabilities in the latest burning sequences, which prompts us to discuss a number of far-reaching implications for the fates of massive stars. In particular, we explore connections to enhanced pre-supernova mass loss, unsteady nuclear burning and consequent eruptions, swelling of the stellar radius that may trigger violent interactions with a companion star, and potential modifications to the core structure that could dramatically alter calculations of the core-collapse explosion mechanism itself. These modifications may also impact detailed nucleosynthesis and measured isotopic anomalies in meteorites, as well as the interpretation of young core-collapse supernova remnants. Understanding these critical instabilities in the final stages of evolution may make possible the development of an early warning system for impending core collapse, if we can identify their asteroseismological or eruptive signatures.

  13. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  14. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  15. Comparison of edge turbulence velocity analysis techniques using Gas Puff Imaging data on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierchio, Jennifer Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past, two methods for analyzing data from the Gas Puff Imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod have been used. One uses temporal and spatial Fourier analysis to obtain wavenumber-frequency spectra, from which a phase ...

  16. Velocity oscillations in turbulent RayleighBenard convection Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Penger

    , Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 X.-D. Shang Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong P. Tong Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 and Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear

  17. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  18. Transitions between turbulent and laminar superfluid vorticity states in the outer core of a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Peralta; A. Melatos; M. Giacobello; A. Ooi

    2006-07-08

    We investigate the global transition from a turbulent state of superfluid vorticity to a laminar state, and vice versa, in the outer core of a neutron star. By solving numerically the hydrodynamic Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov equations for a rotating superfluid in a differentially rotating spherical shell, we find that the meridional counterflow driven by Ekman pumping exceeds the Donnelly-Glaberson threshold throughout most of the outer core, exciting unstable Kelvin waves which disrupt the rectilinear vortex array, creating a vortex tangle. In the turbulent state, the torque exerted on the crust oscillates, and the crust-core coupling is weaker than in the laminar state. This leads to a new scenario for the rotational glitches observed in radio pulsars: a vortex tangle is sustained in the differentially rotating outer core by the meridional counterflow, a sudden spin-up event brings the crust and core into corotation, the vortex tangle relaxes back to a rectilinear vortex array, then the crust spins down electromagnetically until enough meridional counterflow builds up to reform a vortex tangle. The turbulent-laminar transition can occur uniformly or in patches; the associated time-scales are estimated from vortex filament theory. We calculate numerically the global structure of the flow with and without an inviscid superfluid component, for Hall-Vinen and Gorter-Mellink forms of the mutual friction. We also calculate the post-glitch evolution of the angular velocity of the crust and its time derivative, and compare the results with radio pulse timing data, predicting a correlation between glitch activity and Reynolds number.

  19. Local models of stellar convection: Reynolds stresses and turbulent heat transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; I. Tuominen

    2004-09-06

    We study stellar convection using a local three-dimensional MHD model, with which we investigate the influence of rotation and large-scale magnetic fields on the turbulent momentum and heat transport. The former is studied by computing the Reynolds stresses, the latter by calculating the correlation of velocity and temperature fluctuations, both as functions of rotation and latitude. We find that the horisontal correlation, Q_(theta phi), capable of generating horisontal differential rotation, is mostly negative in the southern hemisphere for Coriolis numbers exceeding unity, corresponding to equatorward flux of angular momentum in accordance with solar observations. The radial component Q_(r phi) is negative for slow and intermediate rotation indicating inward transport of angular momentum, while for rapid rotation, the transport occurs outwards. Parametrisation in terms of the mean-field Lambda-effect shows qualitative agreement with the turbulence model of Kichatinov & R\\"udiger (1993) for the horisontal part H \\propto Q_(theta phi)/cos(theta), whereas for the vertical part, V \\propto Q_(r phi)/sin(theta), agreement only for intermediate rotation exists. The Lambda-coefficients become suppressed in the limit of rapid rotation, this rotational quenching being stronger for the V component than for H. We find that the stresses are enhanced by the presence of the magnetic field for field strengths up to and above the equipartition value, without significant quenching. Concerning the turbulent heat transport, our calculations show that the transport in the radial direction is most efficient at the equatorial regions, obtains a minimum at midlatitudes, and shows a slight increase towards the poles. The latitudinal heat transport does not show a systematic trend as function of latitude or rotation.

  20. Evolution of turbulence in the expanding solar wind, a numerical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yue; Grappin, Roland; Verdini, Andrea E-mail: verdini@arcetri.astro.it

    2014-10-01

    We study the evolution of turbulence in the solar wind by solving numerically the full three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations embedded in a radial mean wind. The corresponding equations (expanding box model or EBM) have been considered earlier but never integrated in 3D simulations. Here, we follow the development of turbulence from 0.2 AU up to about 1.5 AU. Starting with isotropic spectra scaling as k {sup –1}, we observe a steepening toward a k {sup –5/3} scaling in the middle of the wave number range and formation of spectral anisotropies. The advection of a plasma volume by the expanding solar wind causes a non-trivial stretching of the volume in directions transverse to radial and the selective decay of the components of velocity and magnetic fluctuations. These two effects combine to yield the following results. (1) Spectral anisotropy: gyrotropy is broken, and the radial wave vectors have most of the power. (2) Coherent structures: radial streams emerge that resemble the observed microjets. (3) Energy spectra per component: they show an ordering in good agreement with the one observed in the solar wind at 1 AU. The latter point includes a global dominance of the magnetic energy over kinetic energy in the inertial and f {sup –1} range and a dominance of the perpendicular-to-the-radial components over the radial components in the inertial range. We conclude that many of the above properties are the result of evolution during transport in the heliosphere, and not just the remnant of the initial turbulence close to the Sun.